Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00062
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: November 26, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00062
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

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Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 21, No. 48
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


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PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSEI
Retailers are getting even more creative for this year's Black Friday, the official kickoff of the holiday shopping season.


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Dee Dee Cutright is excited
to open the doors to her
Winter Park Village store at
6 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 27.
Her store, Learning Ex-
press Toys, is one of about
10 stores in the Village that
are opening early for this
year's Black Friday, the of-
ficial kickoff to the holiday
shopping season.
After some sluggish
seasons, retailers such as
Cutright are getting more
creative when it comes
to drawing shoppers into
their stores. Some are even
getting a head start.
"Retailers have had the
realization that they have


to strike fast because there's
not going to be a sustained
wave of spending," Univer-
sity of Central Florida econ-
omist Sean Snaith said.
In advance of the holi-
day rush, Cutright hosted a
VIP shopping event Sunday
night for her best custom-
ers.
"I'm not one of those
doom-and-gloom retail-
ers," Cutright said. "I order
heavily and have an opti-
mistic attitude."
She is offering 20 percent
off everything at Learning
Express Toys from Wednes-
day, Nov. 25, through Mon-
day, Nov. 30, with an addi-
tional 10 percent off from
6 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Black


Friday.
She's also doing free gift-
wrapping and personaliza-
tion, and partnering with
neighbor Schakolad Choc-
olate Factory, which will
offer discounted coffee.
Local businesses and
even cities are partnering
to drive traffic to their re-
tail areas.
An ice skating rink
opened in Central Park on
Thursday, Nov. 19, an eco-
nomic initiative put to-
gether by the city and the
Winter Park Chamber of
Commerce, with the hopes
that it will benefit the Park
Avenue merchants. UCF
also has an ice rink.
> turn to BLACK on A3


Rail fight

revisited
ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

An uproar reached from the
audience into the Winter
Park City Commission dais
as state Sen. Paula Dockery
of Lakeland spoke about the
financial issues surrounding
a recent push for a Central
Florida commuter rail deal
on Monday.
But she didn't utter a syl-
lable before the questions
flew the other way, with
residents and prominent lo-
cal officials probing her mo-
tives for appearing.
"I thought we voted in
favor of SunRail, is that not
correct?" resident Jim Coo-
per asked. "I want to know
why we have our biggest
opponent of SunRail here.
I think this is good for our
economy and good for Win-
ter Park."
Dockery's presentation
focused largely on financial
conditions for the rail deal,
which have been hotly de-
bated in the state Legisla-
ture. She had opposed a rail
deal that died in the legisla-
ture in the spring session.
She presented figures
showing that the proposed
rail deal could cost more
than 15 times the national
average per mile.
"Why is Florida paying
$10.5 million per mile?"
she asked. Answering her

> turn to RAIL on A3


School bankrupt


MATT MORRISON
GUEST REPORTER
A Maitland charter school
mired in debt after pay-
ing administrators more
than $500,000 in salaries
and charges filed for Ch. 11
bankruptcy on Nov. 10.
Summit Charter School
is operating under a new
principal and board after an
April audit revealed that the


school was paying six-figure
salaries to four employees
and crediting lavish bills for
the school's principal and
co-founder. It's on two-year
probation from the county
after the findings came to
light. During this time the
school could remain open,
so long as the administra-
tors involved in the scandal


> turn to SCHOOL on A3


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCI
Summit Charter School in Maitland may be the only Orange County school to file for
Ch. 11 bankruptcy protection. The school owes more than $1 million to its creditors.


Ul


Business Briefs............A4
Community Bulletin........A4
City Talks ........ .....A5
Jepson............... A12
Play On! ...............A13
Legals .............. A14
Marketplace/Games .....A15


0 94922 95642 2












News



Knights dominate the court


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

The Knights dominated
the basketball court at the
Glenn Wilkes Classic last
weekend, winning three of
four games over teams from
throughout the country.
The Knights extended
their season-opening win-
ning streak to three games
with wins over Howard and
Auburn, but fell to Niagara
63-46 on Saturday.
Against Auburn, new-
comer MarcusJordan scored
his first official points of
the season. After going 0-4


shooting from the floor
in his first two outings, he
scored 7 points in a flawless
performance from the floor
and the free throw line.
Meanwhile AJ. Tyler
shined, scoring 48 points
in the series, including a
season-high 19 against Au-
burn.
They bounced back with
a 59-50 win over Drake to
finish off the tournament.
Five players scored at
least double digits during
the series, many of them
entering the teens in two
games or more. The team
worked well to spread the


ball around, keeping oppos-
ing defenses on their heels.
A.J. Rompza dished out 15
assists in the series. Isaac
Sosa helped his team with
43 points in the series, with
Keith Clanton scoring 32 of
his own.
Dave Diakite pulled a
double double with 12
points and 10 rebounds
against Auburn.
Now the Knights (4-1)
face Albany (3-3) at home.
The tipoff is at 5 p.m. Sat-
urday. The Great Danes are
coming off a 71-66 win over
Robert Morris.


ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
The Knights spread the ball around at the Wilkes tournament, winning 3 of 4 games.


UCF blows out Tulane, sets records
I ur F f


MU I U BY IrAAU BABUUUKI MI H UBEhLMV
A.J. Guyton picked up 56 yards in the air during the Knights' rout of Tulane on Saturday. Defense set a record for total yardage allowed and rushing yardage allowed, while offense poured on 504 yards in the 49-0 win.


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
The Knights are Conference
USA record holders after a
historic 49-0 shutout of Tu-
lane on Saturday.
The winning score came
on the fourth play of the
game, as running back
Brynn Harvey broke free on
a third down and one to run
50 yards for the touchdown.
After that, the Knights
cruised, giving some new
players a chance to play for
the first time this season.
The win was the most
lopsided blanking between
two C-USA teams in confer-
ence history, beating a re-
cord dating back to 1997.
Once again the Knights
(7-4, 5-2) proved them-
selves an explosive second
half team, scoring 28 points
in the third quarter alone as
they took a 14-0 halftime
lead and increased it more
than threefold by game's


end.
That included a plethora
of gains on the ground and
in the air totaling 504 yards
in the game. Brynn Harvey
led his team on the ground,
gaining 129 yards and pick-
ing up three touchdowns.
Meanwhile the Knights'
defense scored a monu-
mental achievement for
any NCAA team this season,
holding the Green Wave to
50 yards of total offense,
which was also an all-time
C-USA record.
On rushing defense, the
Knights had one of their
greatest performances in
school history, and the sec-
ond best in NCAA football
this year, holding Tulane to
negative 30 yards.
During that dominating
defensive demonstration
the Knights held the Green
Wave to less than a yard per
play, yet another record for
the Knights this year. Senior


Cory Hogue helped lead his
team in tackles yet again,
with five on the day. Se-
nior Torrell Troup provided
needed pressure, breaking
up a pass and hurrying Tu-
lane quarterbacks out of the
pocket.
As the scoring gap spread,
the Knights took advantage
to give backup players some
time on the field. Kicker Ja-
mie Boyle was 3-for-3 on
extra points, coming in to
replace Nick Cattoi in the
third quarter. Rob Calabrese
took the helm as quarter-
back in the fourth quarter,
throwing for a touchdown
on his only play of the game,
connecting with Brendan
Kelly on a six-yard pass.
Now the Knights are in
a two-way tie with South-
ern Miss for second place
in C-USA. If the Knights win
against UAB, kicking off
at 1:30 p.m. this Saturday,
they'll have reversed their


4-8 record from last season, won't qualify for the C-USA
and they could be in a three- championship game, but
way tie for first. Due to tie- are bowl eligible.
breaker rules the Knights




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Page 2 Thursday, November 26, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, November 26, 2009 Page 3


Winter Park sports finish strong


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

Winter Park's cross country
teams raced to strong fin-
ishes at the state champion-
ships Saturday, with senior
Shelby Hayes winning the
girls' 5k run with a time of
18:13.02 to propel the Wild-
cats to a team champion-
ship.
As a team the girls de-
stroyed their competition,
winning by an average
time of 28 seconds faster
than their closest competi-
tion. Hayes won her final
high school race outright
with a dominating 17-sec-
ond spread over the sec-
ond place finisher. Not far
behind her, senior Marjorie
Ducos picked up sixth place
with a time of 18:51.31. Se-


nior Olivia Papa finished
13th with a 19:09.71 time.
The boys team sopho-
more William Anguish led
his team with a 26th place
finish in 16:23.20. They
placed third overall.
Trinity Prep's boys team
would also win the state
championship Saturday,
with four runners finishing
in the top 10. Junior Chase
Franklin IV finished third
with a time of 16:02.19.
On the girls side se-
nior Chelsi Woodruff fin-
ished sixth with a time of
18:51.51, improving on her
ninth place 2008 finish. The
girls finished 16th overall.
That same day Winter
Park's volleyball team bat-
tled to a tough four-game
loss to Plant City at the state
championship game.


The football team battled
to their most dramatic win
of the season with a 50-47
nail biter over Lake Brantley.
The Patriots had overcome
a 43-26 lead with less than
6 minutes left in the game
to take the lead back 47-43,
shocking a previously jubi-
lant Wildcats team.
It would take a career
game by running back Pat-
rick Mputu to carry his team
to victory. After a 31-yard
drive by quarterback Sam
Richardson, Mputu, as he
had done many times in the
season, raced to a touch-
down to punctuate an al-
ready impressive game. He
ran for 198 yards and three
touchdowns in the win.
Winter Park faces Semi-
nole at 7:30 p.m. Friday on
Showalter Field.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
The Wildcats football team remains in the playoffs after thwarting a comeback effort
by Lake Brantley. Cross country and volleyball teams had strong finishes in the finals.


RAIL I Diebel probes Dockery for ideas after the senator questions rail deal


< continued from the front page
own question she pointed
to a figure of $198 million,
which the state would pay
to CSX as part of the com-
muter rail deal, but would
go to fund improvements
to its freight rail system. She
suggested removing that
provision.
She also reiterated an
argument that the SunRail


deal's accident liabil-
ity provisions left the
state largely responsible for
damages, even if CSX were
at fault.
"It's like saying I'm go-
ing to sell you a house that's
worth $200,000, and you
have to pay $2 million for
it, and if I set the house on
fire, you have to pay for it,"
Dockery said.
Commissioner Karen


Diebel said that the city
had already shown strong
support for the system, and
that it had played it safe
when becoming part of the
previous failed rail deal.
"We think we've pro-
tected ourselves up to the
seven-year mark for a dedi-
cated funding source to be
found," Diebel said. Then
she asked Dockery for solu-
tions to problems she'd dis-


cussed.
The discussion momen-
tarily turned heated when
Mayor Ken Bradley abruptly
told Dockery that her time
to speak was up, and Com-
missioner Beth Dillaha in-
tervened.
"I apologize for the disre-
spect from our mayor," Dil-
laha said.
"That comment was out
of line, Commissioner,"


Bradley quickly retorted.
The discussion ended
quickly with Dockery's fi-
nal call to seek a dedicated
funding source to make
SunRail possible.
Bradley reiterated the
city's support for the sys-
tem.
"The city of Winter Park
has voted for SunRail at ev-
ery opportunity," he said.


BLACK I Park Ave. markets ambience


< continued from the front page
Chamber President Patrick
Chapin said they're promoting the
Avenue as a whole.
"Instead of people spending
day in box store or a mall they can
come experience the whole atmo-
sphere of Park Avenue and Hanni-
bal Square," he said.
Snaith said that this Black Fri-
day's sales may be better than last
year, as the economy slowly grows.
He said the forecasted numbers
are "not a reflection of a great holi-
day shopping season but of people
working a little harder for the bar-
gains."
Retail traffic this holiday season
is expected to decrease 4.2 per-


cent, according to a ShopperTrak
report. But a 1.6 sales increase is
predicted during the same season.
In 2008, sales decreased 5.9 per-
cent while traffic fell 15.4 percent
compared with 2007.
Cutright said she's stocking her
shelves with her specialty toys no
matter what the forecasters say,
and encouraging other Winter
Park Village retailers to open early
with her.
"I guess I'm the crazy toy store
lady who opens before anybody
else," she said. "But then [other
retailers] will look at the lines
outside my store in the morning
and maybe say 'Wow, that's a good
idea.'"


SCHOOL I Charter school rebuilds


< continued from the front page
were fired.
County officials say the bank-
ruptcy filing is part of Summit's
plan to restructure its finances as
it moves forward.
"They (Summit) can do good
things, but they can't do it with this
debt," said Evelyn Chandler, who
oversees Orange County's charter
schools.
According to court documents,
Summit is more than $1 million
dollars in debt, primarily to in-
stitutions responsible for school
maintenance, stocking and ben-
efits. The school also owes about
$19,000 to the IRS.
Summit estimates that funds
will be available to unsecured
creditors.
There are 20 charter schools in
Orange County, with eight more
approved that could open this fall.
Charter schools are not subject
to decisions made by the county


board, instead directing them-
selves through their own appoint-
ed board. The county serves as a
sponsor. Six charter schools have
closed since 2003.
Chandler said the charter
schools that stay open are the ones
with strong boards. In the case of
Summit, Chandler said the earlier
board failed to question the ac-
tions of its administrators or to
visit classrooms and inspect the
school.
Summit provides schooling for
about 150 learning-disabled chil-
dren. Chandler said the school is
considering launching litigation
against some of the school's for-
mer officials involved in the scan-
dal. The school's principal did not
return phone calls.
"I think it's a positive step be-
cause they (Summit) have new
board members focused on build-
ing the school to what it was,"
Chandler said.


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Business Briefs


Larry Vershel Communications was
named public relations agency for
Meritage Homes, Central Florida.

Rebecca Furman of Lowndes, Dros-
dick, Doster, Kantor & Reed recently
took part in the Developer's Update:
Navigating Change panel.

Palmer Electric Co. announced the
expansion of its residential north
Florida office, the opening of its new
residential office in Central Florida
and the signing of a new homebuilder


client, Lennar Homes.

Mary Hurley, real estate and leasing
manager of Pineloch Management
Corporation, received the Leadership
in Energy and Environmental Design
Accredited Professional designation
from the U.S. Green Building Council.

The Central Florida office of SIKON
Construction has been awarded a
contract to build the new Publix-an-
chored Seminole Shoppes retail cen-
ter in Neptune Beach.


William T Dymond Jr. of Lowndes,
Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed
was elected vice chair of the Down-
town Development Board and the
Community Redevelopment Agency
Advisory Board on Oct. 28.

NAI Realvest recently negotiated the
sale of Unit 1710 at Legacy Village
Office Park, 3208 W. Lake Mary Blvd.

Crossman & Company recently
completed a new lease agreement


and two renewals at retail centers on
Aloma Avenue, Winter Park.

RLF has added Katie Romano and
Enrique Gomez to its talented team of
professionals.

Beazer Homes has renewed its lease
of the 14,713 square feet of Class A
office space it occupies at 2600 Mai-
tland Center Parkway.

Ferrell Wealth Management has
hired J.L. Hurt IV as senior financial


adviser and research analyst, ap-
pointed Shena Stewart to senior
financial adviser and director of
marketing, Pedro Lebron to senior fi-
nancial adviser and chief compliance
officer, and Crystal Garner to senior
financial adviser and vice president of
relationship management.

Liberty Lodging of Maitland is plan-
ning to open a Value Place in early
December just outside the nation's
capital in Gainesville, Va.


Community Bulletin


Kimberly J. Devitt of Winter Park
has accepted membership in the
Golden Key International Honour Soci-
ety and was honored during a recent
induction ceremony at The University
of Florida.

There is an upcoming reunion of
Winter Park High School Class of
'70. Contact the committee on Fa-
cebook at Wphs NineteenSeventy or
e-mail WPHS.1970.Alumni@gmail.
com.

Make a difference in the life of a
child by bringing a new unwrapped
toy to any Central Florida Chick-fil-a
or Qdoba Restaurant location or Cen-
tra Care clinic location from Nov. 27
through Dec. 14. Contact Dawn or


Sandi at Christian HELP, 407-834-
4022 or visit www.christianhelp.org.

The continuing care retirement
community, The Mayflower, is cel-
ebrating its 20th anniversary. The
facility's Health Center is a recipient
of Florida's Association for Health
Care Administration's highest rating:
5-Star, Gold Seal. It has a staff re-
tention rate of 86 percent, compared
to the national industry average of
around 12 percent and remains 100
percent occupied.

The Leu House Museum's trans-
formation into Leu's Holiday House
will run from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
through Jan.7 at 1920 N. ForestAve.,
Orlando.


Bright House Networks is offering
25 new high definition and digital
channels.
New High Definition Services include;
BBC America HD, channel 1353;
Cartoon Network HD, channel 1336;
Crime and Investigation HD, channel
1346; E! Entertainment HD, channel
1365; FUSE HD, channel 1375; G4
HD, channel 1350; Headline News
HD, channel 1327; MSNBC HD, chan-
nel 1326; History International HD,
channel 1346.

Take Care Clinics, located at 355
Walgreens drugstores nationwide,
received the remainder of their 2009
seasonal flu vaccine order, with vac-
cines being offered on a first-come,


first-serve basis while supplies last.
Take Care Clinics are open seven
days a week, including evenings and
weekends. To get up to date informa-
tion on vaccine availability visit www.
takecarehealth.com or call 1-866-
825-3227.

A special Black Friday, Nov. 27,
incentive is being offered by the Or-
lando division of Beazer Homes, Mai-
tland. Anyone buying a Beazer home
at five communities in the Orlando re-
gion will be given up to $2,000 in free
appliances. The Federal Tax Credit for
qualified new homebuyers at $8,000
and $6,500 for existing homebuyers
is also still available. The one-day
incentive is being offered at Heritage
Commons, Winter Springs; Legacy in
Orlando; The Enclave at Moss Park in
southeast Orlando; Sawgrass, also
in southeast Orlando; and at Victo-
ria Park Trails in Deland. Visit www.
Beazer.com.


PHOTO COURTESY OF KIMBERLY J. DEVITT


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SWinter Park /Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday. November 26. 2009


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Eric Sly
407-563-7054
erics@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-563-7023
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIEDS
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
legal@observernewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Megan Stokes
megans@eosun.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us


ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-515-2605
tcraft@observernewspapers.com

INTERN
Sarah Kezer


Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr. USPS 00-6186
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 ISSN 1064-3613
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I Phone: 407-563-7000 I Fax: 407-563-7099 le-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com

Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park/Maitland ObserverO 2009


Volume 21, Issue Number 48


Page 4 Thursday, November 26, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, November 26, 2009 Page 5


On behalf of the City of
Winter Park, I wish you and
your loved ones a very safe
and blessed Happy Thanks-
giving.

NOVEMBER 23 CITY
COMMISSION MEETING
HIGHLIGHTS
There was a City Com-
mission meeting held on
Monday, Nov. 23, at 3:30
p.m., in City Hall Commis-
sion Chambers. Due to the
Observer's early holiday
deadline, the highlights
from this City Commission
meeting will be included in
next week's column.

"WINTER IN THE PARK"
ICE SKATING RINK OPEN
NOW!
If you haven't been out yet
to see the new "Winter in
the Park" ice skating rink in
Central Park West Meadow,
make sure to visit and skate
now through Jan. 3.
Join us to glide your way
through the holiday season.
"Winter in the Park" in-
cludes a full calendar of joy-
ful events including family
nights, youth nights, musi-
cal entertainment from lo-
cal arts organizations, and
meet and greet with Santa
Claus himself.
The rink will be open
Monday thru Thursday, 3
p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.;
and Sunday, noon to 6 p.m.
For more freezing in-
formation, please call 407-
599-3203 or skate into our
blustery Web site at www.
cityofwinterpark.org.

'TIS THE HOLIDAY
EVENTS SEASON
The city of Winter Park
is once again preparing
to host a string of festive


events this holiday season.
Gather with friends, family
and loved ones to experi-
ence these annual holiday
traditions in Winter Park,
the "City of Culture and
Heritage."
-The season begins with
a special Holiday Pops
concert performed by the
Orlando Philharmonic Or-
chestra that will take place
at 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 29,
in beautiful Central Park.
Bring a blanket and a pic-
nic for a concert program
of holiday favorites that
will be sure to put everyone
in the spirit of the season.
Guest Conductor Anthony
Hose will lead the Phil-
harmonic and Baritone
Stephen Mumbert will join
the orchestra for a special
performance. This free con-
cert is made possible by the
Charlotte Julia Hollander
Trust. For more informa-
tion, please call 407-896-
6700.
-The Charles Hosmer
Morse Museum of American
Art continues their holiday
tradition with the 31th an-
nual Christmas in the Park
Celebration on Thursday,
Dec. 3. Central Park creates
the beautiful backdrop for
the lighting of eight turn-
of-the-century Tiffany win-
dows as the Bach Festival
Choir performs in concert
from the main stage. The
two-hour program begins
at 6:15 p.m. For more in-
formation, please call 407-
645-5311.
-To compliment the an-
nual Christmas in the Park
Celebration, Friends of Casa
Feliz will present Cookies,
Cocoa and Carols on Thurs-
day, Dec. 3, from 7 p.m. to 9
p.m., at Casa Feliz, located
at 656 N. Park Ave. Santa
Claus will be on hand to
greet everyone, the house
will be decorated for the


season and costumed carol-
ers will lead attendees in
holiday favorites. For more
information please call
407-628-8200.
-On Friday, Dec. 4, at 5
p.m., the festivities con-
tinue in Central Park with
the annual Tree Lighting
Ceremony and Holiday
Stroll presented by the Win-
ter Park Chamber of Com-
merce. The night will begin
with carols from several lo-
cal ensembles, followed by
the award ceremony for the
2009 Holiday Card Compe-
tition winners. Central Park
will come to life with beau-
tiful bright lights and Santa
Claus will make a special
appearance.
-In conjunction with
the Annual Tree Lighting
Ceremony on Friday, Dec. 4,
the city of Winter Park and
Enzian Theater will present
Popcorn Flicks in Central
Park featuring "How the
Grinch Stole Christmas"
and "White Christmas."
The animated film "How
the Grinch Stole Christ-
mas" will begin at 7 p.m.
and precede the 1954 clas-
sic "White Christmas." For
more information, please
call 407-629-0054.
-On Saturday, Dec. 5,
Park Avenue comes to life at
9 a.m. with the 57th annual
Winter Park Christmas Pa-
rade, presented by the Win-
ter Park Chamber of Com-
merce. This family-friendly
occasion showcases holi-
day-themed floats, Santa
Claus and well-known local
figures as they make their
way down the avenue. For
more information, please
call 407-644-8281.
-Before and after the
Christmas parade on Satur-
day, Dec. 5, Leadership Win-
ter Park Class 20 will host
the 11th annual Leadership
Winter Park Pancake Break-
fast at the Central Park
main stage from 7 a.m. to
10:30 a.m. Enjoy hot pan-
cakes, sausage and beverag-
es for just $5 per adult and
$3 per child with proceeds
benefiting Winter Park area
elementary schools. For
more information, please


call 407-644-8281.
-Enjoy the rich sounds
of Christmas as tuba, eu-
phonium, sousaphone and
baritone players of all ages
gather to perform a free
concert from the main
stage in Central Park begin-
ning at 1 p.m., on Saturday,
Dec. 12. Winter Park's 14th
annual Merry Tuba Christ-
mas has become a must see
on the holiday list of things
to do. Registration for mu-
sicians begins at 9:30 a.m.,
with rehearsal running
from 10:30 a.m. to noon.
For more information,
please call 407-599-3463.
-Also on Saturday, Dec.
12, the Albin Polasek Mu-
seum & Sculpture Gardens
will become the official
judging and viewing site
for the annual Winter Park
Boat Parade & Festival of
Lights. This free event will
begin at dusk and parking
fees will apply. For more in-
formation, please call 407-
647-6294.
-Casa Feliz will hold a
Holiday Tea Fundraiser
on Sunday, Dec. 13, from
2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Casa
Feliz, located at 656 N. Park
Ave. Guests will be treated
to a traditional "high tea"
and enjoy Beautiful Mu-
sic's Holiday Flute Trio in
the elegant ambiance this
historic home elegantly
decorated for the holidays.
Attendance is limited to the
first 100 tickets sold, and
tickets are $25 each. For
more information, please
call 407-628-8200.
-The Charles Hosmer
Morse Museum of American
Art will hold a free Christ-
mas Eve Open House on
Thursday, Dec. 24, from
9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more
information, please call
407-645-5311.
-To wrap up the holi-
day season and place a
bright bow on top, the
City of Winter Park will
proudly host the 3rd an-
nual Champs Sports Bowl
Parade of Bands on Tues-
day, Dec. 29, at 1:30 p.m. As
a prelude to the Champs
Sports Bowl" game on
Tuesday evening at 8 p.m.,


at the Florida Citrus Bowl,
school bands from the At-
lantic Coast Conference
(ACC) and Big Ten cham-
pionship teams will march
through downtown Winter
Park and perform a "Ban-
dastic Game Day Preview"
in the Central Park West
Meadow. For more infor-
mation, please call 407-
599-3463.
For information regard-
ing additional events in the
City of Winter Park, please
visit the city's official Web
site at www.CityofWinter-
Park.org.

ART IN CHAMBERS
EXHIBITION CURATED BY
LOUISE PETERSON (1920
2009) EXTENDED
The current Art in Cham-
bers exhibition "Galleries
International: A Retrospec-
tive" has been extended
through Monday, Jan. 4,
2010. The exhibition is
presented by the City of
Winter Park Public Art Ad-
visory Board and features
artworks by 12 noted artists
curated by the late Galleries
International owner Louise
Peterson before her recent
passing. The exhibition
is open for public view-
ing from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Monday through Friday, in
Commission Chambers and
Room 200 in City Hall, lo-
cated at 401 S. Park Ave.
"Art in Chambers," a
project of the Winter Park
Public Art Advisory Board,
showcases the city's art
collection, works by local
artists or works borrowed
from local museums. "Art in
Chambers" enlivens Winter
Park's public rooms and
exposes residents and visi-
tors to art, highlights the
importance the city places
on art and culture, provides
city support to local artists
and studios, and creates op-
portunities to educate the
populace on the value of art
and its place in a meaning-
ful life.
Visit the city's official Web
site at www. CityoJWinter-
Park. org


Families across the country
are dealing with matters
that are significantly and
directly affecting them
personally and financially.
But no matter how difficult
the situation becomes,
there will always be
opportunity to be thankful.
First and foremost, I am
thankful for having a family
that is caring, respectful
and considerate of others.
We are fortunate to have
our health and to be stable
enough financially to


weather the economic
storm.
Not a week goes by that
I am not thankful that I
live in Maitland. Just in the
past two weeks, after many
years of rigorous discussion
and debate, our city was
successful in opening our
much anticipated Edward
Doyle Police Headquarters
and set the stage for the
construction of our new
fire department and city
hall buildings.
I am thankful that


the residents of our
community have been
given an opportunity to
voice their opinions and
express their convictions
on many issues affecting
Maitland such that we
continue to make real
progress and move forward.
With this opportunity of
involvement and input,
our leaders have been in
a much better position
to make more informed
decisions about matters
that impact each of us.
I would not trade
serving my community
over the past four years for
anything. I am appreciative
and thankful for the
opportunity to serve in
ways I never dreamed
possible. I am thankful to
be employed in a profession
that allows the flexibility to
respond to any community
need. In addition, I am
thankful to have residents


that are concerned enough
about their city that they
choose to consider running
for City Council. Having
a passion to serve others,
without regard to self
interests, is what makes a
great community leader.
Recently, I had the honor
to host members of our
armed forces, alongside
every other mayor in
Orange County, in the
signing of a Community
Covenant, which
recognized the families of
those serving our country.
I am thankful for and pray
for all of our veterans and
soldiers who have given so
much of themselves so that
we are able to enjoy the
freedoms we have today.
During this upcoming day
of thanks, let's all keep our
veterans and soldiers in our
thoughts and prayers.
And finally, I am
thankful for all who work


for our city in the many
departments and for staff
who, in times of budget
cuts, work harder than
ever, and I pray that their
families are taken care
of during the upcoming
holiday season.
I am honored and
privileged to be in
a position to set an
example of involvement,
communication
and dedication to
professionalism and
optimism. I will always
be humbled by what this
opportunity to serve has
brought to my family and
me.
Here's wishing you
and your family the very
best during the upcoming
holidays. Have a healthy,
happy, enjoyable and safe
Thanksgiving.


Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


A time to be thankful


Winter Park / Maitland Observer












Lifestyles


Warcraft card aame


ABRAHAM ABORAYA
GUEST REPORTER
A journalistic quest to find Billy
P., the reigning World of Warcraft
Trading Card Game champion, ends
at 3592 Aloma Ave., Suite 10, better
known as Cool Stuff Games.
There, William Postlethwait -
Billy P. to his friends comes out
and shows me through the Cool
Stuff Games warehouse, a maze of
tall metal shelving overfilled with
boxes of cards and board games.
Then Postlethwait sits at a table
usually reserved for weekend and
weeknight card tournaments. The
$50,000-richer world champion is
wearing a hooded jacket and, frank-
ly, seems a little short for a Mage.
"It's kind of crazy," he said. "It's
kind of funny that much money
from just a card game."
Postlethwait won the World of
Warcraft's Trading Card Game world
championships early this month.
And while he's won $4,000 or $5,000
from other card games, the $50,000
bounty and glass trophy were the
best he's ever done playing cards.
Never heard of World of War-
craft? It's an online role playing
game, which, as of December 2008,
had 11.5 million people playing it
every month.
Never heard of a Trading Card
Game? It's like poker on steroids.


ti r


roves lucrative


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Billy Postlethwait holds a handful of cards that won him $50,000 playing the World of Warcraft trading card game, which he honed at his job in Winter Park.


Players can buy either packs of
cards or individual cards from re-
tailers, and start by choosing their
hero (like Boris Brightbeard or
Omedus the Punisher). Players
build decks of 60 cards around the
hero from the literally thousands


Holiday Stroll and


Friday, December 4,2009
5:00 pm
Central Park, Winter Park


RETIRE. L,. RENEW.
Central Park & Park Avenue will be
transformed into a Winter Wonderland at
i The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce's
Holiday Stroll and Tree Lighting Ceremony.
ing the entire family for a night of cheer
to this FREE event including:
Visit Santa Claus Live Music
Face Painting and Balloon Art
7pm Popcorn Flick in the Park:
"How the Grinch Stole Christmas"
and "White Christmas"
Fresh-Made Snow
Cookies for the Kids
Holiday Cards Winners Announced
Bonds presented by:
BankFIRST
CNLBank
Citizen's Bank of Florida
Florida Bank of Commerce
For more information
visit www.winterpark.org


CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


of cards available to them, all based
on the characters and adventures in
the online game.
Then, you test your deck against
other WoW players at shops such as
Cool Stuff Games, where Postleth-
wait works full time while finishing
his finance degree from the Univer-
sity of Central Florida.
Postlethwait and his friend be-
gan testing and building decks two
months before the tournament,
ending with a Mage deck. He said
about 60 percent of the players there
were playing with Mage decks.
"Ours was a little different, so I guess
our testing was a little further than
other people's," Postlethwait said.
"That was maybe the difference. It
was really good against other Mage
decks, which was a big deal."


The big tournament is the World
Championships, which offers
$250,000 in cash and prizes. During
the rest of the year, they hold Realm
Championships across the country,
which don't offer cash for the win-
ners, but does give out $500,000 in
prizes.
It's all part of the Battlegrounds
program, and Mike Girard, who
manages the Organized Play Pro-
grams for Upper Deck, said Postleth-
wait has been a top player in the
tournaments before.
"He's one of our top players," Gi-
rard said. "He's a great player. He's a
very analytical thinker. A lot of our
good players are. In the middle of a

> turn to WARCRAFT on NEXT PAGE


THE MAITLAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Presents




Sunday, December 13th, 2009
7:30 p.m.
The First Presbyterian Church of Maitland
341 North Orlando Avenue, Maitland FL, 32751


The Maitland Symphony Orchestra welcomes
you to experience the excitement and wonder of the
holiday season by unwrapping musical presents with
you. There will be surprises from "The Polar Express,"
"The Nutcracker," Leroy Anderson, George Gershwin,
and even "Cirque du Soleil." Special guests include the
scintillating Orlando Brass Quintet and the talents of
Jeremy and Johanna Hunt.

We hope you will bring the family and let us
transport you to a musical place of holiday love and de-
light. The concert is sponsored by the Performing Arts
of Maitland and is free to all.


Page 6 Thursday, November 26, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, November 26, 2009 Page 7


Winter Park
Residential burglaries
An unknown suspect kicked in the rear door and stole three
Mac Book Pro laptops, a Canon EOS digital camera, medica-
tion, a 32" LCD TV, a Canon EOS Rebel digital camera, a Breitling
Lady J watch, a ring, purses, backpacks and a wallet on the 1100
block of South Pennsylvania Avenue on Friday, Nov. 13.
An unknown suspect entered the unlocked residence and
stole a 42" LG model TV, an Apple desktop PC, 40 assorted
books, a Cartier watch and multiple pieces of fine jewelry on the
1100 block of South Pennsylvania Avenue on Friday, Nov. 13.


Business burglaries
An unknown suspect pried open the front door and stole a
32" TV, two 19" TVs, three notebook computers, three laptop


computers, eight iPods, and four R/C cars and pried open the
lock box under the cash register on the 500 block of North Or-
lando Avenue on Friday, Nov. 13.
An unknown suspect broke the window on the east side of
a business that was concealed by bushes on the 600 block of
North Wymore Road on Monday, Nov. 16 and stole a 20" Sam-
sung LCD TV.


Vehicle burglaries and theft
An unknown suspect broke the rear driver's side window
and stole a purse on the 600 block of North Park Avenue on
Friday, Nov. 13. The victim's purse was later recovered by a wit-
ness at 1820 Lee Road.
An unknown suspect entered an unlocked vehicle on the
900 block of South Orlando Avenue on Friday, Nov. 13 and stole


Nov. 13 to Nov. 19
checkbook and wallet from within a purse.
An unknown suspect broke the front passenger window
and stole a Canon DSLR Rebel XLT, three camera lenses, and
a Mac Book Pro laptop on the 400 block of South Park Avenue
on Saturday, Nov. 14.
Winter Park Police registered various noise complaints from
around the city between Friday, Nov. 13 and Monday, Nov. 16
including loud people, lawn tools, music and a party.
Arrests were made in Winter Park between Friday, Nov. 13,
and Monday, Nov. 16, for crimes including loitering and prowling,
uttering a counterfeit check, possession of counterfeit check, un-
lawful use of personal identity information, grand theft, warrant,
possession of alcohol by a minor, driving under the influence,
possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, re-
tail theft, driving without a license and harassing phone calls.


WARCRAFT I Card game champion might buy a house with $50K winnings


< continued from previous page
game, they'll be able to see
and predict what's going to
happen three or four turns
ahead. That's why he's so
good."
Postlethwait and his
competitors brought their
60-card decks for Day One
of the competition on
which he went 7-1. The sec-
ond day of play is meant to


test the players' ability to
build a deck from scratch.
Game cards come in 20-
card booster packs, which,
statistically, are 70 percent
common and, therefore,
less useful cards. Eight
players are put together, and
one person opens a pack of
cards, looks through it, takes
one card and passes the rest
to his right, continuing un-


til they run out.
That's called the draft,
and Postlethwait only lost
one game during draft play.
Girard said that's because he
can remember what cards
were available and then
predict what style decks the
others are likely going to fa-
vor.
"If you're getting passed
packs with no Alliance play-


ers in it, you know people
to your right are probably
drafting Alliance, so you
have to make sure you adapt
to what's being passed to
you," Postlethwait said.
Overall, Postlethwait said
he likes playing the World
of Warcraft game, but he
doesn't know if he'll keep it
up forever. That's because,
frankly, there aren't as many


players in the area as, say,
Magic the Gathering.
So what's Postlethwait
planning on doing with the
money?
"I'm actually looking to-
ward maybe buying a house.
So maybe that would be
good to use, since you can
actually get a decent house
right now for a really good
price."


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer







Page 8 Thursday, November 26, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


G.O.


I For Greater Orlando's


Family

Calendar


Events this week at Maitland
Public Library, 501 S. Maitland
Ave.:
For more details, please contact
the Maitland Public Library, 407-
647-7700.
At 7 p.m. on Mondays is
Bedtime Stories.
At 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays is
Story time for age 36 months to
preschoolers.
At 10:30 a.m. on Wednesdays
is Story time for babies to 36
months.
At 4 p.m. on Thursdays is
Reading Buddies
At 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6
there will be Teen Pizza Taste off.
Sign up to sample selections of
pizzas from local pizzerias.

High school students and their
teachers are being reminded
that the Bill of Rights Institute's
national Being An American Essay
Contest deadline is approaching.
The contest asks students to
share their thoughts on American
citizenship by answering the
question, "What civic value do
you believe is most essential to
being an American?" Essay entries
are due by Dec. 1. Teachers must
submit essays online at www.
BeingAnAmerican.org for a chance
to win cash prizes from a pool
totaling nearly $200,000 and one
of 54 trips to the nation's capital.
Visit www.BeingAnAmerican.org
for details.

Bright House Networks and
C-SPAN are encouraging Central
Florida students to explore national
issues by entering C-SPAN's 2010
StudentCam Video Documentary
Competition. C-SPAN invites all
middle school and high school
students to produce a five to eight-
minute video documentary on one
of the following topics: One of the
country's greatest strengths or a
challenge the country is facing.
C-SPAN will award a total of
$50,000 in cash prizes. The grand
prize winner will be awarded
$5,000, with multiple cash prize
awards of $3,000, $1,500, $750,
$500, and $250 to students in both
middle and high school categories.
Last year's grand prize winner
received a personal message of
congratulations from President
Barack Obama.
Entries must represent
varying points of view and include
C-SPAN video that supports the
documentary's topic. Students,
working alone or in groups up to
three, can upload their entry form
and videos directly online at www.
studentcam.org. Documentaries
must be the original work of the
students but teachers may provide
guidance and critiques. The
deadline for entries is Wednesday,
Jan. 20, 2010. Winners will be
announced in March 2010, with
winning videos to air on C-SPAN
beginning in April. Educators can
register for updates and view
competition details at www.
brighthouse.com/studentcam.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Ice skaters enjoy a rare opportunity at Light Up UCF, an annual event on the UCF campus featuring a skating rink, light shows and movie screenings.


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER

It's beginning to feel a lot
like winter, as temperatures
dip into the 40s in Central
Florida on Thanksgiving
weekend.
In honor of the season,
cities and businesses are
opening ice rinks and host-
ing light shows and parades.
One city is even trucking in
snow!
Here's your guide to fam-
ily-fun activities through
December:
On Nov. 20 Light Up UCF
began on the UCF campus
next to the Arena. Holiday
light shows are scheduled
at 7 p.m., 9 p.m. and 11 p.m.
daily, and there will be ice
skating in front of the Are-
na from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Monday through Thursday,
5 p.m. to 12 a.m. Friday, 11
a.m. to 12 a.m. Saturday and
11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday.
Outdoor Christmas movie
screenings are also sched-
uled on certain evenings at
7 and 9:30 p.m. The event is
through Jan. 8. It costs $12
to skate and the screenings
and light shows are free.
For more information, visit
lightupucf.com or call 407-
823-6062.
The Leu House Muse-
um, located at 1920 North
Forest Avenue in Orlando,
has been decorated for the
holidays. Each of 11 rooms
in the home has its own
theme from Victorian to
Art Deco fused with diora-
mas "so there's something


for everyone to enjoy," said
Tracy Micciche, event and
marketing manager for the
museum. Seminole Com-
munity College Interior De-
sign students and designers
from Ron's Miniature Shop
and Museum dedicated their
time and trimmings, turn-
ing the home into a holiday
showcase, which the mu-
seum couldn't have gone
without, Micciche said. The
admission is $7 for adults
and $2 for children K-12th
grades. For more informa-
tion call 407-246-2620 or
visit www.leugardens.org.
On Dec. 12 Orlando's
annual Christmas parade,
the Holiday Sidewalk Sa-
shay, will march along a
one-mile route in down-
town Lake Eola Park. This
year's version is down sized
and "going green" said Terri
Boardman, producer of the
parade. They're using deco-
rated golf carts, pedicabs
and wagons instead of big
floats. The parade will fea-
ture marching bands, dance
troops, and Santa alongwith
a song and dance show tap-
ing featuring celebrities at
the Eola amphitheater. The
Sashay is from 3:30 p.m. to
5 p.m. and is free. For more
information, visit orlando-
christmasparade.com.
The "Winter in the
Park" ice skating rink
opened Nov. 20 in Central
Park West Meadow located
at the corner of Morse Bou-
levard and New York Avenue
in downtown Winter Park.
More than 3,200 square


feet of grass is covered with
2,500 gallons of frozen wa-
ter to welcome the thou-
sands of skaters through
Jan. 3. Skaters can enjoy
the rink for $10 Monday
through Thursday 3 p.m. to
9 p.m., Friday and Saturday
10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sun-
day noon to 6 p.m. Call 407-
599-3203 or visit www.cit-
yofwinterpark.org for more
information.
The Orlando Philhar-
monic Orchestra will pres-
ent its annual Holiday Pops
concert in Winter Park's
Central Park on Sunday, Nov.
29 at 4 p.m. The concert, full
of holiday favorite tunes, is
free. For more information
call 407-896-6700 or visit
www.orlandophil.org.
The Winter Park Play-
house, located at 711-B Or-
ange Ave., will be presenting
"Haul Out the Holidays,"
a traditional and inspiring
holiday show featuring a
cast of four adults and four
children who will help ring
in the holidays with every-
one's favorite tunes from
Broadway, film, television
and radio. The show costs
$32 for adults and $22 for
students. Performances will
be on Fridays and Saturdays
at 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays
and Sundays at 2 p.m. For
more information, call 407-
645-0145 or visit www.win-
terparkplayhouse.org.
The traditional lighting
of Cranes Roost Park in Al-
tamonte Springs will be on
Saturday, Dec. 5 from 5 p.m.
to 9 p.m. at the Eddie Rose


Amphitheater. There will be
music, entertainment and
fireworks. A large Christmas
tree will be on display as
well as the holiday fountain
show. Santa and Mrs. Claus
will be there that night as
well as every Tuesday before
Christmas thereafter. Food
and drink will be available
for purchase throughout
the venue. This event is free.
For more information, visit
www.altamonte.org.
The Eddie Rose Am-
phitheater, located at 247
Cranes Roost Blvd. in Alta-
monte Springs, is featuring
two holiday concerts. The
Robert Harris Holiday
Jazz Show will take center
stage for a performance of
both holiday favorites and
a selection of the groups
many popular songs on Dec.
11 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. En-
joy the great holiday sounds
of "The Ritz Featuring Car-
ol Becker" on Dec. 18 from
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Carol and
the Ritz will be performing
your favorite holiday tunes.
For more information visit
www.altamonte.org.
The city of Casselberry
will host the lighting of
the tree at the City Hall, 95
Triplet Lake Drive, on Dec. 5
from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Enjoy
children from local schools
singing Christmas carols
and free cookies and hot
chocolate. This event is free.
Call 407-262-7720 for more
information.
The Casselberry Senior

> turn to NEXT PAGE


-111 ~


Page 8 Thursday, November 26, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, November 26, 2009 Page 9


Calendar


Events this week at Maitland Public Li-
brary, 501 S. Maitland Ave.:
On Thursday, Nov. 26 the library will be
closed for Thanksgiving.
At 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 1 is PC Acad-
emy: Intro to Open Office Writer. Registration
is required.
At 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 2 is Wii
gaming for older adults.
At 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 3 is Knit & Cro-
chet Club.
At 3 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 5 is creative
writing with Dale Slongwhite.
From 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Sunday,
Dec. 6 is Creative Stamping: Holiday Cards
and Gifts. Registration is required.

"Maidens and Monsters: The Art of Science
Fiction, Adventure and Fantasy" will be at
the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Gar-
dens from Nov. 24 to April 18, at 633 Osceola
Ave., Winter Park. The exhibition will be open
Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Call
407-647-6294 or visit www.polasek.org for
admission details.

The Morse Museum of American Art, at 445
N. Park Ave., hosts the following free public
events: From 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov.
27 will be live music by the Harpist Bizarre
Quartet.
From 6:15 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Dec.
3 is the annual lighting of the Tiffany windows
in Central Park with an outdoor concert.
From 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 4 will
be live music by Beautiful Music Holiday Flute
Trio.

The sport division of The Turkey Burn Ad-
venture Race begins on Saturday, Nov. 28 at
noon and is a four-hour event. The elite divi-
sion begins at 4 a.m. and is a 12-hour event.
The start and finish are at Wekiva Falls Resort,
30700 Wekiva River Road, Sorrento. Register
online at www.pangeaadventureracing.com
or e-mail info@pangeaadventureracing.com.
For additional information, contact Cristina
Calvet-Harrold 407-832-4814 or cristina@
cchmarketing.com.

The second CEO Nexus Forum will be host-


ed on Wednesday, Dec. 2, with guest speaker
Steve Miller. Contact Cari Coats at 407-646-
2067 or ccoats@rollins.edu.

The Tip-Off Classic Invitational high school
basketball tournament will be at 7 p.m. from
Wednesday, Dec. 2 to Saturday, Dec. 5 at the
Winter Park High School Gymnasium, 2100
Summerfield Road, Winter Park.

"Cookies, Cocoa & Carols" will be from 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. on Dec. 3 at Casa Feliz, 656
N. Park Ave., Winter Park. Suggested donation
is $3 per person or $10 per family. Children
can have their photo taken with Santa for $10.
Visit casafeliz.us.

The Orlando Museum of Art's 1st Thurs-
days event "The Line Art Party" from 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m. on Dec. 3, welcomes visitors to ex-
perience an exhibition of artistic expression.
Admission is $10, always free for OMA mem-
bers. Call 407 896 4231 x260, or visit www.
OMArt.org.

From 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 8
the International Association of Adminis-
trative Professionals, Winter Park Chapter
will have Linda Freese present "Business Eti-
quette for the Business Professional" at 240
N. Pennsylvania Ave. The meeting is free and
charge for optional dinner is $16. For reserva-
tions, e-mail cherylh@nodarse.com by Dec.
4.

There will be ballroom dancing to live mu-
sic with the Armand Marchesano Orches-
tra from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday,
Dec. 5 at the Beardall Senior Center, 800
Delaney Ave., Orlando. Please bring a covered
dish. Admission is $4.

Holler Family Fun Day is from 1 p.m. to 5
p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6, in Central Park. Par-
ticipation in Holler-Classic activities is free;
ice skating is $10 per person.

The Holocaust Memorial Resource and Ed-
ucation Center of Florida will be screening a
new documentary "Swimming in Auschwitz"
at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6. It will be shown
at the Center, 851 N. Maitland Ave.


HOLIDAY I 60 tons of snow in Oviedo


< continued from previous page
Center, 95 N. Triplet Lake Drive,
will host "Pancakes at the Pole,"
a holiday themed family breakfast
complete with elves and Santa.
There are seatings at 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. The cost is $5 for resi-
dents and $7 for non residents. For
more information contact Erin
Myers at 407-262-7720.
The Oviedo Gymnasium and
Aquatic Facility, 148 Oviedo Blvd.,
is bringing a "Snow Mountain" to
residents on Dec. 12 from 5 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Play in 60 tons of snow
delivered straight from the North
Pole. Tickets are $5 before Dec. 12
or $10 the day of the event and in-


clude unlimited rides while snow
lasts, inflatable games, carnival
games, activities, entertainment
and more. For more information
call 407-971-5568.
The city of Sanford will pres-
ent "Christmas in the Square" at
Magnolia Square and First Street
on Dec. 4 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
The free event will feature a tree-
lighting ceremony, face painters,
balloon artists and Santa. Then on
Dec. 5 will be the city's 4th Annual
Illuminated Christmas Parade at 6
p.m. on First Street. There will be
floats, music and dancing at this
free event.


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For tickets or more information, please call 407-644-8281




iB__ R ObsiIROFCOi
CIIAMBEROFCOMMERC


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Under one roof for the first time


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -THE OBSERVER
Maitland Mayor Doug Kinson speaks to the crowd at the dedication ceremony for the city's new police station, named after former chief Edward "Butch" Doyle. The building came in $300,000 under budget.


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF

The flag was hoisted into
the air on Nov. 19, crowning
the long-awaited new head-
quarters of the Maitland Po-
lice Department.
The new station will al-
low the whole police de-
partment to be under the
same roof for the first time,
and replaces the 30-plus-
year-old station on Inde-
pendence Avenue.
"Today begins a new era
for the police department,"
Maitland Police Chief Doug
Ball said at the dedication
of the Edward Doyle Po-
lice Headquarters, which
was attended by about 200
citizens, police officers and
elected officials on Thurs-
day, Nov. 19.
Councilman Jeff Flow-


ers told the Observer about
a year ago that the old sta-
tion built in 1974 was
in bad condition and was
"moldy" and "old."
"This one smells a lot
better," he said after taking
a tour of the new, state-of-
the-art facility.
Flowers said it will be an
incredible advantage for all
the investigations and oper-
ations staff to be in the same
place. "It's luck that we've
been able to maintain our
accreditation," he said.
The new station has on-
site holding cells and inter-
view rooms, complete with
video and audio recordings
fed into a room on the other
side of the one-way mirror.
The station was named
after Edward "Butch" Doyle,
the city's chief from 1989
through November 2008.


Abeaming Doyle thanked
the department for honor-
ing him and his late father,
who was also a Maitland of-
ficer. Looking to the sky at
the podium, Doyle smiled
and said, "Dad we did
great."
The city did pretty great
too the station finished
about $300,000 under bud-
get and is the city's first
"green building," being
LEED Silver Certified. That
savings will be returned to
the fund that will be put to-
ward building the city's new
fire station and city hall.
All three projects were ap-
proved by voters in 2004.
Maitland Fire Chief Ken
Neuhard silently watched
from the police station lob-
by as the ceremony outside
came to a close. His fire sta-
tion on Independence Av-


enue was also built in 1974,
along with city hall. He said
he can't wait to be in Ball's
shoes, when his department
gets its new station.
He may not have to wait
too long.
The police station was
completed in 10 months,


and Mayor Doug Kinson said
he hopes the city will break
ground on both the fire sta-
tion and city hall projects
within a year.
"This is a building we can
be proud of for all time,"
Kinson said at the ceremo-
ny.


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Page 10 Thursday, November 26, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, November 26, 2009 Page 11


Cinema


A showcase of this week's releases,
and a look ahead to upcoming movies.


'The Lovely Bones'

Coming Dec. 18


'Avatar'


Coming Dec. 25


'It's Complicated'


Coming Jan. 8


'Youth in Revolt'


/ (/i ~


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NETWORKS
For a Leadership Breakfast Seminar entitled,
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Featuring Lee Cockerell,
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Wednesday, December 2nd
7:30-9:30 am
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Orlando, FL 32803
Free Parking in OSC Garage
This seminar is a must for those looking to
take themselves or their organization to
the next level of excellence!
Registration:
SI 5 for Chamber Members
520 for Non-Chamber Members
520 at the door
You may also pay online at www.winterpark.org
Questions? Please call 407-644-8281.


Supporting Sponsors:
O bs Winter ParkMaitand
Observer


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


orrr*oo
frii*c
acr*rir
1L










Opinion/ Editorial


Perspectives

by...







On whose authority?


This Thanksgiving I'd like
to explore whether an in-
dividual is ever absolved of
the responsibility to think
for him or herself. How do
we reach a moral or ethical
decision? How exactly do
we determine what is ap-
propriate or inappropriate,
right or wrong, good and
bad? On whose authority
should we act?
Shakespeare observed,
"Why then 'tis none to you;
for there is nothing either
good or bad, but think-
ing makes it so." There is a
part of me that completely
agrees with this perspec-
tive? Yet, child molestation
is not made acceptable by
thinking it is permissible.
Rape. Intentionally pollut-
ing our environment, most
wars, stealing an election,
violence against the harm-
less, no amount of thinking
will make such acts ethi-
cally acceptable. To me.
Obviously killing falls
under the "thinking makes
it so" category. We kill
during war but we call it
self-defense or "Manifest
Destiny" or "Remember
the Alamo" or "My Country
Right or Wrong." We kill
to protect ourselves, even
our property. We execute
killers. We kill time. We kill
ideas. We kill creativity.
Spontaneity. We even kill
ourselves. So there is a great
degree of "relativity" on


how we apply the Do Not
Kill admonition.
Is there a moral code for
how we "should" act that is
in any way separate or dis-
tinct from human beings?
The Ten Commandments
are a human construct, an
understandable attempt
at creating order out of a
world of chaos. I've count-
less examples of religious
doctrine passing for divine
wisdom. Why we have to
attribute humane behavior
to a supernatural spirit has
always made me chuckle.
Can we not attempt on our
own to be "better" without
insisting that some nebu-
lous otherworldly spirit is
responsible, is pulling our
strings? God is watching.
And the boogeyman is in
the closet. What's the differ-
ence?
I've said for years that
a gift one generation can
give to another is to let go
of shopworn ideas, of ques-
tionable values and odious
behaviors that while once
acceptable and normal are
no longer so.
I have a family example
that illustrates this per-
fectly. My grandfather was
a martinet. He instilled fear
(love, too) in his sons. He
punished with a belt and
taught his sons that such
violence was acceptable,
normal and permissible.
He was so fearsome that his


brother sent his children
over to be disciplined by
Gramps. My father started
out his family and, as the
twig is bent so grows the
tree, he thought that hard,
physical, emotionally con-
frontational parenting
was how you did it and my
brother bore the brunt of
just that for the first four
years of his life. My brother
says today, "Thank gawd
for sister Susan, she saved
my life! Dad had something
else to focus on after she
was born."
Decades later my father
welled-up with tears de-
scribing how he treated his
first child. He changed his
behavior. My father let go
of how he was raised, of his
parenting examples and
literally became a much
kinder and gentler man
(parent) as a result of some
personal epiphany he had
in the mid-1940s. I was
never aggressively touched,
not once, by my father. Fa-
ther let go of the baggage of
an earlier generation and
we (children) all led better
lives as a result. What a gift.
Thank you, Father.
My point in this example
is that we all make deci-
sions all our lives based on
how we were raised, what
we learned from our par-
ents, what their values were
and how we saw them ap-
plied.
Literature, fiction is a
fabulous tool of moral
persuasion. It's a gift. By
reading a book (play, poem,
novel, etc.) we can liter-
ally submerge ourselves in
another's life and experi-
ence what they experience.
Think Charles Dickens,
Nabokov, Whitman, Orwell,
Voltaire or Julia Alvarez.
Fiction offers us the ability
to live a variety of "morals,"
to try them on for size, to
see their applicability from


the "safety" of our over-
stuffed den chair. Literature
has arguably been the most
illuminating of life-chang-
ing tools. No wonder book
burning, book banning,
censorship is such a famil-
iar and persistent phenom-
ena.
Reading on your own,
thinking for yourself is
probably the most revolu-
tionary act we can all freely
participate in. At least in
America, in the West.
We come to conclusions
about "moral" issues based
on what we observed as
children, what we have
learned by living as adults,
what we have gleaned from
our efforts at self-education
(reading and such) and
from what our "trusted"
authorities tell us is so. An
illustration of a trusted au-
thority follows.
On June 18, 1452, Pope
Nicholas V "authorized
Alfonso V of Portugal to
reduce any Saracens (Mus-
lims) and pagans and any
other unbelievers to per-
petual slavery." Slavery was
sanctioned in the papal bull
Dum Diversas.
This act, according to
some historians, started
(the imprimatur of) the
slave trade of West Africa.
On January 5, 1455,
Pope Nicholas V again
wrote to the same Alfonso.
"It followed up the Dum
Diversas extending to the
Catholic nation of Europe's
Dominion over discovered
lands during 'The Age of
Discovery."' "It sanctified
the seizure of non Christian
lands and it encouraged the
enslavement of native and
non-Christian peoples in
Africa and, later, to the New
World."
History is another av-
enue available when deter-
mining one's moral barom-
eter.


Why would you auto-
matically believe what your
church is telling you about
the morality of reproduc-
tive choice or homosexual
rights when that very same
institution has been on
the wrong side of the dime
so many times in history?
Why? Why?
From slavery to how the
Earth moves through the
heavens, Pope after Pope
after Pope claimed moral
authority and people died,
people suffered.
Faith is good, I practice
it myself. But faith does
not absolve you from not
thinking through why and
how you live (lead) your
life. There are many ways
to determine answers as to
how one lives morally.
What we learned at
momma's knee, what we
learned in "kindergarten,"
life's experiences, life's
possibilities through fic-
tion, and our trusted moral
authorities are all factors
in making us the moral per-
son we are.
Because the Pope (or any
religious authority) issues
a dictum prescribing your
moral choices does not pre-
vent you as a sentient hu-
man from legitimately ask-
ing, "Why are you right now
in your condemnation of
homosexuals, for example,
when your moral authority
has so often wrongly cen-
sored so much of humanity,
condemning so much of
humanity to suffering, hu-
miliation and death? And
the morality of that is?"
Answer that and then
judge, condemn others.
This time of Thanksgiving.

TALK JEPSON

Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letter tothe Editor


Take advantage of Part D -
before it's too late
From Nov. 15 until the end
of the year, seniors can sign
up for Medicare Part D -
the prescription drug ben-
efit for seniors. And those
who are unhappy with
their existing coverage can
switch to a new plan.
All those eligible should
take advantage of this
"open enrollment" period.
The health care reform bills
working their way through
Congress might soon make
serious and unnecessary
- changes to Part D. And
the consequences could be
dire.
Unlike most public
health programs, the Medi-
care prescription drug ben-
efit is administered by the
private sector. The program
is subsidized by taxpayer
dollars, but seniors are al-
lowed to select the drug
benefit that best suits their


needs. Providers compete
for this business, which
leads to more choices, bet-
ter service, and lower pre-
miums. This feature the
freedom to comparison
shop between competing
Medicare drug plans is
one of the reasons the pro-
gram is both popular and
cost effective.
Part D has a 92 percent
satisfaction rate among
its beneficiaries. And the
program has reduced the
number of seniors without
a drug plan by 17 percent.
Meanwhile, the price of
Part D over the next decade
is expected to be nearly
$120 billion less than origi-
nally estimated when the
program was created.
But the recent push for
health care reform has put
the program in danger. The
health care bill recently
passed in the House would
enable the federal govern-


ment to "negotiate" Medi-
care Part D drug prices. The
government doesn't negoti-
ate, though. Just look at the
drug benefit administered
by the Department of Vet-
erans Affairs.
At the VA, the govern-
ment "negotiates" prices by
requiring drug companies
to sell their medicines at a
price that's at least 24 per-
cent of the non-federal av-
erage manufacturer price.
That's a price control; not
a negotiation. When drug
companies refuse to play
ball, they're not on the VA's
drug formulary, or list of
preferred drugs.
The Lewin Group, a
health policy consulting
firm, recently found that
the VA formulary contains
less than 65 percent of the
nation's 300 most-popular
prescription drugs as a re-
sult of government nego-
tiations. The most popular


Part D plan, by contrast,
covers nearly 95 percent of
those meds. Of the brand-
name drugs on the top-300


list, just 42 percent are on
the VA formulary. A full 97

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Page 12 Thursday, November 26, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Winter Park/Maitland Observer



Play On!
y "


Conservative commentary
& opinions of Louis Roney
Harvard'42-Distinguished Prof, Em.-
UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
(Assisted by b.w.:Joy Roney)

"You are entitled to your own opinions-
you are not entitled to your own facts"
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

My thanks -
and ever thanks!
eated with friends at
a bounteous table, we
hold hands with those
on either side of us and join
in the blessing being said.
I find my thoughts con-
centrating on things far
and near for which my
whole being is thankful
- things without which
my life would be infinitely
poorer, perhaps unbear-
able.
I realize that I am most
thankful for being a lucky
person.
Amid voluble table-
talk, my reminiscences
are drawn to oft-forgotten
things that make all such
occasions Thanksgivings of
a sort.
I give thanks again that
I did not perish, as did
many of my young friends
and Navy comrades-in-
arms, during the four-year
slaughter that was World
War II.
I am thankful for being
born with a competitive
nature that thrives in the
high-risk climate that duty,


Thursday, November 26, 2009 Page 13


profession, and inclination
have ordained to me.
Nothing has brought me
exultation without the pos-
sibility of just the opposite's
occurring.
I've lost many a skirmish,
but never the zest to return
to the fray with a will to
win.
That great pragmatist,
Vince Lombardi, taught
me to pluck out the worm
in the core of the human
apple, i.e., the will to lose.
Johnny Mercer's lyrics
suggest succinctly, "Elimi-
nate the negative."
As the willing disciple
of get-up-and-goers, I have
never let myself conceive
of myself as anything but a
winner.
Hence, I have a con-
scious excitement when
getting up in the morning.
I'm thankful for that fact.
I am indebted to my
genes and to temperate
living for a strong physical
constitution.
A cup of coffee is my one
indulgence in the morn-
ing when my relatively low
blood pressure is at its low-
est.
I believe wholeheartedly
in "Mens sana in corpore
sano" "A sound mind in a
sound body."
I believe that negative
thinking can make a body
sick that a maltreated,
ill body can poison one's
thinking.
This obvious symbiotic
dependency of physical and
mental well-being needs no
temple, no theology.
I am thankful that my
parents never let me be lazy
- for very long, anyway!
As a result, I cannot to-
day sit idle without think-
ing of something I should
be doing.
Then, if I can do it, I do it.
And I feel an inner glow
at having done it, rather
than just sitting and think-
ing about doing it.


"Doing" is what it's all
about. Doing nothing is the
stuff of death.
I am thankful that I was
brought up accepting re-
sponsibility for my own ac-
tions.
I am proud of some
things I've done, and I
happily take the credit for
them.
I have made lots of errors
- some that were lulus. So
what else is new?
I try not to repeat my
mistakes, so that I don't
cross the line that separates
an excusably imperfect hu-
man being from a damned
jackass.
I've tried to learn to ac-
cept my own limitations, so
that I can live at peace with
myself.
I'm glad that I have nev-
er been able to gratify in-
stantly any of the white-hot
desires that have piqued me
through the years.
In retrospect, nothing
that I value highly ever
came quickly or easily.
The dearest prizes have
taken the longest to win,
and have come in their own
sweet time.
I am eternally thank-
ful to the people who have
helped me from my earliest
years to achieve things that
appeared out of reach.
My wise Georgia grand-
mother advised, "Try to
make people like you. Make
them want to help you.
You'll never amount to
much all by yourself."
When I suggested to
her that there might be
such a thing as a self-made
man, she was ready for me:
"Show me anyone who's
successful, and who claims
to have done it all by him-
self, and I'll show you either
a conceited ass or a bald-
faced liar."
I am thankful for a
keenly attuned conscience
that keeps my pride from
getting me too far in debt


to reality.
Conscience is the last line
of defense of hard-won self-
esteem.
I feel thankful that I have
had some communicative
skills, for better or worse.
Candidness obviates the
reptilian processes of game-
playing.
If "the truth shall set you
free," game-playing shall
fetter you in a tangled web
of lies, and you shall stand
for nothing.
I am grateful to people
who let the chips fall where
they may.
I have never been felled
by a truthful chip.
But heavily timbered lies
have knocked me for many
a loop.
I am thankful to Harvard
College for a scholarship
that gave me four years that
changed every aspect of my
young existence.
How well I remember,
after more than seven
decades, such giants as
Howard Mumford Jones,
Robert Frost, William Yan-
dell Elliott, Bertrand Rus-
sell, "Frisky" Merriman,
Perry Miller, Harry Levin,
and those other Dons who
opened challenging doors
for us and made us question
everything we had ever ac-
cepted as dogma.
I am thankful for hav-
ing been born with a good
voice, and for having been
graced as pupil and protege
by great teacher Maestro
Renato Bellini, the supreme
tenor Jussi Bjoerling, and
the dazzling Met soprano
- and movie star Grace
Moore.
I am thankful that my
life has taken me from
Central Florida to so many
historic places I had only
read about, and that I have
met so many people who
were legends in their times:
John Charles Thomas, Wal-
ter Damrosch, Bing Crosby,
Amelita Galli-Curci, Rosa


Ponselle, Ezio Pinza, Mary
Martin, Charles de Gaulle,
Grace Kelly, Douglas South-
all Freeman, Wieland Wag-
ner, Carlo Maria Giulini,
Alfred North Whitehead,
Bertrand Russell, Albert
Schweitzer, Ernest Heming-
way, Dimitri Mitropoulos,
Konrad Adenauer, Leonard
Warren, Fritz Wunderlich,
Regine Crespin, Leonie Ry-
sanek, Margaret Truman,
Birgit Nilsson, and many,
many others.
After 50 years of singing,
I was thankful to become
enthusiastically occupied
as a teacher, who could pass
on to another generation
of talented young people
those treasures of vocal
technique that were given
to him by many who are no
longer on Earth.
"Bel canto," beautiful
singing, describes the prag-
matic technique that makes
singing a high art. I am grat-
ified to have embodied that
long-honored tradition and
do not presume to have
added much of anything.
Above all, I am grate-
ful for my smart, spirited,
gifted, positive-thinking
wife who sees mostly the
good in me but who
pulls no punches when she
thinks I'm out of line. She
is my seeing-eye light in my
Samson's-night.
You can't choose your
siblings, but you can choose
your mate.
That's a "relative" privi-
lege worth considering.
Lastly, I am thankful
for the Christian ethic, the
embodiment of the Golden
Rule that generates intrin-
sic and extrinsic peace.
The loveliest fruit of this
way of thinking is called
"good will to men."
Good will is the product
of our crediting each other
for even the smallest of hu-
man kindnesses Thanks!


LETTER I Helping one group of seniors will hurt another


< continued from previous page
percent are available under
the most-popular Part D
plan.
Another provision be-
ing considered on Capitol
Hill would force pharma-
ceutical firms to offer a
substantial rebate to the
government for all drugs
used by low-income Part D
beneficiaries. Lowering the
price of drugs for one group
of seniors, though, would
cause drug prices to rise
for every other senior. The
nonpartisan Congressional
Budget Office has conclud-
ed that this proposal could
cause drug prices to rise by
20 percent for most seniors!
Any sort of price-fixing
scheme would also stifle
research and development.
On average, it costs more
than $1 billion to produce
a new drug. Pharmaceuti-
cal companies must be
able to recoup that cost. If


government bureaucrats
start tampering with drug
prices, investment in new
treatments will drop off
dramatically.
Fortunately, none of
these provisions have been
signed into law.
The open-enrollment
period gives seniors a valu-
able opportunity to get the
most out of their Medicare
drug benefit. Even benefi-
ciaries who are happy with


their current Part D plan
should visit www.Medicare.
gov and consider their op-
tions. There are dozens of
plans out there, so every-
one should be able to find
one that's both affordable
and well-suited to their
needs.
-Peter J. Pitts
President of the Center for Medi-
cine in the Public Interest and a for-
mer FDA Associate Commissioner.


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Page 14 Thursday, November 26, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA04173
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS
TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CER-
TIFICATEHOLDERS FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE
SECURITIES TRUST 2006-R2, ASSET-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-R2,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
JENNIFER R. ASARO, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 13, 2009
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on January 14, 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

That certain Condominium parcel known as
Unit No. 2933, LAKE LOTUS CLUB III, A CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 31, Pages 33 through
37, inclusive of the Public Records of Semi-
nole County, Florida, and the undivided inter-
est in the common elements and common
expenses appurtenant to said unit, all in ac-
cordance with and subject to the covenants,
conditions, restrictions, terms and other pro-
visions of the Declaration of Condominium of
Lake Lotus Club III, a Condominium, as con-
tained in Official Records Book 1595, Page
1732 through 1774, and any amendments
thereto, of the Public Records of Seminole
County, Florida

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated November 16, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Selene Worley
Deputy Clerk of the Court

Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 217
Boca Raton, FL 33432

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
11/26,12/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2008CA008592-14-K
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK
OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE-
HOLDERS CWALT, INC. ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2005-86CB MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-86CB.,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
PATRICK NAVE, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 13, 2009
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on January 14, 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Seminole County
Courthouse 301 N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771
for the following described property:

CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 205, SANDY COVE,
A CONDOMINIUM ACCORDING TO THE DEC-
LARATION OF CONDOMINIUM THEREOF AND
EXHIBITS THERETO, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 1310, PAGE 1344, AND ANY
AMENDMENTS THERETO, ALSO RECORDED
IN THE PLAT BOOK 24, PAGES 86 THROUGH
91, INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF SEMI-
NOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH
AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN AND TO THE
CONDOMINIUM ELEMENTS APPURTENANT
TO SAID UNIT.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated November 16, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Selene Worley
Deputy Clerk of the Court

Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 217
Boca Raton, FL 33432

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
11/26,12/3


Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the
Division of Corporations, Department of State, State
of Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Goin' Postal
under which the undersigned expects to engage
in business at
9148 Narcoossee Road
Suite # 106
Orlando, Florida 32827
and that the party interested in said business
enterprise is as follows:
A & R Brains, LLC
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 26th day of
November, 2009
11/26


Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the
Division of Corporations, Department of State, State
of Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Home Appliance Repair Parts Online
under which the undersigned expects to engage
in business at
3979 S. Orange Blossom Trail, Suite 211
Orlando, FL 32839
and that the party interested in said business
enterprise is as follows:
CWD Laundry Equipment, LLC
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 26th day of
November, 2009
11/26


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2009-CP-1904
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CARL E. HARMS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CARL E.
HARMS, deceased, whose date of death was Au-
gust 9, 2009, File 2009-CP-1904, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 301 North Park Av-
enue, Sanford, FL 32771. The names and address-
es of the Personal Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice has been served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LAST OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: Nov.
26, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
DOUGALD B. LEITCH, ESQUIRE
FLORIDA BAR NUMBER: 312908
Mahaffey & Leitch
2461 West State Road 426, Suite 1001
Oviedo, FL 32765
(407) 894-2081

Personal Representative:
Shirleen K. Harms
1281 North Division Street
Oviedo, FL 32765
11/26,12/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009 CP 1994
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NORA KELSO
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Nora Kelso,
deceased, whose date of death was September 26,
2009, is pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is P. 0. Box 8099, Sanford, FL 32772 8099.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is No-
vember 19, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Jeanette Triacca
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794 1251
Telephone: (407) 645 4833
Fax: (407) 645 4832

Personal Representative:
Jeanette Triacca
110 Foxridge Run
Longwood, Florida 32750
11/19,11/26

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2009-CP-2279-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT FERRO
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Albert Ferro,
deceased, whose date of death was August 27,
2009, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 340,
Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
November 19, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Teresa Pancotto
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794 1251
Telephone: (407) 645 4833
Fax: (407) 645 4832

Personal Representative:
Teresa Pancotto
9487 Wickham Way
Orlando, Florida 32836
11/19,11/26

Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the
Division of Corporations, Department of State, State
of Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Studying Solutions
under which the undersigned expects to engage
in business at
1136 Howell Branch Road, Winter Park, FL 32789
and that the party interested in said business
enterprise is as follows:
Amy Lawton and Steve Illsley
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 26th day of
November, 2009
11/26


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-13321
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
GAVIN GORDON, THE CREST AT WATERFORD LAKES
CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., JOHN DOE and
JANE DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: GAVIN GORDON
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Unit 511, Building 5, THE CREST AT
WATERFORD LAKES, a Condominium,
according to the Declaration thereof, as
recorded in Official Records Book 8170,
at Page(s) 1746, of the Public Records of
Orange County, Florida, together with an
undivided interest in the common elements
appurtenant thereto
has been filed against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to it on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is POHL & SHORT, P.A.,
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box
3208, Winter Park, Florida 32790, on or before
30 days after date of first publication, 2009,
and file the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED this 19th day of November, 2009.

LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: KERRY BRICKNER
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
11/26,12/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009-CP-001020-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF RAY E. WARE
Aka Ray Elizabeth Ware
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Ray E. Ware,
deceased, whose date of death was April 28, 2009,
and whose social security number is XXX-XX-8345,
file number 2009-CP-001020-0, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 425 North Orange
Avenue, Room 310, Orlando, Florida 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Nov. 26, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Jere F. Daniels
Florida Bar No. 0017859
Jere F. Daniels, P.A.
1330 Palmetto Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 677-0740

Personal Representative:
Woodrow B. Ware, Jr.
5183 Tellson Place
Orlando, Florida 32812
11/26,12/3

Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 713.585(6) F.S. United American
Lien & Recovery as agent with power of attorney
will sell the following vehicle(s) to the highest bidder
subject to any liens; net proceeds deposited with
the clerk of court; owner/lienholder has right to
hearing and post bond; owner may redeem vehicle
for cash sum of lien; all auctions held in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lienor facility; cash or ca-
shier check; 15% buyer prem; any person inter-
ested ph (954) 563-1999

Sale date December 18 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
21329 2000 Ford vin#: 1FTWW32F3YEA28157
lienor: grand American dollar store discount auto &
diesel svcs 1782 lee rd Orlando fl 407-601-7796
lien amt $3125.09
21330 2003 Volkswagon vin#: WVWP-
D63B33P181125 lienor: dmvw motors david maus
volkswagon 5474 s obt Orlando fl 407-581-4321
lien amt $2121.64
21331 1997 Jeep vin#: 1J4GZ78Y4VC684123
lienor: usa transmission 2699 s obt Orlando fl 407-
648-5653 lien amt $4049.37
21332 2003 Nissan vin#: 1N4AL11D53C223503
lienor: action Nissan universal Nissan 12801 s obt
Orlando fl 407-926-7003 lien amt $5529.22

sale date December 24 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale fl 33309
21344 2006 Ford vin#: 1FAFP34NX6W116900
lienor: pal kal associates inc tuffy auto svc 300 w sr
434 longwood fl 407-339-5724 lien amt $2404.64

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
11/26


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2009-CA-018618-0
Division: 32A
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RICHARD E. RUIZ; MARIA I. RUIZ; and AQUA FI-
NANCE, INC., a Florida Corporation,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 11th day of
January, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described real
property:
LOT 18, ROYAL MANOR ESTATES, PHASE
FOUR, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 21 PAGES 13-
14, PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-018618-0; Div. 32A, now pending in the
Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 12th day of November, 2009.

By: Eric Jontz
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
Florida Bar No. 133990
ERIC B. JONTZ
Florida Bar No. 64905
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
11/26,12/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Number: 48-2009-CA-019467-0
Division 32A
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TITO RAMIREZ; and GLORIA LOPEZ,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 14 day of De-
cember, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described real
property:
LOT 30, BLOCK 162, MEADOW WOODS
SUBDIVISION, VILLAGE 10, AS PER PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 24
PAGES 17 & 18, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2009-CA-019467-0; Division 32A, now pending
in the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 6 day of November, 2009.

By: Eric Jontz
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905

JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
11/19,11/26


Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the
Division of Corporations, Department of State, State
of Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Prompt Care
under which the undersigned expects to engage
in business at
727 Cricklewood Terrace, Lake Mary, FL 32746
and that the party interested in said business
enterprise is as follows:
Prompt Care of Central Florida, LLC
Dated at Seminole County, Florida this 26th day of
November, 2009
11/26

Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the
Division of Corporations, Department of State, State
of Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Prominent Construction Company
under which the undersigned expects to engage
in business at
1623 Patton Avenue, Apopka, FL 32703
and that the party interested in said business
enterprise is as follows:
Prominent Construction, LLC
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 26th day of
November, 2009
11/26


Place your FREE classified ad in;1


our paper and n our Web site



If you're advertising an estateAI1I I I~ I



sal, grae sle yad ale o


Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the high-
est bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999

Sale date December 4 2009 @10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
1921 1997 KW trl vin#: 1XKADB9X8VJ741345 ten-
ant: watec inc brant smith
1922 1996 Great Dane trl vin#:
1 GRAA9623TW032303 tenant: watec inc

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
11/19,11/26


NOTICE OF SALE OF VESSEL
Pursuant to FL. Stat. 328.17(7) the following de-
scribed vessel will be sold in a public sale to the
highest bidder to satisfy a claim lien by lienor for
labor and/or storage: 2002 BENNINGTON MARINE
CORP HIN#: ETW15734J102. Owner/ RANDALL S
LUGENBEAL LAKE MARY, FL. L/H ,. Lienor/ BOAT
TREE MARINA 4370 CARRAWAY PLACE SANFORD,
FL 407-322-1610. Sale Date: December 07, 2009
at 10:00a.m. at 4370 CARRAWAY PLACE SANFORD,
FL 32771. For additional information call 407-657-
7995.
11/19, 11/26



NOTICE OF SALE MOTOR VEHICLE
PURSUANT TO F.S. 715.109(5) (6)
To: CHRICLIOPHE BLANC / former tenant. You are
hereby informed the following described vehicle
will be sold in Public Auction for cash to the high-
est bidder. 1992 FLEETWOOD BOUNDER VIN: 1GB-
KP37N9M3313421. Vehicle location: 180 HOPE
STREET LONGWOOD, FL on December 14, 2009 at
10:00 a.m.
11/26,12/3


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

NOTICE OF EQUALIZATION HEARING
LAKE CHELTON PLUG-IN
CITTErgLNwRiMiThe WINTER PARK, FLORIDA

Dear Property Owner;
Notice is hereby given that a public equalization hearing will be held on December 14, 2009, at 3:30
p.m., at the Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida, by the City
Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida, sitting as an equalizing board to hear any and all com-
plaints regarding the special assessments described in Resolution No. 2037-09 of the City Commission
adopted on October 26, 2009 (the "Assessment Resolution") related to the undergrounding of electric/
CATV facilities within the municipal boundaries of the City of Winter Park, consisting of properties
abutting Fawsett Road, Glencoe Road, West Dana Way, West Reading Way, West Rockwood Way and
Lake Chelton Circle, in the City of Winter Park, Florida (the "Project"). Please be advised that resolution
2037-09 approved on October 26, 2009 called for a public hearing date of November 9, 2009 but that
date has since been changed to December 14, 2009.
All affected property owners have a right to appear at the hearing and to file written objections with the
City Commission within 20 days of the date of the first publication of this notice.
The Project is more particularly described in plans and specifications on file with the City.
It is proposed that the assessments for the undergrounding of electric/CATV facilities will be levied
in the total amount of $115,761.00 to be paid in 10 equal annual installments, commencing with
the tax bill for the calendar year 2010 or in full at the option of the property owner. Assessments
will be assessed on an estimated unit cost of $3,508.00 per parcel among the respective properties
abutting Fawsett Road, Glencoe Road, West Dana Way, West Reading Way, West Rockwood Way, and
Lake Chelton Circle, specially benefited thereby, all as more particularly set forth in the Assessment
Resolution.
All interested persons are advised that the description of each property to be assessed and the amount
to be assessed to each parcel or piece of property may be ascertained from the preliminary assess-
ment roll on file at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Winter Park, Florida, at City Hall, 401 Park
Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida.
It is the intention of the City Commission to adjust and equalize all assessments on a basis of justice
and right, following the hearing, and adopt a final assessment roll to be recorded in the Official records
of Orange County, Florida, which shall constitute a lien on all property so assessed, coequal with
all state, county, district and municipal taxes, as provided in Section 170.09, Florida Statutes, and
pursuant to which the assessments will be collected by the Tax Collector of Orange County, Florida,
together with such taxes.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and for such
purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office, (407) 599-3277, at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
11/26, 12/3



CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789


PUBLIC NOTICE
CrrITT a rLnRl JeIl CKITiC
NOTICE is hereby given that the Board of Adjustment of the City of Winter Park, Florida on Tuesday
December 15, 2009 will hold a Public Hearing at 5:00 P.M. in the Commission Chambers of City Hall.
At that time, the following variance from Article III "Zoning" of the Winter Park Land Development
Code will be heard:

#1 Request of Chris and Michelle Hallemeier for a variance from Sec 58-66 "R-1AA and R-1A districts"
par (f) and Sec 58-82 "General provisions" par (h) to allow the construction of a carport to be located
at 2.3 feet from the north side lot line in lieu of the required side setback of 7.5 feet and to allow the
carport roof overhang to be located one foot from the side lot line in lieu of the required setback of
4 feet.
Property described as Orwin Manor Westminster, Plat J, Page 118, Lot 21, Block 4 as recorded in the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
Located at 1400 Canterbury Road. Zoned: R-1A

#2 Request of Blaise & Jan Mercandante for a variance from Sec 58-83 "Lakefront lots,...boathouses
and docks" par (c) to allow the reconstruction of a boathouse with an area of 750 square feet, side
setback of 3.7 feet, and extending 51 feet into the lake in lieu of the maximum area of 600 square feet,
side setback of 10 feet and maximum extension into the lake of 30 feet.
Property described as Sicilian Shores, Plat Book 0, Page 34, Lots 11 & 12, Block L as recorded in the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
Located at 651 Pinetree Road. Zoned R-1AAA

#3 Request of Jodie Konold for a variance from Sec 58-66 "R-1AA and R-1A districts" par (f) to allow
the construction of a 700 square foot second floor addition onto an existing one story home located
5.5 feet from the side lot line in lieu of the required side setback of 7.5 feet.
Property described as: Replat of Woodmere Terrace, Plat Book M, Page13, Lot 32, Block B as recorded
in the Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
Located at 1281 Woodmere Drive. Zoned: R-1AA.

#4 Request of Greg Hardwick for a variance from Sec 58-66 "R-1AA and R-1A districts" par (f)
to allow a home to remain 20 feet from the front lot line in lieu of the required setback of 30 feet
and to allow 150 square feet of additional floor area with the planting and maintenance of a dense
landscape barrier.
Property described as: Orwin Manor Westminster, Plat Book J, Page 118, Lot 20, Lot 19, Block 11 as
recorded in the Public Records of
Located at 1620 Westchester Avenue. Zoned: R-1A.

#5 Request of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Harris for a re-instatement of an expired variance which was
approved on August 15, 2006 which was a variance from Sec 58-66 "R-1AA and R-1A districts" par
(f) to allow the construction of stairway enclosure addition to be located 7 feet from the side lot line in
lieu of the required side setback of 10 feet.
Property described as: Virginia Heights, Plat Book G, Page 107, Lot 15 ,Block N as Recorded in the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
Located at 1521 Highland Road Zoned R-1AA.

/S/ Stephanie J Edsall
Stephanie J Edsall
Board Secretary
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (F.S. 286.0105)"Persons with disabilities needing
assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact the Board of Adjustment Secretary
(407-599-3237) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
11/26



CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789


PUBLIC NOTICE
CITT or CLNR ~ MRITEi
NOTICE is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the Historic Preservation Commission of
the City of Winter Park, Florida on Wednesday, December 9, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. in the Commission
Chambers of City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida, to consider the following PUBLIC
HEARINGS:
HDA 09-003 Request to designate a proposed Virginia Heights sub-area historic district. The proposed
district is generally bounded by Stirling Avenue, Glencoe Avenue, Hampden Place and Highland Road.
All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information will be available in the
Planning and Community Development Department office so that citizens may acquaint themselves
with each issue and receive answers to any questions they may have prior to the meeting. (407)
599-3498.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (F.S. 286.0105)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's Office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
/s/: Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC
City Clerk
11/26






Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, November 26, 2009 Page 15


TheMarketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626
ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
Account Representative needed to work on
behalf of our company. 18+ needed and
must have computer skills. Accounting
experience needed. Any job experience.
Email to mclarkemployment111@gmail.
com for more information.
DRIVERS:
$.40 cpm, Great Benefits run flatbed OTR!
Run Canada make $.50cpm! 2yrs OTR Exp.,
clean MVR Req., Loudon County Trucking:
800-745-7290

WORK FOR GOD!
Get Paid Well To Teach Others Prepared
Lessons From The Bible. Part Or Full-Time.
The Home Church Network 407-309-9864




-H
FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.
OVIEDO OFFICE FOR RENT
Oviedo Office for rent. 1,640 sq. ft., $14/
sq. ft. + tax, no CAM. Reception, kitchen,
conference offices. Near 417 Red Bug exit.
815 Eyrie Drive. Call 407-365-3490.

GREAT OPPORTUNITY
Unique location in Maitland. 2 office spaces
still available. Amazing Rate $16/sf Full
Service. Call 321-436-8650


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.
SCAN PHOTO PRINTS
TO CD OR DVD
$15 per order box (up to 600 prints) plus 12
cents per print. Free pick-up and delivery in
Winter Park, Maitland, Altamonte Springs
for orders of 500 scanned prints or more.
In-home service for qualifying orders. 407-
862-5449
IT'S TIME TO SPRUCE-UP
FOR THE HOLIDAYS
Craftsman Custom Installations, LLC is ready
to take care of All Your Home Repairs and
is now setting appointments to install your
holiday light displays. Pressure Washing -
Painting Trim Flooring Licensed Insured
-References Over 30 Years Experience
-Your Neighbors Handyman. Owned and
operated by Greg Martin a Florida State
licensed Building Inspector certified in
all areas of home construction. Contact:
Greg Martin, 407-925-7085, gwmartin@
meandmycci.com

ATTORNEYS PROBATE /
BANKRUPTCY I FORECLOSURE
LAW OFFICES OF ADAMS & JAMES P.L.,
415 South Orlando Ave, Suite 1, (Across
from Burger King), 407-679-3111, www.
adamsjameslaw.com, Julie Jo Adams,
Esq., Mark A. James, Esq., Free initial
consultation. Hours by appointment. Cards
accepted. Serving Central Florida. Contact:
Adams & James, P.L., 407-679-3111,
mjames@adamsjameslaw.com


WP^bererco


OUTDOOR MARKET
COMING IN NOVEMBER
NEW OUTDOOR MARKET WITH VENDORS
COMING IN NOVEMBER AT LA VINA
PLAZA,NONA. CALL 407-459-3149 FOR
DETAILS.


Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.
Paint/Body Worker B
Job Description: Responsible for applying
a variety of different paints and coatings.
Sands and preps aluminum truck bodies
to be painted or repaired and completes
any required body work. Work Monday-
Thursday, 6:00am-4:30pm.
Pay Rate: $10.55-$15.15 per hour
Job Order Number: 9441059

Vacation Planner
Job Description: Responsible for making
outbound calls to sell preview vacation
packages in an effort to sell timeshares.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:30pm-12:00am.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour plus bonus and
commission
Job Order Number: 9428345

Admissions Representative Military
Job Description: Responsible for the student
from the time of enrollment through the
first week of classes. Contacts and enrolls
students in degree and certificate programs.
Enrolls the student and collects the five
essential documents. Sets a registration


appointment and maintains continual
contact with the student until the end of
drop/add week. Assists in the collection
of financial aid documents that may be
required for verification. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $30,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9429065
Contracts Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for conducting
the preparation, negotiation, acceptance
and management of company contracts/
subcontracts. Reviews and approves all
contractual documents for protection of
company's contractual posture, satisfaction
of customer specification and adherence
to company policy. Advises management
of contractual rights and obligations
and provides interpretation of terms and
conditions. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $60,000.00-$70,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9442174
Senior Inspector I
Job Description: Responsible for conducting
field measurements to establish quantities
for pay item documentation as well as other
contract administration documentation.
Inspects work zones for proper traffic
control setup, erosion control devices and
maintenance thereof, utility coordination
and right-of-way issue resolution. Reads,
interprets and explains construction plans,
contract provisions and specifications. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $40,000.00-$60,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9442050

Front Desk Agent
Job Description: Responsible for maintaining
high levels of service within all the front
office areas including front desk, private
branch exchange (PBX) and reservations
to guests, as well as keeping the operation
profitable. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $11.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9442162
Technology Consultant
Job Description: Responsible for analyzing
test data. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $59,812.95 per year
Job Order Number: 9442185
Housekeeping Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for answering
phone and radio. Follows directions
and solves problems without constant
supervision. Work days and hours may


vary.
Pay Rate: $11.00-$12.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9442160

Cruise/Tour Travel Representative
Job Description: Responsible for obtaining
rates and availability from preferred vendors
via booking systems. Handles leads as
assigned and furnishes quotes to clients and
members with 24 hours. Utilizes booking
systems to research and secure travel,
reviews company websites to stay current
on deals offered to members, and builds
accurate reservations in Client Base Plus
(CB+) system. Enters all quotes and invoices
initial deposits/fees in CB+ system. Sells
and processes insurance policies on vendor
website. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.00 per hour plus commission
Job Order Number: 9442003

Customer Service Representative I
Job Description: Responsible for verifying
insurance coverage and the billing of all
insurance. Corrects and updates patient
information and insurance information.
Sends correspondence to the customer
in reference to his/her billing statement,
refund, account rejection, installment plans,
write off/discount forms-financial hardship,
and missing check process. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.67 per hour
Job Order Number: 9442570

Refrigeration Mechanic
Job Description: Responsible for
implementing power outage management
practices. Executes inspection rounds and
detects, responds, communicates, and
documents issues resulting from inspection.
Develops and implements preventive
maintenance systems in refrigeration
equipment. Troubleshoots and maintains
refrigeration systems. Completes shift
departmental maintenance records. Work
Sunday-Wednesday, 7:00am-7:00pm.
Pay Rate: $21.96 per hour
Job Order Number: 9439842
Waste Water Operator
Job Description: Responsible for operating
wastewater treatment and associated
equipment. Manages wastewater
operations, resolves minor equipment
technical issues, and monitors storm water
basins/outside storage areas. Maintains
equipment and area cleanliness to ensure
compliance with standards and performs
preventative maintenance duties. Maintains


accurate records/logs and conduct
wastewater sampling/analysis. Generates
work orders and troubleshoots/corrects
problems during equipment operation. Work
Sunday-Wednesday, 7:00am-7:00pm.
Pay Rate: $21.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9439854

Director of Nurses Registered Nurse
Job Description: Responsible for managing
various responsibilities including quality
assurance, survey protocol, and nurse's
education/in services. Goes out in the field
to do admissions, supervises field staff, and
qualifies candidates. Work Monday-Friday,
9:00am-5:30pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9438749


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Page 16 Thursday, November 26, 2009 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver


You Won't Believe
Your Eyes!
Don't miss the Orlando area's only
display of magical, moving, mysterious
Snowfall Lights, as seen on the
Champs Elysees in Paris.
The whole family will enjoy


Pier 1, Borders, Coldwater Creek,
Learning Express and more great shops
are brimming with gifts, and more
than a dozen restaurants are ready
to help you celebrate the season.
So come see for yourself this incredible
fairy tale setting for shopping, dining
and holiday fun.


Win a $300 Shopping Spree!

Just in time for your last-minute shopping,
we'll give two lucky shoppers a bundle of
Winter Park Village merchant gift certificates...
with a value of $300!
To enter the drawing, visit our website and
subscribe to our e-newsletter.
The winner will be selected on Saturday, December 19.



WINTER PARK VILLAGE
Highway 17-92 between Fairbanks and Lee Road 407.571.2700
Shop Monday-Saturday, 10am to 9pm Sunday 12-6pm


Holiday Music
Around the Christmas Tree
Music Nightly
Provided by Guitar Center

Christmas Crafts
Saturdays: Dec 5, 12 & 19
11am 1pm
Learning Express Toys

Holiday Open House
Saturday, Dec 5
11am -2pm
Chamberlin's

Breakfast with Santa
Reservations Required.
Saturday, Dec 12
9 11am
Brio 407622.5611


w w. h p i t rpv I I a g e


Page 16 Thursday, November 26, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer




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