Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00063
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: December 3, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00063
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

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Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 21, No. 49
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FIRST COLONY

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C u i i l ne


Calendar of Events ........A8
Baldwin Park Talk ......A8
Cinema ................A13
Senior Observer........A14
Play On! .............A19
Marketplace/Games .....A21
Josh Garrick............ A22


0 94922 95642 2


Brass brothers


Gifts not found in the mall


CARMEN CARROQUINO
GUEST REPORTER
Every year after the Thanks-
giving holiday, people flock
to stores at early hours in
the morning to get their
hands on the perfect gifts
for loved ones.
But there are families,
children and individuals
throughout the commu-
nity unable to give gifts, re-
ceive them or have a home


in which to spend the holi-
days.
Chris Allen, executive di-
rector of Hands on Orlan-
do, said volunteering and
donating makes a profound
impact on not only those
you help, but yourself.
"It's important to find
something meaningful
when picking a cause you
want to support because
you'll be helping others,


but learning about yourself
and what kind of person
you really are," Allen said.
Here are a handful of
local nonprofits that need
donations or volunteers
this holiday season:

Kids House
of Seminole
A local non-profit advocat-
ing the health and safety of
> turn to NON-PROFIT on A7


Special

session a go
ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

State lawmakers may see a
clearer picture of how they'll
assemble a mass-transpor-
tation network in Central
Florida as they grapple with
the future of SunRail and
other transportation sys-
tems at a special legislative
session that starts Thursday.
Lawmakers flooded the
Capitol this Monday to
ready for the special ses-
sion, which would help in
the push for the $1.2 billion
SunRail project, as well as a
high-speed rail project that
could connect the Orlando
area to Tampa and Miami.
"We've got a lot of sup-
port for this," U.S. Congress-
man John Mica said. "We've
got both sides of the aisle
working for it."
Legislators are pushing
for votes to form a Florida
Rail Enterprise that would
oversee commuter and high-
speed rail statewide. Politi-
cal arm-twisting will culmi-
nate in a Thursday vote.
But the Legislature al-
ready faces a significant hur-
dle against the project, with
the AFL-CIO Florida's
most powerful labor union
- changing its course and
railing against the deal.
The loss of the labor

> turn to SUNRAIL on A4


Police actions questioned in case


ABRAHAM ABORAYA
GUEST REPORTER


The report Officer Randy
Davison wrote on Oct. 19
weighs in at 11 pages with
more than 1,500 words of
narrative, not including
three statements from three
witnesses and another page
to describe the surveillance.
But one paragraph in it
is turning heads.
An officer doesn't think
a man should be arrested.


Then, after hearing from
several residents, a city
commissioner asks the dep-
uty police chief to revisit
the case. He calls the state
attorney, who says to charge
the man with disorderly
conduct. The man is then
arrested. That breaks a state
law.
"I was advised that City
Commissioner Beth Dillaha
was contacted by person(s)
living on Parkland Drive,
after which she contacted


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[Deputy Chief Art] King,"
Davison's affidavit states.
"King then reportedly
called Assistant State At-
torney Mark Graham, who
told King that [the suspect]
should be charged with Dis-
orderly Conduct."
That's the situation de-
scribed by Davison in the re-
port, but everyone close to
the case is saying that isn't
how it happened.
Davison's affidavit was
sent to the State Attor-


FIRST


FLDRIDA
0 LENDING CORPORATION


ney's Office. They decided
that, based on the report, a
46-year-old resident of Win-
ter Park should be charged
with three counts: first de-
gree exposure of sexual or-
gans, second degree lewd-
ness and second degree dis-
orderly conduct. The man
wasn't arrested; instead, he
received a summons to ap-
pear in court on Dec. 18.
It all stemmed from two

> turn to POLICE on A4


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News



Knights bowl-bound after big win


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

A late rally wasn't enough to
overcome the Knights, who
beat the UAB Blazers 34-27
on the gridiron on Saturday
in Birmingham. Now they're
bound for the St. Petersburg
Bowl to celebrate a strong
finish to the season.
The Knights picked up
their sixth straight confer-
ence victory with their sea-
son-ending win.
As has been the case with
the Knights in recent games,
they led from the outset,
never relinquishing the mo-
mentum to the Blazers. At
one point in the game the
Knights had a 17-point ad-
vantage over the Blazers, but
watched that gap narrow in
a fourth-quarter comeback.
But with a resounding
final snub by the Knights,
they blocked an extra-point
kick attempt that would
have brought the Blazers
within a touchdown of ty-
ing the game. Then they re-


tained possession until the
clock ran out on a strong
season.
Six different Knights
would combine in the
team's four touchdowns
and two field goals.
In a freak statistical
anomaly the Knights were
outgained significantly in
the game, but still managed
a win. Good field position
on strong punt and kick-
off returns from Quincy
McDuffie and AJ. Guyton
gave the Knights a shorter
field to cover to make it to
the end zone. The Knights
would gain 435 yards in the
game to the Blazers' 527.
An issue that haunted the
Knights early in the season
came back with a vengeance
Saturday, as they managed
only 2 of 10 third-down
conversions, with three of
them just outside of the red
zone.
Senior Cory Hogue again
dominated on defense,
picking up 12 tackles in the
game. Junior Bruce Miller


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Quarterback Brett Hodges led his team to its sixth conference win against UAB on Nov. 28, en route to the St. Petersburg Bowl.


found Blazers quarterback
Joe Webb twice in the back-
field, sacking him back 12
yards.
The Knights' big finish
set a few marks in the Con-
ference USA record books.
Only one other team in
conference history started
a season 0-2 in conference


play and finished with six ing this their closest bowl
straight wins. They also re- game appearance. As of
corded their highest rank- Tuesday three teams were in
ing in school history for the running as potential op-
rushing defense, coming in ponents, with Rutgers and
fourth in the nation. Connecticut the favorites,
They'll play in the second and Pittsburgh another pos-
annual St. Petersburg Bowl sibility.
at Tropicana Field at 8 p.m.
on Saturday, Dec. 19, mak-


Hoop domination for the Knights


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

The Knights continued their
season-opening dominance
with a 76-72 win over Al-
bany on Nov. 28. Now 5-1,
the men's basketball team
is finding its groove and
spreading offense around


Alabama Oaks
of Winter Park
ASSISTED I LIVING


the roster, which helped
them break away from a
37-37 halftime stalemate
against the Great Danes.
Freshman Dave Diakite
again led his team with a
dominating 21-point, 8-re-
bound performance. Not far
behind, sophomore Isaac
Sosa paced the team on


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3-pointers, dropping three
into the net on his way to 13
total points. Taylor Young
came off the bench to drop
10 points of his own, with
a hard-charging offensive
style that drew seven foul
shots. Dishing out of the
lane, he also picked up four
assists, leading the team.
Seven of the nine Knights
in the game scored 6 points
or more, keeping the Danes
guessing.
On defense, Marcus Jor-
dan hounded opponents in
the paint, leading the team
in turnovers created with
four, and picking up three
rebounds, one block and
one steal in the contest.
Tuesday night at press
time the Knights ended
their two-game homestand
against Newberry at home.
They'll get a few days' break
before hitting the road for
South Bend, Ind., against
Notre Dame. That game tips
off at noon on Sunday.
The Fighting Irish are
6-1 this season, losing only
to Northwestern in a 72-58
game Nov. 27. The Irish have
proven adept at scoring this
season, posting 80 points


PHOI U BY ISAAU BABUUUK I HL O UBHVEH
A tough defense and scrappy offense have kept the Knights in the win column,
with the mens basketball team boasting a 5-1 record to start the season.


or more in five games so
far. The Knights have only
eclipsed 80 points twice,
with a season low of 46


points in their only loss of
the season against Niagara
on Nov. 21.


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Page 2 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 3


Wildcats storm to playoff victory


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

Winter Park devastated
reigning Florida 6A football
champion Seminole on Fri-
day night, winning 31-10.
The big win helped propel
the Wildcats (11-1) into
the regional championship
game.
But it didn't come easy,
with Seminole keeping pace
through most of the first
half of the game. But later
in the second quarter the
Wildcats took control, with
running back Patrick Mpu-
tu carrying the ball 14 yards
into the end zone to break
things open.
After that, quarterback
Sam Richardson threw a
16-yarder to receiver Zee
Ware to take the score up to
21-7.
From there the Wildcats
cruised, outgunning the
Seminoles on the ground
and in the air, and show-
ing some special teams and
defensive scoring strength
with a 38-yard field goal
from Alex Rowlinson to
open the gap, and a 15-yard
interception return by Ker-


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Winter Park running back Patrick Mputu helped carry his team to a big win over Seminole on Nov. 27. The Wildcats play DeLand in a regional final showdown Friday.


on Rouse to deliver the dev-
astating final blow.
The Wildcat defense held
Seminole in check for much
of the game, allowing only
one red zone possession,
which resulted in a four-


yard run for a touchdown.
The win was the biggest
so far by the Wildcats in the
postseason. Now they face
what could be their tough-
est defensive and offensive
opponent the DeLand


Bulldogs.
In two postseason rounds
the Bulldogs have outscored
opponents 72-0 in two shut-
outs. In two of their two
postseason appearances,
the Wildcats have outscored


opponents 81-57.
Once again the Wildcats
will have home field ad-
vantage, kicking off at 7:30
p.m. on Friday at Showalter
Field.


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer









POLICE I Officer disagrees with deputy chiefs decision to charge local man


< continued from the front page

neighbors, a husband and wife, tak-
ing a walk in their neighborhood.
As they passed suspect James Koep-
ke's house at the corner of Parkland
Drive and East Winter Park Road,
they looked over and saw Koepke
naked and masturbating with the
blinds open and the lights on, ac-
cording to witness statements.
Koepke didn't return a request
for comment. The husband and
wife witnesses, David and Aman-
da McReary, declined to be inter-
viewed, and a third witness, neigh-
bor Ameleen Mae Gross, didn't re-
turn phone calls requesting com-
ment.
Should Koepke have been
charged? Davison didn't think so.
The police officer didn't see
Koepke do anything illegal, even
after setting up surveillance. The
legal definition of disorderly con-
duct says the act must "outrage the
sense of public decency, or affect
the peace and quiet of persons who
may witness them."
Since none of the witnesses were
outraged enough to go home and
call police the McRearys finished
their walk or call police from
their cell phones, Davison doesn't
think it meets the criteria.
"Just because a citizen sees some-
thing happen does not necessarily
mean there is legal probable cause
that this particular crime has been
committed," Davison said. "I have
to examine what they're telling me
and put that in the framework of
the legal charge."
Davison said that the direction to
arrest Koepke came from WPPD's
deputy chief after a high-ranking
state attorney told police to charge
him with disorderly conduct. And
that came only after a city commis-
sioner made a call to the deputy
chief asking him to look into it.
The Observer obtained a police
report detailing Davison's notes
concerning the arrest.
Davison went out the night of
the incident, but didn't think Koep-
ke should be charged, and instead
talked to him about not repeating
the behavior.
But then this happened, accord-
ing to the arrest report: citizens
made calls to City Commissioner
Beth Dillaha. She contacted Deputy
Chief Art King, who said he would
look into the matter.
King talked to State Attorney


Mark Graham. Graham told King
that "Koepke should be charged
with disorderly conduct," Davison's
report states.
Davison said he stands by what
was written as the facts told to him
- although he makes it clear it was
hearsay from another officer.
"As I indicated in the report, that's
what I was directed to do," Davison
said about charging Koepke. "Again,
that's the way I do reports. I try to
provide all the information I can."
King told the Observer that the
conversation with Graham did hap-
pen, but not the way Davison writes
in the report Davison, after all,
got the information third-hand
from Sgt. Mike Hilton. If a state at-
torney told a police officer to arrest
a specific person, that would be ille-
gal, according to Florida statutes.
That's because the State Attor-
ney's Office isn't the legal represen-
tation of the police department. If
they give legal advice like telling
an officer to make an arrest they
would lose "sovereign immunity."
That means they could be charged
in a civil case if the arrest was in-
valid.
King said the conversation was
based in hypothetical situations. He
said that after he looked over the
case after Dillaha's phone call, he
felt it was a gray area that maybe
Koepke should have been charged.
"We're here to do a thorough,
complete, professional job," King
said. "I feel better knowing that my
decision was checked by someone
higher than me to make the right
decision." The State Attorney's Of-
fice wouldn't let the Observer in-
terview Graham about the conver-
sation because it's part of an ongo-
ing case. Randy Means, director of
Investigations with the State At-
torney's Office, said they normally
frown on law enforcement calling
attorneys and asking advice.
But he said he could see a situa-
tion where an attorney and a law
enforcement officer could discuss
hypotheticals.
"We will not tell law enforcement
officers to make an arrest one way
or another," Means said. "So if it was
done, shame on our part. And police
departments shouldn't be asking us
whether or not to make an arrest."
Means said they will likely meet
with Graham to find out what hap-
pened.
"We will have an administrative
meeting with him," Means said. "We


RAIL I 'Big changes' for SunRail deal


< continued from the front page
union support could be crippling
to some Democratic votes, which
have been seen as closely tied to the
approval of labor unions.
But Mica said that the deal would
help create jobs and improve the
economy.
"It would be a huge economic
shot in the arm, especially with the
economy down," Mica said. "The
construction of the stations, the
tracks, the signaling it would be
one of the biggest infrastructure
projects we've had in a long time."
Contingent on the deal's ap-
proval is a change to the liability
provisions, which some lawmakers
have tried to strengthen to protect
Florida from carrying the full brunt
of economic liability in the event
of an accident on the rail lines. Rail
line operator CSX, which would
enter into a deal with the state
department of transportation in
the agreement, had previously at-
tempted to remove its liability in


the event of an accident along the
commuter rail lines.
Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley,
who has seen grappling at the City
Commission dais on a rail system
that would run through the city,
said he thinks the deal has enough
approval to make it.
"I think this has a strong chance,"
Bradley said. "And it'll be excellent
for our region. Multimodal forms
of transportation are critical for
cities to survive."
With Sen. Lee Constantine, R-
Altamonte Springs, in meetings in
Tallahassee Monday, he was un-
available for comment on devel-
opments. Constantine's legislative
assistant, Nathan Cook, described
"big changes" in the deal compared
to the one that failed in the spring
legislative session.
In Central Florida, legislators
will have to wait until the end of
next week for a verdict.
"We'll see by this time next week
where we're at," Bradley said.


don't even know if anyone is even
accusing him at this point.
"If that's the case, we will discuss
that with him. Mark [Graham] is a
very senior person here, and I would
be reluctant to believe he would tell
an officer to make an arrest."
King also said he wasn't pressured
by Dillaha or Graham, and that city
commissioners often get phone
calls from constituents concerned
about resolving cases. He said the
commissioners just forward the in-
formation along.
Dillaha said she didn't know
Koepke had been charged when
contacted by the Observer.
"I didn't even know it went to
the State Attorney's Office," Dillaha
said. "I had gotten a couple e-mails,
and I said I would absolutely follow
up. That's what I did, so they (the
police) took it from there, which is
their job, not mine."
Lt. Wayne Farrell said the situa-
tion was a simple misunderstand-
ing. Davison's direction to look into
the case came from King to Farrell
to Hilton.
"Here's part of the issue: Officer
Davison misunderstood," Farrell
said. "He was told to go out and re-
visit it and look at whether disor-
derly conduct applied, and if [it]
did, file an at-large affidavit, or sim-
ply write an office supplemental re-
port. He did an at-large affidavit....
He was given the opportunity to do
either."
King said there was no impropri-
ety, and that he's not worried about
the appearance of impropriety. He
said since he's been with the po-
lice department, there have been a
handful of officers who don't think


someone should be arrested for var-
ious reasons.
"We're to do the right thing,"
King said. "If the officer says no, and
I say no, I'm comfortable with that.
But if I'm in a gray area, let a better
authority review it to be safe, which
is what we did in this case."


PHOTO BY ABRAHAM ABOR,
James Koepke's home in Winter Park, where
neighbors say he exposed himself in the window.


As part of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce's

Successful Strategies for 2010 Series


Please Join


WORKFORCE
CENTRAL FLORIDA


CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


For a human resources seminar entitled,

"Hire Hard, Manage Easy & Retain Talent"


Featuring Jean L. Seawright,
Certified Management Consultant of
Seawright & Associates


Wednesday, December 9th
7:30- 9:45am


Winter Park Welcome Center
151 W. Lyman Avenue
Winter Park


Free to the Public!

This FREE Workshop will address such topics as:
Workforce realities: laying the foundation
To hire talent, you must first attract talent
Managing effectively begins with hiring effectively
Retaining talent


To RSVP or for questions, please call Judy at 407-644-8281 or
wpcc@winterpark.org


Page 4 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 5


Winter Park

Residential burglaries Business burglaries


An unknown suspect entered a residence on
the 2400 block of Mandan Trail on Saturday,
Nov. 21 and a stole wedding ring.
An unknown suspect pried open the rear
French doors then stole loose coins from the
1800 block of Loch Berry Road on Saturday,
Nov. 21.
An unknown suspect forced open the door to a
residence and stole jewelry on the 500 block of
Balmoral Road on Sunday, Nov. 22.
An unknown suspect entered a residence
through an unsecured bedroom window and
stole fine jewelry and a Toshiba Satellite laptop
on the 500 block of North Lakemont Avenue on
Sunday, Nov. 22.


An unknown suspect damaged the front door,
which activated the alarm system, and the
suspect(s) fled without making entry to the
business on the 2600 block of West Fairbanks
Avenue on Sunday, Nov. 22.
An unknown suspect broke the front glass door
and stole an Asus laptop computer and a Sony
Viao laptop computer on the 200 block of North
Denning Drive on Sunday, Nov. 22.
An unknown white male broke the lower glass
window with a crowbar and then stole the cash
drawer from a business on the 900 block of
West Fairbanks Avenue on Monday, Nov. 22.
The suspect was approximately 5-foot-10, 165
Ibs with short hair.
An unknown suspect forced open a suite door
and stole a Dell Inspiron 1700 laptop, USB
drives, cash, prescription pads and a bottle


of Cymbalta medication on the 1100 block of
Louisiana Avenue on Monday, Nov. 23.
An unknown suspect forced open a main suite
door and stole an iPod with "Davy Dill" en-
graved on the back on the 1100 block of Loui-
siana Avenue on Monday, Nov. 23.


Criminal mischief
An unknown suspect cut copper wiring from
several power meter boxes on the 500 block of
North Orlando Avenue on Friday, Nov. 20.
A subject was charged for slashing a vehicle's
tires on the 800 block of Margaret Square on
Sunday, Nov. 22.
An unknown suspect sprayed an unknown oily
substance on the exterior of a residence on the
900 block of Balch Avenue on Monday, Nov.
23.


Nov. 20 to Nov. 26

Robbery
An unidentified black male, 5-foot-6, grabbed
a victim's purse from her person and fled north
on foot on the 500 block of North Orlando Av-
enue on Sunday, Nov. 22.
Winter Park Police registered various noise
complaints from around the city between Fri-
day, Nov. 20 and Monday, Nov. 23 including
loud music, people and parties.
Arrests were made in Winter Park between Fri-
day, Nov. 20 and Monday, Nov. 23 for crimes
including petit theft, dealing in stolen property,
violation of pawn act, stalking, warrant, retail
theft, driving under the influence, loitering and
prowling, resisting without violence, domestic
battery, disturbing the peace, criminal mischief
and cyber stalking.


Business Briefs


Mattamy Homes U.S. Group will
start construction of 11 new homes
in December at City Homes in Bald-
win Park.

Palmer Electric Co. won three Excel-
lence in Construction awards in the
annual competition sponsored by the
Central Florida Chapter of Associated
Builders & Contractors.

The Rollins College Philanthropy
& Nonprofit Leadership Center is
working closely with Lowndes, Dros-
dick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, P.A. and
10 other Central Florida law firms as
part of the Business Lawyers' Pro
Bono Project. The Rollins College
Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership
Center is currently accepting and re-
viewing applications.

Cuhaci & Peterson Architects was
awarded contracts to re-image the
exteriors of eight retail centers and to
design interiors for three retail facili-
ties at Village Crossroads retail center
at The Villages in Lady Lake.

NAI Realvest negotiated a new lease
agreement for 1,380 square feet of
office space at 3361 Rouse Road,
Suite 125 in University Court.
Crossman & Company recently
closed two new 10-year lease agree-


ments for retail space totaling 6,876
square feet in Maitland and College
Park.

Ashton Woods Homes has appoint-
ed Ben Snyder strategic marketing
analyst in the Orlando and Tampa
regions.

Allstate Insurance Company is
proud to announce the opening of
two new offices. Allstate Agent Mi-
chael Lapella is opening an agency at
1567 Meeting Place in Orlando. All-
state Agent Patrina Freeman is open-
ing an agency at 549 Wymore Road
#208 in Maitland. Both offices will
open on Dec. 1.

RLF, a leading Winter Park-based
architecture, engineering and in-
terior design firm, recently received
two Merit Awards in the Best of 2009
competition held by Southeast Con-
struction Magazine.

The Central Florida office of
SIKON Construction was awarded
a contract for the new $3 million,
45,000-square-foot Publix Super
Market at 2227 W. New Haven Ave.
in Melbourne.

Larry Vershel Communications
was named public relations agency


for Meritage Homes, Central Florida.

Rebecca Furman of Lowndes,
Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed
recently took part in the Developer's
Update: Navigating Change panel.

Palmer Electric Co. announced the
expansion of its residential north
Florida office, the opening of its new
residential office in Central Florida
and the signing of a new homebuilder
client, Lennar Homes.

Mary Hurley, real estate and leasing
manager of Pineloch Management
Corporation, received the Leadership
in Energy and Environmental Design
Accredited Professional designation
from the U.S. Green Building Council.

The Central Florida office of SIKON
Construction has been awarded
a contract to build the new Publix-
anchored Seminole Shoppes retail
center in Neptune Beach.

William T. Dymond Jr. of Lowndes,
Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed
was elected vice chair of the Down-
town Development Board and the
Community Redevelopment Agency
Advisory Board on Oct. 28..


Brandywine Square

Courtyard Shopping Sidewalk Cafe *
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum

Brandywine Deli Cida's of Winter Park Antiques
Cida's of Winter Park featuring On the Avenue
Enjoy eating outside on The Original Consignment Quality Antiques
beautiful Park Avenue. Buffet Collection. Owned by Hardy Hudson.
catering specialist since 1972 407-644-5635 407-657-2100

Family Comics & Cards Essence NOW OPEN!
Follow the exploits of your favorite Salon & Day Spa Ueltimate Fitness
comics from yesterday and today. Hair-Manicures-Pedicures-Nail by Yatska
comicsfromyeserdayandt Extensions-Facials-Waxing
Trading cards for every taste! 407-629-2588 407-782-9171


Winter Park /Maitland

Observer


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


Volume 21, Issue Number 49


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Eric Sly
407-563-7054
erics@observernewspapers.com


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-563-7023
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIEDS
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
legal@observernewspapers.com


CLASSIFIEDS LISTINGS
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
classified@observernewspapers.com

COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Megan Stokes
megans@eosun.com

INTERN
Sarah Kezer


COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us

Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com

Josh Garrick
joshgarrick9@gmail.com
407-522-3906

ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-628-8500, ext. 308
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


Member of: RO. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr.
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-563-7000 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer@ 2009


Published Thursday. December 3.2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer








Community Bulletin


Make a difference in the life of a child by
bringing a new unwrapped toy to any Central
Florida Chick-fil-a or Qdoba Restaurant loca-
tion or Centra Care clinic location from Nov.
27 through Dec. 14. Contact Dawn or Sandi at
Christian HELP, 407-834-4022 or visit www.
christianhelp.org.
This year's first place winner of the 17th An-
nual Young Artist Competition is cellist Logan
Castro of Saint Cloud. Flutist Jake Chabot won
second place and pianist Enoch Wong from Or-
lando won third place.
Maitland Library youth services librarian
Michelle Swiat and her standard poodle, Trek,
will be among the contenders at the prestigious
American Kennel Club National Obedience In-
vitational. Michelle Swiat will compete Dec. 12
and 13 in Long Beach, Calif. Visit www.akc.org/
aenc for more information.
The Florida Wildflower Foundation, Mait-
land, recently donated $100,000 to the Gary
Henry Endowment for the Study of Florida Na-
tive Wildflowers at the University of Florida/IFAS.
The endowment is made possible by the $15
donation made with the purchase of each State
Wildflower license tag.


The Howard Phillips Center for Children &
Families will be collecting holiday gifts for
their Adopt-a-Family Drive now through Mon-
day, Dec. 14. To adopt a family or to arrange
for donation pick-up, please contact Amy Drury
at 407.317.7430, ext. 2197 or Amy.Drury@or-
landohealth.com. Donations can be dropped off
at the Howard Phillips Center: 601 W. Michigan
Street, Orlando.
Interstate All Battery Center kicked off a six-
week recycling drive at the company's 157 loca-
tions from Nov. 16 through Dec. 31 to celebrate
America Recycles Day. Orlando customers can
bring in a used car, laptop or cell phone battery
in exchange for a free pack of alkaline batteries
and a coupon for 20 percent off their next pur-
chase. IABC Orlando is located on 1950 W. State
Road 426.
Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson is urging
consumers to check on the registration status
and funding history of charities before agreeing
to donate any money. Bronson says it is pru-
dent to take time to investigate a charity and
ensure the money is being spent wisely. Con-
sumers can find out if a charity is registered by
calling 1-800-HELPFLA (1-800-435-7352), or


1-800-FLAYUDA for Spanish-speaking opera- Interior design students at Seminole State
tors, or by visiting http://www.800helpfla.com. College of Florida are using their creativity to
They can also check the complaint history of an transform the Leu House Museum into Leu's
organization. Holiday House (pictured above). The holiday dis-
play runs through Jan.7 at the museum, which
There is an upcoming reunion of Winter Park is at 1920 N. Forest Ave., Orlando. Hours are 10
High School Class of '70. Contact the commit- a.m.-3:30 p.m.
tee on Facebook at Wphs NineteenSeventy or
e-mail WPHS.1970.Alumni@gmail.com.


For people with



Alzheimer s


there's


no time to lose.


A research study ICARA is now under way to
explore a possible new investigational treatment for
Alzheimer's disease.

You may be eligible to participate in the ICARA study if you:
* Are 50 to 88 years old
* Have a diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease

In addition to receiving study-related physical exams and
laboratory services at no charge, participants may receive
study drug and will be monitored by a medical team,
including a nurse or study coordinator and a physician.

Ask your doctor if the ICARA study is right for you.

Call Neurology Associates, PA

at 407-647-5996, Ext. 241 A,


or visit www.ICARAstudy.com


for more information.


ICU A
Investigational Clinical Amyloid
Research in Alzheimer's


Cajllus










e-al us:



suscibe


Page 6 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 7


NON-PROFIT I Local charities are in need of donations, volunteers for holidays


< continued from the front page

children who've experience
neglect or abuse, Kids House
of Seminole is hosting a hol-
iday party from 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. on Dec. 5 for children
who've been helped by Kids
House of Seminole. Marcie
Dearth, development di-
rector of Kids House, said
the event is hosting about
400 children, who have
walked through their doors,
so they can experience the
holidays as children should.
The event, held at Seminole
State College, will feature
arts and crafts, games, and
photos with Santa, where
each child will receive a toy
from their wish list. "It's an
exciting time for kids just to
be kids," Dearth said. Kids
House is looking for volun-
teers for the event and toy
donations from the com-
munity, and asks for anyone
interested in helping with
the event to call Kids House
at 407-324-3036 ext. 237.
Kids House of Seminole is
located at 5467 N. Ronald
Reagan Blvd.

HOPE Foundation
With a mission to prevent
and reduce homelessness in
Central Floridabyequipping
individuals and families to
become self-sufficient, the
HOPE Foundation in Ovie-
do is hosting its second an-
nual "Christmas in the City"


on Dec. 20. The event part-
ners the HOPE Foundation
with 20 local churches to
help families in need during
the holidays.
At last year's event more
than 500 families were giv-
en a complete Christmas
dinner totaling $25,000,
and more than 600 children
were given two new gifts to-
taling $30,000. The event,
which lasts from 1 p.m. to 5
p.m. at the Oviedo Aquatic
Center, located at 148 Ovie-
do Blvd., allows families and
individuals to walk through
the facility and shop for
holiday gifts and necessities,
said Joan Faulkner, a Hope
Foundation director. While
outside, there will be music,
food, announcements and
children's games.
Hoping to serve more
than the 1,100 helped last
year, Faulkner said fami-
lies in need must register in
person by Saturday, Dec. 12
at the HOPE Foundation's
Emergency Food Pantry lo-
cated at 149 E. Broadway St.
in Oviedo. Families must be
from Seminole County and
cannot be registered for
another Christmas event.
Proof of residence and ID is
required for all members of
the family. Those who want
to donate items, money or
volunteer their time should
call 407-366-3422 or visit
www.helpforthehomeless.
net.


Seniors First
Seniors First, a non-profit
social service organization
dedicated to the needs of
Central Florida senior citi-
zens, is hosting two holiday
events:
The Holiday Shoebox Gift
Drive helps brighten the
season for more than 4,000
seniors just by filling a shoe-
box. The drive is designed
for frail and homebound
senior citizens that may not
otherwise receive a gift for
the holidays. Seniors First
asks people to fill a shoe-
box with gift cards, hygiene
products, puzzle books, cal-
endars, notepads, dominos,
wallets with some change
or small bills, and anything
else that a senior might en-
joy. Jan Ingrando, director
of community relations and
marketing for Seniors First,
said that slogan for the drive
is, "A little box that goes a
long way to brighten a se-
nior's holiday." With 2,500
boxes already committed to
benefit seniors through the
Meals on Wheels program,
Ingrando said she hopes
they reach their 4,000 shoe-
boxes-collected goal.
On Sunday, Dec. 20, Se-
niors First hosts their 3rd
Annual Holiday High Tea at
the Peabody in Orlando, lo-
cated at 9801 International
Drive. They invite the com-
munity to spend a delight-
ful afternoon enjoying fruit,


sandwiches, desserts and
exotic teas with the chance
to win prizes. Jan Ingrando
says special guest judges
will judge the guests' styl-
ish tea hats. A chance auc-
tion and silent auction will
also take place at the event,
which raises money to ben-
efit homebound seniors liv-
ing in Orange and Seminole
County. Tickets are $50 and
can be purchased by calling
Ingrando at 407-581-9366.
For more information, e-
mail her at jingrando@se-
niorsfirstinc.org.

Christian HELP
Christian HELP, devoted to
preventing homelessness
by helping people find jobs
while providing for them in
the meantime, is partnering
with Chick-fil-a and Qdoba
eateries to allow customers
the opportunity to sponsor
a child this holiday season.
At participating restaurants,
customers can take part in
Christian HELP's Dove Tree
project, where the age and
gender of children in need
will be placed on the tree, so
customers can buy toys and
necessities to give them for
the holidays.
Christian HELP has also
partnered with Centra Care
clinics as a drop-off point
for new, unwrapped toys.
Additionally, Christian HELP
offers community members
the chance to sponsor a


family at the low and gener-
ous price of $40 this holiday
season. Lastly on Dec. 17, 18,
21 and 22, Christian HELP
is looking for volunteers to
participate in the Christmas
distribution event, where
families or individuals can
come in and shop for items
to give and receive. For more
information on all of these
events and opportunities,
visit www.christianhelp.org
or call 407-834-4022. Chris-
tian HELP is located at 450
Seminola Blvd. in Cassel-
berry.

Second Harvest
Food Bank
The Second Harvest Food
Bank is always looking for
volunteers to help them
collect, store and distribute
donated food to more than
500 partner agencies in six
Central Florida counties.
Contact their volunteer ser-
vices manager, Mindy Ortiz
at 407-843-5009 ext. 20 or
mortiz@foodbankcentral-
florida.org for more infor-
mation. Also, visit their Web
site at www.foodbankcen-
tralflorida.org and click on
the volunteer tab to see a
full list of United Way spon-
sored organizations, such as
the Coalition for the Home-
less of Central Florida, for
holiday giving opportuni-
ties throughout the com-
munity.


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Page 8 Thursday, December 3, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Baldwin Bark & Meow
On Saturday, Dec. 5, Bald-
win Bark will host "Naugh-
ty & Nice Pet Pajama Party"
from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. There
will be yummy bites for
the doggies, pictures with
Santa, a Holiday Sale Tree,
Puppy Pawdicure, 15 per-
cent off boutique purchases
and a create a personalized
piece of doggie art. Oh and
let's not forget the cham-
pagne for the humans!
Baldwin Bark is located at
4836 New Broad Street, Or-
lando. For more details, call
407-893-6868.

BullFish Baldwin Park
Friday, Dec. 4 BullFish hosts
their Wine Flight: Wine
Tasting Series from 5:30
p.m. 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 11 BullFish
hosts Holiday Wine Tasting
& Presentation from 6 p.m.
- 8 p.m. featuring a selec-
tion of limited production
and reserve wines. There


is a $10 admission fee; $5 is
applied to purchase of $15
or more.
Friday, Dec. 18 BullFish
hosts Wine Flight A Toast
to 2010 from 5:30 p.m. -
7:30 p.m. Try a sampling of
sparkling wines for your
New Year's celebration
BullFish is located at
4899 New Broad Street, Or-
lando. For more details call
407-894-3474.

Jack's Steakhouse
On Dec. 4, 5 11, 12, 18, 19
and 26, Jack's Steakhouse
hosts evenings with "Live
Music".
On Dec. 31 Jack's Steak-
house hosts a New Year's
Eve Bash with Live Enter-
tainment with a dance
floor. Dinner is served until
10 p.m. and there will be a
Champagne Toast. Jack's
Steakhouse located is at
4868 New Broad Street. For
more details, call 407-896-
2688.


Baldwin Park

Community Update

BY PAT JONES-PETRICK
MERCHANT'S ASSOCIATION


Tiny Toes
On Saturday, Dec. 5, Tiny
Toes Children's Shoes hosts
Santa Claus from 1 p.m. to 3
p.m., so bring your camera.
Tiny Toes is located at 4867
New Broad Street. For more
information call 407-228-
2100.

Trish's Teas
On Friday, Dec. 4 Trish's
Teas presents "Picture
Opportunity with Santa"
from 5 p.m. 8 p.m. Bring
your own digital camera
or camcorder and take as
many pictures per setting
as you wish. Suggested $10
donation per setting. Trish's
Teas is located at 4844 New
Broad Street, Orlando. For
details, call 407-896-3155.
On Saturday, Dec. 12
Trish's Teas presents a book
signing with Jesse Cutler,
author, Grammy-award
winner performer and
composer. Trish's Teas is
located at 4844 New Broad
Street, Orlando. For details
call 407-896-3155.

Annual community
celebration
Come join us in Downtown
Baldwin Park for the Annu-
al Baldwin Park Festival of
Lights holiday celebration
on Sat., Dec. 12 from 5 p.m.
to 9 p.m.
Celebration schedule
5-9 p.m. Merchant
Open House
5:30-8 p.m.- Musical Per-


formances
6 p.m. Parade
7 p.m. Baldwin Park
"Movie Night on The
Green" in the Village Center

Parade route
Starts at Jake Street and
New Broad Street
Runs down New Broad
Street to Chatfield
Right on Chatfield to
Lakemont
Right on Lakemont to
Jake Street

There will also be Horse
and Carriage rides, face
painters, balloon artists,
sand candy, make-n-take
arts & crafts, popcorn and
military & municipal "Rigs
For Kids" so you won't want
to miss this!!!!
Be sure to check out the
Baldwin Park Merchant As-
sociation December Calen-
dar of Events to see what's
scheduled. For more infor-
mation on Baldwin Park
activities, visit www.bald-
winparknetwork.com.
November was the start
of the holiday season and
Baldwin Park was ready to
celebrate!
The Baldwin Park Mer-
chant Association hosted
a "B2B Happy Hour" on
Thursday, Nov. 4. The event
was open to the public
with tasty food and drink.
Admission was free and
the event provided a great
opportunity for local busi-


Calendar


Events this week at Maitland Public Library,
501 S. Maitland Ave.:
For more details, please contact 407-647-
7700
At 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 3 the Knit & Cro-
chet Club will meet.
At 3 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 5 is creative
writing with Dale Slongwhite.
From 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, Dec.
6 is Creative Stamping with Linda Heller. Regis-
tration is required.
From 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Monday,
Dec. 7 is PC Academy class. Registration is re-
quired.

The following are free Morse public pro-
grams and events this month:
From 6:15 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Dec.
3 the annual lighting of century-old Tiffany win-
dows in Central Park with an outdoor concert by
the Bach Festival Society Choir.
From 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 4 is live
music by the Holiday Flute Trio.
From 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 11 is
live music by the Chamber Quartet.


Holidays at the Waterhouse, is open from
12 p.m. to 4 p.m., Thursdays through Sundays
through Jan. 10 at 840 Lake Lily Drive, Maitland.
Evening tours are from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Fri-
day Dec. 4, 11 and 18. Visit www.maitlandhis-
tory.org or 407-644-2451.

The 18th Annual Brouhaha Film and Video
Showcase, will be held at Enzian on Dec. 5 and
6 at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. will include films
by student filmmakers from Dr. Phillips High
School, Full Sail University, Florida State Univer-
sity, Ringling College of Art and Design and the
University of Central Florida. Tickets are $5. Visit
Enzian.org, the Enzian Box Office, or call 407-
629-1088, touch zero.

Ballroom dancing to live music with the Ar-
mand Marchesano Orchestra is from 7:30
p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 5 at the


Beardall Senior Center. Please bring a covered
dish. Admission is $4.

The Holocaust Memorial Resource and Edu-
cation Center of Florida will be screening
"Swimming in Auschwitz" for free at 2 p.m. on
Sunday, Dec. 6. at 851 N. Maitland Ave.

The Holler Family Fun Day will be from 1 p.m.
to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6, in Central Park and
the West Meadow Ice Rink is next door. Holler-
Classic activities are free and ice skating is
$10.

Friends of Fleet Peeples Park will hold a fund-
raising event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday,
Dec. 6 at 2000 S. Lakemont Ave., Winter Park.
FFPP has a goal of putting the plan for site im-
provements to the park into action by raising the
$800,000 needed.

There will be a free anthropological lecture,
"How our early settlers survived during the
late 1850s" by Roy Singer at 7 p.m. on Thurs-
day, Dec. 10 at 1920 N. Forest Ave.

Valencia Community College's vocal stu-
dents' performances take place at 7:30 p.m.
on Dec. 11 and 12 in the Black Box Theater at
701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail in Orlando. Both
are free and open to the public. Call 407-582-
2900.

The annual Winter Park Boat Parade and Fes-
tival of Lights will take place Dec. 12 on Lakes
Virginia and Osceola beginning at 3:30 p.m. in
the Polasek Gardens. At 4 p.m. there will be a
water ski show by former SeaWorld and Cy-
press Springs skiers. For resident boats, there is
no entry fee this year, and all local licensed area
boat owners are invited to participate. Boat reg-
istration is required with applications available
by contacting winterparkboatparade@polasek.
org. All proceeds will benefit The Albin Polasek
Museum & Sculpture Gardens. Call 407-647-
6294 or e-mail bgreene@rose.net.


nesses and neighbors to
meet, socialize and net-
work.
The Baldwin Park Mer-
chant Association monthly
"Movie Night" for Novem-
ber, sponsored by Belle Vie
Day Spa offered a slightly
different twist. "Rock Out
on the Green" was held on
Friday, Nov. 27 in the Vil-
lage Center Courtyard. The
Baldwin Park Merchant As-
sociation hosted a family
and kid-centric "Battle of
the Bands" contest while
local merchants donated
prizes for a fun-filled eve-
ning.
Tiny Toes Children's
Shoe Store hosted its No-
vember Story Hour each
week. Nov. 27-28 Tiny Toes
Children's Shoes held their
Semi Annual Sale. Thanks
to all those customers that
supported the pre-holiday
sale!
Friday, Nov. 5, Bull-
Fish Baldwin Park hosted
Cheese and Wine 101 Event
to a large gathering with
much success.




The OBSERVER
is now covering
Baldwin Park.

Copies of the paper are
available in front of
Subway and CVS.


December has some

exciting activities!


Visiting Angels Helps Spread Joy
to Our Seniors This Holiday Season

Visiting Angels starts community effort
"Stocking Stuffers for Seniors"


Orlando, FL (Dec.2009) Visiting Angels, Americas Choice in Homecare, has officially
kicked off "Stocking Stuffers for Seniors". They will be collecting donated items and
money donations in an effort to help brighten this holiday season for local senior
home residents by providing them with Holiday gifts.

The holiday season is supposed to be a happy and fun time that you share with your
loved ones. It is a time for gifts, food, and festivities. "I think in general as a society
we put most if not all of our focus and effort to make sure that Christmas is exciting
and memorable for those who we feel it should matter to most which is children.
Unfortunately, because of this, our seniors most often than not get pushed to the
way side and are forgotten," says CFO of Visiting Angels Orlando/Winter Park, Peg
Pickett. "We forget to realize that this holiday season is very important to people of
all ages. Everyone wants to wake up Christmas morning and open a gift and have
the feeling that someone remembers and cares about them." What most people do
not know is the reality that more than 50% of nursing home residents have no close
relatives, and 46% of them have no living children. It is no wonder that the rate of
depression among nursing facility residents can run as high as 50%, according to
some studies, with about 10 to 15% of residents suffering major depression and 25
to 35% suffering milder forms.

Because of this reason, Visiting Angels has created a community effort called
"Stocking Stuffers for Seniors". We will be collecting donated items that our seniors
could use in the nursing home, as well as taking donations which 100% of it will go
towards purchasing gifts for the residents. We will have drop off locations at which
you can bring by a new and unwrapped item that will be given as a holiday present
to a senior. House slippers, non-skid socks, night gowns, cross word puzzles and
word search books are just a few examples of items that can be donated which will
make this holiday season a little brighter for our nursing home residents.

They will be delivering gifts on December 19th to deserving Seniors with a local
Brownie Troop and Santa along with some special caregivers to help with any needs
for that day. "Please give from your heart for the Seniors in need." Says Peg Pick-
ett

Gifts and donations can be dropped off Monday thru Friday 9a-4p at the following
location: 625 Executive Dr, Winter Park, 32789, (407)236-9997We will be accepting
donations now thru December 15th.


Page 8 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 9


SMaitland CityTalk
BY DOUGLAS T KINSON
Sia MAYOR


The holidays are in the air!


I hope everyone had a
wonderful Thanksgiving
holiday with their loved
ones. It is this time of year
that we can all reflect on
the good things in our lives
and make memories that
will last a lifetime.

The Season of Lights
is upon us
"City sidewalks, busy
sidewalks, dressed in
holiday style..." only at
Lake Lily! Join us this
Saturday, Dec. 5 for our
annual Season of Lights
Celebration! Music at
the Overlook Stage will
begin at 5 p.m. and then
help me count down with
Santa Claus as we throw
the switch to light up
Lake Lily Park and start


the holiday festivities.
Food will be available and
entertainment from the
Maitland Middle School
Wind Ensemble, Maitland
Middle School Chamber
Singers and Maitland
Middle School Orchestra
will fill the air. Dancers
from the Maitland Colby
Dance Studio will delight
one and all. Mark your
calendars for this Saturday
and join me as we celebrate
the holiday season with
you!

Santa is coming to town
City of Maitland residents
should be on the lookout
for Santa Claus this year!
The Maitland Police and
Fire departments will team
up to escort Santa through


our city's streets on Dec. 19.
For more details and times
in your neighborhood,
please go to our Web site at
www.itsmymaitland.com
where you can find out
when and where you can
see Santa!

Holiday safety
Keeping Your Family Safe!
Tips from Maitland's Fire
Department:

Tree safety
Water that tree! It may seem
like it goes without saying,
but if your household
includes a natural tree in
its festivities 33 million
American homes each year
do keep the tree watered.
Christmas trees account
for 200 fires annually,
resulting in six deaths, 25
injuries and more than
$6 million in property
damage. Typically, shorts
in electrical lights or open
flames from candles,
lighters or matches start
tree fires. When decorating
your tree, always use
lights listed by a testing
laboratory. Some lights
are designed only for
indoor or outdoor use,
but not both. Larger tree


lights should also have
some type of reflector
rather than a bare bulb.
Follow the manufacturer's
instructions on how to use
tree lights. Any string of
lights with worn, frayed or
broken cords, or loose bulb
connections should not
be used. Connect no more
than three strands of push-
in bulbs and a maximum
of 50 bulbs for screw-in
bulbs. Always unplug
Christmas tree lights before
leaving home or going
to bed. Bring outdoor
electrical lights inside after
the holidays to prevent
hazards and extend their
life. Never use lit candles to
decorate a tree, and make
sure any lit candles in the
room are placed well away
from tree branches. Safely
dispose of the tree when it
begins dropping needles.
Dried-out trees are highly
flammable and should not
be left in a house or garage,
or placed against the house.
If you purchase an
artificial tree, be sure it is
labeled as fire-retardant.
Make sure the tree is at least
three feet (one meter) away
from any heat source, such
as fireplaces and radiators.


"Dothetelerskno yo by"A efr shn
nae tyorbak atrntvet
II conventional.
ho lng" anin.
... an you'v been here S-A t e9405 Hi h a 17 9

407-831-884EGu lffi;)
www) ulf t sc.or C ID T U. ONM itnF 25


NOV. 23 CITY
COMMISSION
MEETING HIGHLIGHTS
The City Commission met
on Nov. 23 at 3:30 p.m.
in City Hall Commission
Chambers. Below are a few
highlights regarding deci-
sions that were made:
CONSENT AGENDA:
-The minutes of Nov. 9 were
approved.
-The appointment was
confirmed for Ms. Dori
DeBord as the new Director
of Community & Economic
Development effective
Monday, Dec. 14.
-The resale of a Hannibal
Square Community Land
Trust home located at 654
W. Canton Ave., requiring
city's waiver of first right of
refusal and assignment of
99-year lease was approved.
ACTION ITEMS REQUIRING
DISCUSSION:
-High Performance Man-
agement was awarded the
contract for the Tennis
Management Services at
Azalea Lane Tennis Center.
PUBLIC HEARINGS:
-The resolution authorizing


the filing of funding ap-
plications with the Federal
Transit Administration was
approved.
-The Conditional Use
Request for Dr. Alexander
Jungreis to add tennis court
lighting to the existing ten-
nis court at 1360 Alabama
Drive was approved.
-The first reading of
the ordinance to amend
Ordinance No. 2730-08 to
extend the deadline estab-
lished in Section 2 by one
year was approved.
-The first reading of the
ordinance for the charter
revisions for March 2010
ballot was approved with
modifications.
-The second reading of
the ordinance to amending
and restate the Winter Park
Police Officers' Pension
Plan was approved.
-The second reading of
the ordinance to amend
and restate the Winter Park
Firefighters' Pension Plan
was approved.
-The second reading
of the ordinance revising
Concurrency Management
Regulations to implement
school concurrency in


conformance with the new
Comprehensive Plan was
approved
A full copy of the Nov.
23 City Commission min-
utes will be available on
the city's official Web site at
www.CityofWinterPark.org
the week of Dec. 14, pend-
ing approval by the City
Commission.

WINTER PARK LAUNCHES
THE GREEN BUTTON AND
FACEBOOK, TWITTER
ACCOUNTS
On Dec. 1, the city of Win-
ter Park offered Web users
three new ways to receive
information about the city
that can be accessed from
www.CityofWinterPark.org
or by logging on to the fol-
lowing sites:
1. Facebook: www.cityof-
winterpark.org/facebook
2. Twitter: www.twitter.
com/WinterParkFla
3. The Green Button:
www.winterparkgreenbut-
ton.org
These accounts will com-
plement the city's existing
communication methods
and diversify its communi-
cation portfolio. By adding
these powerful global com-
munication tools, the city
is able to send out informa-
tion faster, wider and more
efficiently than ever before.
In addition, the city also
launched the Green But-
ton accessible from the
home page of its Web site


or by visiting www.winter-
parkgreenbutton.org. The
new site encourages users
to be mindful of the envi-
ronment and also furthers
the city's commitment to
become a Green Local Gov-
ernment. This new resource
gives Web users the ability
to easily access informa-
tion about environmentally
conscious and sustainable
living.
So whether you're go-
ing green or want to keep
informed on upcoming city
events, there are now more
choices than ever.

CITY TO OFFER LIMITED
SUPPLY OF H1N1 AND
SEASONAL FLU SHOTS
The City of Winter Park's
Fire-Rescue Department
will administer a limited
supply of H1N1 and sea-
sonal flu shots beginning at
9 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 4, at
the Rachel D. Murrah Civic
Center located at 1050
W. Morse Blvd. Licensed,
insured fire-rescue profes-
sionals will administer
a supply of 200 seasonal
influenza and 200 H1N1
vaccines to the first 200
people requesting the vac-
cinations. A charge of $15
for the H1N1 vaccination
and $25 for the seasonal flu
vaccination (exact change
cash, check or credit card)
will apply. For those insured
primarily with Medicare
Part B, there is no charge
for vaccinations.


According to the Nation-
al Center for Disease Con-
trol, no shortage of 2009
H1N1 vaccine is expected.
However, vaccine availabil-
ity and demand is unpre-
dictable as the vaccine has
been initially available in
limited quantities. The CDC
recommends the seasonal
influenza vaccination for
anyone wishing to reduce
their chances of getting the
seasonal flu.
There are several sources
of reputable information
regarding current public
health situations. Winter
Park officials recommend
that citizens use the con-
tacts below for the most
up-to-date and accurate
public health information:
Center for Disease
Control: www.cdc.gov;
1-800-cdc-info (1-800-232-
4636)
Florida Department of
Health Information Line:
www.doh.state.fl.us; 1-800-
775-8039
Orange County Health
Department Call Center:
www.orchd.com; 311, press
4
For additional informa-
tion regarding the city of
Winter Park flu shot offer-
ings, please call 407-599-
3613.

Visit the city's Web site at
www.CityofWinterPark.org


Try to position the tree near
an outlet so that cords are
not running long distances.
Do not place the tree where
it may block exits.

Turkey fryers
When the turkey is placed
in the hot oil, oil may spill
onto the burner, creat-ing
a fire.
The units can tip over
spilling hot, scalding oil
onto anyone or anything
nearby. Some units do
not have automatic ther-
mostat controls to regulate
the temper-ature of the
oil, so oil may heat to the
point of boiling over and
catching fire. The sides,
lids and handles can get
extremely hot and may
cause burns.
As we enter the last
month of 2009, take this
time to reflect on your
accomplishments from the
past year and don't forget
to tell your loved ones how
much they mean to you. Be
safe and Happy Holidays
from my family to yours!

-Many thanks to Mari
Smith andKristine Neal for
their contributions to this
week's City Talk.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Lifestyles



Seven companies, one kitchen


SARAH KEZER
GUEST REPORTER
Bacon covered in dark
chocolate, vegan hummus
dip and homemade jel-
lies aren't items you'd find
next to each other in the
supermarket, but the dis-
play of complimenting and
contrasting treats seemed
to represent the heart of A
Chateau Kitchen quite ap-
propriately during its grand
opening on Nov. 18.
The 1,900 square-foot
space on Winter Park's
Fairbanks Avenue has been
newly made over into a
busy kitchen and home
base for seven individual lo-
cal culinary entrepreneurs.
These eclectic chefs all
make their food under one
roof, using it as a launching
pad to sell their products
at local shops and farmers
markets.
The master behind
Barkolate!! chocolate bark
gourmet edibles, Donna
Moore, owns the space and
offered other small busi-
ness owners she met at the
markets to lease kitchen
usage from her. Moore


said she spent about five
months searching for the
right location, then redeco-
rated it herself.
The walls now cast a
warm red color, covered by
dog-themed artwork and
photographs opposite a
large multi-color tiled bar
where Moore said she has
plenty of space to lay out
her chocolates.
Moore was "unleashed"
last year, after quitting a
corporate job she had for
30 years. Her first busi-
ness, Chateau E.I.E.I.O., sells
pet-themed products and
accessories including dog-
gie bandanas, pet sympa-
thy cards, games and two
books. Chateau Confec-
tions is her chocolate prod-
uct line she makes without
wax, fillers, or oils.
Moore makes about 20
different chocolates and
fudge including Smokin'
Barkolate!!, which is made
with bittersweet chocolate
and chipotle chili powder
and Barnie's Santa's White
Christmas Coffee Bean
Barkolate!!, which is sold
in all Barnie's corporate


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Donna Moore shows off her Barkolate!! chocolate bark at the grand opening of A Chateau Kitchen in Winter Park on Nov. 18.


stores.
"There's nothing like
women entrepreneurs,"
said Alice Reo, president
of AE Foods, who will now
use A Chateau Kitchen for
a workspace. "We rule the


world."
Reo also has a corpo-
rate background but said
that cooking and food
was always her passion. AE
Foods features dips free of
artificial ingredients and
preservatives. "Healthy


made easy is our slogan,"
said Reo. Whole Foods Mar-
ket has picked up her all
natural hummus, dips and
chilies and she also sells at
the Winter Park Farmers
> turn to NEXT PAGE


WEATHER




1 "E A I I


640 730
6 a.m. I 3 p.m.


L7 5
HmE moderate


TODAY: Scattered showers and
thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy,
with a high near 73.


MORNING LOW 56
DAYTIME HIGH 670 Wa g b
Sunrise Sunset cloudy Wind Mm
7:03 a.m. 5:28 p.m. NW 5mph 4 -.0


.I S A PARTLYCLOU D


MORNING LOW 570
DAYTIME HIGH 670
Sunrise Sunset partly cloudy Wind
7:04 a.m. 5:28p.m. I NW 5 -10


MORNING LOW 480
DAYTIME HIGH 700


clear
skies


Wind
NW 5 mph


MARINE FORECAST


m Cocoa Beach tide schedule
imph


Time
Saturday
Nov. 14

Sunday
Nov. 15


Low
1:34 a.m.
2:06 p.m.

2:25 a.m.


High
8:07 a.m.
8:12 p.m.

8:57 a.m.


2:57 p.m. 9:06 p.m.


560
6 a.m.
Friday


Sunrise Sunset
7:05 a.m. 5:28 p.m.


Page 10 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 11


CHATEAU I Baking and learning


< continued from previous page
Market.
Anna Marie Mele, aka
the Pesto Diva, said after
having her rent raised and
being forced to move from
her last location, A Chateau
Kitchen is a dream. Sold in
Whole Foods Markets all
over Florida, her eight pes-
tos are homemade and pre-
servative free.
"I like different and un-
usual," said Cathy Boullosa,
owner of Cathy's Cajun
Cuisines. Boullosa includes
New Orleans flair to her
gourmet jams, jellies, rel-
ishes and pickled veggies.
Her Mardi Gras Jam made
with onion and garlic pep-
per paired well with Sharon
Brenner's blue cheese short
bread cookie, another chef
at A Chateau Kitchen.
Brenner's line "Our bis-
cotti" includes almond,
orange zest and pistachio
biscotti and is sold in the
new Waldorf Astoria, Or-
lando. Brenner said she en-
joys cooking with the other
women because they are
able to bounce ideas off one
another and work together.
"I wish Karen would have
brought her coconut rum
cake. You need a smoke af-


ter you eat it," said Moore,
boasting about Karen
Scheff, owner of Scheff
Bakes.
Scheff will be baking her
confections with Moore
along with Lissa Adams,
owner of Chunky Junk Gra-
nola. Adams started selling
her all-natural granola in
March. "You can learn from
those who have been doing
this for a while," said Adams
about working with the
other business owners.
It may be chocolate in
the morning and jalapefio
relish in the afternoon,
but something will always
be cooking in A Chateau
Kitchen.

r


AChateau
-'tce'n




A ChtauKtce i h


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Boasting some of Winter Park and Maitland's most famous culinary artists, A
Chateau Kitchen turns out food ranging from hummus to jalapeno chocolate.


MORE THAN JUST A GAME


EAST WEST
SHRINE GAME


The 85th Anniversary
East-West Shrine Game will
be played on Saturday,
January 23, 2010, at 3:00
p.m. EST at the Florida


Citrus Bowl Stadium in Orlando, Florida. The East-West Shrine
Game is played for the benefit of Shriners Hospitals for
Children and is one of our cornerstone events every year. This
year's game will be televised on ESPN2, which will ensure
national television exposure reaching in excess of one million
households.

TICKET INFORMATION
Premium Sideline Reserved Seating $50
Sideline Reserved Seating $25
General Admission Seating $15
Questions? Call 407-467-1885


EAST-WEST TICKET ORDER FORM
Kiwanis Club of Oviedo/Winter Springs
* Buy tickets from any Oviedo/Winter Springs Kiwanian or Key
Club Member
* OR at any branch of Citizens Bank of Florida:
Main Branch: 156 Geneva Dr., Oviedo
Alafaya Office: 10 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo
Red Bug Branch: 8305 Red Bug Lake Rd., Oviedo
Winter Park Branch: 7250 Aloma Ave., Winter Park
Longwood Branch: 410 S. Myrtle St., Longwood
* OR Mail to East-West Game Tickets, PO. Box 196983, Winter
Springs, FL 32719-6983
* Make Checks Payable to: Kiwanis Foundation
Name:
Address:
Contact Phone #:
Number of Tickets: $50 $25 $15
Amount Enclosed: $


h----. H Tickets will be mailed or hand-delivered.
Shriners Hospitals -
\ for Children -.-e SHRINERS AND KIWANIANS HELPING CHILDREN






THE MAITLAND

SYMPHONvY nHESTRA


DC. 15. 2009
-73Ort -


HOLIDAY SURPRISS
fIRST PRMSbTT RIAnl (MIUR Of MAITLAnD. 341 nORTH ORLAIDO AVm[1U


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


frm COI1CnIT






Page 12 Thursday, December 3, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


G.O.


I For Greater Orlando's


Family

Calendar


Events this week at Maitland
Public Library, 501 S. Maitland
Ave.:
For more details, contact 407-
647-7700.
At 7 p.m. on Mondays is
Bedtime Stories.
At 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays is
Story time for age 36 months to
preschoolers.
At 10:30 a.m. on Thursdays
is Story time for babies to 36
months.
At 4 p.m. on Thursdays is
Reading Buddies
At 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Dec.
6, there will be Teen Pizza Taste
off. Sign up to sample selections
of pizzas from local pizzerias.

Bright House Networks and
C-SPAN are encouraging
Central Florida students to enter
C-SPAN's 2010 StudentCam
Video Documentary Competition.
C-SPAN invites all middle school
and high school students to
produce a five to eight-minute
video documentary on one of
the following topics: One of the
country's greatest strengths or a
challenge the country is facing.
C-SPAN will award a total of
$50,000 in cash prizes. Students
working alone or in groups up to
three can upload their entry form
and videos directly online at www.
studentcam.org. The deadline for
entries is Wednesday, Jan. 20,
2010. Educators can register for
updates and view details at www.
brighthouse.com/studentcam.

The following are events at the
Maitland Jewish Community
Center, 851 N. Maitland Ave.:
Israeli dance workshop for
children and adult beginners is
from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on
Monday, Dec. 14.
Isreali Culture Week kick off
will be led by Anat Taggart, Limor
Gabbai and Orna Jaffe.
Children will learn and dance
to the newest in Israeli folk
dance. Debbie Meitin will lead
the adults in the beginning steps
to traditional Israeli dances.
Intermediate dancers are
welcome to join, $5 admission.
Chanukah Maccabiah is
from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Dec. 15. The evening
will begin with a latke dinner
followed by a Chanukah lighting
and games. It is $20 for families
of four and $2 per additional child
older than age 6.
Isreali movie night and
children's sing-a-long is from
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on
Thursday, Dec. 17. Adults enjoy
an evening watching "Lost
Islands" while kids and teens
watch "8 Crazy Nights" and eat
falafel.
The JCC offers a variety of
winter break camps from Dec. 21
through Jan. 1. Visit OrlandoJCC.
org.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF NATHANIEL'S HOPE
Groups of carolers visit disabled children in local hospitals during the holidays each year to lift their spirits as part of Nathaniel's Hope's Caroling for Kids


ABRAHAM ABORAYA
GUEST REPORTER

Ask Pastor Wally Meyer if he
has any favorite stories from
volunteering with Caroling
for Kids for the last six years
and he'll pause. His favorite
story isn't a specific one, but
rather one that unfolds ev-
ery year at Florida Hospital
East.
Every year, there are
children with the group of
carolers bringing Christ-
mas spirit and gifts to
children in the hospital on


Christmas. And every year,
a child will go into a room
and give a toy to another
child.
"There's just a connection
immediately, the kid smiling
at the bed," said Meyer, who
was a Florida Hospital East
Foundation board member
until a few years ago. "It's
so neat to see that. And that
happens on a regular basis."
Since Christmas 1998,
Nathaniel's Hope, a non-
profit Christian mission
organization dedicated to
helping children with dis-


"
' .. .
\


"For my teach-
ers, the animals,
games, for
everything."
Michai,
age 5


"For my brother
and Hoppy my
bird, he's like my
little brother.
Abbigal,
age 4


abilities, has organized Car-
oling for Kids. It all started
with Marie Kuck, the execu-
tive director.
Kuck's son Nathaniel was
born prematurely on June
6, 1997, with multiple birth
defects, including duode-
nal artesia (the absence or
closure of the first section
of the small intestine) and
craniosynostosis (a condi-
tion where the skull closes
too early in development,
causing brain and skull
growth problems). He spent
most of his four and a half


years in and out of hospitals,
being fed through tubes and
getting multiple surgeries.
That included Christ-
mas 1997, Nathaniel's first
Christmas. While in the
hospital, Kuck realized that
no one wanted to be there
on Christmas not the pa-
tients, not the families and
not the caregivers.
So the next year, Kuck got
about 40 volunteers togeth-
er and they walked through
the hospital, singing carols
and giving small presents to
> turn to NEXT PAGE


This week kids from Wee The People
Pre-K in Sanford were asked:


"What are you thankful for?"


Interested in getting your face on The Buzz? Call us at 407-563-7000 and
ask for associate editor Jenny Andreasson to sign up for a visit to your school.


"For being nice
to everyone, my
sister and Dan-
ger, my dog."
Madison,
age 5


"I don't know,
maybe for
everything."
Saunti,
age 4


"For my dog,
Elmo, my new
school and my
smile."
-Adam,
age 4


-111 ~


Page 12 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer












n e ma A showcase of this week's releases,
Sand a look ahead to upcoming movies.

Coming Dec. 18









'Did you Hear About the
Morgans?'

Coming Dec. 25









Coming Jan. 8 Coming Jan. 15 S ** Sm ,
-W4






'Shel' Invictus'
'Youth in Revolt' 'The Spy Next Door'


CAROLING I Ready for holidays


< continued from previous page
the children.
"This last year, we had
550 people going into the
hospitals in 14 caroling
teams," Kuck said.
Nathaniel's Hope, Kuck's
organization, is ramping up
for this Christmas. Before
the big day, they are asking
the community to donate
prepackaged snack items,
Christmas cookies, big red
and white candy canes and
beanie babies. The dead-
line to drop off items is
Dec. 16, and the items can
be dropped off at any Wal-
greens, including the loca-
tion at State Road 436 and
Curry Ford Road.
They also need volun-
teer carolers and musicians
on Christmas Day to bring
cheer to the hospital as well
as homebound children
with disabilities, which
over the past few years the
program has been expand-
ed to include. Last year,
they paired 72 homebound
children with 72 groups of
carolers to sing and hand
out presents. Kuck said that
having a child with disabili-
ties can be severely taxing
financially, and for some
families, the gifts Nathan-
iel's Hope gives are the only
gifts the children get.
"The needs are incredi-
ble," Kuck said. "We're trying
to identify the families that
are the neediest and that


truly couldn't come to us to
get the help they need."
Nathaniel's Hope orga-
nizes four major programs
every year, including Car-
oling for Kids. They offer
the Buddy Break program,
which allows families with
children with special needs
to drop their child off at a
church and take a break for
an hour or two. They offer
the Birthday VIP program,
which sends various cards
and letters of encourage-
ment to children through-
out the year.
Every June, Nathaniel's
Hope puts on the Make 'm
Smile event, which cele-
brates Nathaniel's birthday.
This June, they had 7,000
people at the event, includ-
ing 1,000 kids with special
needs.
Meyer, a pastor at Cal-
vary Assembly of God in
Orlando, said that he would
encourage anyone think-
ing about volunteering to
do it. He said caroling in
hospitals on Christmas has
helped him to better appre-
ciate time with his family
on Christmas.
"Oh Amen," Meyer said.
"I don't know that I've ever
spent a night in the hos-
pital. To think that you're
there on Christmas, when
it's such a family day and a
day to celebrate the birth
of Jesus Christ, you're even
more thankful of what you
have."


BEEN IN AN AUTO ACCIDENT?

YOU DON'T HAVE TO LIVE WITH THE PAIN
* Neck Pain
* Headaches
* Middle and Lower Back Pain
* Shooting Pain Down Arms or Legs
* Numbness and Tingling of Hands or Feet
* Just Plain Old Aches and Pains
These are among the many conditions treated well with chiropractic care!

TRY CHIROPRACTIC!


T/


Dr. Frank T. Comparetti, D.C.
1850 Lee Rd, Suite 324 Winter Park, FL 32789
407-951-8349


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 13






THRIVE @55 AND BEYOND!


Seniorserver


BINS N'S
Home Health Care Centers
c7- -ce 953 -
www.binsons.com


762 E. Altamonte Drive
Altamonte Springs,
FL 32701
(407) 691-3009


* U


2069 Aloma Ave.
Winter Park,
FL 32792


(407) 679-2135


Page 14 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 15


Senior


Older Drivers Safety Week is Dec. 2 through
12. The Web site www.aota.org/Older-Driver/
Awareness.aspx has articles on driver screen-
ings, adaptations, and life after driving.

The Winter Park Life Long Learning Institute
will host Jacqueline Rawiszer, ACC of Reform
Judaism, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on
Thursday, Dec. 3 at the Winter Park Library.

Many seniors need ways to finance their
dreams and are turning to reverse mortgages
and life settlement because these have been
largely unaffected by the recession. Online
calculators like those at www.goldengateway.
com are a good way to determine if they can
help.

RetireSafe, a senior advocacy group, is call-
ing on all of America's seniors to protest the
massive cuts to Medicare. RetireSafe President
Thair Phillips said, "the simple, uncomplicated
fact the legislators are skirting is: This bill cuts
Medicare by almost $500 billion." Visit www.
retiresafe.org

Claire Gaynor of Cornerstone Hospice will
present a free seminar "Adult Children Caring
for Their Parents" from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m. on
Thursday, Dec. 17, at the Orange County Li-
brary, 101 E. Central Blvd. on the third floor,
Albertson Room. Lunch is provided to the first
50 people who RSVP to 407-836-7446 or of-
ficeonaging@ocfl.net.

On Dec. 2 and 3, the Senior Resource Alli-
ance will offer a training seminar for ALF and


Eighteen years after moving
to The Mayflower, Eleanor
McKechnie says moving to
The Mayflower was one of the
best choices she's ever made.
"There's so much to do here,


Bulletin


AFCH providers. For more information call Jean
or Barbie at 407-514-1800.

The 2009 National Triad Conference is com-
ing to Orlando on Dec. 7 through Dec. 10. Visit
www.nationaltriad.org/Orlando09.

The Agency for Health Care Administration
is "connecting Florida with health care infor-
mation" through its easy-to-navigate Web site,
www.floridahealthfinder.gov.

Elderhostel, the popular travel and life-long
learning organization has changed its name
to Exploritas. Exploritas offers educational tours
in all 50 states and more than 90 countries.
Learn more at http://exploritas.com.

Visit www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/
statcomps/ for data on individuals receiving
Social Security.

The Food & Drug Administration Web site
has a consumer page with information and
updates on everything from drugs, food, medi-
cine and more; www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/
ConsumerUpdates.

Serving the Health Insurance Needs of El-
ders, or SHINE, is a program of the Florida
Dept. of Elder Affairs. Shine volunteers provide
educational materials and free unbiased insur-
ance counseling to Florida elders on Medicare,
Medicaid, prescription assistance, long-term
care planning and insurance, and other health
care issues. For information, call 1-800-963-
5337.


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It's a good plan for the future.

Call today to secure a spot on
our waiting list.

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Page 16 Thursday, December 3, 2009 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver


by Matilda Charles

If you start now, you have time to
make the best holiday gift your
family has ever had.
What I have in mind is called
Life Story Writing. You'll tell pieces
of your life story, either written
down or as an oral history on tape
or video, and give it as a gift to
your family.
Here's a suggestion for get-
ting started: As quickly as you
can, make a list of your life's early
events, things your family might
not know, jotting down a word
or two to remind yourself later.
Make the list as long as you can,
and keep it handy because other
things will come to mind as you
get started.
By events, I don't necessarily
mean big things. It's in the small,
everyday life occurrences you'll
find the greatest value.
If you have a computer, use
that. Copy the files onto CDs.
If you have a tape recorder, use
that to record your stories. Tapes
can be duplicated.
Or you handwrite your stories,


if that is easiest for you.
Still don't know how to start?
Here are some ideas to get you go-
ing.
"I learned a hard lesson when

"One thing I never told my par-
ents was ..."
"The best day of my childhood
was..."
"The first car I ever had was..."
"My first job was..."
"I got caught doing ..."
The more details, the better.
Even the smallest descriptive de-
tail can make your story come
alive.
If telling your life story is
something you'd like to do, but
you want help with it, ask among
your friends who has a camcorder
or who can transcribe what you
write.
Don't believe that your story
has no value. It does! Chances are
your family will want more chap-
ters! Consider this as chapter one
in a family heirloom.

Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot per-
sonally answer reader questions, but will
incorporate them into her column whenever
possible. Write to her in care of King Features
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475, or send e-mail to columnreply@
gmail.com.
2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


GI Bill backlog leaves


vets in lurch


by Freddy Groves


With the economy being in the
shape it's in, a record number of
people have decided to sit it out -
and go back to school. Veterans are
a healthy portion of that number.
The new GI Bill, with its cash
benefit, is a good impetus for veter-
ans to enroll.
The problem? Getting the
money. The Department of Veter-
ans Affairs didn't expect to be so
swamped with education claims.
Recently, the delays in getting
the funds out were so long that the
VA came up with a way for veterans
to get their checks pronto: Appear
in person at the closest regional
office, and a check would be cut
while you wait. I imagine the VA
hoped that would take care of the
backlog and get things back on the
right track.
Well, it didn't. Unfortunately,


that payment at the regional office
was a one-time deal. If you've done
it once, you can't do it again.
Now the solution, it says, is to
hire an outside contractor.
Don't those two words out-
side contractor just send a shiver
down your spine?
It's said that the outside contrac-
tors will weed through the backlog
by doing enrollment certification.
VA personnel will actually make
the claims decisions. At this point,
the VA has put out a solicitation for
a contractor to handle the work.
Bottom line: If you're stuck in
this no-check scenario, don't give
up. Stay in school. Talk to the people
in the appropriate department and
see if you can make arrangements
to pay your tuition later. Maybe
you can take out a school loan for
expenses and pay it off when the
checks come in. Just don't quit.
These education benefits are yours.
You've earned them.

Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475, or send e-mail to columnreply@
gmail.com.
2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


SHUTTLE I Cultural events could be added


< continued from page 14
of federal funds through
Federal Transit Admin-
istration New Freedom Pro-
gram.
"We have a very corpo-
rative relationship with Se-
niors First and the Winter
Park Health Foundation,"
Watson said. "It's one of
many, many programs we
probably fund about a doz-
en or more agencies that
can do services like this."
Cathy Edwards, chief op-
erating officer for Seniors
First, said they are very ex-
cited to be part of such a
wonderful partnership.
"Because Seniors First is
such a large nonprofit in
Central Florida that serves
seniors, it just makes sense,"
Edwards said. "So it was
just a natural partnership
to come together and see
whether we would be able
to participate."
Marsha Lorenz, CEO of
Seniors First, said they are
also getting a lot of positive


feedback from participating
seniors.
"One resident ran up to
me and told me, 'I have been
waiting for this day,"' Lorenz
said. "It just makes all the
difference in the world for
them to be able to go out
and do things."
Calvary resident Rita
Stanton said she believes
the shuttle is an excellent
idea.
"Everyone seems to be
happy with it," she said.
"I've talked to a couple of la-
dies who are just thrilled to
death about it."
Although 85-year-old
Stanton still drives, she said
she is glad to know there is
a transportation service for
her when she can no longer
get behind the wheel. She
also said she would love to
use the service if and when
the project gets enough
funds to expand and offer
more outings to cultural
events, such as museums or
art exhibits.
Watson said the shuttle's


r


primary purpose is to offer
the basics but if they receive
more funding they hope to
offer more trips for seniors.
As the program stands now,
the seniors benefit as do the
businesses they visit.
"It's a win for everybody,"
she said.











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Page 16 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


o


N


14









Maitland docs pioneer technique

KRISTY VICKERY
GUEST REPORTER
LRotert Wint. LD. hManuel Prez,. M.D.
ck Waltz never thought he
would be cruising through u;


the Caribbean to celebrate
his 50th wedding anniver-
sary two and half months
after heart surgery.
But a pioneering technique
from some local doctors
made the weeklong celebra-
tion with family and friends
possible.
Maitland-based vascular
surgeons Drs. Robert Win-
ter, Manuel Perez and Ken-
drix Adcock were the first
to perform the procedure
called endovascular repair
(EVAR), in Central Florida.
Now they're performing
hundreds of the arterial sur-
geries a year, taking what
used to be one of the most
serious heart surgeries and
slashing its severity and re-
covery time.
At one point Waltz
thought he'd be lying in bed
rather than enjoying his an-
niversary.
"Dr. Winter advised
against it at first," Waltz said.
"But then after I had it done,
he said go on your cruise."
He underwent a mini-
mally invasive treatment
for a deadly type of vascu-
lar disease, abdominal aor-
tic aneurysms (AAAs), as an
alternative to open heart
surgery. Rather than cut-
ting open his chest, doctors


PHOTO BY KRISTY VICKERY- THE OBSERVER
A group of Maitland-based doctors has slashed recovery times with a pioneering heart surgery, which has gained popularity for helping patients get on their feet quicker.


made a small incision and
inserted an artificial graft to
stabilize the artery and pre-
vent it from rupturing.
Winter said they have
been performing EVAR ever
since it was approved by the
FDA, 10 years ago, and their
institute members have per-
formed 143 just in the last
year.
"This is a huge number
for a single institute," he
said.
Winter also said that this
procedure is sometimes a
much better choice for old-
er patients because some
cannot tolerate an open op-
eration in the chest.
AAAs are the 13th leading


cause of death in those aged
55 or over, and according to
the U.S. Census Bureau 17.4
percent of the population
in Florida are over 65.
They occur when the
body's largest artery, the
aorta, bulges out. The bulge
is fatal if it bursts, but can
easily be treated by EVAR if
detected early.
According to a new U.S.
study, the rate of death for
the endovascular proce-
dure at 30 days was 0.2 per-
cent versus 2.3 percent with
open surgery.
Winter said that the mo-
rality rate for all aortic sur-
gery, open and endovascu-
lar, in their institute is 2.7


percent, which is about half
of what is considered to be
excellent on a national ba-
sis.
Perez said they have got-
ten a lot of positive feedback
from the patients who had
undergone the procedure.
"They (patients) all love
it... they like being back to
normal inwithin one month
versus three months," Perez
said.
Waltz is one patient who
Winter remembers getting
a lot of positive feedback
from after the procedure.
"He went on to go on a
big cruise with his family to
celebrate his 50th wedding
anniversary," Winter said.


"So that was particularly
meaningful."
Waltz said the procedure
went very smoothly and
he and his family are very
grateful to Winter and his
team.
"It meant everything to
me," Waltz said. "I'm a bet-
ter man because of it."
Although Waltz is not the
only one who is grateful,
Winter said he is also grate-
ful to be able to have such a
huge an impact on his pa-
tients.
"It is exceptional to be
able to help someone and
have an impact on an entire
family," he said. "That's big
stuff."


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 17










Opinion/ Editorial


Perspectives

by...


Pa 04C4SC S


Fore! Game on!


Part of me is intrigued with
the Tiger Woods jaunty line
drive into a fire hydrant
and part of me is not. I
genuinely do not care who
schtupps who, although
I did Google the alleged
"schtuppee," Rachel Uchi-
tel, and found her appro-
priately fetching. Memo
to Rachel: Wear contrast-
ing panties when photo-
graphed in a parteee mode.
Didn't your sorority sisters
teach you anything!?!
No, what would perplex
me about the whole affair,
if true, would be the "why"
question. Why have two
babies with a woman (your
wife in this case) if you are
not going to be there to
finish the "round," so to
speak? Ah, there's the rub.
Indeed.
One of my all-time-
favorite sights is to be walk-
ing down Park Avenue and
up ahead I spot a guy in
his 50s, early 60s. He's got
this "What in the hell have
I done?" crazed look in his
eyes as he holds the hand of
his runny-nosed progeny,
and beside him his new
model wife pushes a pram
with a crying baby. It abso-
lutely warms the cockles
of my heart. It is too funny.
Best of luck, fella! Have
another one! No doubt his
other children are just fin-


ishing college.
Last Saturday night I was
in Sanford having dinner
at the German Restaurant,
the Willow Tree Cafe. Lots
of Oompa-pa-pa music and
laughter. We then headed
around the corner to The
Sanford Wine Company
and listened to a great,
genuinely sublime singing
duo (They'll be back the
weekend of the 13th). In
walk two couples. I'd guess
the men to be in their late
50s, professionals, either
doctors or lawyers. You can
tell by their shoes. You can.
The gals were in their 40s.
Pretty. I intently watch the
interactions of each couple.
One woman (no ring)
is all over one of the guys.
They're out dancing and
she's listening ever so in-
tently to every word "her"
man utters, laughs uncon-
trollably at his wit and has
her hands all over him. It's
sweet. It is.
I turn to the barkeep
- who's been slyly watch-
ing the same show and
say, "Well, it's obvious they
haven't been married 10
years," and we both know-
ingly "Ha! Ha! Ha!" laugh.
No wife, no woman finds
her man "that" amusing
given enough time. Sigh.
I've repeatedly read that
the seven-year-itch is really


closer to a four-year-itch
- that we evolved with the
need for the male to stick
around at least that long to
ensure the survivability of
any offspring. If the seven-
year-itch is accurate, I'd
venture two children have
been born of that relation-
ship. Statistically speaking.
If I were to give marriage
counseling and that, in
and of itself, is hysterically
funny, regardless I'd give
women two pieces of un-
solicited advice regarding
how to achieve a long-term
relationship. My advice to
men would be much more
lengthy and nuanced.
To women, I offer two
things for a long(er) rela-
tionship: Laughter and fun.
There is no real way to get
around it. Life is genuinely
sorrowful. It comes at you
relentlessly, by the wheel-
barrow load. How do you
counteract that?
Aside: I am going to write
an essay on what percent-
age of our daily life we
should be happy. Happy
50 percent of the time? 75
percent? 40 percent? 25
percent? Happiness, as a
daily (hourly) pursuit, is a
relatively recent phenom-
enon. Our ancestors did not
necessarily "feel" that was
life's goal. But what the hell
did they know?
So all around us, all of
the time, relatives are dy-
ing, cousins are getting
breast cancer, nephews are
shipped off to Afghanistan,
children are deconstruct-
ing, jobs are lost, homes in
foreclosure, failing busi-
nesses, divorcing neigh-
bors, parents are becoming
sponge-brained shells of
their former selves and are
now moving into the bed-
room just vacated by your
college-bound child, the


chickens ain't laying, the
milk has soured and the
roof leaks. And that, per-
haps, is a good day. And that
doesn't even begin to touch
on an environment that
should have us all weeping,
a government out of touch
with reality and the infinite
tragedy of an America at
war all the time, forever.
Sigh.
Men, shallow creatures
that we are, are easily (ge-
netically?) distracted by
the shiny new bauble that
sparkles and shines and sits
dewy-eyed enthralled by
the mush that spews forth
from our mouths. So sad
but true, ladies. Men, per-
haps more than women,
require fresh ears to give
them validity that our
meager lives amount to
something more than "He
was born, he bred and he
died." Ha! Ha! He! He!
And laughter, when all
is said and done, is just the
tonic for the human condi-
tion. Irony makes me laugh,
caustic S.O.B. that I am. Yet
irony is but one "type" of
humor. I like it all. Infantile,
middle school boy humor
that centers on bodily func-
tions, noises and secretions.
You bet. Ethnic humor. Hu-
mor that takes a stereotype
and turns it on its ear. Slap-
stick humor. Sexual humor.
Mmm-Mmm Good! Puns.
Wordplays. I don't even so
much mind when I'm the
butt of the humor (Gawd
only knows I so deserve it
at times). Sheer goofiness.
Un-huh. Irreverence. Nearly
my favorite. Humor that
sees the precariousness of
the human condition and
laughs at it. Humor that
deflates the pompous, in-
flates the vulnerable and
conflates what it means
to be human, to be alive. I


love a woman who sees the
humor in life and that the
joke, perhaps, is on all of us.
Tiger is in the "rough,"
to employ an overused golf
analogy. And the world is
all atwitter about this and
that as it pertains to his life
and marriage. And part of
me says, "Are you kidding?
Obama is getting ready to
drive America farther into
the ditch, into the morass
called Afghanistan, and
we're focusing on whether
Tiger has his driver out,
swinging away on an, uh,
unsanctioned, uh, hazard?"
But then I'm reminded
of the time when Arnold
Palmer and his wife were
on the Johnny Carson TV
show and Johnny asked
Mrs. Palmer if they had any
pre-tournament rituals for
luck? Mrs. Palmer said yes,
she "kissed Arnie's balls for
luck?"
Quicker than lightening,
Johnny said, "I'll bet that
keeps his putter up." Evi-
dently, the Mrs. didn't see
the humor. Ladies: please
see earlier paragraphs on
the importance of laughter.
All I know is if the "typi-
cal" man, while hurriedly
exiting his home, crashes
into a fire hydrant at 2:25
a.m., and the wife within
mere seconds is out with
a nine iron clubbing out the
back window, we cannot
automatically assume it is
to rescue the poor fool. We
only have her word, after
all, that he was knocked
out, bloodied from the
actual car accident. Fore!
Game on!

TA JEPSON

Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters tothe Editor


Dockery, city owed apology
Mayor Bradley once again
not only disgraced himself,
but went further this time
to disgrace the city. We did
not sign on for this. His
behavior toward state Sen.
Paula Dockery at the Nov.
23 City Commission meet-
ing in which she spoke was
reprehensible and abhor-
rent.
I have long enough held
the opinion that Bradley's
ego is way too large for
this little town, and that
he clearly does not have
the temperament to be its


mayor. Not to mention that
he is not an effective mayor.
Conciliation and respect
are two characteristics dis-
tinctly bereft in his skills
repertoire.
No one, and I mean no
one, should sit idly by and
allow this churlish behavior
to continue un-redressed.
Silence at a minimum
condones his misconduct.
Nothing short of twin apol-
ogies to Sen. Dockery and
the city will suffice.
The recall petition is a
coming (sung to the tune
of the Wells Fargo Wagon).
I will go into the streets


FM Ill89ta? lo




NIUNl


FM 899


and joyfully sing when he is
banished.
-William Shallcross
Winter Park

It's not time for SunRail
For the fourth time spe-
cial interest groups are at-
tempting to force passage
of a government spending
program known as SunRail.
I have been a consistent
opponent of commuter
rail for the reasons detailed
below. With massive cuts in
education on the horizon,
even supporters of com-
muter rail are saying now
is not the time. I ask the
taxpayers of Winter Park to
contact your commission-
ers to let them know where
you stand on commuter
rail.
1. Sun Rail will move
freight traffic through our
community during sleep-
ing hours. Most people
think the freight traffic that
comes during the day will
now go through Lakeland.


But freight needs to get to
Orlando, and that freight
will arrive after midnight
on whistle-blowing trains
coming through our neigh-
borhoods. Any transit sys-
tem should not lower the
quality of life for our resi-
dents.
2. SunRail will create
more traffic than it allevi-
ates. SunRail claims it will
have 3,200 riders a day,
some which already take
buses or carpool. The re-
duction in car traffic will be
offset by additional traffic
from road closures when
the train passes through
each community. Time
saved on Interstate 4 will be
lost getting to and from 1-4.
Any transit system should
be a net gain to commuters
in terms of travel time.
3. SunRail does not have
a dedicated funding source.
Once the federal money
stops coming in, SunRail
may cost local taxpayers as
much as $100 million a year


to operate. Because of Save
Our Homes, that burden
will fall on small businesses
who are already struggling.
Any transit system needs to
have a dedicated funding
source preferably approved
by the voters.
4. SunRail will cost local
governments $1.5 billion
over the first 30 years (ac-
cording to an FDOT esti-
mate).
The special interests sug-
gest commuter rail will pro-
mote economic develop-
ment. This assumes people
will want to move into new
condos next to the freight
tracks. The reality is com-
muter rail will raise taxes
on every homeowner and
small business in Orange
County.
Please tell your elected
official now is not the time
for commuter rail.
-Matthew Falconer
Candidate for
Orange County mayor


Page 18 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Winter Park/Maitland Observer



Play On!
y *


Conservative commentary
& opinions of Louis Roney
Harvard'42-Distinguished Prof, Em.-
UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
(Assisted by b.w.:Joy Roney)

"You are entitled to your own opinions-
you are not entitled to your own facts"
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Where oh where
has my
little life gone?
ome disturbing anony-
mous thoughts have
stuck in my mind, and
have become parts of my
distracting search for the
political whole: "So much
of what I respected in my
early life is today viewed as
Shinola."
(I still don't know pre-
cisely what George W. did
to so infuriate American
voters that they paid us
back with the madcap wild-
spending Barack Obama.)
We've come to learn
there are Americans
among us who hate the
U.S.A. Spending is the way
to make us a Third World
country fast.
Here we are on the
George Soros Limited
headed for membership in
a degrading world govern-
ment. There is a catastro-
phe waiting for us around
every bend while most folks


Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 19


are simply looking out the
windows.
We are reducing our-
selves crazily into bank-
ruptcy, in a never-before-
seen orgy of spending.
Obama told us to judge
his administration by evalu-
ating the people surround-
ing him, in this cleanest
of all possible administra-
tions.
Mr. Obama has filled
most of his salaried ap-
pointments with an entou-
rage of folks from South
Chicago.
These Obama-syco-
phants all seem to have
studied their catechism
with Karl Marx, Friedrich
Engels and Saul Alinsky -
what a faculty!
I come away thinking
that these guys are maybe
some vestigial branch of
the Al Capone finishing
school. Perhaps the one
thing these ex-Chicagoans
share is their common
Marxist origins.
Mr. Obama a former
Chicago community orga-
nizer has been president
for about a year.
I am still waiting patient-
ly for his first crystal-clear
pronouncement of truth.
When will he keep one of
the vast or half-vast prom-
ises that are spurring us on
our footloose gambol to the
poor house?
I should think it would
take a certain kind of guts
to stand up in front of the
world and reel-off nonstop
prevarications!
By now, do I believe what
the president says? Do you?
I get the feeling that
those who voted for Obama
are reeling from the shock
of having to face the entire-
ty of the man.
Those of us who have
long lived comfortably with
our Constitution and "way
of life" are a bit fidgety as


the cold wind of "change"
blows down our necks.
It's quite a jarring thing
when the proudfinesses of
our American civilization
are rudely uprooted and
dumped, in one fell swoop.
Obama and his gang are
shamelessly "revamping"
the fundamental ideals of
the American Constitution!
The president's equivo-
cations, if unchallenged,
are an endangerment to
those principles that are
the backbone of our de-
mocracy. Meanwhile, we
are spending ourselves into
oblivion.
We did want "change,"
didn't we?
But "change" a la
Obama?

The riches enjoyed by hu-
man beings on this Earth
come in many different
forms.
Material wealth gets
most of the attention in our
mundane lives.
Wealth of heart and
spirit are riches far more
important, but are often
valued far less.
Reputation itself is
something of immense val-
ue: "A good name is rather
to be chosen than great
riches, and loving favor
rather than silver and gold."
Does material wealth
make one nicer or smarter?
Does it enhance one's char-
acter?
It is said that a rich man
has about the same chance
of getting into heaven as
a camel does in walking
through the eye of a needle.
Most camels are too
smart to try such a sappy
stunt!
An old saying goes, "It's
hard for a rich man to enter
the kingdom of heaven, but
it's easy for him to get on
the board of trustees." -
Anonymous


"Wealth is what gives you
the right to preach about
the virtues of poverty," said
someone who probably
knew little about either.
With Barack Obama's
folks in power, there's a lot
of talk about "sharing the
wealth" these days. The so-
cialistic nature of our pres-
ent White House is well-
documented.
When you look at all the
fine people in this great
land, are you happy to con-
template those chosen to
sit at the top?
When "sharers" like Ba-
rack get through, don't be
surprised if no one else has
anything.
You can joke all you
want about "sharing the
wealth," but in the Bible,
the locusts were probably
the politicians of today,
and when they get finished,
there ain't usually much
meat on the bone left to
share.
When you put your hand
in your pocket on April 15,
you find another hand al-
ready there-the IRS'.
"The Scriptures may have
first taught us about the
futility of riches, but it took
an income tax man to drive
the lesson home." Anon-
ymous
Have you ever tried to
spend your "wealth of ex-
perience"?
It doesn't even pay inter-
est!

Where are the snowy Alps
of yesteryear, where the
eagles and trumpets lie bur-
ied?
The road back will be a
tough climb for high-mind-
ed conservative thinkers
who know that our country
has lost qualities without
which all of us are poorer.
Even more important, we
have lost our way.
I can think of no time


in my life when the federal
government of the U.S. has
seemed so lacking in direc-
tion, in strong morality, in
good will, and in inspira-
tion.
I believe that the great
poet T.S. Eliot could have
been thinking of us and our
time when he wrote "The
Waste Land."
The word "conservative"
has overtones embodying
concepts that are social,
intellectual, political and
personal, however there are
people who call themselves
"conservatives" who don't
know exactly what they
mean.
The kind of people who
"serve" the public in all
government capacities
will determine very much
the kind of lives we enjoy.
Barack Obama himself has
expressed a like opinion.
Obama's choices for
his staff and advisers have
already changed even
debauched the mental,
physical and spiritual en-
vironment in which we
Americans now live and
think.
Late in my lifetime, sec-
ondary education has been
rudely jerked away from old
American principles and
crammed into an armature
of Marxist dimensions.
The historic feeling
that ordinary students and
teachers alike have ex-
pressed in thanks toward
our Founding Fathers has
been systematically down-
graded, laughed at, and fi-
nally spat on as "worthless."
American kids are still in
American classrooms.
But where is Old Glory -
the flag we hailed each day
in our schooldays?
Where are the eagles and
the trumpets of yesteryear,
and what has taken their
place?


Editorial


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Page 20 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2008CA008592-14-K
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK
OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE-
HOLDERS CWALT, INC. ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2005-86CB MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-86CB.,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
PATRICK NAVE, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 13, 2009
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on January 14, 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Seminole County
Courthouse 301 N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771
for the following described property:

CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 205, SANDY COVE,
A CONDOMINIUM ACCORDING TO THE DEC-
LARATION OF CONDOMINIUM THEREOF AND
EXHIBITS THERETO, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 1310, PAGE 1344, AND ANY
AMENDMENTS THERETO, ALSO RECORDED
IN THE PLAT BOOK 24, PAGES 86 THROUGH
91, INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF SEMI-
NOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH
AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN AND TO THE
CONDOMINIUM ELEMENTS APPURTENANT
TO SAID UNIT.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated November 16, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Selene Worley
Deputy Clerk of the Court

Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 217
Boca Raton, FL 33432

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
11/26,12/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009-CP-001020-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF RAY E. WARE
Aka Ray Elizabeth Ware
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Ray E. Ware,
deceased, whose date of death was April 28, 2009,
and whose social security number is XXX-XX-8345,
file number 2009-CP-001020-0, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 425 North Orange
Avenue, Room 310, Orlando, Florida 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Nov. 26, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Jere F. Daniels
Florida Bar No. 0017859
Jere F. Daniels, P.A.
1330 Palmetto Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 677-0740

Personal Representative:
Woodrow B. Ware, Jr.
5183 Tellson Place
Orlando, Florida 32812
11/26,12/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA003075
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS INDEN-
TURE TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2005-4, MORTGAGE-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, 2005-4,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
TONY WILLIAMS, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 18, 2009
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on Jan. 19, 2010, at
11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Seminole County Court-
house 301 N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the
following described property:

LOT 26, HEATHROW WOODS PHASE II, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 51, PAGE 84, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated Nov. 23, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Lisa S. Hockenhull
Deputy Clerk of the Court

Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 217
Boca Raton, FL 33432

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990
Administrative Order No. 08-01
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
12/3,12/10


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-13321
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
GAVIN GORDON, THE CREST AT WATERFORD LAKES
CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., JOHN DOE and
JANE DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: GAVIN GORDON
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Unit 511, Building 5, THE CREST AT
WATERFORD LAKES, a Condominium,
according to the Declaration thereof, as
recorded in Official Records Book 8170,
at Page(s) 1746, of the Public Records of
Orange County, Florida, together with an
undivided interest in the common elements
appurtenant thereto
has been filed against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to it on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is POHL & SHORT, P.A.,
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box
3208, Winter Park, Florida 32790, on or before
30 days after date of first publication, 2009,
and file the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED this 19th day of November, 2009.

LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: KERRY BRICKNER
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V)1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
11/26,12/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2009-CA-018618-0
Division: 32A
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RICHARD E. RUIZ; MARIA I. RUIZ; and AQUA FI-
NANCE, INC., a Florida Corporation,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 11th day of
January, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described real
property:
LOT 18, ROYAL MANOR ESTATES, PHASE
FOUR, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 21 PAGES 13-
14, PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-018618-0; Div. 32A, now pending in the
Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 12th day of November, 2009.

By: Eric Jontz
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
Florida Bar No. 133990
ERIC B. JONTZ
Florida Bar No. 64905
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
11/26,12/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA04173
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS
TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CER-
TIFICATEHOLDERS FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE
SECURITIES TRUST 2006-R2, ASSET-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-R2,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
JENNIFER R. ASARO, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 13, 2009
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on January 14, 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

That certain Condominium parcel known as
Unit No. 2933, LAKE LOTUS CLUB III, A CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 31, Pages 33 through
37, inclusive of the Public Records of Semi-
nole County, Florida, and the undivided inter-
est in the common elements and common
expenses appurtenant to said unit, all in ac-
cordance with and subject to the covenants,
conditions, restrictions, terms and other pro-
visions of the Declaration of Condominium of
Lake Lotus Club III, a Condominium, as con-
tained in Official Records Book 1595, Page
1732 through 1774, and any amendments
thereto, of the Public Records of Seminole
County, Florida

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated November 16, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Selene Worley
Deputy Clerk of the Court

Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 217
Boca Raton, FL 33432

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
11/26,12/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 59-2009-CA-005690
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY,
AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVIC-
ING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF AUGUST 1, 2007,
GSAMP TRUST 2007-HSBC1,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
CHRISTOPHER GLOCK A/K/A CHRISTOPHER A.
GLOCK, ETAL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 18, 2009
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on Jan. 19, 2010, at
11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Seminole County Court-
house 301 N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the
following described property:

LOT 14, IN BLOCK 11, OF TOWNSITE OF
NORTH CHULUOTA, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, AT PAGE(S) 54 THROUGH 58, IN-
CLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SEMI-
NOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated November 24, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Lisa S. Hockenhull
Deputy Clerk of the Court

Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 217
Boca Raton, FL 33432

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990
Administrative Order No. 08-01
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
12/3,12/10

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2009-CA-010880-0; Division 32A
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs. ETONNE DUPRAS; and ERNSLINE DUPRAS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 11th day of
January, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described real
property:
LOT 37, MAGELLAN CROSSING, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 33, PAGE 10, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-010880-0; Division 32A, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 19th day of November, 2009.

By: Eric Jontz
Attorney


JEFFRY R. JONTZ
Florida Bar No. 133990
ERIC B. JONTZ
Florida Bar No. 64905
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile: (407) 647-2157

Attorneys for Plaintiff


12/3,12/10


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009 CP-2295-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARY K. STEBBINS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Mary K.
Stebbins, deceased, whose date of death was
September 13, 2009, and whose social secu-
rity number is XXX-XX-7541, file number 2009
CP-2295-0, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Room 310, Orlando, Florida 32801. The names
and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Dec. 3, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Daniel M. Hunter
Florida Bar No. 038132
Hunter & Marchman, P.A.
1330 Palmetto Avenue
Winter Park, FL 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-6900

Personal Representative:
Billye Sharpless DePratter
324 SE Pearl Terrace, Lake City, Florida 32025
12/3, 12/10

NOTICE OF SALE MOTOR VEHICLE
PURSUANT TO F.S. 715.109(5) (6)
To: CHRICLIOPHE BLANC / former tenant. You are
hereby informed the following described vehicle
will be sold in Public Auction for cash to the high-
est bidder. 1992 FLEETWOOD BOUNDER VIN: 1GB-
KP37N9M3313421. Vehicle location: 180 HOPE
STREET LONGWOOD, FL on December 14, 2009 at
10:00 a.m.
11/26,12/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
DOMESTIC RELATIONS DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2009-DR-12674
Div. 31
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
WA MUTISYA,
Petitioner,
and
JOSEPH MUTISYA
Respondent.
AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: JOSEPH MUTISYA
Last Known Address: 12852 Gettysburg Circle
Orlando, Florida 32837
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage has been filed against you and the
Petitioner seeks an award of that certain property
owned by you and the Petitioner, YVA MUTISYA, as
tenants by the entirety, located at 1266 Epson Oaks
Way, Orlando, Florida 32837, in Orange County,
Florida, and more particularly described as:
Lot 135, SOUTHCHASE PHASE 1A PARCELS
14 AND 15, according to the plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 40, pages 132
through 138, of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida.
Petitioner is claiming special equity in the afore-
mentioned property and seeks sole and exclusive
use, title and possession of said property due
to alleged special equity in same as lump sum
alimony. You are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on NICOLE M. BURNS,
ESQ., Attorney for Petitioner, whose address is
705 W. Emmett Street, P.O. Drawer 422084,
Kissimmee, FL 34742-2084, on or before January
7, 2010, and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court at Domestic Relations Division, 425 N. Orange
Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, before service on
Petitioner of immediately thereafter. If you fail to do
so, a default may be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You may
file Notice Of Current Address, Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law form 12.915). Future
papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules Of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated: 11/25/09
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: KAREN M. SMITH
CIRCUIT COURT SEAL
Deputy Clerk
12/3, 12/10, 12/17,12/24


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2007-CA-007985-0
Division 33
ANTICA DEVELOPMENT, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VINOOD MINOO AND ROMA MINOO,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 29th day of
December, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:

Lot 2, Sawmill Summit, according to the Plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 54, Page 58,
Public Records of Orange County, Florida

6832 Mill Stream Road, Ocoee, FL 34761

together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on October
14, 2009.
DATED this 30th day of November, 2009

/s/James C. Washburn
James C. Washburn, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 0138800
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Washburn@pohlshort.com
Counsel for Plaintiff

If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance.
Please contact Court Administration at 425 North
Orange Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone (407)836-2303, within 2 work-
ing days of your receipt of this Sum mons; if you are
hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are
voice impaired, call:
1-800-955-8770.
12/3,12/10


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2009-CP-1904
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CARL E. HARMS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CARL E.
HARMS, deceased, whose date of death was Au-
gust 9, 2009, File 2009-CP-1904, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 301 North Park Av-
enue, Sanford, FL 32771. The names and address-
es of the Personal Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice has been served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LAST OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: Nov.
26, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
DOUGALD B. LEITCH, ESQUIRE
FLORIDA BAR NUMBER: 312908
Mahaffey & Leitch
2461 West State Road 426, Suite 1001
Oviedo, FL 32765
(407) 894-2081

Personal Representative:
Shirleen K. Harms
1281 North Division Street
Oviedo, FL 32765
11/26,12/3


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CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789


PUBLIC NOTICE


Notice is hereby given that public hearings will be held by the City Commission of the City of Winter
Park, Florida, on Monday, December 14, 2009, at 3:30 p.m. in the Commission Chambers of City Hall,
401 Park Avenue, South, to consider the following:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA, AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 2730-08 TO
EXTEND THE DEADLINE ESTABLISHED IN SECTION TWO BY ONE YEAR.
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA, SUBMITTING TO THE ELECTORS OF WINTER
PARK PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK AT THE REGULAR
CITY ELECTION TO BE HELD MARCH 9, 2010; PROVIDING BALLOT TITLES, SUMMARIES AND TEXT FOR
THE PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENTS; PROVIDING FOR THE CALL OF A REFERENDUM ELECTION;
PROVIDING FOR DIRECTION TO THE CITY CLERK; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS, SEVERABILITY,
CODIFICATION, EFFECTIVE DATE OF ORDINANCE AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE FOR THE APPROVED
AMENDMENTS.
PLEASE NOTE: This hearing will be held at 5:01 p.m. or soon thereafter
Transmit to the Florida Department of Community Affairs an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan
to amend and update the Capital Improvement Element to reflect the revised Five Year (FY 2010-FY
2014) Capital Improvements Plan and Narrative. This public hearing is for transmittal to Florida DCA
only City Commission will adopt at a later date following the receipt and response to ORC comments
from Florida DCA.
All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information is available in the City
Clerk's office so that citizens may acquaint themselves with each issue and receive answers to any
questions they may have prior to the meeting. "If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need
a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105) Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in
any of these proceedings should contact the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in
advance of the meeting.
/s/ Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC, City Clerk
12/3


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

NOTICE OF EQUALIZATION HEARING
LAKE CHELTON PLUG-IN
caorgLtw irTme WINTER PARK, FLORIDA

Dear Property Owner;
Notice is hereby given that a public equalization hearing will be held on December 14, 2009, at 3:30
p.m., at the Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida, by the City
Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida, sitting as an equalizing board to hear any and all com-
plaints regarding the special assessments described in Resolution No. 2037-09 of the City Commission
adopted on October 26, 2009 (the "Assessment Resolution") related to the undergrounding of electric/
CATV facilities within the municipal boundaries of the City of Winter Park, consisting of properties
abutting Fawsett Road, Glencoe Road, West Dana Way, West Reading Way, West Rockwood Way and
Lake Chelton Circle, in the City of Winter Park, Florida (the "Project"). Please be advised that resolution
2037-09 approved on October 26, 2009 called for a public hearing date of November 9, 2009 but that
date has since been changed to December 14, 2009.
All affected property owners have a right to appear at the hearing and to file written objections with the
City Commission within 20 days of the date of the first publication of this notice.
The Project is more particularly described in plans and specifications on file with the City.
It is proposed that the assessments for the undergrounding of electric/CATV facilities will be levied
in the total amount of $115,761.00 to be paid in 10 equal annual installments, commencing with
the tax bill for the calendar year 2010 or in full at the option of the property owner. Assessments
will be assessed on an estimated unit cost of $3,508.00 per parcel among the respective properties
abutting Fawsett Road, Glencoe Road, West Dana Way, West Reading Way, West Rockwood Way, and
Lake Chelton Circle, specially benefited thereby, all as more particularly set forth in the Assessment
Resolution.
All interested persons are advised that the description of each property to be assessed and the amount
to be assessed to each parcel or piece of property may be ascertained from the preliminary assess-
ment roll on file at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Winter Park, Florida, at City Hall, 401 Park
Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida.
It is the intention of the City Commission to adjust and equalize all assessments on a basis of justice
and right, following the hearing, and adopt a final assessment roll to be recorded in the Official records
of Orange County, Florida, which shall constitute a lien on all property so assessed, coequal with
all state, county, district and municipal taxes, as provided in Section 170.09, Florida Statutes, and
pursuant to which the assessments will be collected by the Tax Collector of Orange County, Florida,
together with such taxes.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and for such
purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office, (407) 599-3277, at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
11/26, 12/3






Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 21


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ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
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-H
FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
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month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
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OVIEDO OFFICE FOR RENT
Oviedo Office for rent. 1,640 sq. ft., $14/
sq. ft. + tax, no CAM. Reception, kitchen,
conference offices. Near 417 Red Bug exit.
815 Eyrie Drive. Call 407-365-3490.

GREAT OPPORTUNITY
Unique location in Maitland. 2 office spaces
still available. Amazing Rate $16/sf Full
Service. Call 321-436-8650


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

IT'S TIME TO SPRUCE-UP
FOR THE HOLIDAYS
Craftsman Custom Installations, LLC is ready
to take care of All Your Home Repairs and
is now setting appointments to install your
holiday light displays. Pressure Washing -
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-References Over 30 Years Experience
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operated by Greg Martin a Florida State
licensed Building Inspector certified in
all areas of home construction. Contact:
Greg Martin, 407-925-7085, gwmartin@
meandmycci.com

ATTORNEYS PROBATE
BANKRUPTCY I FORECLOSURE
LAW OFFICES OF ADAMS & JAMES P.L.,
415 South Orlando Ave, Suite 1, (Across
from Burger King), 407-679-3111, www.
adamsjameslaw.com, Julie Jo Adams,
Esq., Mark A. James, Esq., Free initial
consultation. Hours by appointment. Cards
accepted. Serving Central Florida. Contact:
Adams & James, P.L., 407-679-3111,
mjames@adamsjameslaw.com














DETOXIFICATION EBOOK
(4) Detoxification Ebook Super Sale: $7.99
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org/order.html. How to Detox for Overnight
Pain Relief. Flatter Tummy Colon Cleanse.
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(407)970-1483


OUTDOOR MARKET
COMING IN NOVEMBER
NEW OUTDOOR MARKET WITH VENDORS
COMING IN NOVEMBER AT LA VINA
PLAZA,NONA. CALL 407-459-3149 FOR
DETAILS.


Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.









Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Set Up Mechanic Technician
Job Description: Responsible for preventative
maintenance of all assigned equipment.
Installs new stations and withdraws parts/
tools from tool stock room when needed.
Accounts for broken tools and maintains
them and performs other duties as assigned.
Work Monday-Thursday, 5:00pm-3:00am.
Pay Rate: $14.00-$17.75 per hour
Job Order Number: 9443611


Sub Sandwich Manager
Job Description: Responsible for and
accountable for all restaurant operations
and profitability. Establishes/maintains
outstanding guest service and oversees all
restaurant operations to ensure maximum
sales and profitability through marketing,
inventory, expense control, human resource
management, and managing operating
costs. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9442810

Manufacturing Engineering Manager
Job Description: Responsible for assisting
in management of business unit by
participation on management team. Assists
in preparation of annual/m ulti-year business
plan and supports business plan. Ensures
performance plan and development plan
are in place for direct reports. Coaches,
develops, and provides feedback to direct
reports. Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $75,000.00-$100,000.00 per
year
Job Order Number: 9430339

Housekeeping Room Attendant
Job Description: Responsible for cleaning
guest rooms and assisting with any guest
requests. Work 11:00am-7:30pm or
12:00pm-8:30pm.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9442156

Security Officer
Job Description: Responsible for conducting
patrol, roving patrol, and/or standing guard
as instructed. Serves as general security
presence and visible deterrent to crime
and client business rule infractions and
violations. Detects suspicious activities and
watches for criminal acts/activities at or
near assigned post which may be a threat to
the business, property, clients, employees,
visitors and others alike visiting and or
entering the business or area to be secured.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9443468

Fab Process Technician
Job Description: Responsible for providing
technical support for temperature
compensated surface acoustic wave (TC-
SAW) development lots. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $30,470.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9440728


Commercial Truck Tire Technician
Job Description: Responsible for performing
commercial truck tire maintenance
including tire repair and rotation. Provides
on-call service to customers and rotate tires
to different positions of automobiles, buses,
trucks, and other vehicles using pneumatic
and/or hand tools. Seals punctures in
tubeless and tube tires by inserting adhesive
material and/or expanding rubber plugs into
punctures. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9443085

Cabinet Shop Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for planning,
directing, and adjusting as necessary
production activities and managing to
meet scheduling requirements. Revises
production schedules and priorities as result
of equipment failure or operating problems
and ensures departments to follow standard
work procedures. Work Monday-Thursday,
6:00am-4:30pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9442592

Receptionist
Job Description: Responsible for handling
a multi line telephone system, assisting
agents and walk in customers, inputting
data, correspondence and performing
general office duties. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.25 per hour
Job Order Number: 9444581

Construction Laborer
Job Description: Responsible for performing
manual labor duties as related to pipe laying,
water service, fire hydrant installation, and
water meter sets/exchanges. Performs small
diameter size wet and dry taps for service
connection, sets up push rod machine for
installing pipe under paved road, and trains
in testing and repair of all sizes of meters.
Work Monday-Friday, 6:30am-3:00pm.
Pay Rate: $12.00-$13.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9444302

Communications Technician
Job Description: Responsible for installing
and servicing products to commercial
and residential customers while adhering
to procedures and safe work practices.
Installs, inspects, and troubleshoots existing
pole, ground or indoor cable connections
and equipment. Work 8:00am-7:00pm,
days may vary.
Pay Rate: $11.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9441887


Housekeeping Utility (House Person)
Job Description: Responsible for maintaining
all corridors, stairwells, and closets.
Assists room attendants with stocking
housekeeping carts, emptying trash, and
deep cleaning rooms. Assists with guests'
requests for extra supplies promptly. Work
1:00pm-9:30pm, days may vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9442158

Office Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for handling of
escrow deposits and account receivables/
payables.
Prepares letters to customers and manages
listings/closings. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $7.25 per hour
Job Order Number: 9437127


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IA ."Copyrighted Material ,




Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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Page 22 Thursday, December 3, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


From the

Corner Table
Restaurant Reviews by



P.JA atm


One of the greatest meals

of my life really!


If you have not yet experi-
enced the tastes, the ambi-
ance and the "fun" of Cuba
Libre Restaurant and Rum
Bar at Pointe Orlando on
International Drive, now
is the time to go. They are
currently offering a menu
called "15 Tastes of Cuba." I
went, I saw, I tasted and am
more than happy to report


that the meal is truly one of
the greatest meals I've ever
had the good fortune to ex-
perience.
Spoiler Alert: At first you
cannot believe you will
have placed before you
all 15 taste-sensations on
the menu, but once that is
explained, you simply sit
back and allow the luxury


of food and more food
- to be brought to you in
perfectly portioned serv-
ings, so that the evening
becomes one great tast-
ings sensation. And it is
even more exciting (yes,
exciting) to realize how
wonderful certain foods
are that you might never
order, but you can say, "OK,
it's here, so let's try it." That
was the case for my dinner
guest and me with mustard
greens, a vegetable on the
menu. I had never tasted
this particular vegetable,
but it was so wonderful that
I immediately added it to
my Thanksgiving menu.
The decor of the two-
story, 20,000-square-foot
restaurant transports its
guests to Havana, Cuba,
with the kind of amazing
decor we do so well here
in Orlando. In an environ-
ment that recreates build-
ings and courtyards of old
Havana, the interior is an


inviting tropical ambiance
of vibrant colors, exotic
foliage, Latin rhythms and
servers dressed in guayab-
era uniforms. Our server
- Christopher deserves
special mention for provid-
ing nothing less than per-
fect service. He was knowl-
edgeable about every menu
item and checked with us
just often enough to be sure
that the food and drinks ar-
rived with perfect timing.
Of the appetizers, the pork
ribs in a guava barbeque
sauce was more than wor-
thy of the "award-winning"
part of its name. Of the en-
trees, the sugarcane-skew-
ered jumbo shrimp and the
"suntanned" salmon were
clear winners. I also have
to throw in a personal vote
for the pineapple-flavored
mojito, a surprise taste sen-
sation.
The menu is the creation
ofJames Beard Award-
Winning Chef Guillermo


Pernot who mixed the tra-
ditional Cuban beef, poul-
try, pork and seafood dishes
with contemporary tropi-
cal fruits, root vegetables,
herbs and seasonings. And
the amazing thing is you
taste some of each of those
offerings in the "15 Tastes"
menu! Pernot has a special
commitment and personal
connection to Cuba, as his
wife's great-great-grandfa-
ther was once president of
Cuba. For reservations to
the Cuba Libre Restaurant
& Rum Bar, please call 407-
226-1600 or visit www.Cub-
aLibreRestaurant.com.



T GARRICK

Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer,
educator, and fine art curator. He is a
member of the Curatorial Council for the
Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be
reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com
or 407-522-3906.


I tripvine k Orlando Arts & Entertainme


Holiday gStroll and


Tr i tin





Friday, Decenber 4,2009
S5:00 pm
Central Park, Winter Park

Presented by:

THE MAYFLOWER

RETIRE. efRENEW.
Central Park & Park Avenue will be
transformed into a Winter Wonderland at
The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce's
Holiday Stroll and Tree Lighting Ceremony.
ing the entire family for a night of cheer
to this FREE event including:
Visit Santa Claus Live Music
Face Painting and Balloon Art
7pm Popcorn Flick in the Park:
"How the Grinch Stole Christmas"
and "White Christmas"
Fresh-Made Snow
Cookies for the Kids
Holiday Cards Winners Announced
Bonds presented by:
BankFIRST
CNLBank
Citizen's Bank of Florida
Florida Bank of Commerce
For more information
visit www.winterpark.org


@Brion.Price.com
S T H E A T E R Photography

WENDELL BRUCE HAYS, P.A.
Attorney and Counselor at Law CHAEROPCOMMERC


Page 22 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, December 3, 2009 Page 23


eC ving


gifs and home accessories encouraging an earth-fiendly Ifestyle


300 North Park Ave., Winter Park, FL
407-644-2344
www.earthinspiredliving.com



GIVE THE GIFT OF KNOWLEDGE
S|b Winter Park/Maitand
Observer
Purchase a 1 year subscription for
$30 and get a full year for Free!
Plus, you'll be entered in a drawing
to win 4 tickets to the January 14-17
performance of:



Call 407-515-2605 www.wpmobserver.com


SThe Florida State Stamp Show a WSP event?
Central Florida Fairgrounds
4603 West Colonial Drive (SR50)
Orlando, Florida 32808
Friday, December 4from 10:00 AM -6:00 PM
Saturday, December 5from 10:00 AM 5:00 PM
Sunday, December 6 from 10:00 AM 3:00 PM
BUY SELL TRADE
52 DEALERS PUBLIC AUCTION (SATURDAY, 5:30PM)
USPS PARTICIPATION SOCIETIES (CSA, CSS, GPS, AND OTHERS)
180 EXHIBIT FRAMES SPONSERED BY FSDA, HOSTED BY CFSC
SHOW CACHET AND CANCEL (LINCOLN)
r Contact: Mr. Francis Ferguson 407.493.0956
www.FLOREXStampShow.com
AI. ^1 V .


One of Valencia Community College's
thirty-six A.S. career programs with
a 96% placement rate. Check out all of
the fabulous options, including an A.A.
degree that guarantees admission
to a state university, at
WWW.EDUCATIONISIN.COm.


e ea rt


ARCHITECTURE

VALENCIA


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Page 24 Thursday, December 3, 2009 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver


You Won't Believe
Your Eyes!
Don't miss the Orlando area's only
display of magical, moving, mysterious
Snowfall Lights, as seen on the
Champs Elysees in Paris.
The whole family will enjoy
a fantastic holiday wonderland
of lights, music and more.

Pier 1, Borders, Coldwater Creek,
Learning Express and more great shops
are brimming with gifts, and more
than a dozen restaurants are ready
to help you celebrate the season.
So come see for yourself this incredible
fairy tale setting for shopping, dining
and holiday fun.


Win a $300 Shopping Spree!

Just in time for your last-minute shopping,
we'll give two lucky shoppers a bundle of
Winter Park Village merchant gift certificates...
with a value of $300!
To enter the drawing, visit our website and
subscribe to our e-newsletter.
The winner will be selected on Saturday, December 19.



WINTER PARK VILLAGE
Highway 17-92 between Fairbanks and Lee Road 407.571.2700
Shop Monday-Saturday, 10am to 9pm Sunday 12-6pm


Holiday Music
Around the Christmas Tree
Music Nightly
Provided by Guitar Center

Christmas Crafts
Saturdays: Dec 5, 12 & 19
11am 1pm
Learning Express Toys

Holiday Open House
Saturday, Dec 5
11am -2pm
Chamberlin's

Breakfast with Santa
Reservations Required.
Saturday, Dec 12
9 11am
Brio 407622.5611


w h op i e p r v I I a g e .


Page 24 Thursday, December 3, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer




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