Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00066
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: December 24, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00066
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

00001-07-2010 ( PDF )


Full Text



Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 22, No. 1
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net

FIRST COLONY

w, -BANK
Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
UMember FDIC


Business Briefs............A4
Community Bulletin........A4
City Talks ................A5
Jepson .. ............ A12
Play On! ................A13
Legals ................ A14
Marketplace/Games .....A15


Thursday, January 7, 2010


50N+ tax
Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL
BANK & TRUST
On the corer of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
407-622-8181 www.CNBT-FL.com
o it i C ,


bb


Local experts weigh in on
what Winter Park, Maitland

and the state should expect A
economy-wise this year.


Centra


ABRAHAM ABORAYA
GUEST REPORTER
So what's 2010 going to
hold for the economy? The
short answer: Recovery will
continue, but Florida will
lag behind the rest of the
country.
Experts are pointing
down a simple path. The
Gross Domestic Product will
begin to rise, signaling that


businesses are doing better.
That's already happening.
But businesses won't re-
spond to doing better by
increasing hiring and ex-
panding. Instead, most will
likely continue to shed jobs
through 2010.
"I think the recovery will
continue, but it's going to be
weak," said Sean Snaith, the
director of the Institute for


Economic Competitiveness
at UCF. "Florida is going to
lag the national recovery. I
think it's going to be rela-
tively muted in 2010."
Here's what a handful of
industry experts say about
what to expect in 2010:

The world's scariest bubble
Snaith sees anotherproblem
on the horizon in Florida.


He's worried about the
commercial real estate mar-
ket. Ever noticed how many
strip malls or malls in
general are sitting half
empty? This is bad for Flor-
ida, and the Florida banks
who lent the money to build
them.
Snaith said he predicts

> turn to FORECAST on A2


Report: shooting justified


ABRAHAM ABORAYA
GUEST REPORTER
When Maitland Police of-
ficers Steve Mendez and
Rebecca Denicola arrived
at the house at 241 Domer-
ich Drive with their guns
drawn, police dispatch had
warned them that a son was
attacking his mother with a
pitch fork.
According to a police re-


Ue


port written by Denicola,
when they entered, they
heard a moan from the left
side of the house. They came
into the kitchen, which was
covered in blood with a trail
of it leading down the stairs.
As Mendez walked down
the stairs to the master bed-
room, he heard the sound of
what he described as "flesh
being stabbed."
In the bedroom, 18-year-


old Alex May was on top of
his naked mother. Mendez
told him to drop the weap-
on. Alex looked up at him,
smirked, and plunged the
16-inch barbecue fork into
his mother, Diana May.
Officer Mendez shot and
killed Alex on Aug. 4, and
last month, the State Attor-
ney's Office cleared Mendez
in the shooting. And for the
> turn to SHOOTING on A4


Help us welcome Dr. Parramoure!
Our practice continues to grow with the addition of Dr. Marc Parramoure to our group.
Dr. Parramoure has over 15 years of experience in all aspects of Family Dentistry. He has practiced in
Orlando for several years and we welcome him to our dental team. He looks forward to meeting you!


Fairwater Dental Group has moved to a new state-of-the-art facility located across from Subway at the flashing light, near Edgewater Drive.


es,


MAY


94922 95II642
0" 9 49 22 '9 5 6 42"2










Road design has pedestrians in mind


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER
Orlando ranks as the na-
tion's most deadly metro-
politan area for pedestrians,
but cities such as Winter
Park are working to change
that.
Metro Orlando made
up of Lake, Osceola, Orange
and Seminole counties is
No. 1 on a national report
that includes three more
Florida metro areas as its
top four: Tampa, Miami and
Jacksonville.
The report, Dangerous by
Design, released by a coali-
tion of transportation pol-
icy groups called Transpor-
tation for America, founded
its rankings on the Pedes-
trian Danger Index. The in-
dex is based on the rate of
pedestrian deaths relative
to the average amount of
walking.
Metro Orlando has a
pedestrian fatality rate of
2.9 pedestrian deaths per
100,000 residents, despite a
very low proportion of resi-
dents walking to work, only
1.3 percent, according to
the report.
"In other words, the few
people who do walk to work
in Orlando face a relatively
high risk of being killed by
traffic," the report states.
Orange County had 66
pedestrian fatalities in 2007
and 2008, Lake County had
18, Osceola 17 and Semi-
nole 14. That's 115 deaths
in two years in the area.


One of the reasons Flor-
ida is so dangerous for pe-
destrians is that the road
system was designed for
cars, not people. David
Goldberg, communications
director for Transportation
for America, said the streets
are made for driving quickly,
with few traffic calming ele-
ments, for example speed
bumps and lower speed lim-
its.
Elements such as cross-
walks, median islands, side-
walks and even trees are
designed out of plans to en-
sure faster traffic, according
to the report. That leaves no
choice for pedestrians but
to navigate the busy roads
that lead to commercial ar-
eas.
"It puts them in a perilous
position," Goldberg said.
Orange County Commis-
sioner Bill Segal said part
of the blame goes on the
economy. Three years ago
the county had $35 million
set to be dedicated to spend
on pedestrian safety, but the
money dried up.
Segal, who was just elect-
ed chairman of Metroplan
Orlando, an agency to de-
cide where transportation
directed state and federal
money goes, said he's going
to be focused on spending
some of that money on pe-
destrian safety. He has plans
to add more crosswalks and
improve road lighting.
Despite the bad label on
the Orlando metro area,
Winter Park "is the excep-
tion," Goldberg said.
"Winter Park was de-


PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS -THE OBSERVER
The streets of Winter Park, shown above, are designed to slow traffic and have few multiple-lane roads to cross, its mayor said.


signed to be community-
oriented," said Ken Bradley,
Winter Park's mayor.
The fact that the city has
an older "main street" style
design that slows traffic and
has few multiple-lane roads
to cross, makes it "safe by
design." Bradley said the
city continues to look into
more sidewalks, trails, paths
and crosswalks to make it a
safe place for pedestrians.
Avid runner and Winter
Park resident Aileen Pita
said that the city was a bet-
ter place to run than down-
town Orlando, but she
didn't feel totally safe.
"It's pretty dangerous, a
lot of the time I have to run


on the street because there
is no sidewalk," she said.
She thought more trails
in Winter Park would be a
good idea for pedestrians.
Doug Kinson, Maitland's
mayor, has implemented
similar constructions to
make his city safer. He's
also set up an accessibility
and mobility committee to
research and plan ways to
make the area safer for bik-
ers and pedestrians.
Kinson said it's long-term
planning that will solve the
problem of pedestrian safe-
ty in Central Florida. He
plans to have all future con-
struction in Maitland cor-
rect dangerous areas and


new developments be pe-
destrian and biker friendly.
Seminole County already
has the trails to make it safe
for pedestrians and bikers,
said Bob Dallari, county
commissioner.
Dallari said that although
they've got the trails cov-
ered, there are improve-
ments to make. The county
is focused on adding bridges
and tunnels to make cross-
ing busy intersections and
going along large roads
safer, sidewalks and cross-
walks.
"You can ride from one
end of the county to the
other on trails; I do it all the
time myself," he said.


FORECAST I From exchange rates and banks to employment, 2010 looks better


< continued from the front page

that, in 2010, a number of
smaller banks will fall in
Florida because of a rise in
commercial real estate de-
faults.
"Generally, there's this
commercial real estate crisis
that's going to begin to fully
manifest itself in 2010,"
Snaith said. "This is not
necessarily investments in
mortgage-backed securities.
A lot of it is just bad loans,
non-performing loans, that
are going to full-out default
in 2010. It's the commercial
side of what happened in
the (residential) real estate
sector."
If you're worried about
bubbles, Snaith has some
advice look to the side of
the road. The people hold-
ing the spinner signs are
usually the harbingers of
the next bubble.
It used to be real estate.
Now the signs say to sell
your gold, we buy gold, in-
vest in gold. Snaith said it's
a bubble like anything else.
It's going up, but the trick is
to get out before the crash.

Employment
According to Workforce
Central Florida, the unem-
ployment rate in Orange
County dropped from 11.5
percent to 11.2 percent in
2009; regionally, the Greater


Orlando Metropolitan Area
dropped from 11.6 percent
to 11.4 percent.
Sounds like great news.
But not really.
Forecasters at the Florida
Economic Estimating Con-
ference said they expect
the 11 percent unemploy-
ment for almost all of 2010,
but then a slow and steady
decline. How slow? They're
not talking about having
high-side of normal figures
(such as 6 percent unem-
ployment) until 2016.
Currently, more than
99,000 candidates are com-
peting for 804 available po-
sitions.
"Depending on who you
listen to, we're in the start
of a recovery, near the end
of the recession," said Kim-
berly Corenett, a spokes-
woman forWorkforce Cen-
tral Florida. "Employment is
a lagging indicator, so it will
continue to lag as one of the
last signals of recovery."

Housing
The housing market is still
in a decline that will likely
continue through 2010.
Randy Anderson, a How-
ard Phillips Eminent Schol-
ar Chair and real estate pro-
fessor at UCF, said that the
decline is, believe it or not,
a good thing. Just not for
people in the construction
industry.


As prices and home val-
ues continue to drop, they
eventually reach the point
where it makes sense for
people to buy. That clears
out the inventory in the real
estate market and, eventu-
ally, that will create the need
for more housing.
He said he's had students
who have bought homes be-
cause it just makes sense to
do it right now.
"It's a once in a 20-year
buying opportunity," An-
derson said. "The caveat to
that is we don't know when
prices are going to come
back. So don't think you can
buy and sell in 12 months.
You need to be able to hold
for three to five years."

Banking
As an industry closely tied
with the real estate and
housing market, it was hit
hard.
Snaith said that we
should be done seeing big
banks fall. But we will see
smaller ones fall, especially
in Florida.
He said he'd like to see
the government fully im-
plement the Toxic Asset
Relief Program. Right now
banks are getting two sets
of marching orders: from
Washington, it's free up
credit and get the market
rolling. From regulators, it's
fix your books.


Dollar for dollar
The greenback in your
pocket is worth less than it
was two years ago.
And while that isn't a
good thing, it could mean at
least two positives: Tourism
could get a boost through
2010 as people overseas
take advantage of what
their dollar buys in the
U.S. And overseas investors
could start buying homes in
the U.S. to take advantage of
that exchange rate as well.
From the consumer side,
though, it means things are
going to be harder in 2010.
And you can expect energy
costs to rise but not spike
- as well as food costs to
rise.

The stimulus: did it work,
and what does it mean for
2010
The short answer is it de-
pends on who you ask.
So far, it's only been 20
percent spent, and while it's
done a lot to shore up state
budget holes and school
board funding problems,
most of that money hasn't
hit the economy yet.
"It's hard to credit it
for much," Snaith said. "It
helped to fill in some gaps
in budgets at the state and
school level, but the over-
whelming majority of that


money has yet to hit the
economy. That's going to hit
during recovery."

The dollar, inflation, govern-
ment spending and tourism
Sounds like a lot of unrelat-
ed stuff, right? Think again.
Snaith said he's worried
about government spend-
ing and deficits, especially
when it comes to a huge
potential commitment for
health care reform. But he's
not worried about it for the
same reasons the pundits
are shouting about it.
"I don't think [inflation]'s
an issue," Snaith said. "I
think there's sufficient slack
in the economy right now
in terms of unused capacity
that there will be plenty of
time for the reserve to pull
back ... in sufficient tie be-
fore inflation sets in."
But he is worried that
other countries won't buy
government bonds in the
same proportions that they
used to. Snaith called it the
$12 trillion question.
"That is one of the poten-
tial pitfalls that the econo-
my is facing, with the gov-
ernment running such large
budget deficits," Snaith said.
"If this triggers a rise in in-
terest rates, it could choke
off growth and threaten a
nascent recovery."


Page 2 Thursday, January 7, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, January 7, 2010 Page 3


Knights up, down as C-USA play looms


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

A triumphant return to the
UCF Arena was muted a day
later as the Knights fell in
their home Holiday Classic
on Wednesday.
The Knights had domi-
nated Liberty 82-58 in the
first day of the tournament,
with three players scor-
ing in the double digits and
Dave Diakite grabbing 14
rebounds in the game.
From the beginning they
set the pace of the game,
easily building a strong lead
in the first half on aggressive
play by AJ. Rompza, who
scored 12 points, picked up
5 assists and 2 steals in the
game.
After halftime, the
Knights ratcheted up their
scoring, nailing 55.6 percent
on shooting and opening up
a massive gap in the second
half that the Flame couldn't
close.
It was Keith Clanton
doing the rebounding in
the Knights' game against
Jacksonville, picking up 11
boards in their 61-51 loss.
He would pull off a double
double, adding 10 points


as well. Isaac Sosa added 12
points of his own, making
him the scoring leader for
the series.
But early scoring dif-
ficulties would plague the
Knights in that game, ul-
timately proving their
downfall. Dismal shooting
contributed to most of the
Knights' problems in the
second half, as they shot
only 25 percent, down from
an already poor 42.9 percent
in the first half. Both teams
were playing near full court
presses to force bad shots,
with the Knights suffering
the most.
That defensive nightmare
persisted on Jacksonville's
end of the court as well, as
they shot only 26.3 percent
in the second half.
Tuesday the Knights trav-
eled to Ole Miss at press
time.
The Knights return home
at 5 p.m. Saturday to face
Rice in their first conference
matchup of the season. The
Owls are 6-7 so far, com-
ing off a 70-58 loss to Texas
Christian. If the Knights can
keep Rice below 65 points,
their odds of a win increase
dramatically.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Knights forward P.J. Gaynor scored 8 points, including this alley-oop from A.J. Rompza, against Liberty in an 82-58 rout.


CenturyLinkTM
High-Speed Internet


$,


.95
a month when
I you bundle*


"ir ""I blIIon to oUnsi-enul y Ia zya r y sa. i .ice.Call 866.948.6104
yours,10%of the time. for is the price youpay.Click centurylink.com/highspeed
Stop by a CenturyLink Store

Para oir ofertas en espanol marque al
866.948.6104.

Test-drive High-Speed Internet at:
S175 East Altamonte Dr., Altamonte Springs
S3030 East Semoran Blvd., Apopka
S260 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont
S1359 East Vine St., Kissimmee
3244 North John Young Pkwy., Kissimmee





EMBARO is now CenturyLink.




CenturyLink-
Stronger Connected"
*Offer ends 3/31/2010 Offer applies to new Residential High-Speed Internet activations only. The listed High-Speed Internet monthly rate of $195 requires a 24-month term agreement (after which the rate reverts to the then-current standard rate) and subscription to CenturyLink Unlimited Calling plan. Listed rate applies to up to 768 Kbps High-Speed Internet service. An additional
monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable)will apply to customers modem or route Terms and Conditions-Residentialcustomersonly All producs andservices lisedonthisformaregovernedbytariffs, termsofservice, orterms andconditionspostedatcenturylinkcorn (Webse), incorporatedhere,andprovidedtoyoubytheCenturyLinklocaloperatingcompanyserving yourlocationTaxes,
fees, andsurcharges-Applicabletaxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, NationalAccess Fee surcharge, a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees thatvary by area and certa in in-state surcharges Cost recovery fees are nottaxes or governmentrequired charges for use Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates Call 866 9607089
fora listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges General-Services and offers not ava ilable everywhere CenturyLink may change or cancel services or substitute similar services at its sole discretion without notice Offer, plans, and stated rates are subject to change and may vary by service area Requires credit approval and deposit may be required Additional restrictions apply Monthly Rate-Monthly rate applieswhile
customer subscribes to a II qualifying services If one (1) or more services is cancelled, the standard monthlyfee will apply to each remaining service High-Speed Internnt (HSI)- Early termination will result in customer being responsible for payment of the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied bythe number of months remaining inthe minimum service period, up to $200 Professional installation of modem or router
kits is available for an additional monthly fee Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed Consistent speed cla im as well as cla im that your connection to CenturyLink's network is 100% yours is based on CenturyLink providing HSI subscribers with a dedicated, virtual circuit connection to the CenturyLink central office Unlimited Calling -Applies to one (1) residential phone
line with direct dial local and nationwide voice calling, designated calling features, and unlimited nationwide long distance services; excludes commercial use, dial up Internet connections, data service, facsimile, conference lines, directory and operator assistance, chat lines, pay per call, calling card use, or mu ti housing units International calling billed separately at rates listed at Website To recer e long distance plan rates, you
must choose EMBARQ Long Distance, Inc as your IntraLATA and InterLATA toll carrier @2010 CenturyTel, Inc All Rights Reserved The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyTel, Inc All other marks are the property of their respect e owners
IM J' tt


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Business Briefs


Thurston House, the only bed &
breakfast accommodation in the Mai-
tland/Winter Park area, has launched
a brand new Web site, www.thurston-
house.com. Designed using all the
latest in technology, it is built around
a Word Press blog. It has information
about the inn and its history, many
new photographs, extensive informa-
tion about this area of Central Florida,
local city & business links, and online
reservations.


At Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kan-
tor, & Reed, P.A. it's not typical to see
employees wearing jeans and sneak-
ers. But during the firm's United Way
campaign held in October, employees
paid for the privilege of dressing ca-
sual and helping to raise more than
$100,000 for Heart of Florida United
Way (HFUW) 2009-2010 campaign.

NAI Realvest made a big jump in


rankings of Central Florida Com-
mercial Property firms recently. The
annual Book of Lists, published by
Orlando Business Journal, ranked NAI
Realvest as the area's second largest
commercial property firm with 253
lease transactions and 70 sales that
totaled $471.6 million.

Ashmore Equestrian Center, Inc., a
premier equine facility located in Apo-
pka, which services dozens of Winter


Park and Maitland residents, is proud
to announce the esteemed appoint-
ment and certification by the British
Horse Society (BHS) as an approved
livery and riding/training establish-
ment facility. It is one of the select
few BHS approved riding and train-
ing facilities in North America, and
the only approved facility in Florida.
Ashmore Equestrian Center is located
at 7700 Stone Road. For further infor-
mation call 407-718-5917.


The University of Central Florida
provides one of the nation's best val-
ues in education, according to a Ki-
plinger's report published today. UCF
ranked 36th, advancing six spots from
its 2009 position on the magazine's
annual 100-school list of best-value
U.S. public colleges and universities.
The list is available at www.kiplinger.
com/reports/best-college-values.


Community Bulletin


Dr. and Mrs. Preston and Christine
Richmond of Winter Park, Fla. are
pleased to announce the engagement
of their son, Derek Richmond, to Mi-
chelle Veresink, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Theodore and Rosemary Vere-
sink of Easton, Pa. Derek is a 2001
graduate of Winter Park High School
and received a BA from Georgetown
University in 2005. He earned his Juris
Doctorate from The Catholic Univer-
sity of America in 2008 and works as
a criminal defense attorney in Fairfax,
Va. Michelle received a BA in English
and music from Gettysburg College in
2007. She is a graduate student in the
arts management program at Ameri-
can University in Washington, D.C. A


July 2010 wedding is planned.

On Nov. 13, more than 650 com-
munity members attended UCP
of Central Florida's "Faces Behind
the Miracles" fundraising breakfast
to celebrate the triumphs and suc-
cesses of UCP's students and clients.
Sponsored by Dr. Donald and Mrs.
Cindy Diebel, the annual breakfast
came close to setting an event record
by raising $486,000 in one-time gifts
and multi-year pledges. UCP's next
fundraising event, An Evening at the
Palace, is scheduled for March 6 at
the Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa.
For information on UCP's gala, go to
UCPGala.com.


Rep. Bryan Nelson announces to-
day that constituents of District 38
should be informed of the new docu-
mentation requirements for Florida
residents wishing to obtain a driver
license or identification card. This in-
cludes those looking to obtain a new
card, legally change his or her name
prior to the renewal date or replace
a lost or stolen card. Such services
must be obtained at a driver license
office and show proof of 1) identifica-
tion 2) Social Security number 3) Proof
of residential address (2 items). For
those simply looking to renew their li-
cense, they may still do so online. The
Florida Department of Highway Safe-


ty and Motor Vehicles has created a
website,GoGatherGet.Com, to provide
useful information about these impor-
tant changes, as well as guidance on
how to obtain such documents.

This holiday season agents at the
Winter Park real estate office, Kelly
Price & Company, teamed up to en-
sure more than 30 teenagers from
Maitland's Intervention Services could
enjoy a brighter Christmas. They were
given Christmas presents in the form
of gift cards and Lynx bus passes. For
more information visit www.founda-
tionforfosterchildren.org.


SHOOTING I Maitland's deputy chief says officer's actions saved Diana May's life


< continued from the front page

first time, the upper ech-
elons of the Maitland Po-
lice Department are talking
publicly about the event.
"Quite frankly, [Men-
dez] saved [Diana May]'s
life," said Maitland Police
Department Deputy Chief
Bill McEachnie. "I'm sure
it's hard for a mother to
understand that. It's a trag-
edy all the way around. It's a
tragedy for the mother, the
son and the police depart-
ment."
Diana survived the at-
tack by her son, but she told
investigators that Mendez
didn't ask her son to drop
his weapon before he shot
Alex. McEachnie said that


the Maitland Police Depart-
ment, the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement
and the State Attorney's Of-
fice all reached the conclu-
sion that Mendez did issue
an order to Alex before he
shot him.
McEachnie said that even
if Mendez hadn't told Alex
to drop the weapon, it still
would have been considered
a legal and lawful shooting
because Diana's life was in
danger.
"It wasn't a significant
part of the review," McEach-
nie said.
Diana May didn't return
several phone calls request-
ing an interview, and sever-
al attempts to reach her on
the phone number listed as


her work phone failed.
During the 911 phone
call, Diana May seems calm
for the first few minutes,
telling police dispatchers
that her son was psychot-
ic and had stabbed her. In
the end, though, she starts
screaming "He's got a big
fork," and screams "don't
do it" four times before the
phone is dropped, buttons
are pressed and the line
goes dead.
Mendez also declined to
be interviewed for this ar-
ticle. McEachnie said that
Mendez wasn't on paid ad-
ministrative leave for long
and has been back to work.
"He's dealing with it as
well as can be expected
of someone who had to


make the decision he did,"
McEachnie said.
Denicola, who was first
on-scene with Mendez,
was involved in another
shooting on Dec. 22, 2008.
Denicola shot and critically
wounded a schizophrenic
man with the mental age of
a 9-year-old, causing him to
require a colostomy as a re-
sult.
A grand jury said that
Denicola acted appropri-
ately in the incident, but
said a lack of communica-
tion from the dispatchers
significantly contributed to
the incident, according to
a grand jury report criticiz-
ing Maitland Police and the
Apopka dispatchers. Police
had responded to the house


four times prior to the
shooting.
After Alex May was shot
and lying on the floor, Deni-
cola wrote in her report that,
while lying on the floor cov-
ered in blood, Diana said:
"Alex, you're in trouble now.
Look what you've done."
McEachnie said that po-
lice officers don't get to
choose what calls they re-
spond to.
"The only message, I
think, is the officer acted ex-
actly as he had to based on
the circumstances present
that day," McEachnie said.
"It's not something anyone
wants to face, but when you
take the oath to be a police
officer, sometimes you have
to make that choice."


The Observer's Dec. 31 calendar misstated the location of the American Legion Winter Park Memorial Post 112 "Information You Can Use" workshop on
Tuesday, Jan. 12. It will be at Post 112, 4490 N. Goldenrod Road in Winter Park. See this week's calendar for more information.


SWinter Park /Maitland

Observer


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Eric Sly
407-563-7054
erics@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-563-7023
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIEDS
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
legal@observernewspapers.com


Volume 22, Issue Number 1


CLASSIFIEDS LISTINGS
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
classified@observernewspapers.com

COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Megan Stokes
megans@eosun.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us


Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com

Josh Garrick
joshgarrick9@gmail.com
407-522-3906

ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-515-2605
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


Member of: PO. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr. USPS 00-6186
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 ISSN 1064-3613
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I Phone: 407-563-7000 I Fax: 407-563-7099 le-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park/Maitland Observer 2010


Published Thursday, January 7, 2010


Page 4 Thursday, January 7, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, January 7, 2010 Page 5


JAN 11 CITY COMMIS-
SION MEETING TOPICS
OF INTEREST
There will be a City Com-
mission meeting on Mon-
day, Jan. 11, at 3:30 p.m.,
in City Hall Commission
Chambers. Below are a few
topics of interest:
MAYOR'S REPORT:
-Recognition of Kayla
McCulley, a recipient of the
U.S. Fulbright Award
-Employee of the Quar-
ter presentation to Jose-
phine Leeks
-Commission agenda
structure and feedback on
changes
-Commission meeting
length
CITY MANAGER'S REPORT
-Winter Park in the Park
Ice Rink
CITY ATTORNEY'S RE-
PORT
-Scheduling of an execu-
tive session
NON-ACTION ITEMS
CITIZEN COMMENTS
CONSENT AGENDA
-Approve the minutes of
Dec. 14.
ACTION ITEMS REQUIRING
DISCUSSION
-Purchase of the remain-
ing portion of the parking


Maitland anticipates great
accomplishments in the
New Year. I asked each
of our city departments
to provide their outlook
on what their resolutions
would be in the coming
year. Here are just a few
of each department's
resolutions:

Community
Development/CRA
Our Downtown
Community
Redevelopment Area will
be busy in 2010 now that
the futures of our city hall
and fire station are set.
With respect to the CRA,
the city looks to update the
Downtown Master Plan in
preparation for prudent
future development that
will get us one step closer
to a real pedestrian-friendly
downtown. In addition, the
CRA resolves to streamline
the development review
process, making it easier
and more timely for
applicants.
From a community
development perspective,
resolutions include the


piazza on New England and
Pennsylvania avenues
-Rules and standards for
Parks & Recreation rate ad-
justments/fee waivers/fee
schedules.
-Post office decision
points
PUBLIC HEARINGS
-Second reading of the
ordinance to annex 1807,
1810,1850,1911 and 1922
Stonehurst Road and the
East Kings Way and Stone-
hurst Road rights-of-way
-First reading of the ordi-
nance requiring a superma-
jority vote
-First reading of the ordi-
nance establishing a policy
for the automatic advance-
ment of citizen board alter-
nates to regular positions in
the event a regular member
of the board vacates his or
her position prior to the ex-
piration of his or her term
-First reading of the ordi-
nance regarding Land De-
velopment Code revisions
CITY COMMISSION REPORTS
-Commissioner Ander-
son
Winter Park Historical
Association request for
funding
-Commissioner Dillaha
Audio access to debates
between the four candi-
dates running for the two


successful delivery of
groundbreakings for new
public facilities, as well
as moving ahead with
a number of projects
on the north end of our
downtown including the
Northbridge and Parker
Lumber sites that will
surround the new SunRail
station in our city.
Moving ahead with the
development of a master
plan for the Maitland
Center area west of
Interstate 4 is paramount
to our future financial
stability. Resolving to see
progress in this area is a key
objective for the coming
year.
In addition to pursuing
grants to help offset tax
burdens to our residents,
community development
looks to continue to
improve efficiencies
with building permits,
inspection reporting and
file storage.
And finally, the hopes are
that we can, in 2010, realize
improvements to our
landscape code to include
irrigation and plant related


Commission seats
-Commissioner Diebel
Form-based code update
Howell Branch retention
pond
-Commissioner Bridges
-Mayor Bradley
Proposal for civic venues
along with financial plan
SunRail implementation
Dedicated transporta-
tion funding task force
Naming of a street in
Winter Park honoring Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
You can find the Com-
mission's full agenda and
information on specific
agenda items by logging on
to the city's official Web site
at www.cityofwinterpark.
org and clicking on Gov-
ernment > City Commis-
sion > Packets.

WINTER PARK WEL-
COMES TWO NEW CITY
EMPLOYEES
The City of Winter Park is
pleased to announce the
newest additions to the city
family, Dori DeBord, the
new economic develop-
ment/community rede-
velopment agency (CRA)
director, and Mary Green-
wood, the new human re-
sources manager.
DeBord comes to Winter
Park with over 20 years of
experience in economic de-
velopment and community
planning. Prior to accept-
ing the position in Winter
Park, she worked for the
city of Altamonte Springs,
and Osceola and Semi-
nole counties. In addition,
DeBord brings her experi-

standards that will benefit
our environment.

Police
In 2009, the Maitland
Police Department
accomplished their primary
resolution in the form
of the completion of the
new Police Headquarters.
In 2010, their resolutions
include the revitalization
of the city's community
policing strategies, such as
Neighborhood Watch and
Business Watch, as well as
other community outreach
programs.
In addition, the
department hopes to
achieve accreditation status
for an additional three
years. This is an intensive
look at the department
by the Commission for
Florida Law Enforcement
Accreditation.
And finally, the Maitland
Police Department
resolves to gain significant
manpower increases by
participating in many area
task forces such as the FBI
Violent Crime, the Drug
Enforcement Agency and
the High-Intensity Drug
Trafficking Task Forces.
This involvement allows
Maitland to leverage area
teams for our residents'
benefit.

Fire
Although their primary
resolution is to see the
beginning of construction
on a new downtown fire
station, the Maitland


ence in private consulting
for site development and
transportation planning to
Winter Park. DeBord led the
effort in the development
of the SeminoleWay Cor-
ridor and the management
of the U.S. Highway 17-92
CRA Corridor.
Winter Park is also proud
to welcome Greenwood,
who comes to warm Win-
ter Park from chilly Bris-
tol, R.I., where she most
recently served as assistant
vice president of human
resources and labor & em-
ployment counsel for Roger
Williams University.
Greenwood brings with
her over 25 years of experi-
ence as an attorney, media-
tor, negotiator, arbitrator,
trainer, law school profes-
sor and human resources
director. She has worked
for a variety of governmen-
tal agencies such as the
cities of Miami Beach and
Hollywood, Fla., Monroe
and Manatee counties, and
Keys Energy Systems. In ad-
dition, many educational
institutions have also ben-
efitted from her diverse
expertise such as Colorado
College, Winthrop Univer-
sity, S.C., the University of
North Carolina-Greens-
boro, Stetson Law School,
Fla., and St. Thomas Law
School, Fla.
Throughout her career,
Greenwood perfected her
skills in conflict resolution
and authored two award-
winning books: "How to
Negotiate Like A Pro", win-
ner of six book awards,
and "How To Mediate Like

Fire Department has
many more resolutions,
including the continuation
of securing grants like
those that have already
been secured for the
enhancement of our
Emergency Operations
Center.
In addition, given
limited available
funding for training, the
Department resolves to
secure more than our fair
share of training funding to
assure our community that
every member of our team
is the best they can be.

Leisure Services
One of the most important
resolutions is to have the
most celebrated Founders
Day ever in our city's
history of 125 years. Leisure
services hopes to do just
that on July 17, 2010.
But in addition, the
department hopes
to deliver on the
recommendations and
implementation of the
Connectivity Task Force,
which was set up to
address the challenges
of pedestrian and biker
connectivity throughout
our city.

Public Works
Our Public Works team
resolves to pursue, in
every way, certification
of our city as a "Green
City" at the gold level,
making us one of an elite
group across the country
with such a distinction.


A Pro" which has won 10
book awards.
Greenwood has a bach-
elor's in English from New
School University, N.Y., and
a master's in English from
University of Southern
California. She also holds
law degrees from California
Western School of Law and
George Washington School
of Law, District Columbia.

SAVE THE DATE FOR THE
ANNUAL WINTER PARK
MAYOR/CITY COMMIS-
SION LUNCHEON
Save the Date! The 2010
Winter Park Mayor/City
Commission Luncheon is
scheduled for Wednesday,
Jan. 13, at 11:30 a.m. at the
Rachel D. Murrah Civic
Center located at 1050 W.
Morse Blvd.
Featuring Mayor Ken
Bradley's annual State of
the City Address and the
Winter Park City Commis-
sioners, you won't want to
miss hearing your elected
officials' plans and visions
for the New Year!
Seats will be $35 for
Chamber Members, $40 for
Non-Chamber Members
and $265 for Corporate
Tables. Reserve your seats
today.
For information, call
the Winter Park Chamber
of Commerce at 407-644-
8281 or purchase tickets
directly on their Web site at
www.winterpark.org.
Visit the city's Web site at
www.cityofwinterpark.org,
find us on Facebook and
follow us on Twitter.

The department also
resolves to expand our
water conservation
program, protecting our
environment even more
than we do today.

Management Services
Long range strategic
planning is a commitment
that assists our city in
preparing for the future.
It has helped us deal with
difficult financial times
and ongoing resolve and
commitment will help us
on into the future.
Management Services
also resolves during
the upcoming year to
increase efficiencies
city-wide by moving
forward the imaging of
records, the consolidation
of equipment and the
utilization of technology
that will make each
employee more efficient
and save the city money.

City Clerk
And last but not least, our
city clerk has one of the
most important resolutions
of the new year in terms
of assisting any resident of
the City of Maitland who is
interested in pursuing and
obtaining the information
to run for a seat on the
Maitland City Council.
For additional
information on the City
of Maitland's initiatives,
please visit our Web site at
www.itsmymaitland.com
or call 407-539-6219.


New Year's resolutions


Winter Park / Maitland Observer












Lifestyles


Four films made by local residents are headed to the Florida Film Festival at Maitland's Enzian in April.


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER
Four local films were select-
ed by a three-member panel
in December at the Enzian
Theater's 18th Annual Brou-
haha Film and Video show-
case. Fourteen films will
now go on to be featured in
the "Best of Brouhaha" at
the 2010 Florida Film Fes-
tival, held at the Enzian in
Maitland on April 9-18.
While the "Best of Brou-
haha" showcase is not com-
petitive, the filmmakers
have the opportunity to en-
ter their films into the Film
Festival separately, which
many have chosen to do.
Here's a chance to get to
know the four local win-
ners:

"The Exposition Report"
University of Central Flori-
da filmmakers Jesse Chap-
man and David Sigurani
garnered the laughs at the
Fest as well with their film,
"The Exposition Report."
The film spoofs nightly
news shows like Dateline,
with the story focused on
a young woman regretting
her decision as a child to


swap out her parents for
new ones using the compa-
ny Pick-a-Parent's service.
Chapman said funny is bet-
ter than sad for short films,
plus he's good at it.
"Comedy to me comes
more naturally. It's a lot eas-
ier to make someone laugh
than cry, especially in a short
time." He's also focused
on storytelling, which can
sometimes be overlooked
when doing a comedy.
"More than anything I
love telling stories ... creat-
ing stories is where my heart
is." Chapman is extremely
proud of this film, which
he said combines both. And
while he wasn't able to at-
tend the Fest, seeing it pre-
sented at UCF as a senior
was one of his favorite mo-
ments of college.

"The Cost"
Full Sail University students
John Hoffler, Mitch Long,
Michael Hamill, Katie Band-
bo and Disco San Andreas
produced a project that
certainly told a story, but
brought anticipation rather
than laughs.
Their film, "The Cost" was
focused around "economic


"The Cost" lead actors Bruce O' Harrow, from left, and Stevie Sculthorpe join pro-
ducers Disco San Andreas and Mitch Long, as they celebrate at the Enzian last month.


hit men" and the lead actor
trying to save his brother
from one. And while tons
of action happens onscreen
in the film, Andreas said
one of the most memorable
and tense moments for the
team happened behind the
scenes. Long was supposed
to bring a copy of the film
the team had revised late
into the night before the
Festival. He forgot it.
"Ten minutes before
the festival we got the film
there," Andreas said. "It
hadn't even been tested."
It was Long's first experi-
ence presenting a film at a
festival, and the last minute
race to get the project there
didn't help his nerves.
"You come up with every
possible thing that could
go wrong, but it was fine,"
Long said. "It was a cool ex-
perience to have for the first
time." The team hopes that
their "large idea" will some-
day become a feature film.

"World on Fire"
Orlando residents Chris
Greider, Matt Hutchens and
Matt Tinleywon their spot at
the FFF with a music video
for Luna Halo's song "World
on Fire." The two Matts met
each other when they were
8, and have been making
films together since, start-
ing with action movies with
their G.I. Joes. They've now
moved on to shooting music
videos, live shows for bands
and short films. Hutchens
favors music videos.
"Music videos allow for
a lot of creativity, with the
subject matter and how it's
accomplished," he said.
The team definitely had
to use their creativity the
band's portion of the video
had to be filmed in only one
night because they were on
tour. For "World on Fire" the
filmmakers shot the entire
video against a green screen
and then added a newspa-


per headline background
proclaiming the world's
end, with a Godzilla-like
creature spewing fire be-
hind the band, all done after
the band was on their way
to the next state.

"Happy Birthday Jesus"
Orlando filmmaker Stanley
Pomianowski's short film
asks the question, "What
if Jesus were alive today?"
Nope, he isn't walking on
water or healing the blind
in this one, he's getting his
very own surprise birthday
party, complete with Christ-
mas carols, a cake featuring
Santa, and gifts for every-
one else in "Happy Birthday
Jesus".
Pomianowski said he


makes "sneaky" Christian
films. "The goal is to make
Christian films that don't
look like Christian films,
that don't feel like Christian
films," he said.
While he said the film
isn't trying to tell people
that giving gifts on Christ-
mas is bad he does it he
is trying to remind people
what it's really about. And
almost as important, mak-
ing them laugh at the same
time. At his Christian col-
lege, most were making
abstract religious films. "I
just wanted to do films that
were funny." Pomianowski
is even thinking of making a
birthday cake for Jesus one
of his own family's holiday
traditions minus Santa.


18TH ANNUAL


Page 6 Thursday, January 7, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, January 7, 2010 Page 7


Winter Park / Maitland Observer

G.O. Family is now part of
Lifestyles, but you'll still see
a family story in every issue!


Family


Calendar A


Public Library, 501 S. Maitland
Ave.:
For more details, contact 407-
647-7700.
At 7 p.m. on Mondays is
Bedtime Stories.
At 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays is
Story time for ages 36 months to
preschoolers.
At 10:30 a.m. on Thursdays
is Story time for babies up to 36
months old.
At 4 p.m. on Thursdays is
Reading Buddies.

The following are events at the
Maitland Jewish Community
Center, 851 N. Maitland Ave.
Visit OrlandoJCC.org for more
information.
-J University session 3
schedule is here. It is from Jan. 18
to March 19. Select from an old
favorite or register for a new class
soon to become an old favorite!
Registration is now open.
-Join in this Mah Jongg
tournament at the JCC Maitland
Campus at 10 a.m. Sunday, Jan.
31.
-The first ever Abigail's Attic
Consignment Shop extravaganza
is coming! Save your "used but
almost new" baby/children's
clothes, toys, books and gear for
sale at Abigail's Attic. Drop off
dates will be Jan. 29 to Jan. 30.
A special pre-sale for consignors
only will be held on Monday, Feb.
1 with Abigail's Attic open to the
general public on Feb. 2-3.

The following events will be held
at Whole Foods Market, 1989
Aloma Ave., Winter Park, FL 32972.
Events, unless otherwise specified,
are free and open to the public.
Reservations required on select
events.
-From 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Thursday, Jan. 21 is Parents
Morning Out. Parents, join us every
third Thursday at the front of the
store to enjoy a complimentary cup
of Allegro coffee, breakfast pastry
and a free five minute massage
compliments of Take 5 Massage!
-From 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Saturday, Jan. 23 is Kids Club: this
is my year to... Make a Colorful
Plate. Kids, join us for a hands-on
class as we create a colorful plate
of food, learning what foods contain
nutrients, fiber and antioxidants
- items that keep our body at
optimal health. Class is for children
ages 6 to 12 and space is limited
to the first 15. All children must be
accompanied by an adult.

The Orlando Museum of Art
(OMA), The Florida Urban
Forestry Council, Orange County
4-H, and the City of Orlando,
present a free program for children
of all ages and their families on
Jan. 22 at 10 a.m. at the OMA. Tim
Womick the modern-day Johnny
Appleseed, is coming to the OMA
for a special family celebration
of Florida Arbor Day. The OMA is
located in Orlando Loch Haven Park
at 2416 N. Mills Ave., Orlando. For
further information, call 407-896-
4231 or visit www.omart.org.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF CATALOOCHEE SKI AREA
The Cataloochee Ski Area in Maggie Valley, N.C., is one family winter vacation spot. There are also great deals on cruises and beach resorts this winter.


Families looking for a winter vacation turn to the professionals


KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS
OBSERVER STAFF

Feeling cooped up by win-
ter blues, blahs and budgets?
Your family could be a click
or phone call away from a
Caribbean cruise or a winter
wonderland thanks to deep
discounts from hotels and
cruise lines.
"Don't think you'll get a
better deal by waiting lon-
ger," said Chris Schwenk,
professional travel consul-
tant of Great Escapes Travel
in Winter Park. "The prob-
lem is air availability. Airline
mergers and flight cancel-
lations can make getting to
those destinations difficult
at the last minute."
Norma Akins, founder of
Affordable Cruise and Travel
in Winter Park said families
save more money if they can
get the kids out of school.
"Vacations tend to be more
expensive when school is
out, less expensive when it's
in," she said.
Mary Delello, owner of All
About Travel in Winter Park
advises every U.S. family
member to have a passport
if considering a cruise.

Cruises and resorts
Winter cruise vacations are
fantastic family options be-
cause they include primary
transportation, lodging,
meals and entertainment.
Delello said Royal Caribbe-
an and Carnival cruise lines
have targeted kid programs
for pre-k to teens, which
give parents a break.
Children younger than
2 can often stay for free at
all-inclusive resorts such as
Sandals or Beaches, where
babysitting services are
available. Generally cruise
ships do not allow children
who are not potty-trained to
be separated from their par-
ents.
Akins advises clients to re-
search pricing for shore ex-
cursions, insurance and port
transfers separately from the
cruise line. "You can save sig-
nificantly by booking those


items with a travel agent or
on your own."

Snowy resorts
A winter vacation spot with
a variety of family activities
work best for families expe-
riencing snowy locales for
the first time. Delello found
that once there, some Flo-
ridians (both children and
adults) find they don't care
for skiing, the cold or the ex-
tra outdoor clothing. Gentler
family-oriented areas such as
Asheville, N.C., Pigeon Forge,
Tenn., Lake George, N.Y and
Stowe, Vt. provide endless
shopping, family entertain-
ment and warmer indoor
activities. For families used
to the colder temperatures,
Park City, Utah has always
been very family-oriented,
said Chris Schwenk. "We can
put together a full package
including air, hotel, ski lifts
and ski instruction. We even
can reserve ski equipment
from your shoe size and
weight."

Other family options
Akins touts fantastic places
to visit in Florida and across


the country by car and rail.
Families form unique bonds
via road trips and state and
national parks provide
unique educational experi-
ences.
"Locally, behind the
scenes at the Central Florida
Zoo, ATV trips in Clermont,
the Orlando Science Center
and WonderWorks (also in
Pigeon Forge) are fantastic
for families," said Akins.
"When you travel as a
family your kids will learn
more from you and the ex-
perience than they will from
a book!"

Caution: Internet ahead
Travel agents advise caution
when researching travel
plans online. "The Internet
is a wonderful hook," said
Chris Schwenk, "but you
don't want to pay $299 for
a cruise and $200 in port
charges.
Except for booking air-
line tickets you should never
pay for an agent to book a
tour or cruise it is compli-
mentary."
Delello agrees. "Our job is
to get you the most for your


travel budget bydoing the re-
search for you. The cheapest
is not always the best deal."
Akins explains that travel
agents are paid by the part-
ners, wholesalers and travel
companies, not the client.
"We use a wide variety of
travel wholesalers who book
thousands of travel arrange-
ments every day and are not
accessible to the public. If
you have a problem, a pro-
fessional travel agent can
help you versus a faceless
name on the Internet."




,l III t .n









www6.pakctco






Thursday, January 7, 2010 Page 9


THRIVE 55 AND BEYOND!




Seniorserver


PHOTO BY ABE ABORAYA THE OBSERVER
Ben Harrison, left, and Aida Rivera, a couple for 26 years, work on a puzzle at the Renaissance Senior Center off Curry Ford Road in Orlando. They visit three times a week.


Orange County operates six senior centers, which offer current events, language and acting programs.


ABRAHAM ABORAYA
GUEST REPORTER
Aida Rivera and Ben Har-
rison visit the Renaissance
Senior Center off of Curry
Ford Road every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.
There, they play pool, ex-
ercise, and assemble puzzles
in the center's quiet library,
along with the 7,000 people
that go through the center's
door on a monthly basis.
In Aida's mind, the Orange
County senior center is
money well-spent to help
senior citizens.
"To tell you the truth, it's
probably the best the coun-
ty has done for the seniors
that will in return, payback,"
Aida said, sitting at a table
with an unfinished puzzle
in front of her. "The more
you exercise, the less you're
gonna drain from Medicare.
So it has its benefits."
There are currently six
senior centers in the Orange
County area, all within driv-
ing distance of Winter Park,
Maitland, Baldwin Park and
the Goldenrod area. With
that many options, what
should seniors looking for a


new home away from home
use as criteria?
Sheryl Fleming, the site
supervisor for the Renais-
sance Center, said the first
thing seniors should con-
sider is a location that's
convenient for them. From
there, they should look at
programming.
"Location obviously,
that's the first one," Fleming
said. "It depends on where
you live because if it's not
convenient, people don't
go. Also, look at their activ-
ity calendar and see what
kind of programs they offer
and see what you're inter-
ested in."
While Winter Park
doesn't have a senior center,
nearby Maitland does.
Maitland Mayor Doug
Kinson said that making the
investment in a senior cen-
ter worked out to be a good
decision for the city. He said
they were able to provide a
place for a taxpaying seg-
ment of the population to
gather a segment of the
population that, in many
cases, spent their entire lives
paying taxes in the city.
"I think a lot of the se-


niors view it as something
they can look to to keep
them active with other se-
niors who they can inter-
act and bond with," Kinson
said. "Certainly every city
and community should
have a community center."
Almost all centers offer
yoga classes, book clubs, cro-
cheting and knitting classes,
to name a few, and many or-
ganize trips. Programming
at some centers gets pretty
specific, and it's usually be-
cause some seniors are ex-
perts in a certain field and
offer to teach the class.
Take, for example, the
Maitland Senior Center.
Every Tuesday, they offer a
class for beginning Span-
ish speakers to learn acting.
That's correct beginning
acting for beginning Span-
ish speakers.
Maitland also has gar-
nered a reputation for pro-
gramming based on current
affairs, featuring led dis-
cussions on certain topics.
In February, for example,
they'll have a University of
Central Florida professor
host a lecture on pseudosci-
ence: everything from the


belief that the world will
end in 2012 to belief in zo-
diac signs.
And seniors from all over
the area are signing up.
"I get a lot of people com-
ing in from Winter Park,
from Casselberry," said Ellen
Pitter, a recreation special-
ist in Maitland's senior ser-
vices department. "I think
it might depend on what
we're doing because we're
pretty heavy in the current
events, in the lectures, and
I'll have people coming in
if they're interested in one
particular phase."
Another difference in
senior centers is the types
of facilities they have. The
Maitland Center used to be
an old farmhouse that was
being used as an art gal-
lery when the city turned
it into a senior center (in
1992, the building was de-
molished and a new center
built, which kept some of
the original cracker house
designs).
The Renaissance Senior
Center at Curry Ford Com-
munity Park, by compari-
son, opened in April 2007,
offers 30,000 square feet of


The Learning Tree is a Ministry of
First Baptist Church of Winter Park

We offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-
Round, Preschool Classes and much more!
NowAccepting Enrollment for Full-Day Summer Camp (K5-Completed 3rd Grade)

"Rooted grounded Established in 1973 we are celebrating 36
inJesus Christ." years of service this year.
(407) 628-1761 1021 New York Avenue N.,
www.FBCWinterPark.org Winter Park, Florida 32789
We are licensed Through Department of Children and Families(C070R0154)


space and cost $5.8 million
to complete. Their center is
open, on average, 12 hours a
day for seniors.
The center tends to focus
on exercise programs be-
cause that's the type of pro-
gramming that is successful
there.
"Our seniors here are very
active," Fleming said. "We
do a lot of fitness programs
here more than anything
else because that's what our
demands are for our cen-
ter."









IL. Clauda l len Senior center






34]1Mi S. M I]i vMland










Orlando .1


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Page 10 Thursday, January 7, 2010 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Senior


Bulletin


Complimentary Ear Seeds by Win-
ter Park Acupuncture will be avail-
able from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 7 at Whole Foods Market, 1989
Aloma Ave., Winter Park. An alterna-
tive form of acupuncture, ear seeds
from the Vaccaria plant are secured
in the ear with a piece of adhesive
tape over specific acupuncture points
and may stay in the ear up to a week.
Learn more and test them yourself
during this free event.

The city of Oviedo is hosting a 55
and older field trip to the Seminole
Hard Rock Casino in Tampa from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 25.
The 145,000 square foot casino has
more than 2,500 of the hottest Vegas-
style game machines on the planet.
The bus will depart from the Oviedo
Gymnasium/Aquatic Facility, 148
Oviedo Blvd.
This trip costs $25 and includes trans-
portation by Bus & Tour Inc., $25 in
machine play and a $5 meal voucher.
Everyone must fill out a play card or
have one available. Photo ID will be
required. There must be a minimum
of 45 participants to book the trip. The
registration deadline is Thursday, Feb.
18. To pay and register please come
by Riverside Park, 1600 Lockwood
Blvd. or call 407-971-5575.

From the January 2010 edition
of the Commission on Aging's e-
newsletter:
Counsel for Caregivers Seminar -
Edith Gendron will present "What to
Consider when Selecting a Long Term
Care Facility" at the Jan. 21 seminar
from 12:10 p.m. to 12:50 p.m. at the
Orange County Library on the third
floor, Albertson Room, 101 E. Central
Blvd, downtown Orlando. The seminar
is free and lunch is provided to the


first 50 people who R.S.V.P. to 407-
836-7446 or officeonaging@ocfl.net.

New Program Art's the Spark" is a
new program by the Orlando Museum
of Art's that uses pictures of famous
art pieces to engage Alzheimer's pa-
tients in conversation. For more infor-
mation call 407-896-4231.

Health Information WDBO's (AM
580 radio) new talk show "Navigat-
ing Health and Senior Living" will fea-
ture the incoming president of the na-
tional AMA, Dr. Cecil Wilson, on their
Jan. 17 show, starting at 1 p.m. For
more info, visit http://wdbo.com/ads/
ate_navigatinghealth.html.

Symposium Florida Hospital will
host an Aging Brain Symposium on
Feb. 3, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Florida
Hospital Orlando. Topics will include
Parkinson's Disease, Dementia and
Depression, and Normal Pressure
Hydrocephalus. For more information
call 407-303-5295.

Nonprofit Conference The 9th
Annual Central Florida Commu-
nity Partners "Nonprofits Winning
Together" conference will be held
Feb. 5, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Florida
Hospital, Orlando. Nationally known
author Carol Lucas, President of
Fieldstone Alliance, will be the guest
speaker. To learn more, call 407-882-
0260 or visit www.ce.ucf.edu.

Census 2010 It's time to get
ready for Census Day 2010 on April
1. For information on how you can
help raise awareness, visit www.ocfl.
net/neighborhoods. This population
count is used to calculate our share
of federal dollars.


Other News
Age Wave Data Check it out at the
Census Bureau Web site- www.cen-
sus.gov/population/www/socdemo/
age/general-age.html#bb.

New Findings The MetLife Study of
the New Realities of the Job Market
for Aging Baby Boomers is now avail-
able at www.metlife.com/assets/cao/
mmi/publications/studies/mmi-bud-
dy-can-you-spare-job.pdf

Living Longer -Read about the
demographics and budget issues
of America's aging population at
http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/
RL33387_20091104.pdf.

Housecleaning If you know of any
woman currently undergoing chemo-
therapy, please let her know there is
a cleaning service that provides free
housecleaning one time per month
for four months while she is in treat-
ment. Learn more at www.cleaning-
forareason.org.

Recommended Reading: Forget
Memory: Creating Better Lives for
People with Dementia by Anne Bast-
ing

Partner Paragraph: Heart of Florida
United Way (HFUW) supports nearly
100 local agencies and nearly 200
health and human service programs
that provide critical care and assis-
tance to one in four Central Florid-
ians. HFUW operates the 2-1-1 &
Elder Helpline, which provides infor-
mation about community services
and programs for older adults and
their caregivers.

Did you know... baby boomers val-
ue high-speed Internet access among


the highest-rated amenities for re-
tirement living, according to a recent
survey conducted by the National As-
sociation of Home Builders and the
MetLife Mature Market Institute?

RetireSafe, representing 400,000
senior citizen supporters across
America, announced a "Let's Get it
Right" campaign for 2010 to estab-
lish a new Consumer Price Index for
Seniors (CPI-S) so that Social Security
benefits can be accurately and fairly
determined each year. In addition,


Alabama Oaks
Sof Winter Park
ASSISTED LIVING


the group announced its support for
the pending introduction of new leg-
islation by U.S. Representative John
"Jimmy" Duncan, Jr. (R-TN) which
would direct the Bureau of Labor Sta-
tistics (BLS) to finally determine the
"right" CPI-S formula for seniors. Re-
tireSafe, an advocacy organization for
older Americans, supports this critical
first step to correct the faulty formula
now used by the BLS, the same one
resulting in a "zero" COLA for 2010.


Call us for a tour
or more information
407-718-7937
1759 Alabama Dr., Winter Park
www.alabamaoaks.com


"Change Is Inevitable,

But You Can Manage It

To Your Advantage."


As an experienced financial
planner, Elizabeth Brothers
understands the importance of
anticipating change and taking
control wherever you can. That's
why she moved to The Mayflower.
"In financial planning, it's
important to know you have some
control over medical costs," she
says. "A continuing care retirement


community like The Mayflower enables
you to do that. But don't wait too
long or you won't be able to enjoy
all the benefits a CCRC has to offer."
If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at
The Mayflower. It's a good plan
for the future.
Call today to secure a spot on our
waiting list.

(407) 672-1620





THE MAYFLOWER
A Plan for the Future-
1620 Mayflower Court
S Winter Park, Florida 32792
www.themayflower.com


I


Page 10 Thursday, January 7, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, January 7, 2010 Page 11


by Matilda Charles

An updated study tells
us that the typical family
caregiver is a 48-year-old
woman caring for her wid-
owed mother who does
not live with her. She is
married and employed. Ap-
proximately 66 percent of
the estimated 65 million
caregivers for seniors are
women.
The average age of the
person receiving the care
is 66 to 69 years. Caregiver
duties generally fall under
the category of "Activities
of Daily Living," such as
dressing, getting in and out
of bed, bathing and eating.
A fair number of caregiv-
ers (66 percent) have some
help from unpaid sources,
but most don't use paid as-


by Freddy Groves

A recent flap brought a
90-year-old Medal of Honor
recipient nose to nose with
his homeowners associa-
tion over, of all things, a flag
he had flying in his yard.
They insisted it come down.
This was not just a flag
that was hung up and for-
gotten season after season
and in all kinds of weather.
Every day he'd go out and
take it down, carefully fold-
ing it and putting it away.
There was a hue and cry,
of course, with veterans, the
American Legion, the gover-
nor and even a U.S. senator


sistance. This has a lot to do
with income too, as skilled
care (or even someone to
come in to clean) carries
a high price tag. A full 70
percent of caregivers also
work at a job.
More than half of care-
givers report going online
for information on treat-
ment, services, facilities
and doctors.
Caregivers spend around
20 hours a week providing
direct care. If the caregiver
lives with the recipient,
that goes up to almost 40
hours a week.
Most have been taking
care of someone for four
years, and this is where
the health concerns of the
caregiver come into play.
While the majority of care-
givers say their health is
good at present, the length
of time spent taking care
of someone takes a toll.
Caregiving for more than
five years or for more than


getting involved. It made
the television news and ra-
dio talk shows. We were all,
naturally, 100 percent be-
hind him.
The homeowners asso-
ciation hedged, saying it
didn't have a problem with
the flag itself, just the pole,
and it threatened legal ac-
tion.
He won in the end, and
kept his flag proudly flying.
But there never should have
been an issue in the first
place.
Granted, the writers of
the Freedom to Display the
American Flag Act of 2005
should have been more
careful when they wrote
that the law didn't have to
do with "any reasonable re-
striction pertaining to the
time, place, or manner of
displaying the flag neces-


r


I


20 hours a week seems to
be the cutoff where good
health can begin to decline.
When it comes to emo-
tional stress, one-third of
caregivers say their stress
level is a four on a one-to-
five scale.
If you're a caregiver,
look for help, especially if
you've done it for a number
of years. Go online to the
Eldercare Locator (www.el-
dercare.gov) or call 1-800-
677-1116. Also see Caring
(www.caring.com) for
information on caring for
parents.

Matilda Charles regrets that she can-
not personally answer reader ques-
tions, but will incorporate them into
her column whenever possible. Write
to her in care of King Features Weekly
Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to
columnreply@gmail.com.
2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


sary to protect a substantial
interest" of an association.
They left open a tiny door
for the association to stomp
through.
I'd hate to think that this
case got so much attention
because its owner is a Medal
of Honor recipient, as there
have been other cases of
homeowners being told to
take down their flags. We
should all have the right to
fly flags.
Remember the weeks
right after Sept. 11? The
country was covered in
flags. Personally I'd like to
see that all the time.
Write to Freddy Groves in care of King
Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box
536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or
send e-mail to columnreply@gmail.
com.
2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


To learn more about our
community in Kissimmee,
call us at 1-800-859-1550 or visit us
at www.good-sam.com/kissimmee


Q


:Good .
Samantan
SocSetyE
KISSIMMEE VILLAGE


4250 Village Dr. Kissimmee, FL

S All faiths or beliefs are welcome. 09-G1384 AL#11474,
L S HH#21899096, HH#299991031, SNF#1267096


Saana ortadCotg
^^^^ of Oviedo If


Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communi-
ties provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a
secured residence for those with memory loss.


Restaurant Style Dining Experience
Vibrant and Extensive Activities Program
24/7 Well Trained and Caring Associates
* Laundry, Housekeeping and Linen Services
Individualized Services and Care


ZIIE


You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo


Where hospitality is truly
a way of life!

s

AVANNAH OURT
ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE


395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765
407-977-8786
ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307


SAVANNAH TTAGE
MEMORY CAI I RESIDENCE


www.savannahcourtoviedo.com


7


I


WslSt *EBDt i
w m st EMSt


i,.S Rd
. Ui i


End


I I I
The Seminole County Engineering Division invites you to
attend a Public Information Meeting about the CR 419 Road
Improvement Project. The County will present design alter-
natives being proposed for the segment of roadway between
the Seminole County line and Snow Hill Road. The meeting
will be held on Thursday, January 14, 2010, in the cafete-
ria at Walker Elementary School located at 3101 Snow Hill
Rd Chuluota, FL 32766-6724. County staff, as well as the
Engineering firm conducting the study, will be available be-
ginning at 6:00 PM to talk individually with interested resi-
dents and answer your questions and receive your comments
and suggestions. Also beginning at 6:00 PM, residents will
have an opportunity to review maps and diagrams of the
proposed project. The formal meeting and presentation of
the proposed alternatives and preferred concepts will begin
at 7:00 PM. For additional information, please contact Mike
Mohler at 407-422-8062, Ext. 187.

Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate
in any of these proceedings should contact the Human Re-
sources Department, ADA Coordinator 48 Hours in advance
of the meeting at 407-665-7941.


Middle-aged woman is


typical caregiver


Flying the flag


I


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


d
gj,~~ ~id'


i


'I


I


iBP~p4i
5










Opinion/ Editorial


Perspectives

by...



e6cka 044,


I have no faith in religion.


I have no faith in reli-
gion. Quite candidly, I am
amazed when any thinking
human expresses an al-
legiance to one particular
religion over another. It
seems inexplicable (to me)
that one is Catholic rather
than an Episcopalian, or a
Missouri Synod Lutheran
as opposed to an American
Lutheran. But then again
I'm not versed in the intri-
cacies of specific religious
dogmas.
I have never once found
myself asking, "What is
God's plan and how do I fit
in?" The closest I ever came
to experiencing an omnip-
otent force was while living
under my father's roof. I
knew his plan, and I knew
that any questioning of his
authority was a problemat-
ic proposition. I knew to be
home by 6 p.m. for dinner
(unfailingly), to never be
disrespectful of Mother and
that loyalty to family was
paramount. That's about
as much creed as my father
expected or demanded.
As a result of how I was
raised and what I think
constitutes "reality," I find
any reliance on religion
and/or superstition an un-
necessary impediment to
living. The idea of God sim-
ply gets in the way much
as clouds might, under cer-
tain circumstances, obscure
the genuine splendor of a


clear sky. Not to in any way
denigrate the incredible
beauty of nature (clouds in
this case).
So I find myself some-
what at a loss to under-
stand the world we now
inhabit. As a student of
history, I appreciate the
"trajectory" of our story.
As a believer in Darwinian
Evolution, I believe Mother
Earth bore us out of her
fertile primordial juices and
that once upon a time we
shared a common ances-
tor with modern apes (6
million, maybe 8 million
or so years ago). Evidently,
if polls are to be believed, I
am in a distinct minority as
most Americans subscribe
to a level of religious non-
sense that is laughably ab-
surd. Of which I am, for the
most part, OK with. If life
is so formidable, so fright-
ening, so confusing, so
"unbelievably" miraculous
that no other explanation
but "religion" gives it (you)
meaning, well, go for it.
But here is the rub. Our
religions are killing us.
"Oh," you say, "Jepson, tell
us something new."
Our religions have al-
ways been killing us. It's
been one constant slaugh-
ter. I won't even say one
after another because there
has never been a break. It's
relentless. Invent a God.
And the slaughter starts


anew. Or rather resumes
under a new name. A
variation on the "infinite"
theme. Allahu Akbar!?
Perhaps it's just a pre-
text. We are genuinely nasty
little monkeys after all. Is
it that our real pleasure is
found in killing (maiming,
torturing, raping, slaughter-
ing ad infinitum, ad nause-
um) one another? And do-
ing so in the name of God,
well, a mere ruse. Which
came first? The slaughter or
the "excuse" for the slaugh-
ter? Maybe that is religion's
function: to give meaning
to our relentless, mindless
slaughter of one another.
We can't be killing for no
reason!?! What God would
want that? Hmmm? The hu-
man kind, perhaps?
But we had such high
hopes. Recall the Enlight-
enment and the Age of Rea-
son? Learned minds opined
that there was another way.
Many of America's Found-
ing Fathers were "Enlight-
ened" men and America
was to be a nation born
anew, populated by a "new"
man, that on his shoulders
the best hope for human-
ity rested. But where does
America find itself today
but at the vanguard of a
religious war with Islam.
President Bush actually in-
voked the word "crusade"
in describing it. Sigh.
I cannot satisfactorily
(completely?) answer why
Islamic suicide terrorists
want to kill us. Can you? Se-
riously. Why are we at war
with Islamic fundamental-
ists? Why have terrorists
singled out America (and
the West) for constant at-
tack?
Is it because America
unequivocally supports
Israel? And by direct asso-
ciation the suppression of
the Palestinians? Which is


roundly perverse to me in
a profoundly hypocritical
way since I have personally
heard a number of Arab
men use the "N" word to
describe the Palestinians as
the "N's" of the Middle East.
Is it because America has
supported "thug" Arab gov-
ernments in order to secure
oil from the region? Is it
because we have subverted
democratic, nationalistic
movements in the region?
Is it because we have in-
stigated revolutions and
installed governments that
would obediently do our
bidding (think: Shah and
Iran)? Is it because we have
troops stationed in numer-
ous Islamic nations? Is it
because we are fighting two
wars there? Are these not
plausible reasons?
Or, is it the "poor dears"
have a serious inferiority
complex? That once upon
a time, oh, let's say the 14th
century, they once held
sway and were a force to be
reckoned with but, alas, no
more. Modernity inexora-
bly passed them by.
Or, is it that we are ex-
periencing but a "hot" time
of conflict in this timeless,
ancient religious conflict?
Islam vs. Christianity?
I highly recommend
Christopher Caldwell's
"Reflections on the Revolu-
tion in Europe," a book on
immigration, Islam and the
West. It's fascinating. And in
some respects, Western Eu-
rope is toast. Sadly so. This
book will make you weep.
If America had the same
percentage of Muslims as
France there would be 40
million living in America
in a few concentrated cit-
ies and regions. Whether
or not America's Muslim
community is similar to
Europe's will play out in the
future.


The irony of what has
happened, is happening in
Europe is that a humanistic,
relativistic (byproducts of
the Enlightenment) culture
has let in (under the tent so
to speak) people (through
immigration) who do not
have the same history of,
and/or appreciation for, the
aforementioned humanism
(tolerance) or relativism.
I use the example of
democracy in a number of
Arab nations. Elections are/
were held and the victors
immediately outlaw(ed)
the opposition. And sup-
pressed freedom. The pro-
cess (democratic elections)
is gamed and used. And ulti-
mately subverted.
Remember in 2001 when
the Taliban in Afghanistan
destroyed the two Bamiyan
Buddha statues? These were
700-year-old works of art,
each over 120 feet tall and
they were destroyed under
the name of Islamic Sharia
law.
The very values I place
a premium on freedom,
humanism, relativism, a
societal respect for the infi-
nite diversity of ideas, free-
dom from religion have
all made Europe vulnerable
to a determined, seem-
ingly unassimilable influx
(with high birth rates) of
disgruntled and disaffected
religious zealots. And, oh,
woe be to Europe (Mother
of America).
Yes, we are at war. Forev-
er. With our own ignorance.
Religion, by any other
name.



TA JEPSON

Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letter tothe Editor


Help grow Florida
In these difficult economic
times, a major priority for
the state has been and will
continue to be the creation
of jobs. With unemploy-
ment at levels not seen
since the mid-1970s, more
than ever, it is it vital that
we look for new ways and
better answers for econom-
ic development in the state.
However, in the midst
of these uncertain times, it
is important to note that
Florida still ranks fairly well
for being "entrepreneur
friendly", according to the
Small Business and Entre-
preneurship Council's 14th
Annual Rankings. Rated as
"6th best in the country,"
the Council acknowledges
the importance of support-
ing entrepreneurship and
small businesses as one of
the major ways to jump
start the economy.
A new initiative funded


by the Legislature is an
excellent example of this
initiative; the Florida Eco-
nomic Gardening Institute
exists as a source of sup-
port to cultivate growing
companies that are private
resident firms that have
between 10-50 employees
and have revenues between
$1 million up to $25 million
and have demonstrated
growth in the last three of
five years.
These companies are
in the following sectors:
manufacturing, finance and
insurance services, whole-
sale trade, information
industries, professional
and scientific and techni-
cal services, management
services, and administrative
support services. These are
considered "second stage"
companies and have been
described as businesses
in the "teenage stage;"
the support provided by


GrowFL will allow these
companies to fully mature
into "adulthood." Initial
estimates state that about
8 percent of companies in
the state are eligible at this
time for this program.
A project of this institute
was recently announced
here in Orlando. Called
"GrowFL," this program
will provide a team of ana-
lysts who will give support
with technical assistance
and access to a variety of
information and decision-
making tools. Some of
these tools include data-
base research, search en-
gine optimization, social
media strategies, capital re-
ferrals, and labor referrals.
If you believe your com-
pany may be eligible for
this program, please visit
http://www.growFL.com
and apply today! On the

> turn to NEXT PAGE


Page 12 Thursday, January 7, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Winter Park/Maitland Observer



Play On!
y *


Conservative commentary
& opinions of Louis Roney
Harvard'42-Distinguished Prof, Em.-
UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
(Assisted by b.w.:Joy Roney)

"You are entitled to your own opinions-
you are not entitled to your own facts"
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Business as
unusual
M y operatic career
began in New York
with two concert
performances of the role
of Cavaradossi in Puccini's
"Tosca," opposite Eleanor
Steber, with Dimitri Mitro-
poulos conducting the New
York Philharmonic.
At that time I knew only
one role, i.e., Cavaradossi,
and I didn't know the stag-
ing for even that one.
Shortly after those per-
formances of what was,
I am happy to say, a huge
success, I found myself be-
ing asked to "jump into"
many other performances
of other operas complete
with staging.
Soon afterward, by the
grace of whatever gods


Thursday, January 7, 2010 Page 13


look after the operatic inco-
gnoscenti, I met up with the
Rossini Opera Workshop
on Central Park West the
answer to my prayers.
The "Opera Workshop"
consisted of two Rossinis',
"Hulda" and "Luigi."
Luigi, whom everyone
called "Maestro," was a na-
tive of Monte Carlo, had
sung in Europe in Italian
and French opera for years,
and was a master of oper-
atic acting.
Thus I learned my first
useful "scena" (business)
from Luigi Rossini.
His wife Hulda, a Penn-
sylvanian, was a strong pia-
nist, whose playing could,
at the drop of a hat, emu-
late a whole orchestra in
the pit.
Maestro gave me many
little bits of valuable char-
acterization in the "scena"
lessons I took from him in
the Rossini Opera Work-
shop.
We would often talk
about an operatic charac-
ter, discussing the charac-
ter's personal history and
idiosyncrasies.
People who go to the
opera may not realize how
eclectic an opera perfor-
mance can be.
For some years I sang
Rudolfo in Puccini's "La Bo-
heme" on many American
and European stages.
My Rudolfo was not a
single concoction, but held
bits and pieces of many
performances and stage di-
rectors I rubbed shoulders
with throughout the years.
The little things an oper-
atic actor might bring into
his performance are often


called his "business."
"Business" is often
"borrowed" from one art-
ist perhaps modified a
bit and may well appear
somewhere else thereafter
without any credits to any-
body.
Your concept of your
role may owe something to
people long dead but still
alive in the never-dying life
of the theater.
How many nights in the
week is "La Boheme" not
being played somewhere in
the world?
Early in my career I re-
ceived a quick contract to
sing Lt. Pinkerton opposite
Dorothy Kirsten in Puc-
cini's "Madame Butterfly" -
in, I believe it was, Hartford,
Conn.
I had learned the music,
but hadn't had a chance to
sing the role on the stage.
What to do? Presto
chango: Maestro Rossini
was suddenly Cio Cio San,
the little Japanese lover
of American naval officer
Pinkerton.
Maestro produced a
piece of folded typewriter
paper, which became a
"fan."
As Hulda played the
score to "Butterfly," Maestro
and I sang the two parts to
each other in Italian.
Maestro's Japanese body
movements were uncanny.
Throughout our years
of professional friendship,
Maestro became any of the
male or female characters
that were needed to teach
me the appropriate stage
business I used to make my
interpretation a success.
Dear friend and elegant


gentleman Luigi Rossini
gave onlookers plenty of
laughs as he perfectly mim-
icked Asian maidens, Ital-
ian villains, Spanish gypsies,
and you name it!
The work that Maestro
Rossini did for young op-
eratic actors was founded
upon his lifetime of stage-
craft.
When you left the Rossi-
ni Opera Workshop, and
went out into the operatic
world of make-believe, you
had been prepared in all
the little ways that an ex-
pert can conjure up.
The Rossinis had a large
retinue of singers famous
and not so famous who
worked with them, and
came to their much-loved
parties.
By New York standards,
the Rossini apartment was
huge.
A very long hallway com-
ing into the apartment
could accommodate doz-
ens of people coming and
going.
Hulda's Steinway grand
piano seemed but a small
piece of furniture in the
space afforded by a large
living room that opened
into a large dining room.
At Christmastime, the
Rossinis' parties featured
well-trained voices vying
with each other in singing
carols, both lusty and sub-
dued.
Thus the listener enjoyed
the effect of Christmastime
and top-flight singing.
My friendship with Hul-
da and Luigi went far be-
yond our professional work
together.
I count Luigi Rossini as


one of the great gentlemen
I have known in my life -
a man of such cultivated
charm and courtesy that he
remains in my memories
today as the "No. 1 gentle-
man" I have known.
Hulda was a uniquely
strong friend, and a person
who gave her all to her stu-
dents.
She taught until she was
95, and lived to 99!
Where are there such
people today, so richly edu-
cated, and so limitlessly giv-
ing?
I took what the Rossinis
had given me to every
performance I did both in
Europe and North America,
and would smile fondly
when I did some little piece
of "business" that Luigi had
imparted to me in his New
York apartment.
Operatic acting must, by
definition, remain personal,
innovative, and at the ser-
vice of the singing, which is
its raison d'etre.
In short, operatic acting
must never get in the way of
the singing that it inspires.
Maestro Rossini showed me
carefully how to fall dead
on the stage as Cavaradossi
when he is shot by a firing
squad, and how to kill Car-
mens without hurting the
little darlings.
Maestro also taught me
how to fence onstage so as
not to risk an eye injury to
myself or my opponent.
A tenor must practice
these things many times to
get the perfect vocal and
histrionic affects.
"Business as unusual,"
you might say.


LETTER I Economic development, jobs priority in Legislature

< continued from previous page


Web site, you will have ac-
cess to the application,
frequently asked questions,
and contact information
should you need additional
information about the
program. I strongly encour-
age you to look into this
program if you match the
qualifications previously
mentioned in this article.


Economic development
and job creation will con-
tinue to serve as our main
priority this upcoming leg-
islative session. It is smart
policies and initiatives such
as GrowFL that will ensure
our future economic suc-
cess for the state, and I look
forward to its success.
Should you have addi-


tional questions about this
program or any other state
agency or issue, please do
not hesitate to contact my
office at 407-884-2023. As
always, it is an honor to
serve you.
-State Rep. Bryan Nelson


Editorial


hted Material


S


j Syndicated Content




from Commercial News Providers"


sI.


THE DAVEY TREE EXPERT COMPANY
Discover The Davey Dfference.
Complete Tree, Shrub & Lawn Care
Quality Pruning
Insect & Disease Management
DeeD-Root Fertilization
ISA Certified Arborists
www.davey.com

407-331-8020



Brandywine Square

e Courtyard Shopping. Sidewalk Cafe .
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum
Brandywine Deli Cida's of Winter Park Antiques
Cida's of Winter Park featuring on the Avenue
Enjoy eating outside on The Original Consignment Quality Antiques
beautiful Park Avenue. Buffet Collection. Owned by Hardy Hudson.
catering specialist since 1972 407-644-5635 407-657-2100

IFamily Comics & Cards Essence NOW OPEN!
Follow the exploits of your favorite Salon & Day Spa Ultimate Fitness
comics from yesterday and today. Hair-Manicures-Pedicures-Nail by Yatska
erExtensions-Facials-Waxing
Trading cards for every taste! 4n7 -n o"9q- 407-789-9171








Page 14 Thursday, January 7, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CC-18186
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
V.
GISELA L. BALCAZAR, and JOHN DOE and JANE
DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 26 day of
January, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Condominium Unit No. 211, Building No.
2, THE CREST AT WATERFORD LAKES, a
Condominium, together with all appurte-
nances thereto, according and subject to
the Declaration of Condominium, recorded in
Official Records Book 8170, at Page(s) 1746,
and any amendments thereto, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida. Together
with an undivided interest in the common
elements appurtenant to said unit.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on December
17, 2009.
DATED this 17 day of December, 2009
Alex C. Costopoulos, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 0112429
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
1/7, 1/14
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CC-5523
ANDOVER LAKES PHASE I HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
DIEGO G. SEGURA, and SANDRA PALACIOS, and
JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 26 day of
January, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 42, ANDOVER LAKES, PHASE 1-B,
according to the Plat recorded in Plat Book
39, Page 111, as recorded in the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on December
17, 2009.
DATED this 17 day of December, 2009
Alex C. Costopoulos, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 0112429
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
1/7, 1/14
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-33644 Div. 33
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FRANCISCO PERALTA and MARIA R. PERALTA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 12th day of
January, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described real
property:
LOT 33, VISTA LAKES VILLAGES N-4 AND
N-5 (CHAMPLAIN), ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 48
PAGES 51 56, INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No. 08-
CA-33644 Div. 33, now pending in the Circuit Court
in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 28th day of December, 2009.
By: JEFFRY R, JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 133990
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
12/31,1/7
Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the
Division of Corporations, Department of State, State
of Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Daily Sunshine
under which the undersigned expects to engage
in business at
2516 Middleton Ave.
Winter Park, FL 32792
and that the party interested in said business
enterprise is as follows:
Elizabeth Ouellette
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 7th day of
January, 2010
1/7


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009CP2022
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CYNTHIA F. MALLOY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(summary administration)
The administration of the estate of CYNTHIA F.
MALLOY, deceased, File Number 2009CP2022, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The
names and addresses of the petitioner and the peti-
tioner's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including un-matured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against the dece-
dent's estate, including un-matured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
Dec. 31, 2009.

Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Edward W. Soulsby
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 488216
KENNETH B. WHEELER, LL.M. TAX, P.A.
1155 Louisiana Avenue, Suite 100
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 645-1779

Person Giving Notice:
Dallas N. Malloy
2201 Alaqua Drive
Longwood, FL 32779
12/31,1/7

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA003143
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR OP-
TION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-5 ASSET-
BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-5,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
WALDO VAZQUEZ AKA WALDO VASQUEZ, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 28, 2009
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on March 2, 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

Lot 32, A REPLAT OF A PART OF SPORTS-
MANS PARADISE, according to the plat there-
of as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 32, Public
Records of Seminole County, Florida.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated December 30, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Mary Stroupe
Deputy Clerk of the Court

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
1/7, 1/14

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2009-CC-9221-0
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
JUSTIN DANIEL OSBORNE and JOHN DOE and JANE
DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 26 day of
January, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 136, WATERFORD LAKES TRACT N-7
PHASE II, according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 31, Pages 5 and 6,
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on December
17, 2009.
DATED this 17 day of December, 2009
Alex C. Costopoulos, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 0112429
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
1/7, 1/14

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
SALE BY CASH AUCTION
THE FOLLOWING UNITS
On January 26, 2010, at Assured Self-Storage, Inc.
to the highest bidder for cash, items contained in
the following units:
D2093 Damien Sears Household Items
D2155 Douglas Clifton Household Items
C1017 Lacy Powers Household Items
C1126 Derrick Tate Household Items
C1055 Susan McDowell- Household Items
D2097 Ivonne Morales Household Items
D1040 Janet Hosie Household Items
D1039 Janet Hosie Household Items
P0136 Bruce Trick 1978 Seacraft Cutty HIN#
5EC00360478
TO BE HELD AT
510 DOUGLAS AVENUE
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL
ON JANUARY 26, 2010
AT 10:00 A.M.
ASSURED SELF-STORAGE, INC.
Assured Self-Storage, Inc. reserves the right to bid
and to refuse or reject any and all bids.
1/7, 1/14


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-12855
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
LILLIANA GONZALEZ, and JOHN DOE, and JANE
DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Lilliana Gonzalez
12524 Crest Springs Lane, Apartment 1212
Orlando, Florida 32828

Lilliana Gonzalez
1717 N. Bayshore Drive, Apartment 1238
Miami, Florida 33132
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Unit 1212, Building 12, THE CREST AT
WATERFORD LAKES, a Condominium,
according to the Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded in Official Records Book
8170, Page 1746, and any amendments
thereto, of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida; Together with an undivided
interest in the common elements appurte-
nant thereto.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is POHL & SHORT, P.A., 280 W.
Canton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box 3208,
Winter Park, Florida 32790, on or before 30 days
from 1st date of publication, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either before service on
the Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
DATED this 15th day of December, 2009.

LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: TENYL BRADFORD
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V)1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
1/7, 1/14
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2009-CP-1322
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JEWEL LEE WRIGHT
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JEWEL LEE
WRIGHT, deceased, whose date of death was No-
vember 12, 2007; File Number 2009-CP-1322, is
pending in the Circuit Court for SEMINOLE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
is P.O. Drawer C, Sanford, FL 32772. The names
and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate mustfile their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: Jan.
7,2010.

ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
DONALD W. SCARLETT
Florida Bar No. 112821
DONALD W. SCARLETT, P.A.
1003 EAST CONCORD STREET
ORLANDO, FL 32803
Telephone: (407) 422-8189

Personal Representative:
RUFUS TED WRIGHT
P.O. BOX 1064
OSTEEN, FL 32764
1/7, 1/14


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2008CA007017
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS
TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE AS-
SETS TRUST 2006-2 MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-2,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
WENCESLAO LOPEZ, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 18, 2009
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash on April 20, 2010, at 11:00 AM, at Room
S201 of Courthouse 301 N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL
32771 for the following described property:

THE EAST 26 FEET OF LOT 2 AND LOT 3,
BLOCK 6, WYNNEWOOD, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4, PAGES 92, 93 AND 94, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated December 21, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Paula F. Russo
Deputy Clerk of the Court

Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 217
Boca Raton, FL 33432

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
1/7, 1/14

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Public notice is hereby given that, on the date and
at the time listed below, and continuing from day
to day until all goods are sold, we will sell at public
auction, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the ware-
house of United Stor-All, at 965 S. Semoran Blvd.,
Winter Park, FL 32792, the contents of the following
storage units containing household and/or business
goods, for rent and other charges for which a lien
on same is claimed, to wit.

DATE OF SALE: January 22, 2010
TIME OF SALE: 12:00 PM or thereafter
Michael Driscoll #19 Tools, cleaning products;
Salah Alkayyali #76 Furniture; Rogelio Trevino
#117 Comercial Equipment; Rose Young #143
Household and Christmas items; Luis E Cordovez
#387 Household Items, Tools; Martin Lane #193
household items; Lisa Ferrara # 322 Household
and Business Items; Rachel Levy #349 Household
Items; Ron Ross # 3971 Household Items; Yamilet
Rivera #406 Clothes; Rose Young #4131 Household
Items; Hope Ligon # 594 Household Items.

Auctioneer: Storage Protection Auction Services
-license 593. The above notice is to be published
once a week for two consecutive weeks. Said sale
to be under and by virtue of the statues of the State
of Florida, in such cases made and provided.

Thank you
JORGE HITSCHFELD PROPERTY MANAGER
1/7, 1/14

Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the highest
bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999

Sale date January 22, 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
1932 1998 Petersbuilt tk dp vin#:
1 NP5XBEX4WN462066 tenant: jls hauling inc

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
1/7, 1/14


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 48-2009-CA-002773-0
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GUOJI HU, ADA GALLEGOS HU, and WOODLAND
LAKES PRESERVE HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 22 day of January,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
LOT 177, WOODLAND LAKES PRESERVE UNIT
1B, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 59 PAGE 137
THROUGH 140, PUBLIC RECORDS OF OR-
ANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2009-CA-002773-0 entered on September 8,
2009 in the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 16 day of December, 2009.
By: Eric Jontz
Attorney


JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile: (407) 647-2157


12/31,1/7


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CA-9363
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
CARMEN MARIA COLON n/k/a CARMEN MARIA
STELLA, RENE STELLA, and JOHN DOE and JANE
DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 25th day of
January, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 111, Waterford Lakes Tract N-33,
according to the plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 30, Pages 91 through 93, of the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on November
23, 2009.
DATED this 23rd day of November, 2009
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 381144
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
1/7, 1/14


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Number: 48-2009-CA-018639-0; Division 40
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
ANNANIE CHARLES; and JANELADRIEN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 16 day of Febru-
ary, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Court-
house of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Av-
enue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will
offer for sale the following described real property:
LOT 130, BEL-AIRE WOODS, FOURTH ADDI-
TION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 127,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2009-CA-018639-0; Division 40, now pending
in the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 3rd day of December, 2009.
By: Eric Jontz
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
12/31,1/7

Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 713.585(6) F.S. United American
Lien & Recovery as agent with power of attorney
will sell the following vehicle(s) to the highest
bidder subject to any liens; net proceeds deposited
with the clerk of court; owner/lienholder has right to
hearing and post bond; owner may redeem vehicle
for cash sum of lien; all auctions held in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lienor facility; cash or
cashier check; 15% buyer prem; any person inter-
ested ph (954) 563-1999

Sale date January 29 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
21481 2006 Hummer vin#: 5GRGN22U76H102352
lienor: classic Chevrolet 940 sr 434 south Altamonte
spgs f1 407-297-4321 lien amt $3255.30

sale date February 5, 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
21525 1994 Dodge vin#: 2B4HB25Z1RK114842
lienor: transmatic inc zembowers auto ctr 956 e
Altamonte dr Altamonte spgs fl 407-831-5620 lien
amt $3553.91
21526 2000 Lincoln vin#: 5LMPU28A7YLJ12731
lienor: sunshine auto repair 301 s obt Orlando fl
407-872-1558 lien amt $1857.42
21527 1991 Dodge vin#: 2B7KB31Z1MK414040
lienor: ricky g's transmission repair 112 dover st
Orlando fl 407-293-5496 lien amt $3550.00
21528 1995 Ford vin#: 1 FALP247SA307187 lienor:
ricky g's transmission repair 112 dover st Orlando
fl 407-293-5496 lien amt $2330.00
21529 1998 Honda vin#: 1HGCG2251WA013776
lienor: ricky g's transmission repair 112 dover st
Orlando fl 407-293-5496 lien amt $4087.23
21530 2001 Ford vin#: 1FTRWO8LX1KF22810
lienor: ricky g's transmission repair 112 dover st
Orlando fl 407-293-5496 lien amt $3843.35

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
1/7

Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the
Division of Corporations, Department of State, State
of Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
IPTV Engineering
under which the undersigned expects to engage
in business at
1121 Park Green Place
Winter Park, FL 32789-1995
and that the party interested in said business
enterprise is as follows:
Paul B. Goulding
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 7th day of
January, 2010
1/7






Thursday, January 7, 2010 Page 15


TheMarketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
Account Representative needed to work on
behalf of our company. 18+ needed and
must have computer skills. Accounting
experience needed. Any job experience.
Email to mclarkemployment111@gmail.
com for more information.

LOOKING FOR A
SECURE RETIREMENT?
EARN EXTRA INCOME TO: *Get out of debt
* Increase you savings Earn ongoing
residual income Work Part-Time from
home. Potential to make $500/$1000 or
even $5000 a month. PLEASE CALL 1-800-
221-3872 listen to a pre-recorded message.
Contact: Carlos Astacio, 800-221-3872,
castacio@saferforyourhome.com


VEGETARIAN RECIPE BOOK
Do you need delicious vegetarian recipe
book? www.veggyfood.totalwarehouse.com

BLOOD PRESSURE MONITOR
Blood Pressure check with this hospital
quality BP. 49.99 +s www.monitorbp.
totalwarehouse.com


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

PRISTINE PROPERTY LANDSCAPING
Home or Business it should always be
Pristine! Your Complete Landscaping
Specialists. Sprinkler repair. Tree trimming
and removal. Rock waterfalls and scapes,
floral scapes, paver installation. Lawn
maintenance. 407-286-0566

POTTY COACHING ...
EVERY CHILD TO SUCCESS!
Don't know if your child is ready to be potty
trained? Tired of the battles? Spending a
fortune on diapers and pull-ups? Education
professional offers personalized, in-home
evaluation and services to toilet train your
child. Includes children with disabilities.
Contact: Eileen Wray, M.Ed, 407-927-2337,
pottycoaching@gmail.com

STAY AT HOME MOMS...
Stay athomewithyou children and contribute
to your household income? Potential to
make $500/$1000 or even $5000 a month
PLEASE CALL 1-800-221-3872. Listen to a
pre-recorder message and you be the judge.
Contact: Carlos Astacio, 800-221-3872,
castacio@saferforyourhome.com


*BE 1


NEW MATTRESS SETS
Brand new, in plastic, under warranty. Twin
sets-$99 Full $110 Queen $125 King $199.
Call 407-936-4194 can Dell


m
LAKEFRONT CONDO
For Rent Lake Front Condo For Rent. 2
bed/2 bath. Luxurious 1,200 sq. ft condo
on Lake Maitland. Recently renovated with
granite counter tops, stainless appliances.
Building amenities include dock, pool, hot
tub, bbq grill, and community room. $1,250
per month call 321-228-2873


FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.

OVIEDO OFFICE FOR RENT
Oviedo Office for rent. 1,640 sq. ft., $14/
sq. ft. + tax, no CAM. Reception, kitchen,
conference offices. Near 417 Red Bug exit.
815 Eyrie Drive. Call 407-365-3490.

WINTER PARK OFFICE SPACE
DOWNSIZING? Do it in style! Classy Winter
Park Office Space, I-4/Lee Rd./Fairbanks
Ave. area. Perfect for the downsizing
professional. Share space with professional/
owner. 2 offices, and file/secretarial station.
670SF $875/mo. Utilities incl. Call 407-629-
6711 x 300.

GREAT OPPORTUNITY
Unique location in Maitland. 2 office spaces
still available. Amazing Rate $16/sf Full
Service. Call 321-436-8650


Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Structured Cable Installer
Job Description: Responsible for installing
and terminating network, broadcast video,
audio and fiber optic cable in cable trays
and racks. Work Monday-Friday, 7:00am-
4:00pm.
Pay Rate: $14.00-$17.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9447501

Diesel Bus Mechanic
Job Description: Responsible for completing
services and annual inspections on vehicles.
Maintains a clean shop and work area.
Completes all paperwork required for jobs.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9448207

Registered Nurse
Job Description: Responsible for delivery of
patient care through case management and
coordination of services offered by all health
team members and existing community
resources. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9448010

Communications and Marketing
Manager
Job Description: Responsible for overseeing
the internal and external communications
and marketing. Works collaboratively with
staff members to create and manage cross-
organizational, integrated marketing and
communication strategies. Works closely
with director of events to market all events
and fulfill sponsorship obligations. Edits and
writes press releases, develops marketing
materials, and writes content for external
publications, chamber e-newsletters, and
website. Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $32,000.00-$37,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9449981

Counselor
Job Description: Responsible for supporting
the company's mission by initiating
therapeutic interventions with the client.
Pursues treatmentgoals, case management,
and the other opportunities for intervention


the agency provides and participates in
evaluating services through data collection,
input analysis, and course correction based
on results. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $29,000.00-$34,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9450055

Teacher Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for educating
and guiding children in developmentally
appropriate lesson plans allowing them to
explore and create their own projects. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9444930

Banquet Worker On Call
Job Description: Responsible for serving
menu items to guests according to the
banquet event order and timing the service
of courses to correspond with the dining
pace of the guests. Performs pre and post
shift work and remove trays of dirty dishes,
silverware and glassware to kitchen for
cleaning. Responds to guest inquires and
special requests to ensure guestsatisfaction.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $4.23 per hour plus tips
Job Order Number: 9435162

Refrigeration Mechanic
Job Description: Responsible for
implementing power outage management
practices. Executes inspection rounds and
detects, responds, communicates, and
documents issues resulting from inspection.
Develops and implements preventive
maintenance systems in refrigeration
equipment. Troubleshoots and maintains
refrigeration systems. Completes shift
departmental maintenance records. Work
Sunday-Wednesday, 7:00am-7:00pm.
Pay Rate: $21.96 per hour
Job Order Number: 9439842

Assistant Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for dealing
with clients and setting up some events.
Performs basic office duties and meets
with individuals, special interest groups and
others on behalf of executives, committees
and boards of directors. Opens, sorts,
and distributes incoming correspondence
including faxes and email. Work 4:30pm-
10:00pm, days may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9419146

Human Resources Director
Job Description: Responsible for
managing and administering human
resource functions including recruitment,
compensation, benefits, safety, employee


I


-== =,


S 1 0


- 40


relations, performance management, and
staff development. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $28,000.00-$31,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9450051

Driver
Job Description: Responsible for acting as
driver or an armed guard truck. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $9.85 per hour
Job Order Number: 9449957

Security Officer
Job Description: Responsible for guarding,
patrolling, or monitoring premises to prevent
theft, violence, or infractions of rules. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$11.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9451128


0 a


m -


A


b .


- I





4


"CoDvriahted Material


SSyndicated Content





Available from Commercial New Providers


* *

0 0 O


* I

* *


0 0* *


I --- -- L


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Ib~l






Page 16 Thursday, January 7, 2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver
Greenberg


Presented By:
Lowndes
Drosdick
DostergC
Kantor L.
Reed, PA.
A T T O R N E Y S
AT LAW

bright house
NETWORKS


Supported By:

University of
Central
Florida

O bs inter Park/Matnd
Observer


Ur TT QCL1KC rltK n lEKITA1

DISTINGUISHED
GUESTS
Mayor
Ken Bradley
Vice Mayor
Karen Diebel
City Commissioners
Phil Anderson
Margie Bridges
Beth Dillaha


Wednesday, January 13th, 2010
11:30AM Registration 12:00PM Program
Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center
1050 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park
$35 Chamber Members $40 Non-Member
$265 Corporate Table Sponsor
Reservations Required
For reservations, please call 407-644-8281 or
buy tickets online at www.winterpark.org



W 8t9R9j? ."







FM 89.9 wa


Greenberg
Traurig
G600D ORNVIG WINTER PARK
The issues The Questions The Discussion The People
.................................................................................................... t's th e p lace to be!

The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
Presents


Dr. Bob Bushong
Senior Pastor
First United Methodist Church
of Winter Park
Speaking on the topic of
"Life As Community"

Join us as we start off 2010 with a renewed commitment
to our community by sharing in an inspirational dialogue
lead by a local leader about the importance of
community.

Friday, January 8, 2010
7:45AM 8:15AM: Networking/ 8:15 AM: Program
Complimentary Continental Breakfast
Winter Park Welcome Center/ Chamber of Commerce
First-floor WPHF Community Room
151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789

RSVP- (407)644-8281, ext 3648 orE-mail wpcc@winterpark.org

The event is free and open to the public.
Presented by. Sponsored by,
SGreenberg WnterPark/Maitland
SGreenberg Observer
Rl e Traurig




DANCE LESSONS
Learn foxtrot, waltz, rumba, cha-cha, and
swing with renowned instructor Stuart
Nichols. Couples & singles are welcome.
Lessons start on Tuesday, January 12,
at the Winter Park Farmers' Market
CS~Lt^'wwv 8- OOpim (4//cTcm6Jai a l 8? -.S-m
Lessons are $80 per person each series.
Proceeds benefit Keep Winter Park Beautiful
Call 407-599-3364 for more information -. .


A healthier mindset? A closer family? Or maybe just a little more time for you.
No matter what your goals, the YMCA will help you get there. So, you'LL end up
with a clear mind, a cleansed spirit oh yeah, and one great set of calves.
Go to TryYtoday.com for a 2-day guest pass and a virtual tour.


WINTER PARK YMCA
407.644.1509


CROSBY YMCA IN WINTER PARK
407.644.3606


Members have access
to all 27 Y's.
tryYtoday.com


Page 16 Thursday, January 7, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs