Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00076
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: March 4, 2010
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00076
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

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Winter Park / Maitland


wpmobserver.com
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


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Community Bulletin ........ 6
Calendar of Events .......8
City Talks .................10
Cinema ................ 17
Play On! ............ 19
Josh Garrick ...........21
Marketplace/Games ......23


0 94922 95642 2


Thurdavv MMarch 18 2010


Faces of art


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
A discussion involving a
political e-mail upset the
Maitland City Council on
March 8, as some called the
timing of the talk an at-
tempt to influence the next
day's election.
Maitland Mayor Doug
Kinson said there have
been other attempts in the


past to cloud campaigns.
"This bullying and in-
timidation during election
times has got to stop," Kin-
son said.
Councilman Phil Bonus,
who put the item on the
agenda, defended it. "PAM
is a cultural partner of our
city, mayor. It's not OK for
one of our cultural part-
ners to send out political
speech," he said.


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Kiss gets

cop fired
ABRAHAM ABORAYA
GUEST REPORTER
It started with a kiss and
ended with an undercover
police officer disgraced and
fired.
Winter Park Police De-
partment Detective Carlos
Calderon was terminated
Feb. 16 after a four-month
internal investigation. Cal-
deron was spearheading
an investigation into Club
Harem, which led to three
suspected drug dealers and
two former employees being
charged.
Club Harem attorney
Steve Mason accused Cal-
deron of having a romantic
relationship with Michelle
Merry, one of the dancers -
and the police department
agreed.
"While the exact ex-
tent of the relationship is
not known, there is clear
evidence that you and she
(Merry) established a per-
sonal relationship of a ro-
mantic nature, which could
have interfered with the per-
formance of the important
duties to which you were as-
signed," wrote Winter Park
Police Chief Brett Railey in
the letter firing Calderon.
The police department
has declined to go on record
about the incident until after
Calderon's appeal is heard
by the Winter Park Civil Ser-
vice Board, a date that has
> turn to HAREM on A3


The e-mail was sent out
Feb. 28 by June Flowers,
director of nonprofit orga-
nization Performing Arts
of Maitland (PAM). It ex-
pressed support for a can-
didate challenging a sitting
city councilwoman, about
a week before the March 9
election. PAM gets most of
its funding from the city,
and per its charter, is not
> turn to MAITLAND on A3


Diebel and Bridges say adieu

Women leave city; one pursues Congressional seat, other keeps one-term promise


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Two Winter Park City Com-
missioners described by
colleagues as "very differ-
ent" in their approach to
legislating will end their
terms Monday.
Both Margie Bridges and
Karen Diebel are at the end
of their first terms in office.
Both had chosen to end
their tenure on the Com-
mission without seeking
re-election.
But that's where the
similarities end for the two
Commissioners, who have
vastly differing plans for


their next step out of of-
fice.

Bridges leaves the city
'in good hands'
Bridges had promised to
only run for one term in of-
fice when she campaigned
in 2007.
Despitecalls from friends
and supporters to run for
re-election, Bridges chose
to stick with her promise.
"My husband has been
retired for a number of
years," she said. "He wants
to spend that time with
me, and I want to spend
that time with him. I have


a 30-year marriage and I'm
more interested in being
still married this time next
year."
The City Commission
did "a lot of heavy lifting"
during Bridges' three-year
term in office, as she worked
with the City Commission
to make broad changes to
the Comprehensive Plan,
City Charter and CRA.
Often cast in the role of a
consensus builder or swing
vote on the five-member
Commission, Bridges said
her position made her
seek a middle ground on as
> turn to PROFILES on A7


E-mail spurs controversy

Nonprofit director 'inadvertently' sends political message







Page 2 Thursday, March 18, 2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Observer


Welcome to the di ital house


PHOTO BY KATIE KUSTURA THE OBSERVER
Housed in this building, just across the street from Full Sail University, are budding digital media companies specializing in 3-D interactive technologies, such as ZeeGee Games and Helios Interactive.

Central Florida's only digital media incubator moves in across from Full Sail, just outside Winter Park


KATIE KUSTURA
OBSERVER STAFF
Chris Oltyan emerged from
his office looking like a
deer caught in headlights.
Crunch time in the video
game world will do that to
you.
But Oltyan, director of
product development for
ZeeGee Games, knows it's
just one of the many situa-
tions he'll learn from while
working in Central Florida's
only digital media incuba-
tor.
Just outside Winter Park,
across the street from Full
Sail University at 1 Purlieu
Place, is 30,000 square feet
of pure potential, some
of which is already being
plugged into the communi-
ty. Companies that special-
ize in 3-D technologies are
sharing the space, and while
each company has its own
office, it is their passion for
the industry that makes the
place function like a coop-
erative.
The building owned by
MEHTA Group, a holding
company, currently houses
MEHTA Interactive, the 3-D
visualizationandsimulation
division of MEHTA Group;
Helios Interactive, a game
development studio and
the creators of GameCore;
IMI Labs, 3-D virtual world
developers; ZeeGee Games,
game developers; and Digi-
tal Media Alliance Florida,



In addition to accounting,
legal, financing and other
traditional start-up servic-
es, MEHTA has recruited
massage therapists, yoga
instructors, and personal
trainers into the building
to help developers keep
their mind, body and spirit
balanced and help them
to get through those high-
stressed deadlines, ac-
cording to a press release.


the state's nonprofit indus-
try association that con-
nects digital media, arts and
entertainment companies.
"This is a particularly
strong time for this type
of 3-D interactive content
emerging in the market-
place," said Jud French, ex-
ecutive director of Digital
Media Alliance Florida. "It's
not a classic incubator. This
is designed as a case where
the companies come to-
gether out of business inter-
ests to coexist and help sup-
port each other. It's exactly
the sort of project that we
feel is needed in the area."
Since its official launch
in December, the incuba-
tor's focus has been foster-
ing the development of the
current tenants and their
businesses.
"It's still a lot of home-
spun, small companies that
are making big differences
in terms of innovation," said
David Beatriz, President of
Planet Digital and Treasurer
of Digital Media Alliance
Florida. "Their idea that
they're putting together is
to make this business build-
ing area where they can do
business development for
little companies and build
them into big companies."
Although University of
Central Florida's Business
Incubation Program isn't
very far from MEHTA's Digi-
tal Media Incubator, the lat-
ter is still one-of-a-kind.
"[These companies] re-
ally need support in getting
up and going and develop-
ing technology that attracts
capital," said Rave Mehta,
MEHTA Group managing
director and Helios Interac-
tive CEO. "We're very com-
plementary to what UCF
is doing. We can tap into
their resources from a sup-
porting start-up, and we re-
ally complement that from
helping companies develop
technologies and business
models in this specific seg-
ment."
A particular benefit of the
incubator's location, Mehta
and other supporters said,


is its proximity to both Full
Sail and UCF.
"Florida is evolving into
a strong digital media state
and Winter Park is kind of
an epicenter of it," Mehta
said. "To have the creative
forces of Full Sail and UCF,
there's no reason why Or-
lando can't be put on the
map in the gaming and 3-D
interactive [industry]."
One of the incubator's
primary supporters is the
Metro Orlando Economic
Development Commission
(EDC), an organization ded-
icated to helping businesses
develop and grow within an
economically competitive
environment.
"The competition to at-
tract [digital media] to any
community is very high,"
said Suzy Spang, EDC vice
president of technology
and entertainment. "I think
it's smart. I think it offers
companies an opportunity
to live and learn off of each
other in a close proximity."
Those who work for
companies that are a part
of the incubator couldn't
agree more.
Ross Rockafellow, an art-
ist and designer at Helios
Interactive, has been with
the company almost six
months and feels confident
in the knowledge and abili-
ties of those around him.
"For the most part it's
all about sharing and hav-
ing that fresh set of eyes
and fresh brain," Rockafel-
low said. "The technology
changes so fast that it's lit-
erally impossible for one
person to stay updated by
themselves."
Members of the incuba-
tor are united by more than
their skills. It's their passion
for the industry that really
makes it work.
"Everyone wants the in-
dustry to move forward,
collectively," Rockafellow
said. "It's not about who
gets there first, but it's re-
ally about progressing the
industry as a whole."


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Page 2 Thursday, March 18, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


I i f il iTir f H ii






Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 3


HAREM I Club Harem is closed again, and the property is for lease, while the officer awaits his appeal


< continued from front page

yet to be set. Attempts to
reach the police union and
Calderon were also unsuc-
cessful, and calls to Mason's
office weren't returned be-
fore deadline.
Calderon posed as Luis
Lopez, a construction
worker, during his under-
cover investigation into
Club Harem, where he met
Merry. The police depart-
ment couldn't find Merry
to interview her as part of
the investigation the last
reports were that she was
working for in Casselberry,
but the police department's
attempts to reach her were
unsuccessful.
Club Harem has pub-
licly called foul against the
whole investigation in the
press, saying that Winter
Park simply wants the only
strip club in city limits to


close down. The club prop-
erty is once again up for
lease, as the most recent
tenant was forced to close
down. Police investigations
had indirectly led to clubs
at the site being forced to
close in the past, under mul-
tiple owners.
Winter Park Mayor Ken
Bradley defended the police
department's current inves-
tigation.
"As it relates to other
kinds of crimes, if you're a
business in this community
and you feel like you're be-
ing harassed, you may need
to consider what you're do-
ing," Bradley said. "We don't
harass. We enforce."
When Mason filed the
complaint, he filed Merry's
deposition, in which she
said that she was attracted
to Calderon and they talk-
ed on the phone and sent
text messages. But the night


with which police were
most concerned was Merry's
birthday.
On that night, she
met friends for drinks at
McRaney's Tavern in Winter
Park and opened her gifts.
She got a text from Calde-
ron wishing her a happy
birthday and wishing he
was there.
So Merry had her friend
drop her off downtown.
They had pizza, held hands
and Calderon took her
home where they kissed,
according to reports. In re-
peated interviews with the
department, Calderon de-
nied the night happened,
even when he was told he
likely wouldn't be fired.
"During the investiga-
tion, instead of being forth-
right with Lt. (Earl) Barber
(the officer who conducted
the investigation), admit-
ting your mistakes and be-


ing repentant, you were eva-
sive as well as untruthful,"
Railey wrote in Calderon's
termination letter.
While police couldn't
find Merry, they did find
the friend who dropped her
off downtown; he was able
to pick Calderon out of a
lineup, as well as recall that
Calderon wore his hair in
corn rows. Calderon had a
police-issued phone as well
as a prepaid phone he used
during the investigation.
Call records showed
more than 100 phone calls
were made between Merry
and Calderon including
a 20-minute phone call on
Merry's birthday. Calde-
ron told investigators he
couldn't remember what
they talked about, but that
it was business.
But Calderon never men-
tioned Merry in any of his
reports, and she wasn't con-


sidered a source in the in-
vestigation. During the de-
position, they asked Merry if
Calderon ever touched her
inappropriately.
Merry vigorously defend-
ed Calderon.
"It is improbable that Ms.
Merry would defend Detec-
tive Calderon on these alle-
gations and then make up
a story about meeting with
Detective Calderon on her
birthday, eating pizza and
French kissing him," Barber
wrote in the internal affairs
report.
Calderon was fired for
nonfeasance (intentionally
leaving out a truth), con-
duct unbecoming a police
officer and immoral, unlaw-
ful, indecent or improper
conduct that would affect
his reputation in the com-
munity.


MAITLAND I Flowers says wife apologized for e-mail; Reponen said she never received an apology


< continued from front page

allowed to participate in
political campaigns.
June Flowers, wife of
Councilman Jeff Flowers,
retracted her e-mail less
than 12 hours later, saying
that she "inadvertently sent
an e-mail with the wrong
sign-off."
It was in support of Coun-
cilwoman Bev Reponen's
challenger, Bill Randolph,
and it also mentions Friends
of First Response-Maitland,
another city-funded non-
profit.
Reponen didn't appreci-


ate Kinson's push to dismiss
the discussion.
"Here's the rub my
supporter's money was used
to promote another candi-
date," she said. "My support-
ers pay taxes and PAM re-
ceived that money and used
it against me."
It breaks a federal law,
she said, and it should not
be discounted.
But Jeff Flowers said it's
not an area that the Council
can adjudicate.
"This is a waste of time,"
he said. He called his wife's
e-mail an "inadvertent mis-
take" that she has apolo-


gized for.
"This is a red herring
to even talk to you people
about it," he said. "You've
all made up your minds
and you've got your little
angry points to hold onto,
and you've got unforgiving
hearts to hold onto."
But Reponen said she
hadn't received an apology.
"Perhaps you got an apol-
ogy. I didn't get an apology.
Not to this moment, and I'm
the wronged party."
Councilwoman Linda
Frosch chastised Bonus for
putting it on the agenda,
calling it an attempt for him


to get back at members of
Council that didn't vote in
favor of terminating the
Maitland Town Center de-
velopment agreement.
"I'd like to get Council
back on city business and
stop this nonsense that
keeps coming up every time
there's a vote that's not ac-
ceptable to someone," she
said.
Resident Sandy Bonus,
Phil Bonus' wife, said the
timing of the discussion
was acceptable, and said the
mayor was wrong to try to
stop it.
"As for the e-mail situa-


tion, which clearly broke
the law, for you to just dis-
miss it and say it's because
of timing ... I find that dis-
respectful to the audience
also," she said.
Resident Renee Stein
Charlan said bickering be-
tween the Council is hurt-
ing the city.
"Imagine what all this
energy and divisiveness
is doing to our town," she
said. "You cannot tell me
June purposely tried to hurt
Councilwoman Reponen ...
We'll never have a commu-
nity if we can't get past this
pettiness."


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Knights trounce SMU, fall to UTEP

After winning its second C-USA tournament game ever, UCF's mens team loses to top-ranked Miners


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
A wild finish to the basket-
ball season ended with a
thud for the UCF Knights,
as they were knocked out
by UTEP in the Conference
USA Tournament's second
round.
But that's not before they
stunned SMU in a 69-53 re-
venge win March 10.
In the two teams' only
other meeting this season
the Mustangs trampled the
Knights 65-43 on Feb. 7 in
Dallas. In that game the
Knights only had one player
shooting in double digits as
they suffered from a dismal
36.2 shooting percentage.
A dramatically different


Knights team walked onto
the floor ofTulsa's BOK Cen-
ter as they met the Mustangs
last week. They held steady
on strong shooting early on,
edging the Mustangs at the
half.
When they came back
from the break, the Knights
caught fire, launching into
a scoring tirade that would
outpace the Mustangs 37-
23 in the second half of the
game.
Under the basket, the
Knights dominated, pick-
ing up 27 rebounds and out-
scoring the Mustangs 2-1 in
the paint.
Aggressive play in close
quarters gave the Knights
a scoring edge that kept in-
creasing, with Taylor Young


again leading his team with
15 points, Isaac Sosa just
behind with 14, and AJ. Ty-
ler rounding out players in
double digits with 12.
Against the UTEP Miners
on March 11, the Knights
were a different team on
the floor, struggling to keep
pace as they were embar-
rassingly outmatched in the
first half, falling behind 48-
20 by halftime.
"We just didn't handle
their press very well at all,"
UCF Coach Kirk Speraw said
after the game.
The Miners' defense
worked feverishly to force
turnovers and bad shots for
the Knights, and the tactic
worked. The Knights shot a
combined 34.7 percent in


the game, using nearly their
entire bench.
Keith Clanton led his
team with 12 points despite
shooting just 33.3 percent
from the floor.
In the end the Knights
would fall 76-54 as the Min-
ers cruised to victory. That
euphoria wouldn't last long
for UTEP, who fell to Hous-
ton in a championship
shocker.
For the young Knights,
the next season awaits with
a promise of more experi-
ence after the Knights made
it to the second round of the
C-USA tournament for only
the second time in team his-
tory.


I W I
PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK
-THE OBSERVER
Keith Clanton's scoring helped buoy
the Knights but it wasn't enough to win.


UCF fires longtime basketball coach

Knights Coach Kirk Speraw passes the school's all-time win record at 279-233, then loses his job


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Kirk Speraw just passed the
all-time win record for any
coach in UCF history. Now
the Knights' men's basket-
ball coach is looking for
another job. The university
fired him Monday, citing a
need to make a "change in
direction."
The announcement from
UCF came just days after
Speraw had spoken about
a bright future building a
young team at the school
where he'd spent most of
his career coaching. He'd
amassed a 279-233 record
in 17 years as the Knights'
head coach.
In a statement imme-
diately following the deci-
sion, Athletic Director Keith
Tribble praised Speraw for
his leadership.
"Coach Speraw has al-
ways gone about his posi-
tion with integrity and class,
and we appreciate all he and
his staff have contributed
to UCF basketball," Tribble


said. "This is the right time
to make a change in direc-
tion."
What that direction is re-
mains to be seen, as the ath-
letic department had kept
the decision not to retain
Speraw a secret until the
day he was let go. No pro-
spective coaches have been
announced as his replace-
ment, though Associate
Head Coach Mike Jaskulski
has been promoted as in-
terim coach.
A change in direction has
served as a more vague rea-
son for Speraw's dismissal,
though more specific ru-
mors about his inability to
move his team upward in
the conference have per-
sisted.
In Conference USA play,
where the Knights have
played since 2005, the
Knights have a 40-38 re-
cord. This past season they
finished 15-17 overall and
6-10 in C-USA.
Tribble cited a need for
better recruiting as a qual-
ity he was looking for in a


future coach, who may be
hired in as soon as three
weeks.
The Knights fielded one
of their youngest teams this
season, with all but three of
its players ranking as under-
classmen.
Only one player will
graduate from the program
- Drew Speraw, who played
for his father for four years
at UCF. Despite short court
time this season, the young-
er Speraw proved instru-
mental in clutch situations
on the court.
In his wake a team of ris-
ing freshmen and sopho-
mores are expected to play
out their second and third
seasons in 2010-2011.
This includes two key
players who immediately
became starters on their
new team. Center Keith
Clanton and guard Marcus
Jordan both improved dra-
matically over the course
of their first season in a
Knights uniform. Both play-
ers entered the season with
slow, nervous performanc-


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -THE OBSER'
Speraw, above left, built a team of underclassmen this season, finishing with a
15-17 overall record. He'll be replaced by interim coach Mike Jaskulski, at right.


es early on, but by season's
end, Speraw had groomed
them into team leaders on
the court, with the pair fre-
quently alternating as team
leaders in scoring or re-
bounding.
Tribble announced Sper-


aw's firing in a team meet-
ing with all of the players
Monday.
"This was not an easy de-
cision, but one we felt will
serve in the best interest of
our program's direction,"
Tribble said.


Winter Park / Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday, March 18, 2010


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

MANAGING EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

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Eric Sly
407-563-7054
erics@observernewspapers.com


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
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Isaac Babcock
407-563-7023
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COPY EDITORS
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Megan Stokes
megans@eosun.com


COLUMNISTS
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Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com

Josh Garrick
joshgarrick9@gmail.com
407-522-3906

ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-515-2605
tcraft@observernewspapers.com

Katie Kustura
Intern


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* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 ISSN 1064-3613
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Winter Park/Maitland Observer 2010


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


Volume 22, Issue Number 11


Page 4 Thursday, March 18, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 5


Wildcats win state cheer title

After coming in second place last year, Winter Park beat eight teams to the state championship


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Alexa Burzee's high school
cheerleading career just
ended in tears. But a year
after her Winter Park cheer-
leading team's toughest de-
feat last season, those tears
came with a smile. The Wild-
cats had just won it all.
It was a relieving end to
a long wait. That Saturday
morning, Feb. 6, inside the
Silver Spurs Arena in Kis-
simmee, the Wildcats had
drawn a nerve-wracking
spot on the final day of
competition. They had to
go first.
Leaping through intri-
cately formed pyramids and
dazzling the crowd with
synchronized tumbling
they'd spent a year perfect-
ing, the girls held together
with near flawless preci-
sion. Standing atop the final
lift, her head 10 feet above
the floor, Burzee had a feel-
ing that she didn't dare talk
about. Not after what hap-
pened in 2009 when her
team had come so close.
That afternoon the Wild-
cats waited for hours as


eight other teams tried to
beat them.
"You feel like you think
you won, but you never
know," Burzee said.
A year ago Burzee was
trapped in that same ago-
nizing moment. On that
cold March afternoon, her
Winter Park cheerleading
team thought they'd won
the state championship.
Then they found out they'd
lost by only 14 points shy of
the winner's 448.5.
"You get a feeling that you
did everything you could,"
Burzee said. "Then it came
crashing down. The whole
team was crying."
Flash forward one year
to the arena floor, and she's
waiting again. But this time,
as the team scores ticked
off like a countdown, the
Wildcats weren't on the list.
Sixth, fifth, fourth, third
then second.
"That's when we thought
it had to be us," teammate
Natalie Gidus said.
When the Wildcats' name
was announced, the girls in
orange and black erupted in
jubilation.
"The whole team was


nu i U BY lIAAAU BOUUUI I Hni UBnLI1VLI
The Winter Park Wildcats cheerleading team poses in front of City Hall, where Mayor Ken Bradley recognized them March 8 for
winning the state championship. The team comprised mostly younger cheerleaders, many of whom had just joined the varsity team.


crying," Burzee, 18, said.
"We were just hugging each
other and crying."
"I jumped on my friend,"
Gidus said. "We were all so
happy."
Teammate Chelsea Farr
was in her first year on the
competitive varsity team,
but said she couldn't help
herself in the moment.
"People always told me
that when you get really
happy you can't control it,"
Farr, 16, said. "Every picture
you see that I'm in I'm cry-


ing."
As the team walked
through the halls that Mon-
day with medals around
their necks, classmates
who'd been strangers sud-
denly said hello.
Gathered at the Win-
ter Park City Commission
chambers March 8, the lady
Wildcats earned their of-
ficial welcome back as the
2010 state competitive
cheerleading champions,
performing one final cheer
for the home crowd.


"You can come back to
City Commission meetings
anytime you want," Mayor
Ken Bradley said. "We're
proud of you."
Most of the team will
be returning for next year,
possibly stronger than ever
coming off their biggest win
yet.
"This is virtually almost
a brand new team," Coach
Angela Ryan said. "To win
a state championship is
amazing."


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer









Community Bulletin


The 2010 class of Hall of Fame In-
ductees includes Winter Park resident
Michael O'Shaughnessy. The 2010
Distinguished Letterwinner played
football and baseball for UCF. A two-
sport athlete for the Fighting Knights,
O'Shaughnessy was a standout de-
fensive lineman for UCF's football
team during the program's first two
seasons of play in 1979 and 1980.

The Enzian announced that the
opening night film for the 19th An-
nual Florida Film Festival will be the
Southeast premiere of Paper Man,
directed by Kieran and Michele Mul-
roney. The Festival will take place April
9-18. Tickets to attend the opening
night film and party start at $30 for
film only passes, $80 for party only
passes and $100 for film and party
passes. Visit www.floridafilmfestival.
com for the complete program and to
order tickets.

The Maitland Historical Society cel-
ebrates its 40th anniversary this year


with free admission to the museums
for the rest of the year. Maitland His-
torical Society operates four unique
museums in Maitland including the
Waterhouse Residence Museum and
the Carpentry Shop Museum, Mait-
land Historical Museum and The Tele-
phone Museum. For more informa-
tion, call 407-644-2451.

Councilman Jeff Flowers has of-
fered a $250K gift to the city of Mait-
land for a performance stage in Lake
Lily Park. He said the money provides
a continuing funding source for the
city. "My desire is to leave [Maitland]
in a strong position financially to pro-
vide community events on a more fre-
quent basis than it could have done in
the past," said Flowers.

Nonprofit organization Shepherd's
Fold began a pilot program help-
ing to provide job skills, coaching
and support with a web design class
and music recording for people with
disabilities. Winter Park Police Chief


Brett Railey and Fire Chief Lars White
donated the pilot program space. For
information, call 407-645-1782.

Borders Bookstore in Winter Park
Village hosted a lecture and book
signing with Thomas J. DiLorenzo,
New York Times best-selling author
of "How Capitalism Saved America"
and "Lincoln Unmasked." The event
was organized by the Orange County
Campaign for Liberty. Visit www.cam-
paignforliberty.com.

Friends of First Response-Mait-
land's annual dues are due to keep
the great work of the charity moving
for the benefit of our area's first re-
sponders. Individual membership is
$20 and family membership is $35.
Please send your membership for
2010 to Friends of First Response-
Maitland, 255 W. George Ave., Mai-
tland. Event volunteers are needed.
Call 407-629-7091 for more informa-
tion.


Business Briefs


Long touted as the "Founding Fa-
ther" of Thornton Park, Olde Town
Brokers' Phil Rampy was thrilled to
see his neighborhood selected as
one of the nation's "Best Old House
Neighborhoods 2010" by This Old
House magazine.

Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kan-
tor, & Reed, PA., the largest law
firm in Central Florida, according to
the Orlando Business Journal, has
launched an innovative internship
program with Florida A&M University


(FAMU) College of Law to provide law
students with a unique opportunity to
learn about the legal profession and
develop their legal skills.

Winter Park-based RLF, a leading
architecture, engineering and interior
design firm, announces the addition
of Gary Badge to the firm's team of
professionals.

United Arts of Central Florida
awarded $33,025 to 37 artists and
arts administrators selected as recip-


ients of its 2010 Professional Devel-
opment Grants. For more information,
visit www.UnitedArts.cc.

Dellecker, Wilson, King, McKenna
& Ruffier, LLP announced that as of
Jan. 1, Anthony F. Sos has been el-
evated to partner.

NAI Global has formed an Invest-
ment Services Group to provide ex-
pert investment property service to
institutional and private commercial
real estate sellers and buyers. Twelve


senior investment brokers have been
designated as directors.

SmARTboard is a hands-on program
developed by United Arts to educate
business professionals in Central
Florida about the responsibilities and
benefits of serving on a nonprofit
board. Completion of the course
guarantees placement on a cultural
board. For more information, please
visit www.UnitedArts.cc.

The Gardens at DePugh Nursing


Center has selected Syslin Francis
as the interim administrator. She will
manage the 40-bed facility in Winter
Park. Syslin is also a candidate for the
permanent position.

Stirling Sotheby's International
Realty has been appointed exclu-
sive sales and marketing agents for
a $1.35 million Winter Park estate lo-
cated near Park Avenue at 961 Bonita
Drive in Winter Park.


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t Florida Hospital Orlando

Georgine Lamvu, MD, MPH Chosen to Serve
On AHRQ Panel Formulating
Treatment Guidelines for Chronic Pain

March 9, 2010 Georgine
Lamvu, MD, MPH had been
selected by the federal Agen-
cy for Healthcare Research
and Quality (AHRQ) to help
formulate new evidenced-
based guidelines for the treat-
ment of chronic pelvic pain.
Chronic pelvic pain often
results from pelvic inflamma-
tory disease and affects about
eight percent of all women of
reproductive age in the United
States. In addition to chronic
pelvic pain, pelvic inflamma-
tory disease can lead to in-
fertility and tubal pregnancy,
according to the AHRQ.
Dr. Lamvu, a board-certified gynecologist, is a recognized leader
in gynecology and minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. She is a
member of the medical staff of Florida Hospital. She practices with
Frederick Hoover, MD, Liza Colimon, MD and Dabney Lipscomb,
ARNP at Advanced Minimally Invasive Surgery and Gynecology Spe-
cialists, and is located at 2501 N. Orange Avenue Suite 286 in Orlando,
Florida.
The AHRQ is part of the United States Department of Health and
Human Services which supports medical research designed to improve
the outcomes and quality of health care, reduce costs, and to improve
patient safety. It sponsors and conducts research to improve health care
services quality.
For more information on Dr. Lamvu and the physicians and staff at
AMISGS, call 407-303-2780 to schedule an office tour, or visit their
website at www.gynspecialistsorlando.com.


Page 6 Thursday, March 18, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 7


PROFILES I Fiscal fastidiousness marked Diebel's tenure on the City Commission


< continued from front page

many issues as she could to
maintain unity on the Com-
mission.
"I've served with two
mayors and always pleaded
my case to try to find sup-
porters for my viewpoint
and tried to build consensus
when I couldn't necessarily
bring people around to my
way of thinking," Bridges
said.
Her diligence in research-
ing issues earned respect
from other members of the
Commission.
"She always came pre-
pared," fellow Commission-
er Beth Dillaha said. "She al-
ways did her homework.
I always appreciated the
time and effort."
That effort helped lead to
the first successful amend-
ment to the Comprehensive
Plan in more than 10 years.
Bridges saw that process
through to the end, start-
ing with a Commission that
at the time included Mayor
David Strong and Commis-
sioners John Eckbert and
Doug Metcalf. Changes to
the mayor and Commission
happened midway through
the process, but Bridges
helped the final push that
saw the plan sent to Talla-
hassee.
"I'm very proud of all of
the effort that went into


passing the Comprehensive
Plan," Bridges said.
Though that plan may
help determine the shape
and governance of the city
for years to come, Bridges
said she's even more proud
of some forward-thinking
budgeting that spared the
city financial heartache dur-
ing the ongoing recession.
"I'm very proud of the fact
that the commissions that
I've served on have worked
to streamline our budgets
in anticipation of economic
challenges that are unprec-
edented," Bridges said. "We
still maintained services,
our phenomenally recog-
nized library, park mainte-
nance, paving schedules for
our roads and still brought
in all our utility projects
that aren't pretty but need
to be done."
Despite her term ending
on the Commission, she said
she hopes to continue with
a project she has worked for
years to see through the
inclusion of Winter Park on
the national register of his-
toric places.
"It's the collection of our
whole historic downtown
that's one of the elements
that makes Winter Park so
special," Bridges said. "I'm
very excited that we've
started that process to des-
ignate that on the historic
register."


She said she's hoping to
land on the Historic Preser-
vation Board when Mayor
Ken Bradley makes his new
appointments in May.
Until then, her thoughts
are set on greener pastures,
spending more time with
her husband, and work-
ing on a home they own in
North Carolina.
In her stead, she said the
city will be in good hands,
regardless of what the fu-
ture holds.
"The citizens of Winter
Park are involved, they're
engaged and they're caring,"
she said.
"I really think the city will
be in good hands because
we have so many passion-
ate, concerned citizens."

Diebel running for
Congress
Diebel has her sights set
high. After her first term in
public office, she's bypass-
ing county and state office
and campaigning for Con-
gress.
During her three years on
the City Commission, she
left her mark as a staunch
supporter of the SunRail sys-
tem, which passed through
the state Legislature in De-
cember.
That may have proven
one of the most divisive is-
sues during the last three
years, as factions took sides
either supporting Winter
Park's inclusion in a rail
funding agreement with
Orange County or deriding
it as being too risky or ex-
pensive.
Diebel continued to push
for the system against some
strong opposition on the
Commission.
"We shouldn't go against
the will of the voters," Dieb-
el said. "I've supported this
because the voters support-
ed it."
Within the city she
worked to increase effi-
ciency in the budget, which
at times helped bridge gaps


rnu i u I la IRRU rBUUUIBr I nt UBtLnvtn
Karen Diebel poses for a photo during a Christmas Party in December. She's run-
ning for U.S. Congress rather than campaigning for a second term on the Commission.


between herself and Com-
missioners Dillaha and Phil
Anderson. Those gaps were
vast on some issues, many
beginning from the outset
of Diebel's term, Dillaha
said.
"I think she was very true
to abiding by the wishes of
her campaign contribu-
tors," Dillaha said.
Despite differences of
opinion on the Commis-
sion, the quintet rallied
to tighten the budget and
avoid cutting services.
"Commissioner Diebel
was a champion of making


sure our tax structure was
as low as possible," Bradley
said.
Both Commissioners
Bridges and Diebel survived
the pressure of public office
well, Bradley said, operat-
ing in what Bridges said was
one of the most economi-
cally difficult times in the
city's history.
"I don't think anybody
else knows what it's like
until you're up here," Brad-
ley said. "These ladies have
served gracefully."


WHEN:
Saturday, March 27th
Sunday, March 28th
from 9 a.m. till 5 p.m.
WHERE:
Central Florida Fairgrounds
4603 West Colonial Drive, Orlando

WHAT ELSE:
Orchid Exhibits & Sales, Door Prizes,
Raffles & More

BY WHOM:
Central Florida Orchid Society
Admission $5

www.CFLOrchidSociety.org
For more information call
407-880-5150


HELP US

E The Winter Park/Maitland Observer has teamed
L up with the Rollins College Hillel Club in raising
funds for Haiti Relief.

P During the month of March, the Winter Park/
Maitland Observer will donate 50% of all new
O subscription sales.
Obs6o&
T An annual subscription (52 issues) =-s=L L
H to the Observer is $30. "


Please contact Tracy Craft at =,
S407-515-2605 or
S tcraft@observernewspapers.com Im
S


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Calendar


The Winter Park Sidwalk Art Fes-
tival, located in Central Park, will be
held March 19-21. It is from 9 a.m. to
6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

The Orlando Garden Club will host
their Spring Flower Show from noon
to 2 p.m. on Friday March 19, for club
members and exhibitors and from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March
20 for the public for free. The club is
located at Lock Haven Park, 710 E.
Rollins Street, Orlando. For a show
schedule and entry guidelines, call
407-426-8759 or visit www.garden-
central.org/florida/-orlandogardens/.

The Family History Center will have
two free workshops on Saturday,
March 20. From 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
will be "Using Free Personal Ancestral
File (PAF) Genealogy Software," and
from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. "Us-
ing U.S. Census Records." The Center
is located at 45 E. Par St., Orlando.
For more information, call 407-461-
2831.

Scott Joseph will host the Rosen Ho-
tels' Homeowners for Haiti fundraiser
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday,
March 20, at the Orange County Con-
vention Center. Tickets to this special
event are just $25, which includes
admission to the Home Show, a $10
value. Tickets are limited and must be
purchased in advance online. To pur-
chase your tickets, go to www.Flori-
daHomeShows.com, click on Spring
2010 and enter in the special code,
HAITIHOUSE, when you purchase your
ticket.

At 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 23,


the University Club of Winter Park will
host the debate "China: Friend, Foe or
Banker?" This free event is located at
841 N. Park Ave. and is open to the
public. Call 407-644-6149 for more
information.

At 2 p.m. on Wednesday, March
24, Kris Kolar Vice President of Inte-
rior Design at Robb & Stucky Interi-
ors will host the a Q&A session with
acclaimed designer Michael Weiss,
who is known for his furniture, rug,
lighting and fabric designs. Attendees
can meet the designer, view his new
collections and hear about his inspi-
rations for the furniture. The session
will take place at Robb & Stucky In-
teriors, 351 S. State Road 434, Alta-
monte Springs. For more information,
visit www.RobbStucky.com.

The Association for Corporate
Growth (ACG Orlando) and the Mi-
ami Consulate of Canada will present
"Cross Border Business Opportuni-
ties" from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on
Thursday, March 25, at the Sonesta
Hotel, 60 S. Ivanhoe Blvd., Orlando.
The event will feature Everton Lewis,
Managing Consultant with IBM Global
Services. Save online by pre-regis-
tering by Monday, March 22 at www.
ACGOrlando.org.

From 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday,
March 26, there will be an art auc-
tion at the Maitland Art Center, 231
W. Packwood Ave., to benefit Doc-
tors without Borders (MSF) in Haiti.
The event, Art with Heart, will have
donated artworks by local artists and
collectors that will be for sale, as well
as part of the auction. All of the pro-
ceeds will be donated to MSF in Haiti.


For more information, contact Jerry or
Gayle at 407-672-1001.

From 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Fri-
day, March 26, there will be a Winter
Park Celebrity Waiters Luncheon at
Flemings Prime Steakhouse, 933 N.
Orlando Ave., Winter Park, to ben-
efit B.A.S.E. Camp Children's Cancer
Foundation. Join co-chairs Orange
County Commissioner Bill Segal, and
the President and CEO of the Winter
Park Chamber of Commerce, Patrick
Chapin, for this event that will fea-
ture silent and live auctions, dares
and dances. Sign up to be a celebrity
waiter, reserve a corporate table for
$500 (seats 10) or purchase tickets
at $35 per person by visiting www.
basecamp.org or calling 407-673-
5060.

Join the Central Florida Mineral &
Gem Society next weekend for the
Spring Mineral & Gem Show at the
Central Florida Fairgrounds, 4603 W.
Colonial Drive, Orlando. The event
will be held from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. on
Friday, March 26, from 10 a.m. to 8
p.m. on Saturday, March 27 and from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, March
28. The society will feature unique
beads, mineral specimens, custom-
made jewelry, door prizes, auctions,
stone cutting (faceting) and cabbing
demonstrations. Parking is free and
tickets for adults are $5 and $2 for
students. For more information, visit
www.thumblicker.com.

Join St. Mary Magdalen Catholic
School at 8 a.m. on Saturday, March
27, for a 5K Road Race Challenge to
support Help for Haiti. The race will
be held at St. Mary Magdalen Par-


ish, 869 Maitland Ave., Altamonte
Springs. Call 407-339-7301 or visit
www.smmschool.org for more infor-
mation.

The Camaraderie Foundation is
holding a free event in Orlando from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April
10. All veterans, current service
members and families who have
served or are still serving in Opera-
tion Enduring Freedom and Operation
Iraqi Freedom are invited to enjoy
lunch and entertainment provided
by The Camaraderie Foundation. All
attendees can learn more about the
ways The Camaraderie Foundation is
working to serve U.S. military service
members and their families. For more
information, visit www.camaraderie-
foundation.com.

Events this week at the Maitland
Public Library, 501 S. Maitland Ave.
For more details, contact 407-647-
7700:

-March 1-31 is Youth Poetry Contest
sponsored by the Friends of the Mait-
land Public Library. Contest is open to
ages 8 to 18 with a Maitland Public
Library card. Gift cards will be award-
ed to winners and honorable men-
tions at the Poetry Award Reception
in April. For details and an entry form,
visit www.maitlandpubliclibrary.org.

-Friday, March 19: From 10 a.m. to 11
p.m. the Maitland Fire & Rescue will
conduct blood pressure checks. No
registration required.

-Saturday, March 20: At 1:30 p.m. lo-
cal author Julie Compton will discuss
her new book, "Rescuing Olivia," and


sign books.

-Monday, March 22: At 10 a.m. PC
Academy teaches Computer Basics -
E-mail. Registration is required.

-Tuesday, March 23:7:30 p.m. Books
to Die For! Mystery Book Club this
month's selection is Blaize Clement's
"Curiosity Killed the Cat Sitter."

-Wednesday, March 24:1:30 p.m. The
Contemporary Authors Book Discus-
sion Group will discuss this month's
selection, Bo Campbell's "Distant
Land of My Father."

Performances by the Performing
Arts of Maitland this month at the
Maitland Farmer's Market, 701 Lake
Lily Drive, for more information, call
407-339-5984 or visit www.pamait-
land.org.

-Sunday, March 21 Amanda Clark
and Bob Sanders

-Sunday, March 28 Davey Sch-
weizer

-Sunday, April 4 Farmer's Market
closed for Easter

-Sunday, April 11 String Theory with
Kayonne Riley

From 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Mondays,
check out the Maitland Stage Band at
the Germaine Marvel Building in the
Maitland Art Center, 210 W. Packwood
Ave. Rehearsals are open to the pub-
lic. Inquire about booking the 16-piece
band for your next event. For more in-
formation, call 407-539-2181.


Page 8 Thursday, March 18, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 9


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I


I


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


2009

wns n TOUG











VIR R5







Page 10 Thursday, March 18, 2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver


MARCH 22 CITY
COMMISSION MEETING
TOPICS OF INTEREST
There will be a City
Commission meeting
on Monday, March 22,
at 3:30 p.m., in City Hall
Commission Chambers.
Below are a few topics of
interest:
Presentation to outgoing
City Commissioners
Oath of Office for the
two newly elected City
Commissioners
BOARD UPDATES:
-Keep Winter Park
Beautiful
MAYOR'S REPORT:
-Passing of Mr. Stanley
Wilson
-90-day plan Scheduled
Work session for April 12
CITY ATTORNEY'S REPORT:
-Agreement resolving
Williams vs. city
NON ACTION ITEMS:
-Presentation of the
Comprehensive Annual
Financial Report
-Fiscal Year 2009/2010
financial report
-Potential 2010
comprehensive plan
changes
CONSENT AGENDA:
-Approve the minutes of
March 8.
-Approve the Tennis
Court Rules and Standards
and Tennis Instructors Use
Fee for Cady Way Park and
Phelps Park.
-Approve Reforestation


Services bid award to
Groundtek of Central
Florida.
-Approve Reynolds
Inliner LLC for sanitary
sewer main rehabilitation
lining, piggy-backing
the City of St. Petersburg
contract.
-Approve Medtronic
Physio-Control
Corporation, piggy-backing
National Association of
State Procurement Officials.
-Approve the Keep
Winter Park Beautiful
Board revised bylaws.
ACTION ITEMS REQUIRING
DISCUSSION:
-Schedule a strategic
planning session and
discuss how it will be
facilitated.
PUBLIC HEARINGS:
-Second reading of the
ordinance adopting new
zoning regulations Section
58-89 and Section 58-90,
amending the process
and procedures, standards
and criteria for approval
of changes to the zoning
regulations text and
official zoning map and for
conditional uses.
CITY COMMISSION REPORTS:
Commissioner Anderson
Commissioner Dillaha
Commissioner Cooper
Commissioner
McMacken
Mayor Bradley
-Repeal Ordinance
No. 2793-10 requiring
a supermajority for


Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
is MAYOR


Take 10 in 2010!


MaitlandNeeds Your Help to
Complete the 2010 Census
Do you have 10 minutes?
Do you have 10 minutes
to help our children learn in
new and improved schools?
Do you have 10 minutes
to help ill or aging family
members gain access to
new hospitals, new senior
centers or enhanced health
care services?
Do you have 10
minutes to ease your daily
commute or improve public
transportation options?

All of these things and
more depend on data
collected during the 2010
Census. I need you to join
me in taking 10 minutes to
complete and return your
census form.
This week, the U.S.
Census Bureau distributed
the 2010 Census to


more than 130 million
addresses across the
nation. Mandated by
the U.S. Constitution
and conducted every 10
years, the census counts
every man, woman and
child. Mailing back the
census form is the easiest
way to participate in the
2010 Census, and every
household should complete
and mail back the form
upon receipt.
The 2010 Census
is important to our
community's future.
The data gathered will
determine funding for vital
local services as well as
representation at all levels
of government. To ensure
an accurate count, join me
in taking 10 minutes to fill
out the form and mail it
back.
Here's why:


Winter Park City Talk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER


Comprehensive Plan
changes to align with
the vote of the people
as expressed in Charter
Amendment No. 10.
You can find the
Commission's full agenda
and information on specific
agenda items by logging on
to the city's official Web site
at www.cityofwinterpark.
org and by clicking on
Government > City
Commission > Packets.

MARCH 22
CRA AGENCY MEETING
The City Commission will
adjourn from the regularly
scheduled City Commission
meeting on Monday, March
22, and reconvene as the
CRA Board at 4:30 p.m., to
discuss the appointment
of the Park Avenue Area
Association Task Force.

GET GOOGLING
Google is looking for a
city/geographic area to
test their experimental
ultra-high speed Internet
network. The city of
Orlando is submitting
an application, and we
would like to support our
neighboring city's efforts to
be considered for this pilot
program. This means our
businesses, both large and
small, could have access
to an Internet connection
100 times faster than
anyone else giving them
an incredible edge in
creating the technology
and jobs of tomorrow that
will ultimately benefit our
community.
We need you to tell
Google why we're the right
community to take full
advantage of this incredible
opportunity. Here's how
you can help:


Census data helps
determine how more
than $400 billion per
year in federal funding is
distributed to tribal, state
and local governments
for services that affect
local communities such as
ours. Census data can help
fund services for people
in poverty, and establish
facilities for people with
disabilities, children and
the elderly.
Census data
helps forecast future
transportation needs and
determines how we are
represented in all levels
of government. Basically,
the 2010 Census is about
the future and well-being
of our community and
country.
Completing and mailing
back your form is the
easiest and most efficient
method of participating.
This is one of the shortest
census forms in U.S. Census
history. It asks 10 questions
and only takes about 10
minutes to complete.
All of your answers are
safe and confidential. By
law, the U.S. Census Bureau
cannot share your answers
with anyone, including
other federal agencies
and law enforcement


Fill out Google's survey:
Tell Google what you or
your company might be
able to accomplish with
this kind of Internet
connection. What sort of
dreams could you turn
into reality? You can find a
link to it on the homepage
of our Web site www.
cityofwinterpark.org > Get
Googling button.
Get creative: Show
the world why you want
Google to choose the
Orlando area by making
your own YouTube video
and submitting it to www.
cityofwinterpark.org > Get
Googling.
Get mapped: Make your
mark and tell Google why
they should build its fiber
network here. You can
make your Google mark at
www.cityofwinterpark.org
> Get Googling button.
Tell your friends: Post it
on Facebook, talk about it
on Twitter. Tell them to go
to www.cityofwinterpark.
org > Get Googling button.
There isn't much time.
The application is due to
Google on Friday, March 26.
Our community is up to the
task, so let's "Get Googling!"

SIGN UP NOW FOR THE
2ND ANNUAL BIKE FROM
PARK TO PARK
The City of Winter Park
Pedestrian & Bicycle
Advisory Board will
celebrate by hosting the
second annual Bike from
Park to Park at 8 a.m. Friday,
March 26.
Bicyclists will begin their
ride through scenic Winter
Park at Mead Garden,
located at 1300 S. Denning
Drive, and will conclude
in Central Park's West
Meadow with refreshments


entities. All Census Bureau
employees take an oath
of nondisclosure and are
sworn for life to protect the
confidentiality of the data.
The penalty for unlawful
disclosure is a fine of up to
$250,000 or imprisonment
of up to five years, or both.
Census workers have to
visit households that do not
return forms to take the
count in person. Not only
does mailing back a form
ensure an accurate count, it
also lowers the cost of the
2010 Census by reducing
the number of census
workers who must go door-
to-door to collect census
data.
To put it in perspective,
about $85 million is saved
for every 1 percent increase
in the number of forms
returned by mail. Also, the
Census Bureau saves $60 to
$70 per census form mailed
back.
"The 2010 Census is an
historical event that will
help shape the future of
our country," said Robert
Groves, U.S. Census Bureau
director. "It is vital that
everyone is counted once
and only once and in the
right place."
During Census 2000,
about 72 percent of


courtesy of Panera Bread.
Bike from Park to Park
supports the mission to
promote a viable and safe
pedestrian- and bicycle-
friendly infrastructure.
Those interested
in participating are
asked to please RSVP by
Tuesday, March 23, via
e-mail at trafficguy@
cityofwinterpark.org or by
calling 407-599-3233.

56TH ANNUAL
EASTER EGG HUNT
The city of Winter Park
is proud to announce
their 56th annual Easter
Egg Hunt will be held
on Saturday, April 3, in
beautiful Central Park
located in downtown
Winter Park. This fun-filled
event will provide as much
excitement and laughs
for adults as it will for
youngsters.
Children as old as 10
can begin lining up at 9:30
a.m. The hunt will begin
promptly at 10 a.m. when
the Easter Bunny gives
the official starting signal.
Children with special needs
are also encouraged to join
in the fun.
More than 10,000
stuffed eggs will be placed
throughout Central Park.
As always, children who
come up empty handed will
still be able to enjoy special
treats at the designated
area.
For more information
regarding the city of Winter
Park's 56th annual Easter
Egg Hunt, please call 407-
599-3203.
Visit the city's official
Web site at www.
cityofwinterpark. org, find
us on Facebook and follow
us on Twitter


households across the
country mailed back their
forms by the April 2000 cut-
off. I challenge you to beat
that number this year.
Our community's future
relies on the 2010 Census.
Do what's right, take 10
minutes to complete and
mail back your census form.
Questionnaire
Assistance Centers (QAC)
will be available to assist
those unable to read or
understand the census
form. For those with visual
impairments, the Language
Assistance Guide will be
available in large print and
Braille. Deaf and hard-of-
hearing persons who do
not have access to Video
Relay Service (VRS) can call
the TDD number, 1-866-
783-2010. In addition to
these options, Language
Assistance Guides will be
available in 59 languages at
all QAC locations.
For more information,
please visit 2010census.gov.
-Special thanks
to Kristine Neal,
communications
coordinator for the city
ofMaitland, for her
contributions to this week's
City Talk.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 10 Thursday, March 18, 2010





Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 11


PoterArtist
Ken Bowser brings a fresh
look to this year's official
art festival poster with his
whimsical and edgy illus-
trative sty*. In addition
to writing and illustrating
four of his own books for
children, Ken Bowser has
illustrated scores of other
published book titles and(
his work hd in
countless magazines, news-
papers and periodicals.
worldwide including The
New York Daily News, The
Chicago Tribune, Time and
Newsweek to name just a
few.


He is also the creator, il-
lustrator and writer of an
internationally syndicated
humor panel and has au-
thored and illustrated a
widely distributed culinary
column. His latest book,
Space Cat will be available
this spring through Red
Chair Press. In additional
to his thriting illustration
career, he also teaches in
the Digital Art & Design
Department at Full Sail Uni-
versity. Ken is married, has
two children and has been a
Winter Park resident for 25
years.


Looatonb dENDb




Located in Winter Park's Central Park bounded by New
England Avenue on the South and Garfield Avenue on the
North, Park Avenue on the East, and New York Avenue on
the West.

March 19-21

Friday, March 19, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Saturday, March 20, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Sunday, March 21, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

No pets are allowed in thepark or on ParkAvenue
during the artfestival hours of operation.

Ken Bowser


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Page 12 Thursday, March 18, 2010 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Letter from

Suzanne

Woodward,
president,
The 51st Winter Park
Sidewalk Art Festival

Since our first year, which
featured 90 artists display-
ing work on folding easels
and simple display tables,
it has been the mission And
passionn of WPSAF to bring
hne art into Central Florida
Sfor the enjoyment and
education of all ages. What
began as a grassroots effort
0in1960 by local art lovers
.as grown over the past
five decades into one of the
premier art festivals in the
United States.
The work of 225 fine art-
ists from around the world
is presented to more than
300,000 art lovers in Winter
Park during our three-day
annual event. A panel of
three independent profes-
sional judges will award
$67,500 in prize money for
excellence in various two
and thfee-dimensional cat-
egories, including the top
purchase award of $10000
for Best Of Sho Wndthe
Morse MuseumAward for
Distinguished Work of Art
of$2500.
The 45 volunteer mem-
bers and provisional mem-
bers of the WPSAF board, as
well as our dedicated com- 1


munity volunteers, spend
thousands of hours each
year planning, organizing,
and fine- tuning what you
will see during your stroll
through the park. Our
Emerging Artists Program
features cutting-edge works
by college art students
and new artists who have
never appeared in an out-
door show and our Leon
Theodore Schools Exhibit
showcases work by Orange
County students.
You'll also find numer-
ous 'hands on' art activities
for children presented by
local museums at our Chil-
dren's Workshop Village.
Delectable food is available
throughout the park, and a
vanity of ongoing musical
entertainment is performed
during the entire week-
ed. Our Friday night jazz
concert is always a crowd
pleaser.
I want to thank ourp-a-
trons; sponsors, volunteers,
artists and supporters who
have greatly contributed
to the success of this week
end. Without the help of
the wonderful employees
of The City of Winter Park
,especially the Parks and
Recreation Department,
and the Police and the Fire
Depar iets, this festi-
val wot not be possible.
Thanks also to you, the fes-
tival attendees, for visiting
our 51st event. We hope you
have an enjoyable experi-
ence and visit us again next


I! i


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RETIREMENT LIVING


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to do exactly as you please. Relax . revitalize . reinvent ..
renew. And, then imagine a place where you can do all that on
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care. That place ... is The Mayflower the gold standard for
retirement communities in Central Florida. Visit us ... and
redefine how you think about retirement living.


THE MAYFLOWER
A Plan for the FutureSM
S .www.themayflower.com
S 1620 Mayflower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 (407) 672-1620


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 12 Thursday, March 18, 2010





Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 13


0-



Each year the art festival selects
three judges from around the
country; they each have artistic
credentials in varying fields. In
October, these judges select the
artists that will participate in the
show from the more than 1,000
artists who apply. The images that

I ^B /*<


George I
curator of the


they view for selection have num-
bers and no mes so the judges
won't be swaed by recognition
of the artist. These same judges
attend the festival in March and
view each artist's whole body of
work in order to select the win-
ners of this year's awards.


1 i thc5lirector and
Maine iluseum f Art.


Chav
George


rt at


The 5 1stAnnual Winter Park Side-
walk Art Festival will feature enter-
tainment on the Florida Family In-
surance Stage and will include per-
formances by jazz artist/original
songwriter Peter White (Friday),
soul-jazz flutist Althea Rene (Satur-
day), and smooth jazz guitarist Tim


Bowman (Sunday). Entertainment
presented by Florida Family Insur-
ance, WFTV Channel 9, Orlando
Home & Leisure Magazine, and
Smooth 103.1 WLOQ. All perfor-
mances are on the Florida Family
Insurance Stae, located in north
Central Park.


2010 Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival
Entertainment Schedule


Friday, March 19


4:30pm-5:30pm:
6:00pm-7:00pm:
7:30pm-9:00pm:


Winter Park High School Jazz Band
BK Jackson
Peter White


Saturday, March 20


10:00am- 10:45am:
I 1:00am-11:45am:
12:00pm-1:00pm:
1:15pm-2:15prm:
2:45pm-3:45pm:
4:15pm-5:45pm:


Chamber Quartet
Suzuki Players of Central Florida 4
Duvall Dance Academy
Orlando Brass Quintet -
Rl. Walker Quartet-
Altha Rene


y, March 21


Three Flutes Only
Rollins Bach Brass
MAKESHIFT
Groove Masters
Tim.Bowman .


The Learning Tree is a Ministry of
First Baptist Church of Winter Park

We offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-
Round, Preschool Classes and much more!
NowAccepting Enrollment for Full-Day Summer Camp (K5-Completed 3rd Grade)

Established in 1973 we are celebrating 36
years of service this year.


(407) 628-1761
www.FBCWinterPark.org


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-Weekly, Bi-Weekly, Monthly
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In aElmn n



JUil ^ J Ini1J9J





Page 14 Thursday, March 18, 2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver


a


CLAY
DIGITAL ART
DRAWINGS & GRAPHICS
FIBER
GLASS
JEWELRY
LEATHER
METAL
MIXED MEDIA
PAINTING
PHOTOGRAPHY
SCULPTURE
WATERCOLOR
WOOD
EMERGIN ARTISTS


Detailedprogramscontaining maps, art-
ists and booth numbers will be availableat1
the art festival.


0i 0


Emcee Miss Megan Clemek~
Miss Florida USA 2010
Tickets are only $ 35
Corporate tables available


For more information, please contact
Patrick Chapin at pchapin@winterpark.org
or (4-07) 644-8281.


Page 14 Thursday, March 18, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


99


eleDrt j
WAITEr la.Nw N B.A.SE. CAMP
Chdren's Cancer Foundotion

Join event co-chairs:
The Honorable Bill Segal,
OrangeMl oy Commissioner


E












Lifestyles


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Single mother Eliana Mahant and her three children, Justin, 9, Jason, 7, and Rachel, 16, were given a Habitat for Humanity house that was built by a Winter Park firm and friends of retired RLF chairman Jack Rogers.

Friends and colleagues of Winter Park's Jack Rogers band together to make home for deserving family


CARMEN CARROQUINO
GUEST REPORTER
Hammering nails, putting up dry-
wall and painting walls is not typi-
cally the way people want to cel-
ebrate 41 years of work before set-
ting off for retirement.
But friends and colleagues of
Jack Rogers, former chairman and
CEO of the Winter Park-based Rog-
ers, Lovelock & Fritz (RLF) archi-
tectural firm, knew that designing
and building a house for a less for-
tunate family was a dream that a
lack of free time had kept him from
achieving.
So when Rogers decided it was
time to retire in 2006, those who
care about him surprised him by
raising more than $60,000 in part-
nership with the Winter Park/Mait-
land affiliate of Habitat for Human-
ity to build "The house that Jack
built."
A dedication ceremony took
place on March 6 at the home locat-
ed at 865 English Court in Winter
Park, where it was named only the
second home to be privately spon-
sored by individuals and the 45th
house built by the Winter Park/Mai-
tland affiliate.
Steve Schoene, friend and former
colleague of Rogers at RLF, said that
Rogers had grown up and worked
in Winter Park. He had always been
involved in community outreach
and appreciated the mission that
Habitat for Humanity had.
"Jack's integrity is really some-
thing," he said. "He's one of the last
men willing to operate on a hand-
shake and be a man of his word. If
doing the right the thing is consid-
ered a good trait, he would go above
and beyond it."
When friends and colleagues
toyed with the idea of buying Rog-
ers a gold watch as a retirement
gift, Schoene was one of many who
agreed the gift would not do for his
longtime friend. He spearheaded
the Habitat projected as a tribute to
an unknowing Rogers, rounding up
about 150 individuals who wanted
to celebrate Rogers' retirement in a
unique way.
The 1,100-square-foot, three-
bedroom/one-bathCraftsman-style


bungalow, broke ground in Janu-
ary 2009 and was completed in less
than a year for the Mahant family.
Habitat homes cost between
$75,000 and $100,000, not including
land costs. A no-interest loan for 30
years is given to Habitat home recip-
ients, where their monthly payment
is about $300. Habitat for Humanity
Winter Park/Maitland works with
Orange County income guidelines
to choose those most in need. All re-
cipients of Habitat Homes must vol-
unteer 100 hours of "sweat equity"
on other Habitat projects besides
their own and 500 volunteer hours
on the construction of their own
home as their down payment.
Rogers said the house was the
"finest retirement gift" he could ask
for after 41 years at the firm and ex-
pressed a quiet, but deep gratitude
to all his friends and family who
had a hand in making the house a
reality.
He said not only has the fam-
ily moving into what he calls the
"greatest blessing" been enriched,
but he has too by the generosity of
those close to him throughout the
years.
Hal George, president of the affil-
iate, said "The house that Jack built"
was an interesting project to work
on because of the rarity of how it
came about.
Most homes are constructed
by organizations such as schools,
churches and non-profits because
of the fundraising required, George
said, adding that it can be quite an
undertaking for smaller groups of
individuals to accomplish.
George said the first privately
sponsored home was built in 2002
in memory of the affiliate's former
attorney, Hope Strong III, by his
brother, former mayor of Winter
Park David Strong.
The uniqueness of the home
also refers to the addition of hav-
ing Rogers' design expertise. Special
features to the exterior and interior
of the home include a wrap-around
porch displaying bricked-column
bases, specialized cabinetry and a
cathedral-ceiling frame.
For single mother Eliana Mahant
and her three children (Rachel, 16,


Justin, 9, and Jason, 7) the house is a
dream come true.
Rich reds, serene greens and vi-
brant turquoise and pinks deco-
rate different rooms of the home,
matching everyone's personalities.
The Mahant family walked through
their new home smiling ear-to-ear
with pride and gratitude written all


over their faces.
"I feel like I've won the lottery,"
Mahant said to everyone at the ded-
ication ceremony. "I know in every
part of my home that there is love
and your hard work... It will always
be more than a house, but a home
to me and my family."


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 15







Page 16 Thursday, March 18, 2010 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Family

Calendar


The Friends of Casa Feliz invite
all local families to attend "Kids
at the Casa," a Spanish-themed
children's festival celebrating
music, dance, art, song and
storytelling, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on Saturday, March 20. Admission
is free, but donations will accepted.
For more information, contact
Angela Roark at 407-484-1246 or
e-mail aroark@mac.com.

Events at the Maitland Art
Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave.
Call 407-539-2181 or visit www.
maitlandartcenter.org for more
information.

-From 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., starting
Monday, March 22, children ages
6 to 8 can join the Little Artist
Series for the six-week program.
Mondays will be drawing, ink and
pen. Tuesdays will be watercolors.
Wednesdays will be acrylic
painting. Cost is $90 for non-
members and $80 for members.
There is a $25 material fee.

-From 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., starting
Thursday, March 25, K-4, K-5
and first grade can join the Young
Masters program. K-4 through
second grade meet Friday from 10
a.m. to 11 a.m. Cost is $90 for non-
members and $80 for members.
There is a $25 material fee.

The Orange County Health
Department's School Health
Program is encouraging parents
to start early to get their child
immunized. Through the Middle
School Initiative, the health
department is helping to get middle
school students ready for the next
school year by providing the Tdap
(tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis)
vaccine, which is required prior to
a child entering seventh grade. A
schedule of when school nurses
will be at your child's school is
available at www.orchd.com.

At 4 p.m. on Wednesday, March
24, the Orange County Students
Working Against Tobacco (SWAT)
is celebrating the "2010 Kick Butts
Day" by hosting a community park
cleanup. The cleanup will be held
at George Barker Park, 2000
Monte Carlo Trail, Orlando. For
more information, contact SWAT
at 407-340-3415.

Events this month at the
Maitland Public Library, 501 S.
Maitland Ave.:
-At 7 p.m. on Mondays is Bedtime
Stories.
-At 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays is
story time for ages 36 months to
preschoolers.
-At 10:30 a.m. on Thursdays is
story time for babies up to 36
months old.
-At 4 p.m. on Thursdays is Reading
Buddies.
For more details, contact 407-
647-7700.

Take Care Clinics, located at
select Walgreens drugstores
throughout the country, will
be offering camp and sports
physicals for $35 through the end
of September. Visit http://www.
takecarehealthsystem.com for
more information.


r 0

II L 08^ "


A *




2113 E. South St
Orlando, FL 32803
407-898-7228 1
www.workforceacademy.com

PHOTO BY KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS THE OBSERVER
H.R. Director Kristin Shutler and Workforce Advantage Academy student Geneva Culbertson review case files at deBeaubien, Simmons, Mantzaris & Neal LLP law firm.

Workforce Advantage Academy students get real-world experience as interns


KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS
OBSERVER STAFF

Geneva Culbertson dreams
of caring for exotic animals
such as cheetahs or polar
bears. But for now the fear-
less 17-year-old is happy
sorting, shredding and
scanning client records at
a downtown Orlando law
firm.
The student body presi-
dent and yearbook editor
will soon graduate from
Workforce Advantage Acad-
emy, an Orange County
charter school where she
takes classes two to three
days a week and works a
paid internship the other
two days.
"This schedule gives
me time to study but I get
to work too," Culbertson
said. "I've learned so much
at school and through my
job."
The innovative program
is the vision of Kenneth E.
Hartsaw Jr., whose military
and business careers in-
cluded 30 years of youth job
training and education. He
founded Workforce Advan-
tage Academy, a nonprofit
organization in 2003.
By its fifth year, the acad-
emy's stunning academic
performance won it an un-
precedented 15-year exten-
sion.
"When students get here,
most have not passed the
FCAT, have fallen behind
and are off track to graduate.
We have over 400 graduates,
a 90 percent graduation rate
with improvements in both
FCAT and grade point aver-
ages." Hartshaw said.
As part of Orange County
Public Schools, students at-
tend for free, however Hart-
saw admits most juniors and
seniors arrive with reserva-
tions and most have never
worked.
What turns them around?
Small class sizes of 15 to
20 students with certified
teachers who pick up on
student moods, struggles


and successes allows prob-
lems and strengths to be
identified early on.
The curriculum com-
bines classes taught in any
Orange County high school
and business courses that
prepare them for paid in-
ternships and real world
challenges. Students work
with household budgets,
business plans and con-
sumer math. They learn in-
terviewing, communication
and workplace skills, in-
cluding tips on appearance,
being on time and filling out
applications.
"When I finally got my
job last January, I was pre-
pared," Culbertson said.
Internships span areas of
employment including law,
manufacturing, construc-
tion, business administra-
tion and retail.
Hartsaw said many stu-
dents come from economi-
cally challenged families or
have become lost at high
schools with 4,000-plus stu-
dents.
"This is not an alterna-
tive school," Hartsaw said.
"When people come here,
they begin to turn their
lives around. We give them
choices and the tools to be
successful."
His graduates go on to
attend community colleg-
es, universities, technical
schools, the military or full-
time work.
Culbertson plans to at-
tend Valencia Community
College then pursue a de-
gree in zoology and biology.
Kristin Shutler, firm ad-
ministrator and human re-
sources director at deBeau-
bien, Simmons, Mantzaris &
Neal LLP has been working
with the academy's students
from its inception and com-
mented on Culbertson's
performance.
"Geneva is the pinnacle of
a star she is determined,
bright and focused with a
great work ethic."
Shutler said students ad-
mit that a smaller school


with a career focus has res-
cued them from the social
pressures of traditional high
schools. Employers win by
paying trainable employ-
ees a moderate wage with-
out extensive benefits. The
unique partnership between
employers and the academy
differentiates from other
teens who struggle alone to
balance a job with classes
and extracurricular activi-
ties.
Allison Okamoto, a ju-
nior at the Academy, is con-
sidered "invaluable" by her
office manager Dottie Ge-
niotto at Lake Howell Chiro-
practic Clinic in Maitland.
"She's my right arm," Ge-
niotto said. "Her computer
skills are awesome, which
allows me to take care of my
other duties."
Okamoto designs flyers,
types clinical notes, creates
labels and scans records.


Next year as a senior and
honor student she hopes to
have dual enrollment at Va-
lencia Community College.
"This is a good opportunity
to get a job and your educa-
tion," Okamoto said.
When faced with a 30
percent budget cut, Hartsaw
increased his student en-
rollment and raised private
donations. He has helped
fund student proms, schol-
arships and trips to college
campuses, Washington,
D.C., and New York City.
His enrollment is at full ca-
pacity with more than 200
students sometimes with a
waiting list.
"No one is alone here,"
Culbertson said. "This
school helps you focus on
yourself, not on someone
else's problems. It's easy to
get close to the staff because
they help you."


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Page 16 Thursday, March 18, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 17


Cinema


Coming March 31


A show case of this week's releases,
and a look ahead to upcoming movies.


'The Last Song'


'Date Night'


Coming April 16


'Death at a Funeral'


Coming April 23


'The Losers'


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Fr u :0P ,63 M 9:0 M0ed6:00P5IM OD-RED
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In the heart of Downtown Orlando
Convenient Parking across the street in the
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Also opening: 'The Bounty Hunter'
Milo, a bounty hun I
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www.madcowtheatre.com/moo










Opinion/ Editorial


Perspectives

by...



e y^ a


It's not the dying,

it's the ending


I'm sixty-sucking-one this
week. I'm old. In my fifties,
I used the F-word to count
my way through that de-
cade. Instead of sucking. I
do not particularly like ag-
ing for two reasons. Regard-
less of the hype to the con-
trary, I am physically less of
the man I was 20 years ago.
I don't like that. But even
more than that I'm closer
to being dead.
And, I so love life. I'm
one of those guys who says,
"I want to live forever." I do.
Puh-leeeese, do not send
me your favorite Biblical
passage promising eternal
bliss as a footstool or night-
stand or fawning, singing
acolyte to God. I'm talking
about life life. Life where
choices have to be made.
Life where pain is common-
place. Life where death is
the best man or gorgeous
bridesmaid at every cel-
ebration.
That's one contradiction
about death. It makes life
precious.
That may be the down-
side to eternal life (if it were
an option), what would get
you excited? Actually, it's
a common enough theme
in fiction. The bored aris-
tocrat -yawn, yawn the
guy with the lavish English


gardens who speaks fluent
Italian, reads Greek and
shoots skeet like James
Bond in "From Russia With
Love." And the poor chap,
he's so bored. My brother
says, "Life is boring to bor-
ing people." I tend to agree
with Uncle Stevie. But ac-
knowledging that "remote"
possibility doesn't staunch
my longing for more time.
My wish to live forever
is, no doubt, predicated
on a number of things. My
health is still good, as far as
I know. And isn't that the
damned truth. You reach a
certain age, oh, say, sixty-
sucking-one, and you know
folks who just up and die.
Young people. Not people
who enlisted for combat
and subsequently died be-
ing all they could be. But
educators who wake up
with a headache and are
dead 11 months later (my
sister at age 54 of glioblas-
toma multiforme). Or,
killed in traffic accident. Or,
had her breasts removed
and then died cancerous
anyway. Here one day and
gone tomorrow.
Actually that is how I
feel about what I hope is
the 81 or so years I am alive.
Here one day, gone tomor-
row. That's about what I'll


get. 83 years. And it is so
short, so brief a time span
as to be here today, gone
tomorrow. And because I
am healthy I want more.
I'm human, I want. More
life. More happiness. More
joy. More love. And to have
that in life requires that you
have more pain. More sor-
row. More heartache.
That is one of life's true
dichotomies. To have exhil-
aration you will have doubt.
And disappointment. And
despair at times. And each
of us has some internal
"scale" that constantly eval-
uates and answers, "How
am I doing today?" And the
reply you give to yourself is
what puts the skip in your
step or the wiggle in your
walk. Or the giggle in your
talk.
So life still excites you
and you want more. Yet,
alas, sigh, more is a finite
number. I've been seriously
aware of my own mortality
and what a screw life is at
the end because you've ac-
quired all this "perspective"
and then shazam, it's over.
How fair is that? At age 21,
one of those light bulbs
went off, you know, one of
those they hang from an
ancient electrical cord dan-
gling from an open rafter in
a rustic, remote Minnesota
cabin. Primitive. You're
standing next to it and the
chain hanging from the
dirty bulb is swinging as
"POP!" On goes that light
in your mind like the bright
bolt of illumination that it
is and something concrete-
ly registers in your mind.
The last time this had
occurred was with my fa-
ther while standing on our
front porch at age 16 at 2
a.m. one hot July morning
with the taillights of the
police car fading down the


street. My father got his left
eyeball four inches from my
right eyeball and succinctly
asked, "When are you going
to learn?" He sternly turned
in his purple flannel robe
and went back to bed leav-
ing me to ponder just that
question. That particular
light bulb experience was
an important lesson.
My light bulb experi-
ence five years later wasn't
a lesson but a recognition
- about life having a "very"
real stop point. And, that
at age 21, I was already a
quarter cooked! And here
I am at sixty-sucking-one,
wanting more. Good Golly
Miss Molly! Three-quarters
in the can!
Friends, people say, oh,
you're not old, Chris. It's
only people my age or older
who say that and have any
believability quotient. I sub-
scribe to a lot of magazines
and see a lot of movies, I
know old and I am it.
As much as I am disgrun-
tled by the inherent unfair-
ness of it all my not liv-
ing for a nanosecond-like
10,000 years I'm totally
OK with it, too.
"Marcus Welby," as my
sainted mother used to say.
Might as well be accept-
ing of one's fate.
The crux of the mat-
ter is how to live life. How
to shove as much of what
you love and want "into"
your life right up to the
day you die. And then cross
your legs, hopefully sigh
thoughtfully, and expire.
Who-o-o-o-oooosh! Here
today. Gone tomorrow. My
mother died like that.
I've been thinking of
giving death a name. And
"Chuck" sounds good to
me. By giving death a name
we would personalize him
a bit more. He'd become


more accessible. You know
when you're with a woman
and you overhear some-
thing to the effect "Aunt
Flow" is visiting. Well, if
Aunt Flow can personalize
a menstrual cycle, Chuck,
sure as "My Friend" can
stand in (be the wink,
wink code word) for
death. The applications are
endless. "Chuck took your
Granny away, Little Mary.
Don't cry." I'm too much.
Hah!
It's not the dying, it's the
ending.
"Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow,
a poor player, that struts
and frets his hour upon the
stage, And then is heard no
more." Shakespeare said
that.
OK, we have this won-
derful consciousness that
quickly lets us know it's all
temporary. Even knowing
our outcomes, life has us
wanting more. It could be
construed as cruel but that
begs the question of intent.
It simply is. And to the
degree that we have control
over our lives and destinies
I so recommend that we all
embrace what life we have
left with the same gusto,
verve and pleasure as the
newborn babe suckles at
his mother's breast.
M-mm-M-mm, Good.
I'm in heaven! Life is.
Even at sixty-sucking-one.
I said earlier, and I quote
myself, "It's not the dying,
it's the ending."
No, my good friend, it's
the living.



T JEPSON

Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters tothe Editor


Why close Winter Park
Memorial thrift store?
The Winter Park Memorial
Hospital Auxiliary White
Elephant Thrift Store is
closing, and 31 volunteers
are asking why. We know
that Publix is expanding
and will be tearing down
our building in the Aloma
Plaza, but why, after 27
years of being a source of
income and volunteer ser-
vice for the Winter Park
Memorial Hospital, was the
decision made to close the
store, even though another
building was available. Dur-
ing these years, thousands
of dollars have been made
for hospital projects, im-
provements, scholarships
and various needs of the
hospital.
Why now, with the econ-
omy like it is and the com-
munity needing stores such
as ours, would the hospital
close it down? The mon-
ies we made did help the


hospital and the commu-
nity by being there for the
people. The 31 volunteers
are dedicated ladies that
have formed friendships
throughout the years with
a wonderful store that has
served the community well
and helped many who were
in need and unable to pay.
We feel that the Winter
Park Hospital fails to real-
ize just what the White
Elephant Thrift Store and
its volunteers have done for
the hospital and the com-
munity after all these years.
-Carol Rollman
Orlando

Jepson stacks the
deck on religion
Chris Jepson blasted God
again in his March 4 col-
umn, "Satan as a Card Deal-
er," in the Observer by ex-
alting the devil. He quotes
Samuel Butler who laments
that, since God has written
all the books; mankind has


only heard one side of the
story. (Is Satan illiterate?)
God's Book is only of value,
however, if read. The devil
can in no way match God's
power, though he can in-
flict great damage. He was
the first to realize and take
advantage of free will to
realize that the choice to
obey God also opens the
door to rebellion, which
many prefer.
Epicurus' error has been
answered many times, but
some have not read those
books either. A diet of skep-
ticism seldom yields wis-
dom. Could God prevent
evil? He could but only at
the expense of our free will.
God is unwilling to eradi-
cate all evil at the moment
of its inception because the
devil and all of us would
have been destroyed long
ago. Furthermore, no one
would ever have a chance
to learn from mistakes,
repent, or make positive


changes. God is not malev-
olent to allow the existence
of evil because it provides
us the means of decid-
ing our future. God knew
from the beginning what
man's choices would be.
For that reason Jesus was
slain from the foundation
of the world. God Himself
has paid an enormous price
for allowing us freedom.
Epicurus and Jepson have
confused Earth with heav-


en, where no evil will ex-
ist. Those who dwell there
forever will enjoy a sin-free
environment.
Is Satan a mere "fall
guy"? The devil has never
made anyone sin, but he
does know how to manipu-
late, spin, twist and distort
circumstances to his own
advantage. He excels in
making sin look attractive,
> turn to LETTERS on A20


FM 89.9 aM


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 18 Thursday, March 18, 2010





Winter Park/Maitland Observer



Play On!
I . 1


Conservative commentary
& opinions of Louis Roney
Harvard'42-Distinguished Prof, Em.-
UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
(Assisted by b.w.:Joy Roney)

"You are entitled to your own opinions-
you are not entitled to your own facts"
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Sweating it out in
the touted tropics
Come to see me in my
Florida house.
I'm the guy in the
seal-skin pants and jacket
huddled by the thermostat.
It's not that I'm really cold
since I came back home to
Florida to live, it's just that
I can't keep warm. The sun
shines a lot, but in winter it
can't seem to warm me.
I was in the North Pacific
once during the war, and
I never expected a balmy
clime. But in Florida, they
keep telling you you're
warm, while you're shiver-
ing.
I was just talking with a
friend on the telephone. I
mentioned Florida in the
30s.
"You mean when you
were in high school?" said
my friend.
"No, I said, "I was refer-
ring to the temperature this
morning."
By 10, I was a confirmed


Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 19


Floridian, who had all but
forgotten his birthplace up
North in cold Atlanta.
There are a few things
in my life that I always
hated: rattlesnakes, Hub-
bard squash, grits and cold
weather, for example.
I must say truthfully that
I have been colder in Flor-
ida than anywhere else in
all my days, because being
in Florida does a Chamber
of Commerce legerdemain
trick on me: that of making
me think it's warm only be-
cause it's supposed to be.
I'm writing in early
March, and yesterday was
in the 50s going down to
freezing at night.
Such weather, I feel in
my soul, breaks the sacred
compact made with me
when I involuntarily be-
came a Floridian in my gull-
ible childhood.
When it's cold in Florida,
everything still looks sum-
mery and inviting. The
hibiscus bloom, and the
water shimmers in the sun-
shine. Those accoutrements
are just "props" arranged
by the C of C in Florida to
make Yankees scratch their
heads and rationalize when
they are looking for their
overcoats. We schoolboys
wanted to swim in Lake
Virginia almost every day of
the year. When it was just
too cold, we "cursed what-
ever Northern gods might
be." The Florida heat we
boys could take all day long
and never gripe about it -
even in scratchy woolen
football jerseys.
Came the day when I
innocently took exams to
see whether any institution
of higher learning in the
hinterlands might see some
glimmer of hope in my fu-
ture.
An envelope came weeks
later telling me to come


to Massachusetts, a state
I couldn't even spell, and
which shrouded a sense of
inimical foreboding to a
Florida Cracker like me.
When I got to Cambridge
in September, the weather
was just as nice as any Flori-
da day you could ask for.
About a month later the
weather-beast came out of
hiding at the North Pole
and whooped into Cam-
bridge one morning when I
was in the office of the dean
of freshmen.
The dean noticed I didn't
have an overcoat. When he
asked why, I said I had nev-
er owned one. He told me
to go across Harvard Square
to the Coop, and charge
one, preferably a Harris
Tweed, to an account num-
ber he gave me. I told him I
was a little short of money,
and he said, "Pay it back
when you can." That gener-
ous act made me smile in
Boston despite the hateful
weather.
I graduated in 1942
straight into the U.S. Navy. I
had enlisted shortly before,
but the summer dragged on
without my being called up.
First I was ordered to Notre
Dame University, and after
the weather turned "chilly"
we trained at the crack of
dawn on the shores of Lake
Michigan, north of Chicago.
We were given only rain-
coats because our overcoats
had not yet arrived.
Those of us who weren't
eliminated by pneumonia
went on to duty in either
hellishly hot or frigid
climes.
We couldn't complain
much after all the Japa-
nese were there sweating or
shivering with us. Suddenly
I was sent temporarily to a
40 mm machine-gun target
range on a forlorn North-
ern Cape Cod beach, where


I lived in a Quonset hut
amid Arctic breezes from
Newfoundland.
When the war was finally
over, I accepted contracts
from a European manager
to sing opera and concerts
in Europe. Of course, I end-
ed up singing in mid-winter
in such cities as Berlin,
Paris, Hamburg, Copenha-
gen, London and Dublin.
One thing about winters
in Northern Europe you
don't have any sunshine
to remind you that some-
where the sun is still shin-
ing. I noticed that my sunny
Southern disposition was
packed away somewhere
in a piece of discarded lug-
gage. Anyhow, it was a liv-
ing freezing though it
might have been.
In the 1990s one sum-
mer, my b.w. and I were in
the states and a friend of-
fered us a nice trip on his
big, beautiful airplane. We
were just to "fly around" a
few places and see some in-
teresting things. Before we
knew it, we were landing in
Anchorage that's in Alas-
ka folks! We went ashore
needing heavy jackets. It
was still summer there,
some misguided natives in
shirtsleeves informed us.
We braced our shoulders
and shifted into smiling
histrionics, which may have
been accented by the audi-
ble chattering of our teeth.
One day we flew over
to Dillingham (July 31), a
town east of Anchorage.
I was first out the door
when heavy sleet sent me
back into the plane. When
we had all "deplaned" we
stood in the wind and wet
and waited for a car to pick
us up. We drove on roads,
mostly mud, for about an
hour heading for Aleknag-
ik a town my wife has
henceforth referred to


fondly as AleknaMUD.
There are folks who love
Alaska and mud dearly,
folks who cherish short
pseudo-summers, and the
feeling of "roughing it" Arc-
tic style in their own back-
yards.
I would be remiss if I
didn't mention the glory of
Alaskan scenery, the wild
animals, and the imposing
silhouette of Mt. McKinley.
Most unforgettable was a
boat trip on Prince William
Sound with glaciers on all
sides. In a hotel restaurant
on Kodiak Island we en-
joyed the best fish ever -
halibut.
Early in World War II my
ship visited the Aleutian
Islands, off Alaska, after
we learned that Japanese
subs were operating there.
I remember being on the
flying bridge in a tempera-
ture more than 30 percent
below zero. I made a note
then never to visit Alaska
unless ordered to do so by
the U.S. Navy.
There are some things
in life, I suppose, that are
meant to be tough, like Chi-
cago winters, and New York
bagels. Soft grocery store
bagels and Miami sunshine
don't seem to build real
character.
There surely should be
something that builds char-
acter when a person moves
from Miami to Chicago and
manages to survive for a
full year.
People joke about living
in places with climate ex-
tremes.
Of course, there's more
joking about not freezing
in Bismarck than there is
about surviving the heat in
Orlando.
I'll tell you succinctly
why I have a special detes-
tation for cold:
It hurts!


Edtonal


S"Copyrighted Material




Syn icated Content




Available fromiCommercial News Providers"



^^/1,4-









LETTERS I Almost 6 million people are unaware that they have diabetes; know your risk for Type 2 diabetes


< continued from page A18

but we are still drawn away
by our own lusts. We bear
the blame for our decisions.
Mark Twain was a bril-
liant humorist, but did he
say with a straight face
that Satan "hasn't a single
salaried helper"? Really?
Do those who traffic in il-
legal drugs do it for free?
Are there no paychecks for
those in Hollywood who
encourage young people to
use crude speech and en-
gage in acts of fornication?
Sin ministries are big busi-
ness. Even writers of books
and newspaper columnists
have been known to receive
remuneration for their ef-
forts.
Many claiming to be
Christians serve in the dev-
il's camp. As the old story
goes, a man was on the way
to a costume party dressed
as what many people imag-
ine the devil to look like
(orange suit, horns, etc.). A
sudden storm arose, and he
ran for cover from the rain.
He slipped into a church
building just as lightning
struck and the power flick-
ered. People suddenly saw
him and began to scream
and scatter except for
one elderly man, who stood
his ground and confided,
"I just want you to know
that I've been a member


pp I I Ib



II I I I

I I
p ofru m r ,o



mado n ate


of this church for 40 years,
but I've been on your side
the whole time." Likewise,
some "clergy" now cham-
pion fornication, adultery
and many other sins -con-
trary to the Word of God.
Those who want to
know God should read His
Book instead of listening
to those who claim to rep-
resent Him. The Bereans
did not even take Paul's
preaching as truth until
they searched the Scrip-
tures. Paul also encouraged
brethren to prove or test all
things. Lumping all or even
most religious leaders to-
gether with the one Jepson
cited is nothing more than
the logical fallacy of "hasty
generalization," which he
surely knows. Talk about
stacking the deck!
-Gary W. Summers
Winter Park

Identifying the silent killer
Can you imagine if every-
one in the state of Florida
walked around with a dis-
ease called "the silent kill-
er" and didn't know it?
Or if every single resident
in New York and California
were at high risk for devel-
oping this "silent killer?"
Nearly 6 million Ameri-
cans are unaware they have
diabetes. Look around you.
One in five Americans is
at risk for Type 2 diabe-


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someone you love?
For many people with
Type 2 diabetes, diagnosis
may come years after onset.
Yet, early diagnosis is criti-
cal to delay or prevent the
debilitating complications
such as heart disease, blind-


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and amputation.
What can you do to stop
diabetes? Know your risk.
Tuesday, March 23 is
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- and join the movement


to stop this terrible disease
- by visiting stopdiabetes.
com or by calling 800-DIA-
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It's time to stop this si-
lent killer once and for all.
-Thomas Kincaid
Longwood


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at www.good-sam.com/kissimmee


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TAX-FREE FOR
GENERATIONS
A Roth IRA also allows
you to leave a tax-free
legacy to your children and
your grandchildren. The
full amount of your Roth
IRA can be spread over
their lifetime and they will
never pay a penny of tax.

FORTUNATELY, YOU
CAN CONVERT AN
IRATO A ROTH
T heT ax Increase Prevention
and Reconciliation
Act (TIPRA) included
provisions for converting a
traditional IRA to a Roth
IRA-significant because it
allows for tens of millions
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AROTH IRAHAS3 BIG
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RSVP at 877-209-0101


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Page 20 Thursday, March 18, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 21


Culture
worthy of your calendar








Third Thursday and a

battle of the sexes


It's Third Thursday!
You definitely want to
check out the "once-a-
month" celebration of fine
art that takes place on the
third Thursday of each
month when the art galler-
ies of downtown Orlando
bring us new exhibits to
view and enjoy. The eve-
ning is one continuous
party with anchors at the
CityArts Factory (corner of


Orange and Pine) and the
Gallery at Avalon Island
(corner of Magnolia and
Pine). The Galleries could
not be more welcoming,
and you don't need to re-
member any of your Art
History 101 to have a good
time. The exhibits open
March 18 at 6 p.m. and will
be available for viewing
until next month's Third
Thursday event.


Among the artists ex-
hibiting this evening, one
of my favorites Brigan
Gresh will open her solo
show at the CityArts Facto-
ry. Her new works are large
mixed-media canvases on
which she examines "the
moment when light and
dark meet." Her opening
is March 18 from 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Keep your eyes
open for the white signs all
around Downtown Orlan-
do. In this economy, you'll
be surprised at the variety
of spaces where artists find
an empty wall on which to
hang and hopefully sell
- their work.

Ballet Battle of the Sexes!
The Orlando Ballet contin-
ues to re-invent itself under
the inspired and forward-
thinking direction of Artis-
tic Director Robert Hill. The
title of this weekend's per-
formances is your first clue
that this is not your grand-


mother's ballet company.
The performances coming
up March 19, 20 and 21
promise world-premiere
choreography and some
serious "body-body" danc-
ing. Called "Battle of the
Sexes," these performances
are bold, sensual and proud
to showcase the dancers'
athletic prowess.
Each performance in-
cludes 14 works with music
by artists as varied as Shir-
ley Bassey, George Michael,
Frank Sinatra and Grace
Jones, among others. The
concept behind "Battle of
the Sexes" comes from Rob-
ert Hill, who possesses the
ability to create ballets that
work to introduce new au-
diences to the medium. He
says, "We aim to present an
exciting, provocative show
which will intrigue ballet
patrons from season-
ticket holders to first-time
audience members. Some
describe it as 'bringing sexy


The Joint is Jumpiny

Lean bou te benefis ofJoitSeplcemntsureryan
tak advantage.offre..J.int.. reenin..- a D.Willa
Roer,- Jr-elbatste pnigo-hsWitrPakofie


WILLIAM D. ROGERS, JR., MD
Orthopaedic Surgery
149 Edinburgh Drive, Suite A
Winter Park, FL 32792

One of Orlando's
most experienced
orthopaedic surgeons,
Dr. Rogers is board
certified in orthopaedic
surgery and a Member
of the American Academy of Orthopaedic
Surgeons. He specializes in a wide range
of orthopaedic surgeries, including total
hip and knee replacement, total shoulder
reconstruction, carpal tunnel, fracture
repair, arthroscopic knee surgery and
rotator cuff repair.

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS.
Appointments may be scheduled
by calling 407-644-1675.


OPEN

HOUSE

2:00-6:30 p.m.

March 24, 2010

Free Joint Screenings

Light Refreshments

RSVP for Joint Screenings:
407-644-1675


Most Major Insurance Plans Accepted


back.' I say it's proving sexy
is already here in dance!"
For tickets or information,
call 407-426-1739 or visit
orlandoballet.org.

Orlando Shakespeare's
Playfest
We have so many reasons
to be proud of our local
Shakespeare company.
Anyone who saw the com-
pany's recent (brilliant)
production of Hamlet can
attest to that. Now "Shakes"
is providing us with an-
other source of pride in
the first week of April in a
Festival of new plays the
company calls Playfest -
The Harriett Lake Festival
of New Plays. Running from
April 2 through April 11,
the Festival includes perfor-
mances, workshops, panels
and play readings as well as
a keynote event featuring
Academy Award-winning
actor Philip Seymour Hoff-
man. Hoffman will take
part in an "Inside the Actors
Studio" type of interview
with Artistic Director Jim
Helsinger during an event
set for Saturday, April 10, at
7:30 p.m.
And there's more: The
theater is presenting the
"National New Play Net-
work Rolling World Pre-
miere" of the play "Shot-
gun" byJohn Biguenet.
Shotgun takes place in
New Orleans four months
after Katrina. Other titles
including "The Weird Sis-
ters," "Glassheart," "Once
a Marine," "Citizen Eve,"
and "Time in Kafka" attest
to the diversity of Playfest's
offerings. You want some-
thing new and different?
Then this is the festival for
you. For a complete listing
of plays and events, visit or-
landoshakes.org. Call 407-
447-1700 for tickets.

Goodbye UrbanThink!
Once again we get to blame
the economy for the recent
announcement that the
much-loved UrbanThink!
Bookstore will close at the
end of March. What began
as a small store in 2001
became a literary neighbor-
hood institution offering
books, events, and a real
commitment to the culture
of our community. The Ur-
banThink! legacy will con-
tinue in the UrbanThink!
Foundation, a charitable
organization founded in
2008, which supports vari-
ous community programs.
To thank the community,
UrbanThink! is holding
a clearance sale with 35
percent off everything.
Children's books, fiction,
non-fiction ... it's all priced
to clear out the space. Ur-
banThink! is located at 625
E. Central Blvd in Orlando.
Call 407-650-8004 for de-
tails.

TALK
>ToGARRICK
Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer,
educator, and fine art curator. He is a
member of the Curatorial Council for the
Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be
reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com
or 407-522-3906.


Looking for Affordable
Cremation and Burial Plans?
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Join us for a Complimentary Lunch
Wednesday, March 24th
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Winter Park, FL

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer








Page 22 Thursday, March 18, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


ItgeoalNotices eIverneIspape


IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CC-3147
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
KARL STEPHEN, and JOHN DOE, and JANE DOE, as
unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 6 day of
April, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Unit 732, Building 7, The Crest at Waterford
Lakes, a Condominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium thereof record-
ed in Official Records Book 8170, page 1746,
and any amendments thereto, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida; Together
with an undivided interest in the common
elements appurtenant thereto.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a Final
Judgment entered in this cause on March 4, 2010.
DATED this 4 day of March, 2010.
Alex C. Costopoulos, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 0112429
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
3/18, 3/25


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 48-2010-CP-294-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
William H. Brown a/k/a William Hans Brown,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of William
H. Brown a/k/a William Hans Brown, deceased,
whose date of death was December 21, 2009 ,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 North Orange Avenue, Room 340, Orlando, FL
32801. The names and addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal Representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is 3/18/10.

Personal Representative:
Basmattie Brown
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor
P.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790

Nancy S. Freeman
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 968293
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor, P.O. Box 880,
Winter Park, FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
3/18,3/25

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2010-CP-000456-0
Division 1
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JEWEL STEWART OVERSTREET,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Jewel Stew-
art Overstreet, deceased, whose date of death was
February 13, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Ave., Room 340,
Orlando, Florida 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
March 18, 2010.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Sheri Lund Kerney
Attorney for Edward H. Overstreet
Florida Bar No. 263028
1420 E. Concord St.
Orlando, FL 32803
Telephone: (407) 898-5526

Personal Representative:
Edward H. Overstreet
314 Woodgrove Trace
Spartanburg, South Carolina 29301
3/18, 3/25

NOTICE OF SALE OF VESSEL
Pursuant to FL. Stat. 328.17(7) the following de-
scribed vessel(s) will be sold in a public sale to the
highest bidder to satisfy a claim lien by lienor for
labor and/or storage: 1979 MURRAY CHRIS -CRAFT
HIN#: CCH09790M79D251. Owner/ TOMOTHY
J UNGER & JOHN R TILLMAN ORLANO, FL. LH ,
. Lienori BOAT TREE MARINA 4370 CARRAWAY
PLACE SANFORD, FL 407-322-1610. Sale Date:
April 08, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. at 4370 CARRAWAY
PLACE SANFORD, FL 32771. For additional informa-
tion call 407-657-7995.
3/11,3/18


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA004230
FEDERAL TRUST BANK,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
ENRIQUE E. FRANCO MORANTE, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 26, 2010
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash at Seminole, Florida, on APR 27, 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:
BUILDING NO. 15, UNIT NO. 101 OF LAKE-
WOOD PARK, A CONDOMINIUM, ACCORDING
TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM
THEREOF RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK 6100, PAGES 473 THROUGH 551, IN-
CLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SEMI-
NOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated FEB 26 2010
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Linda Rubright
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 217
Boca Raton, FL 33432

"If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator, Ms. Stacy Brady at 2825 Judge
Fran Jamieson Way, Viera, FL 32940; telephone
number 321-633-2171 two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing im-
paired, call the Florida Relay Services at 1-800-
955-8771 (TTY); if you are voice impaired, call the
Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8770."
3/11,3/18

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Number: 2009-CA-033447-0; Division 32A
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
JAMES OWUSU; CLAUDETTE-NORMAN OWUSU,
husband and wife; and SUNTRUST BANK,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: James Owusu
Claudette-Norman Owusu
17822 Olive Oak Way
Orlando, Florida 32820
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint to Foreclose
Mortgage on the following described real property
located in Orange County, Florida, to-wit:
Lot 96 of CYPRESS LAKES PARCELS D AND
L, according to the plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 61, at Page 3, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
has been filed against you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on, Plaintiff's Attorney, whose address is: Swann
& Hadley, P.A., 1031 West Morse Boulevard, Suite
350, Winter Park, Florida 32789, within thirty (30)
days from the first date of publication, and file
the original with the Clerk of the Court of Orange
County either before service on Plaintiff's attorneys,
or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for relief demanded in the
Complaint.
Please contact Court Administration at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, Telephone:
(407) 836-2000 within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice. If you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 9th
day of March, 2010.
LYDIA GARDNER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: TENYL BRADFORD
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
Copy furnished to:
Jeffry R. Jontz
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
1031 W. Morse Blvd., Suite 350
Winter Park, Florida 32789
3/18, 3/25

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
SALE BY CASH AUCTION
THE FOLLOWING UNITS
On March 30, 1010, at Assured Self-Storage, Inc.
to the highest bidder for cash, items contained in
the following units:
D2163 Rose Schulaka- Household Items
D2086 James Bryant Household Items
D1138 Coast to Coast Title Business Items
C2052 Norris Slue Household Items
C1127 Robert Reich Household Items
C1120 Robert Reich Household Items
TO BE HELD AT
510 DOUGLAS AVENUE
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL
ON MARCH 30, 2010
AT 10:00 A.M.
ASSURED SELF-STORAGE, INC.
Assured Self-Storage, Inc. reserves the right to bid
and to refuse or reject any and all bids.
3/11,3/18

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2009-CA-14592; Division 33
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PATRICK QUETANT and JEAN RICHARD LYS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 26 day of April,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. at Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL the undersigned Clerk will offer for sale
the following described real property:
LOT 3, REGENCY PARK, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 15, PAGES 9 AND 10, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-14592-0; Division 33, now pending in the
Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 2 day of March, 2010.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: s/ Eric Jontz
Attorney
ERIC B. JONTZ
Florida Bar No.: 64905


JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157


3/18, 3/25


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010-CP-000424-0
Division PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JEFFERSON L. FLOWERS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JEFFERSON L. FLOWERS, deceased, File Number
2010-CP-000424-0 is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Probate Division, Orlando, Florida 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this Court, WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
March 11,2010.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Michael L. Marlowe, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 157000
Marlowe & Weatherford, P.A.
1150 Louisiana Avenue, Ste. 4
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 629-5008

Personal Representative:
Jefferson S. Flowers
117 Whitecaps Circle
Maitland, Florida 32751
3/11, 3/18

Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the Divi-
sion of Corporations, Department of State, State of
Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Needle Rat Press
under which the undersigned expects to engage in
business at
3826 Windway Ct
Orlando, FL 32817
and that the party interested in said business enter-
prise is as follows:
Kyoko Blanchard
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 18th day of
March, 2010
3/18

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2009-CA-030560-0
FIRSTBANK PUERTO RICO d/b/a FIRSTBANK
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
AP/GRUPO ARCENIO PENA, INC., I, FRANCISCO
ARCENIO PENA, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION
NO. 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION NO.
2, and CHATHAM PLACE AT ARBOR MEADOWS
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO
45.031, FLA. STAT.
To Defendants AP/GRUPO Arcenio Pena, Inc.,
Francisco Arcenio Pena, Unknown Tenant
in Possession No. 1 (now known as Francisca
Dominguez), Unknown Tenant in Possession No. 2
(now known as Braulio Dominguez) and Chatham
Place at Arbor Meadows Homeowners Association,
Inc., and all others whom it may concern: Notice is
hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on March 9, 2010, in Case No.
2009-CA-030560-0 in the Circuit Court of the Ninth
Judicial Circuit In and For Orange County, Florida,
in which FirstBank Florida is the Plaintiff, and AP/
Grupo Arcenio Pena, Inc., et al., are Defendants, I,
the Orange County Clerk of the Court, will sell at
public sale the following described real property
located in Orange County:
Lot 120, Chatham Place at Arbor Meadows,
according to the plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 63, Page 39, of the Public Records
of Orange County, Florida.
The sale will be held on April 29, 2010, at 11:00
a.m. to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Room 350, Orlando, Florida 32801. Any person
claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property owner as of the date
of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
Dated this 9th day of March, 2010

Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
Post Office Box 1391
Orlando, FL 32802-1391
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
Facsimile: (407) 423-7014
Attorneys for Plaintiff
/s/Michael C. Caborn
Michael C. Caborn
Florida Bar No. 162477
3/18, 3/25

Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the highest
bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999

Sale date April 2, 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
19681983 Palm hs vin#: 23610787S tenant: nicole
lynn oglesby

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
3/18, 3/25

Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the high-
est bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999

Sale date March 26, 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
19651983 Comm hs vin#: GH07707A tenant: johnh
s donahue

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
3/11,3/18


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 48-2008-CA-017509-0
SPACE COAST CREDIT UNION, a State Chartered
Credit Union,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MELISSA J. TEACHWORTH, LYNN TEACHWORTH,
FOREST AVENUE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION,
INC., a Florida corporation, and THE UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO 45.031,
FLA. STAT.
To Defendants MELISSA J. TEACHWORTH, LYNN
TEACHWORTH, FORESTAVENUE CONDOMINIUMAS-
SOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation, THE UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA and all others whom it may
concern: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 3,
2010, in Case No.: 48-2008-CA-017509-0 in the
Circuit Court of the Ninth Judicial Circuit In and For
Orange County, Florida, in which Space Coast Credit
Union is the Plaintiff, and Melissa J. Teachworth, et
al., are the Defendants, I, the Orange County Clerk
of the Court, will sell at public sale the following de-
scribed real property located in OrangeCounty:
UNIT 1, FOREST AVENUE CONDOMINIUM,AC-
CORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDO-
MINIUM RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK 7244, PAGE 2610 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA;
TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST
IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS AS SET FORTH
THEREIN
The sale will be held on April 9, 2010, at 11:00
a.m. to the highest and best bidder for cash, at
the Orange County Courthouse, 425 North Orange
Avenue, Room 350, Orlando, Florida 32801, in
accordance with 45.031, Fla. Stat. Any person
claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
Dated this 3rd day of March, 2010.

WINDERWEEDLE, HAINES, WARD & WOODMAN,
P.A.
390 North Orange Avenue, Suite 1500
Post Office Box 1391
Orlando, Florida 32802-1391
Attorneys for Space Coast Credit Union
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
Fax: (407) 423-7014
/s/ Michael C. Caborn
Michael C. Caborn
Florida Bar No. 0162477
3/11,3/18

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE No. 59-2009-CA-005875
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY
AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME
MORTGAGE INVESTMENT TRUST 2007-1,
MORTGAGE-BACKED NOTES AND GRANTOR TRUST
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
GINA CAROLLO, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Anthony Marino
RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 443 Club Drive, Winter
Springs, FL 32708
AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through,
under, or against the aforesaid defendant(s).

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following described
property located in Seminole County, Florida:
LOT 55, CYPRESS CLUB, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOFAS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
33, PAGE(S) 25 AND 26, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this
action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A., attorneys for
plaintiff, whose address is 1499 W. Palmetto Park
Rd, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486, and file the
original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days
after te f p the first publication of this notice, otherwise
a default may be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
This notice shall be published once a week for
two consecutive weeks in The Winter Park-Maitland
Observer.
DATED: MAR 3 2010
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Chris Wright
Deputy Clerk of the Court

If you are a person with a disability who needs
accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, for
the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administration at 301 N. Park Avenue,
Sanford, Florida 32771, telephone number (407)
665-4227, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this document; If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771.
3/11, 3/18

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CC-3564
DIVISION: #73
WATERFORD TRAILS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
JOSEPH C. PECORARO, JASON PECORARO, JOHN
DOE and JANE DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 13th day
of April, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Courts will
offer for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 104, Waterford Trails Phase 1, accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 56, Pages 81 through 91, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on February
25, 2010.
DATED this 2nd day of March, 2010.
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 381144
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
3/18, 3/25










iIq t fl/ ollJ t ll -,.)I:i ll


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-23690
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARCUS JOHNSON and SAGUINN JOHNSON and
STATE OF FLORIDA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 15th day of April
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
LOT 10, HIAWASSEE OAKS, UNIT 3,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 25 PAGE 68,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
08-CA-23690 now pending in the Circuit Court in
Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this: 4th day of March, 2010.
By: /s/ ERIC B. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
3/18, 3/25

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2010-CP-443-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GINA MARIE MARCHETTI A/K/A GINA MARIE
FURLAN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Gina Marie
Marchetti a/k/a Gina Marie Furlan, deceased,
whose date of death was December 7, 2008, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 340, Orlando, FL
32801. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
March 18, 2010.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Jacob L. Marchetti
Florida Bar No. 0991726
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794 1251
Telephone: (407) 645 4833
Fax: (407) 645 4832

Personal Representative:
Jacob L. Marchetti
2645 Talladega Drive
Orlando, Florida 32836
3/18, 3/25


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 48-2009-CA-023631-0; Division 39
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
GARY J. CAMARDA and THE UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 22nd day of April,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
Lot 21, Block B, WILMOT PINES, according
to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book G,
Page 139, of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2009-CA-023631-0; Division 39, now pending
in the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 10th day of March, 2010.
By: s/ Robert J. Fraxedas
Robert J. Fraxedas, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 20888
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
ROBERT J. FRAXEDAS
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
3/18, 3/25

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2010-CP-477-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM RAMIREZ, JR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of WILLIAM
RAMIREZ, JR., deceased, whose date of death was
October 25, 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court
for ORANGE County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue (P.O.
Box 4994), Orlando, FL 32801. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
March 18, 2010.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
JOHN D. MAHAFFEY, JR
Attorney for Robert M. Ramirez
Florida Bar No. 098690
Law Offices of Mahaffey and Leitch
2461 West SR 426, Suite 1001
Oviedo, FL 32765
Telephone: (407) 366 8708
Fax: (407) 366 8149

Personal Representative:
Robert M. Ramirez
4400 Suntree Boulevard
Orlando, Florida 32817
3/18,3/25


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789
CITY OF WINTER PARK
NOTICE OF INTENT AND
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


Notice is hereby given that the City of Winter Park intends to use the uniform method for collecting
special assessments within the platted area defined as Granville Drive and Williams Drive, within the
municipal boundaries of the City of Winter Park to fund the City's undergrounding of the neighborhood
electrical/BHN facilities.
Notice is further given that the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida will hold a Public
Hearing at the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida
32789 on April 12, 2010 at 3:30 or soon thereafter to consider adoption of a Resolution expressing
its intent to use the uniform method for collecting the assessments levied against certain properties
along Granville Drive and Williams Drive.
"If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105)
"Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting."
/s/
Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk
3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789
CITY OF WINTER PARK
NOTICE OF INTENT AND
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CITTU or (CTLEtO IRIRTfC

Notice is hereby given that the City of Winter Park intends to use the uniform method for collecting
special assessments within the platted area defined as Golfview Terrace and North Park Avenue,
within the municipal boundaries of the City of Winter Park to fund the City's undergrounding of the
neighborhood electrical/BHN facilities.
Notice is further given that the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida will hold a Public
Hearing at the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida
32789 on April 12, 2010 at 3:30 p.m. or soon thereafter to consider adoption of a Resolution express-
ing its intent to use the uniform method for collecting the assessments levied against certain proper-
ties abutting Golfview Terrace and North Park Avenue.
"If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105)
"Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting."
/s/
Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk
3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

2009 CRA Annual Report Notice
City of Winter Park
. .......- Economic Development/CRA Department
In accordance with s. 163.356(3)(c), Florida Statutes, the annual report for the City of Winter Park
Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) has been filed with the City of Winter Park and Orange
County. The report is available for inspection during regular business hours in the office of the Clerk of
the County Commission, as well as in the office of the CRA located at 401 Park Avenue South, Winter
Park, Florida, 407-599-3203. For questions, please contact Nicholaus Vollman via e-mail at nvollman@
cityofwinterpark.org or by calling 407-599-3695. This report includes information on the activities for
the preceding fiscal year, and a complete financial statement setting forth assets, liabilities, income
and operating expenses as of the end of fiscal year 2010.
Publish Dates: Thursday, March 11,2010
Thursday, March 18, 2010
3/11, 3/18






Thursday, March 18, 2010 Page 23


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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA001754
NATTY MAC CAPITAL,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
PABLO CHOEZ, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 3, 2010 in
the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on May 6, 2010, at
11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301 N.
Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following de-
scribed property:
Lot 115, Bentley Woods; according to the plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 41, Pages
79 through 82, inclusive, Public Records of
Seminole County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated MAR 04 2010
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By TINA SMITH
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 217
Boca Raton, FL 33432
"If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator, Ms. Stacy Brady at 2825 Judge
Fran Jamieson Way, Viera, FL 32940; telephone
number 321-633-2171 two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing im-
paired, call the Florida Relay Services at 1-800-
955-8771 (TTY); if you are voice impaired, call the
Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8770."
3/11,3/18



Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 713.585(6) F.S. United American
Lien & Recovery as agent with power of attorney
will sell the following vehicle(s) to the highest
bidder subject to any liens; net proceeds deposited
with the clerk of court; owner/lienholder has right to
hearing and post bond; owner may redeem vehicle
for cash sum of lien; all auctions held in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lienor facility; cash or
cashier check; 15% buyer prem; any person inter-
ested ph (954) 563-1999
Sale date April 9 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
21764 2000 Toyota vin#: 4T1BF28K5YU094921
lienor: fltv Ic david maus toyota 1160 rinehart rd
sanford fl 407-831-9788 lien amt $1957.15
sale date April 16, 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
21794 2000 Dodge vin#: 2B4FP25BOYR669783
lienor: transmatic inc zembowers high tech auto
956 e altamonte dr altamonte sprgs fl 407-831-
5620 lien amt $2705.18
21795 1993 Toyota vin#: JT5ST871KPO137894
lienor: fltv Ic david maus toyota 1160 rinehart rd
sanford fl 407-831-9788 lien amt $1957.15
21796 1992 Isuzu vin#: 4S2CY58Z4N304300
lienor: Im automotive repair 1150 belle ave #105
winter springs fl 407-936-4388 lien amt $4814.32
21797 1997 Chevrolet vin#: 1G1JF5244V7159420
lienor: extreme auto repair & perforamnce 609 w
27 st sanford fl 407-328-5871 lien amt $2725.13
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
3/18


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,~0"';;







Page 24 Thursday, March 18, 2010 Winter Park / Maitland Observer
U


Winter Park Presbyterian Church


'ou aha nuited .


Special Services & Events
Palm Sunday, March 28:
8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 a.m.

Labyrinth Holy Week,
Monday Friday, 9:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
A personal journey through the
passion of Christ

Maundy Thursday, April 1
Service with Communion 7:00 p.m.


Our Regular Services
Sun. 8:30 a.m. Early
Sun. 9:45 a.m. Contemporary
Sun. 11:00 a.m. -Traditional

Sunday School
Sun. 9:45 a.m.

Youth Fellowship
Sun. 5:00 p.m.


Good Friday Service,
April 2- 7:00 p.m.


ANNUAL EASTER EGG HUNT
Sat., April 3, 9:30 a.m.

Easter Services, Sunday, April 4
Sunrise-6:30 a.m.
Bring flashlight & towel
Regular 8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 a.m.

Vacation Bible School
June 21 25 9:00 12:00 noon
400 South Lakemont Ave.
Winter Park, FL 32792
Phone: 407.647.1467
www.winppc.org


TlAaJ<> YbtLJb r Y The businesses, organizations and individuals below have chosen to support your local
Chamber of Commerce again in 2010 by renewing their membership. Please join us in
thanking them for their investment in our community the next time you shop, eat, or call
on their place of business.


CIIAMBER OF COMMERCE


Adventist Health System
AGIS Florida Agency, LLC
*. Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens
Ruth Anne Arch
*- BankFirst
BB&T Bank
Beasley & Henley Interior Design
*: Bebe's
*: Bella
* Best Western Mt. Vernon Inn
Beta Center
* Bosphorous Turkish Cuisine
Bright House Networks, LLC
Deloris (Dee) Burke
Burns Appraisal, Inc.
Representative Dean Cannon
Carly Ane's Floral Studio, Inc.
Centra Care Florida Hospital Urgent Care
* Christian Science Reading Room
Clanton, Floyd & Nestor CPA Firm
Classic Creations Catering, Inc.
CNL Bank
CoAdvantage
Consensus Communications, Inc.
Cooper, Simms, Nelson & Mosley Insurance
Dales Gas Appliance Repair
+ DownEast Orvis
* Earth Inspired Livin, LL
+ Eileen Fisher
ep3, inc.
- Eyes & Optics
Fannie Hillman & Associates


Florida Gas Transmission Co.
Frank A. Hamner, P.A.
Frank Denis State Farm Agent, CPCU
Don Gallagher
SGary Lambert Salon and Spa
A. Anthony Giovanoli
Gomez Construction Company
Grace Title, Inc.
* Great American Land Investment Co.
Saundra Hester
* Home Resource Gallery
Houston's Restaurant
Hubbard Construction Co.
+ Jacobson's
Jewett Orthopaedic Clinic PA.
Lamm & Company Partners
Lewis-Cobb Pest Control
+* Luma on Park
Lykes Insurance, nc.
-. Marvld A Hair St


*: Reynolds & Co. Jev
RLF
*:1 Rollins College
Ruggiero, Martinez &
Mary Rumberger
Ruth Rushing
S & W Kitchens. Inc.


cannibal
quarsz
Wing Tasting
&
Business
After Htours


Presented by:

MERCANTILE BANK

Street Party on New England Avenue
(between Virginia & Pennsylvania)
Featuring:
40+ Wine & Beer Samples
Hors d'oeuvres from Hannibal Square
merchants
Live Entertainment by The Redcoats
Thursday, March 18 5:30 to 8:00 p.m.
Tickets are $25 at the door


)F WINTER PARKA


Presented by:


CenturyLink-


Save the Date!
Wednesday, April 21 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Winter Park Farmers' Market


received throughout this campaign were overwhelming.
I am so grateful for the trust you have placed in me. I
will honor your trust, and I will keep an open door for
all my neighbors here in Winter Park.
Carolyn Cooper

Political advertisement paid for and approved by Carolyn Cooper for Winter Park Commission, Seat 3.


Page 24 Thursday, March 18, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer




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