Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00061
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: November 19, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00061
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

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Business Briefs............A4
Community Bulletin ........A4
City Talks ................A5
Jepson.................A12
Play On! ................A13
Legals ......... ..... A14
Marketplace/Games .....A15


0 94922 95642 2


Volunteers load pallets of food onto a truck last Thursday in pursuit of the record for food donations in a single day.


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
A tractor-trailer waits
with its door agape, ready
to swallow thousands of
pounds of food as Brent
Turner stands nearby be-
hind a pallet of oatmeal.
He's hoping to help set a
record for the fastest and
most prolific food drive in
world history.
Turner, Rollins College's
director of student involve-
ment, stood in the cold
morning air on Nov. 12 as
more than five tons of food
were loaded up, bound for
an official weigh in. Guin-
ness Book of World Re-


cords representatives were
looking on nationwide as
trucks pulled up to scales
filled with food to be dis-
tributed during the holiday
season.
Turner said it only took
three weeks for Rollins
students to amass the half-
dozen shoulder-height
crates surrounding him
on the brick-lined edge of
Holt Avenue. Watermelons
rolled in. Groceries were
dropped off by the bagful.
Some students even spent
their own school meal plan
food points to buy food for
needy families.
"Our fraternities and so-
rorities really came togeth-


er for this," he said.
And it all came into the
weigh stations on the same
day, as donations across
the country rolled in to be
counted.
Sodexo, a nationwide
food distribution business,
put together the drive to
link food banks throughout
the country to go for the re-
cord, spawning donation
drives on college campuses
and grocery stores just in
time for the holidays.
Sasah Hausman from the
Second Harvest Food Bank
watched as a forklift raised
a few thousand pounds of

> turn to ROLLINS on A3


Dockery to

talk on rail
ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Sen. Paula Dockery is com-
ing to Winter Park on Mon-
day to update the City Com-
mission on renewed plans
for commuter rail, with ru-
mors swirling that she may
try to dissuade the city from
helping push a modified
SunRail plan forward.
Meanwhile Orlando May-
or Buddy Dyer is talking up
a commuter rail deal pat-
terned after one that passed
this year in Massachusetts.
But a Winter Park city
commissioner says that the
deal has no teeth to stop cit-
ies and counties involved in
SunRail from being hit with
large liability lawsuits if an
accident occurs.
That deal in Massachu-
setts between the state and
CSX included stricter liabil-
ity provisions that would
place more of the financial
burden for rail accidents on
CSX than the company had
attempted to negotiate in
Florida earlier this year. But
that would only leave CSX
liable if it were found inten-
tionally negligent in causing
an accident.
That's difficult to prove,
said Commissioner Beth Dil-
laha, and if the SunRail plan
follows similar language, it
could be functionally nearly
identical to the old com-

> turn to RAIL on A3


Station unveiled


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
One public building down,
two to go.
The city of Maitland's
newpolice station will make
its debut at 3 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 19, just as the city's
other two public projects -
a new fire station and city
hall pick up steam.


The Community Redevel-
opment Agency Board voted
4-2 on Nov. 11 to remove all
city-owned land from the
Town Center development
agreement, freeing the city
to move forward with the
fire station and city hall.
That strips Brossier Co. of
about one-third of the land
for its four-block mixed-use
> turn to POLICE on A3


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News



Knights stop Minutemen in opener


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

The Knights' most famous
new player got his shot un-
der the spotlights of the
UCF Arena Friday night, as a
near-record crowd watched
Marcus Jordan in his black
and gold debut.
U Mass proved little chal-
lenge for the Knights (1-0),
who won 84-67 in their sea-
son-opening contest.
With the Knights' sec-
ond largest crowd in team
history looking on, Jordan
did more chasing than drib-
bling, as he hounded U Mass
players under the basket. He
picked up two rebounds and
a steal in 11 minutes on the
floor coming off the bench
for repeated short stints in
the game.
Jordan took two shots
at the basket plus two free
throws, but came up empty
on all his attempts. A little
bit of his father Michael
Jordan came out as he at-
tempted a charging, leaping


crossover layup, but he was
rejected solidly by towering
U Mass center Sean Carter.
On offense it was sopho-
more guard Isaac Sosa steal-
ing the spotlight, shooting
9 of 11 from the floor, in-
cluding 6 of 7 from three
point range, and totaling
26 points on the night. His
3-pointers and total points
were both career highs.
Point guard AJ. Rompza
also shined, picking up 13
points, 5 assists and 3 re-
bounds as he ran circles
around the U Mass defense.
Freshman Keith Clanton
scored 9 points and grabbed
8 rebounds in his debut,
playing 27 minutes on the
floor.
The Knights shined when
defending the basket, forc-
ing the Minutemen outside
of the arc, where they shot
wildly, hitting just 12 of 38
from three-point range.
The night was particular-
ly poignant for some former
Knights, as the father-son
duo of Torchy Clark and Bo


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
The Knights evaded the Minutemen's high-pressure defense to take an early lead, and extended it in the second half of the game.
Some young recruits shined in the game, adding welcome scoring and rebounds from the bench in their UCF debut.


Clark were honored with
a banner to hang inside
the Arena. The elder Clark
coached the Knights for 14
years and is considered the
father of the men's basket-
ball program, gaining 274


wins. The younger Clark
holds the school record
with 2,886 career points, at
an almost unheard of rate of
27.8 per game.
The Knights play in the
Glenn Wilkes Classic this


week, traveling to Daytona
Beach, facing Auburn at 6
p.m. Friday, Niagara at 3:30
p.m. on Saturday, and Drake
at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday.


Knights shock No. 12 Houston


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
The Knights beat their first
ranked team in UCF foot-
ball history Saturday in a
dramatic comeback win
over Houston, 37-32.
For the ninth time this
season the Knights (6-4,
4-2) entered the second half
of the game trailing their
opponent, this time by a
17-3 deficit, and came back
strong in the second half.
They strung together three
straight unanswered touch-
downs to retake the lead
23-17, then continued their
push to stretch the lead to
37-20 at one point.
The Cougars (8-2, 4-2)
didn't let up though, racing


for two touchdowns in the
final 3:39 to bring the score
within five points, followed
by an onside kick with 10
seconds left, which the Cou-
gars recovered. But that re-
covery was overturned by
officials due to being only
9 yards after the ball was
kicked. The penalty handed
UCF the ball and sealed the
win.
Houston had entered the
Bright House ranked No. 12
in the nation, a designation
that had always proven om-
inous for the Knights. This
was their 23rd meeting with
a ranked team since joining
the Football Bowl Subdivi-
sion in 1996. Leading up to
the game, they were 0-22 all
time.


In a post game press
conference Coach George
O'Leary showed unusu-
al emotion when talking
about the team's historic
victory.
"It's great," he said. "It's a
great win for our program."
That win came on a sea-
son high performance by
quarterback Brett Hodges,
who completed 21 of 25 at-
tempts for 241 total yards,
including a touchdown.
That came despite strong
pressure from Houston's de-
fense that sacked him twice
in the game.
Meanwhile on the
ground, running back
Brynn Harvey had another
big game, picking up 139
total yards on 35 attempts,


finding the end zone three
times, including a dramatic
41-yard TD run.
On the defensive side the
Knights pressured Houston
Heisman candidate quar-
terback Case Keenum, who
was sacked twice. Bruce
Miller picked up one sack
that pushed the Cougars
back 10 yards. Cory Hogue
knocked down 10 Houston
ball carriers, with Kamal
Ishmael tackling eight.
The win was an enigmatic
one for UCF this season. For
the second time they won
despite being outgained by
their opponent, this time by
a gap of 423 yards to 393.
In just one game the
Knights may have taken
some of their most dramat-


ic steps toward the postsea-
son, cementing eligibility
for a bowl game, and hold-
ing onto their three-way-tie
for second place in Confer-
ence USA East Division.
All three of those teams
- UCF, UAB and Southern
Miss, are just one game be-
hind East Carolina in the C-
USA standings.
The ECU Pirates have
proven tough to beat this
season, defeating UCF early
on and only losing one C-
USA matchup to Southern
Methodist.
The Knights may be in
their final home game of the
season as they host Tulane
at 2 p.m. Saturday. Tulane
(3-7, 1-5) is at the bottom of
C-USA West.


Wildcats are playoff-bound


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

It's football playoff time
as teams around Central
Florida ready for first round
games this weekend. And
last weekend the Wildcats
finished the regular season
with a final flourish to ready
for the postseason.
The dynamic Winter Park
duo of Sam Richardson and
Patrick Mputu added up 329
yards of offense to lead the
Wildcats to a 41-21 stomp-
ing of Wekiva Friday.
The Wildcats (9-1, 3-0)
leapt out to a 21-3 half-


time lead thanks to touch-
down runs by Mputu and
Zee Ware, plus a scamper
by Richardson. The scoring
gap spread even more by the
end of the game, despite the
Mustangs picking up three
touchdowns in the second
half.
Mputu would go on to
pick up 142 yards on the
ground and three touch-
downs.
Now the district champs
will turn their eyes to the
playoffs against Lake Brant-
ley. The Patriots (7-3, 2-1)
are coming off a 34-21 win
over Hagerty last week.


The Patriots finished run-
ner up in their district this
season.
The last time the Wild-
cats entered the playoffs
with only one loss on their
record they made it to the
state semifinal game before
falling 10-7 to Palm Beach
Gardens. Last season the
Wildcats were knocked out
in the first round with a loss
to East Ridge 23-7.
If the Wildcats can stop
the Patriots, they'll face ei-
ther Timber Creek or last
year's state champion, Sem-
inole.


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Page 2 Thursday, November 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


'I II





Thursday, November 19, 2009 Page 3


ROLLINS I Guinness record in sight


< continued from the front page
soup into the air.
"Sodexo and Rollins did a great
job organizing this," she said. "And
the students and faculty really got
involved."
The college's goal was 10,000
pounds of food, starting Oct. 23.
The bags came flooding in imme-
diately, Hausman said, immedi-
ately outpacing the already ambi-
tious goal.
"To receive 10,000 pounds is
a little bit harder than you'd ever


expect," she said. "But they did it
with flying colors, and there's defi-
nitely more than 10,000 pounds
of food here."
With Guinness still tallying the
results, the school still doesn't
know if it helped set a record.
Hausman said that doesn't mat-
ter.
"Hopefully once we get the
numbers in, they'll succeed in
breaking the record," she said.
"But a lot of families will get to eat
whether they break the record or
not."


POLICE I City hall, fire station seek bids


< continued from the front page
downtown, a project that is stalled
because of a lack of funding. But
Council also gave Brossier the op-
tion to buy the city property not
used by the project at a minimal
price.
Brossier Co. president Bob Re-
ese and the city ran into problems
when it came to relocating the fire
department while a new station
was built on the current site. After
months of tied votes on the Board,
Mayor Doug Kinson presented a
plan that would reclaim both the
fire station and city hall and put
them out to public bid.
On Nov. 11, the amendments to
the agreement passed, with Coun-
cil members Phil Bonus and Bev
Reponen dissenting.
Bonus said he was thrilled about
reclaiming the projects from the
developer, but he didn't like that
Brossier will get to purchase the re-
maining city hall and north park-
ing lot property. He said this piece
of the deal was pushed through
very last minute.
"Once we've got our two build-
ings and Bob has our land, we're


going to find ourselves with egg
on our face," he said.
The city is preparing for a pub-
lic bidding process.
The fire station will still be built
on the current site at Maitland
and Packwood avenues, and city
hall is proposed to be built next to
its current site, at Independence
and Packwood avenues, what Kin-
son calls the "corner of Main and
Main."
The city can put a check mark
next to "new police station." The
Edward Doyle Police Headquar-
ters, the city's first "green" building,
will open its doors for a ribbon-
cutting and tour on Thursday.
Located at 1837 Fennell St., the
new, larger police station is two
stories tall, 17,000 square feet and
LEED (Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design) Silver cer-
tified. It replaces the 30-year-old
station on Independence Lane.
"We are extremely excited,"
Maitland Police Chief Doug Ball
said. "The current facility we're in
was originally constructed in the
early '70s and although it's been a
great home, obviously we've out-
grown it."


RAIL I Commissioner questions plan


< continued from the front page
muter rail deal, which broke down
earlier this year.
"It's like Groundhog Day," Dil-
laha said. "It's just the same thing
over again."
The panel pushing the develop-
ment of SunRail met Friday to dis-
cuss plans for a special legislative
session on Dec. 7. Dyer, the panel's
chairman, has long been a propo-
nent of commuter rail in Central
Florida. He estimated that a su-
permajority could be possible in
a potential upcoming Senate vote
on a deal between the state and
CSX to buy up rail tracks and help


move CSX's rail routes.
But Dillaha said that positive
talk could be hiding the truth be-
hind the renewed push for Sun-
Rail. She said the plan is too simi-
lar to past plans, and too flawed to
work.
"Why should there be a spe-
cial session for a project for the
third time in a row with the same
bad terms?" she asked, calling the
project expensive and risky. "If a
project is so bad that it's been de-
feated twice and they have to mis-
represent a lot of the facts to the
public, you've got to question the
motivation behind it."


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Business Briefs


David Byrnes, president of Beazer
Homes in Florida, said Beazer has
15 new move-in-ready homes in the
Orlando area available for buyers
that may qualify for the $8,000 U.S.
Homebuyer Tax Credit. Beazer will of-
fer up to $8,000 in closing costs on
homes that close by Nov. 30.

NAI Realvest recently completed
a renewal lease agreement for a
50,400-square-foot industrial facil-
ity located at 7452 Presidents Drive,
Orlando.


Winter Park Fish Company will soon
open at 761 Orange Ave.

Cuhaci & Peterson Architects has
started construction drawings on the
renovation of a 1,200-square-foot
office building on West Fairbanks Av-
enue, Winter Park.

The Foundation for Orange County
Public Schools Inc. elected Suffolk
Construction Director of Business De-
velopment Douglas R. Storer as a new
member of its Board of Directors.


Keene Construction Company an-
nounced the grand opening of the
Publix Super Market held Oct. 15 at
the new Village Walk retail center.

United Arts of Central Florida an-
nounces the launch of its redesigned
Web site in partnership with Spider-
host Inc. New functions include a
multi-purpose photo archive, an en-
hanced donation process and an arts
advocacy tab. The Web site address
will remain at www.UnitedArts.cc.


Winter Park Realtor and resident
David T Francetic of Coldwell Banker
Residential Real Estate was named a
Five Star: Best in Client Satisfaction
Real Estate Agent for 2009 by Florida
Homebuyer Orlando Magazine, based
on a Best in Client Satisfaction evalu-
ation process performed by an inde-
pendent market research company.

President, CEO and Managing
Partner William T. Dymond Jr. of
Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor
& Reed, P.A., was elected vice-chair


of both the Downtown Development
Board and the Community Redevel-
opment Agency Advisory Board on
Oct. 28.

Cuhaci & Peterson Architects LLC,
is designing nine residential ramps to
provide handicap access to private
homes in Central Florida.


Community Bulletin


Bright House Network will be mov-
ing the Hallmark, Style and Discovery
Health Channel from the standard tier
to the digital basic tier on Nov. 19.

The Winter Park Public Library is
accepting applications for artists who
would like to exhibit their art as part
of its continuing Community Room
revolving art display during 2010.
Send an artist statement/biographical
sketch and 4x6 digital images on CD,
representative of the work the artist
is interested in showing, to the Com-
munity Relations Office, Winter Park
Public Library, 460 E. New England
Ave., Winter Park, FL 32789. Deadline
is Monday, Nov. 23. Send inquiries to
mgcoffee@wppl.org or call 407-623-
3486.

An annual manatee adoption costs
$25 and includes an adoption cer-
tificate, photo of a real endangered
Florida manatee, biography, member-
ship handbook and four newsletters
throughout the year. Each member
who joins the Adopt-A-Manatee pro-
gram online for a $35 tax-deductible
donation will receive a 2010 calendar.
Contact Save the Manatee Club at
500 N. Maitland Ave. or call 1-800-
432-5646, or visit their Web site at
www.savethemanatee.org.

You can make a difference in the
life of a child by bringing a new un-
wrapped toy to any Central Florida
Chick-fil-a or Qdoba Restaurant loca-
tion or Centra Care clinic location. You
can select a Dove card from the tree
or just bring in a gift. Toy drives will
be held from Nov. 27 through Dec. 14.
For more information contact Dawn
or Sandi at Christian HELP 407-834-
4022. www.christianhelp.org.


Winter Park Maj. Gen. John Raaen
was among 10 other Normandy vet-
erans who received the L6gion of
d'Honneur Award from France, which
was presented at a special Veterans
tribute at Lake Highland Preparatory
School.

There is an upcoming reunion of
Winter Park High School Class of
'70. Contact the committee on fa-
cebook at Wphs NineteenSeventy or
e-mail WPHS.1970.Alumni@gmail.
com.

Insight Financial Credit Union's 3rd
Annual Cruise for a Cause motorcy-
cle and poker run held Saturday, Nov.


7, raised $15,000 to benefit Second
Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida.

The winning team members of the
Winter Park Rotary Club of Winter
Park's first annual Bowling for Lit-
eracy event were Roy Brand, Shaun
Grimes, Skip Vander Mark and Bill
Wright.

The Cadastral Mapping and GIS Di-
visions of the Orange County Prop-
erty Appraiser's office was awarded
the 2009 Outstanding Achievement
Award by the Florida Association of
Cadastral Mappers for a 'first-of-its-
kind in the country' web-based Inter-
active Foreclosure Map.


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Winter Park/ Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday. November 19.2009


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Eric Sly
407-563-7054
erics@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
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LEGALS I CLASSIFIEDS
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
legal@observernewspapers.com


Volume 21, Issue Number 47


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
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COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us


ADVERTISING SALES
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407-515-2605
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INTERN
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* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 ISSN 1064-3613
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Winter Park/Maitland Observer 2009


PHOTO COURTESY OF MAYFLOWER RETIREMENT COMMUNITY


Page 4 Thursday, November 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, November 19, 2009 Page 5


Maitland CityTalk
BY DOUGLAS T KINSON
MAYOR


Leadership makes

Maitland unique


Balancing the demands of
public office, a professional
career and a growing
family isn't easy, but after
more than three years
in office, serving my
community has made
me realize that the more
time I spend dealing with
the very real challenges
of real individuals and
neighborhoods in a real
city, the more appealing
that service becomes.
Many choose to run
for office because they
are passionate about
their community. Many
times, more choose not
to run because they don't


recognize the opportunity
to lead. Adlai Stevenson
put it best when he said,
"It's hard to lead a cavalry
charge if you think you
look funny on a horse." If
you don't recognize that
being an elected official can
help your community, you
will never know how great
a leader you could have
become.
Leadership is caring
more about making a
difference in the lives of
others than even your
own. It is being grounded
properly in solid principals,
to have the confidence to
see the forest through the


thickest of trees.
Leadership is doing
what you believe is right,
based of the principals
you have been taught.
Effective leadership
involves knowing how to
handle varying emotional
viewpoints in order to
accomplish a mission or
goal. As Dwight Eisenhower
once said, "Leadership is
the art of getting someone
else to do something you
want done because he
wants to do it."
Leadership is the
art of connecting and
communicating with
others in order to
determine the best course
of action. As elected
officials, we need to better
understand how our
citizens live, and what their
hopes, struggles, dreams
and passions truly are.
Leadership is not being
afraid to vote for or against
an issue when in your heart
you know the decision is
in the best interest of your
community.
Representing a
community and not
just the interests of a


select few is a primary,
basic characteristic of a
responsible leader. Leaders
are held accountable every
day to every citizen of the
community they represent.
As Winston Churchill once
said, "The price of greatness
is responsibility."
Having the courage to
lead is paramount to being
a successful leader. Looking
past the risks of holding
public office and looking
to the rewards of successful
leadership is what keeps
us searching for more.
Great leaders can never
get enough. As legendary
coach Vince Lombardi said,
"Leaders are made, never
born."
In government, the kind
of courage I am talking
about is the courage to
stand for something
you believe is worthy,
important and in the best
interest of a community,
even when it is an
unpopular point of view.
But it is also the courage to
hold your own convictions
at arms length and be open
enough to discuss new
ideas, new perspectives and


I i[-.n m ,]ui .....ven tion l



40"I'3 188 -44 [ i i 1 1 S
ww I lsaec~rgC DI O MilnF 25


NOVEMBER 23 CITY
COMMISSION WORK
SESSION
There will be a City Com-
mission work session held
at 2 p.m. Monday, Nov.
23 to discuss Resolution
No. 1978-07, rules for the
conduct of meetings, the
preparation of the agenda,
decorum, City Commission
meeting order of business,
addressing the Commis-
sion, and the procedure
for adopting ordinances.
This meeting is open to the
public, however, no public
comment will be taken.

NOVEMBER 23 CITY
COMMISSION MEETING
TOPICS OF INTEREST
Immediately following the
work session, there will be
a City Commission meeting
on Monday, Nov. 23, at 3:30
p.m., in City Hall Commis-
sion Chambers. Below are a
few topics of interest:
MAYOR'S REPORT:
-Senator Dockery presenta-
tion regarding SunRail (No
public comments will be
taken.)
-Attorney Reischmann
Land Development Code
comments
-Ethics Board presenta-
tion
-Community recognition
of Mr. Kenneth Murrah and
Mr. Harold Ward


-Consul General of Italy
Marco Rocca's visit to Win-
ter Park
-Thanksgiving and giv-
ing thanks
-Community Covenant
supporting our troops
CONSENT AGENDA:
Approve the minutes of
Nov. 9.
-Confirm the appoint-
ment of Ms. Dori DeBord as
the new Director of Com-
munity and Economic De-
velopment effective Mon-
day, Dec. 14, 2009.
-Approve the resale of
a Hannibal Square Com-
munity Land Trust home
located at 654 W. Canton
Ave., requiring city's waiver
of first right of refusal and
assignment of 99-year lease.
ACTION ITEMS REQUIRING
DISCUSSION:
RFP-2-2010, Tennis Man-
agement Services.
PUBLIC HEARINGS:
-Resolution-Authorizing
the filing of funding ap-
plications with the Federal
Transit Administration.
-Conditional Use Re-
quest: Dr. Alexander Jun-
greis to add tennis court
lighting to the existing ten-
nis court at 1360 Alabama
Drive.
-First reading of the ordi-
nance to amend Ordinance
No. 2730-08 to extend the
deadline established in Sec-
tion 2 by one year. (Tabled


at the 11/9/09 City Com-
mission meeting)
-First reading of the ordi-
nance for the charter revi-
sions for March 2010 ballot.
-Second reading of the
ordinance to amending and
restate the Winter Park Po-
lice Officers' Pension Plan.
-Second reading of the
ordinance to amend and re-
state the Winter Park Fire-
fighters' Pension Plan.
-Second reading of the
ordinance revising Concur-
rency Management Regula-
tions to implement school
concurrency in confor-
mance with the new Com-
prehensive Plan.
THE FOLLOWING PUBLIC
HEARINGS MUST BE HELD NO
EARLIER THAN 5:30 P.M.
-First reading of the ordi-
nance to adopt the Land
Development Code.
-Transmit to the Florida
Department of Community
Affairs an amendment to
the Comprehensive Plan to
amend and update the Cap-
ital Improvement Element
to reflect the revised Five
Year (FY 2010-FY 2014)
Capital Improvements Plan
and Narrative. This public
hearing is for transmittal
to Florida DCA only City
Commission will adopt at a
later date following the re-
ceipt and response to ORC
comments from Florida
DCA.
NEW BUSINESS (CITY COM-
MISSION):
Commissioner Anderson
Commissioner Dillaha
City commissioners partici-
pation in RFP committees.
Campaign Finance Re-
form.
Commissioner Diebel


Commissioner Bridges
-New permit process; ex-
pedited process.
-Developer's Agreement
for the YMCA, the city and
neighborhoods and the
YMCA's commitment into
the future.
-Code Enforcement is-
sues within the city.
-Independent audit of
billing practices.
Mayor Bradley
-Development of a pol-
icy regarding non-Winter
Park elected officials being
on the agenda.
You can search agendas
by visiting www.cityofwin-
terpark.org and clicking on
Government > City Com-
mission > Packets.

RESIDENTS
ENCOURAGED TO
RECYCLE PHONE BOOKS
Unused and old phone
books can be dropped-off
during the months of De-
cember, January and Febru-
ary in front of the KWPB
office in the Parks & Recre-
ation Department in City
Hall, 401 S. Park Ave. or at
either of the following fire-
rescue stations:
-Station 61 at 343 W.
Canton Ave.
-Station 62 at 300 S.
Lakemont Ave.
For information regard-
ing the city's waste manage-
ment services or to request
recycling bins, please call
Waste Pro at 407-774-
0800.

ICE SKATING RINK
OPENS THIS FRIDAY!
From Friday, Nov. 20,
through Sunday, Jan. 3,
the city of Winter Park will


bundle up for "Winter in
the Park," the city's first-
ever ice skating rink in
Central Park West Meadow
in downtown Winter Park.
Hours:
-Monday thru Thursday;
3 p.m. 9 p.m.
-Friday & Saturday; 10
a.m. 10 p.m.
-Sunday; 12 p.m. 6 p.m.
The cost is $10 per skater
(skate rental included) or
$9 per skater for a blizzard
of 10 or more people.
For more freezing in-
formation, please call 407-
599-3203 or skate onto our
blustery Web site at www.
cityofwinterpark.org.

CITY ASKS RESIDENTS
TO SHARE THEIR
CHRISTMAS
Share Your Christmas, an
annual food drive to ben-
efit Central Florida families
in need, collects donations
of canned, non-perishable
food, baby supplies and
personal care necessities
through Wednesday, Dec.
9. Share Your Christmas
barrels are at the following
locations:
-Winter Park City Hall,
401 S. Park Ave.
-Winter Park Public Safe-
ty Facility, 500 N. Virginia
Ave.
-Winter Park Public Li-
brary, 460 E. New England
Ave.
For more information
regarding the City of Winter
Park's Share Your Christmas
Food Drive, please call 407-
599-3506.

Visit the city's official Web
site at www.cityofwinter-
park.org


new information.
And finally, the strongest
communities are the ones
that have the courage to
be distinctive, to choose
something different and
not be ashamed of it.
Maitland's leadership
has been courageous in a
number of ways. Standing
up for our taxpayers and
recognizing the financial
impact when making
budget decisions; making
the right decisions
regarding development
that allow our city to
move forward with our
public facilities and our
downtown; supporting
commuter rail and
recognizing its benefits
for Maitland and Central
Florida; supporting any
program that results in
keeping our businesses and
creating jobs; and looking
out for our parks and
environment, all result in
making Maitland unique
and different from the
norm.
Our leaders have made
Maitland, "A Community
for Life."


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Page 6 Thursday, November 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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Thursday, November 19, 2009 Page 7


Lifestyles


Mending a home and a life


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
One night Anita Hansen
woke up to a crash. It was
May, as unseasonably rough
weather dumped 17 inch-
es of rain on the 25-year
Iraq War Veteran's Sanford
home. That's when the ceil-
ing started caving in, and
the flooding began.
Her home had been fall-
ing apart for years, but the
disabled 46-year-old single
mother was powerless to
stop it.
Her problems had start-
ed years before, as the long-
time Navy Petty Officer was
in Iraq during Operation
Enduring Freedom. Just af-
ter she'd been deployed in
2004, three hurricanes at-
tacked the state in a month,
and her roof was ripped
apart.
Soon after she returned
from a tour of duty, she was
sent to Louisiana to help vic-
tims of Hurricane Katrina
in 2005. By the time she re-
turned home again, water
had found its way through


the ceiling.
"It got to the point where
I was waiting for the rest of
it to fall down," Hansen said.
She attached plastic sheet-
ing to keep rain from drip-
ping on her bed. When the
plastic began to sag from
water, she'd poke a hole and
drain it.
"I haven't slept in days,"
she said.
Walking across stained
wood floors covered in
tarps Saturday morning as
Veterans Day parades hon-
ored troops nationwide,
she spoke with a bit of op-
timism in her voice, even as
she pointed to six-foot-wide
holes where her ceiling used
to be.
Maybe the hint of a smile
creeping across her face was
from the sound of a more
than a dozen workers out-
side. After years of living
in a house that was slowly
collapsing, Hansen was get-
ting her home back, thanks
to the Office of Veterans'
Affairs, the Red Cross, Or-
lando firm Lowndes, Dros-
dick, Doster, Kantor & Reed


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Retired Navy Petty Officer Anita Hansen shows part of her home's collapsed ceiling, which volunteers helped fix Saturday.


P.A. and donations from the
community.
Walking through a patch
of half-dead grass around
her faded red 1950s-era
home, she points to miss-
ing paint, rotting wood and
a roof that had turned con-


cave under the weight of
hundreds of gallons of wa-
ter.
She wears exhaustion on
her face that weighs down
her voice like it's been there
for years. A brace holds her
wrist together. Another cir-


cles her arm. Resting against
her pickup truck parked
across the street, she stares
at a buzz of activity and says
she wishes she could help.
"They say I've got nerve
damage in my back," she
> turn to VETERANS on PAGE 10


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Page 8 Thursday, November 19, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


G.O.


I For Greater Orlando's


Family

Calendar


Events this week at Maitland
Public Library, 501 S. Maitland
Ave.:
For more details, please contact
the Maitland Public Library, 407-
647-7700.
On Mondays at 7 p.m. is
Bedtime Stories.
On Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. is
Story time for age 36 months to
preschoolers.
On Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m.
is Story time for babies to 36
months.
From 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on
Thursday, Nov. 19 is the Twilight's
"New Moon" Celebration.
Everyone is invited to come to
the party dressed as your favorite
character from the series. There
will be a costume contest, games,
prizes, and food. Registration is
necessary, call 407-647-7700.
From 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on
Sunday, Nov. 22 is Family Game
Day in celebration of National
Board Game Week.

High school students and their
teachers are being reminded that
the Bill of Rights Institute's national
Being An American Essay Contest
deadline is soon approaching.
The contest asks students to
share their thoughts on American
citizenship by answering the
question: "What civic value do you
believe is most essential to being
an American?"
Essay entries are due by Dec.
1. Teachers much submit essays
online at www.BeingAnAmerican.
org for a chance to win cash
prizes from a pool totaling nearly
$200,000 and one of 54 trips to
the nation's capital. Visit the web
site at www.BeingAnAmerican.
org for details.

Parents Night Out will be held
from 6 p.m.to 11 p.m. on Saturday,
Nov. 21 at the JCC Rosen Campus.
The program gives kids a safe and
fun place to be on the weekend
and parents get an opportunity
to have a night out. Drop your
kids off at 6 p.m. for dinner with
a Havdallah service following.
Then there will be sports, games,
crafts, and the night will conclude
with popcorn and a movie. Make
participating kids they bring a
sleeping bag, pillow, favorite
stuffed animal or whatever else
they like to snuggle up with. PreK-
5th grade. We need a minimum of
four children to run Parents Night
Out. Cost for members is $25
and each additional child is $15.
Non-members are $30, with each
additional child $20.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK
Campgrounds at Blue Spring State Park in Orange City are one of a myriad of places families can get together for some overnight fun in Central Florida.


KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS
OBSERVER STAFF

The Fernandez family of
Lake Mary will be pitching
their tent and grilling steak
kebabs amidst the pine for-
ests of Wekiwa State Park
this weekend, free from the
rat race of work and school.
Cooler temperatures and
budget-friendly rates make
camping staycations a wel-
come solution for stressed
out families.
"Our kids love camping;
it brings us closer together,"
Elizabeth Fernandez said.
"With our camp kitchen we
eat very well outdoors and
catch up with each other. At
home during the week ev-
eryone is going in different
directions.
"To spend quality time
together, leave the electron-
ics at home."
Lake Mary Gander Moun-
tain Assistant Store Manag-
er Chris Roody said demand
for camping supplies picks
up when temperatures dip.
High-tech freeze dried food,
hydration backpacks, cast
iron skillets, bug repellent
and tents are among the


most popular items.
www.gandermtn.com;
3750 Flagg Lane, Lake Mary
407-804-0514
Here are some camping
choices within a two-hour
drive.

Blue Spring State Park
in Orange City, known for
manatees that migrate into
the Spring from November
to March, offers 51 camp-
sites with picnic table, a fire
ring and nearby restroom/
bathhouse facilities. Park
Manager Robert Rundle
said attendance at state
parks has increased above
last year's numbers with
weekend camp sites book-
ing quickly. Water activity is
prohibited in the spring dur-
ing manatee season. Visitors
enjoy wildlife viewing along
the boardwalk and along
the three mile multi-use
trail for hiking and biking.
The park is an active habitat
for at least 15 endangered
or threatened plants and
animals including the Flor-
ida Scrub Jay and gopher
tortoise.
Site fee: $24 per night plus
tax including electricity and
water.


386-775-3663; 2100 W
French Ave., Orange City
www.floridastateparks.org/
bluespring; 1-800-326-3521
www.reserveamerica.com

Wekiwa Springs State Park
located north of State Road
434 features hiking, horse
and bicycle trails and water
activities at Sand Lake and
Wekiwa Springs. Sixty ser-
viced campsites in addition
to primitive camping areas
are available. Visitors may
encounter some 50 species
of endangered or threat-
ened animals and plants as
well as flowering dogwood,
passionflowers, warblers,
deer, or 32 species of fish on
the park's 7,800 acres.
Campsite fee: $24 per
night plus tax including
electricity and water with
picnic table, a fire ring and
nearby restrooms and bath
houses.
407-884-2009 1800
Wekiwa Circle, Apopka
www.floridastateparks.org;
1-800-326-3521 www.re-
serveamerica.com

Cape Kennedy KOA is a
family-oriented 10 acre
campground just west of


1-95 on State Road 46. Own-
er Dean Madison said the
location is ideal with prox-
imity to beaches, Merritt Is-
land National Refuge, and
Kennedy Space Center. The
KOA accommodates 147 RV
sites and 25 tent sites under
mature trees and provides
a heated pool and recre-
ational activities. Tent sites
range in price from $24 to
$44; 321-269-7361; 4513
S.R. 46 Mims, Fla.; capeken-
nedykoa.net

Silver River State Park, lo-
cated east of Ocala and one
mile south of State Road 40,
provides water fun and 15
miles of hiking trails that
wind through 10 distinct
natural communities. Near-
ly 60 tent and RV sites which
include electric, water, pic-
nic tables and a fire ring are
available. Site fee: $24 per
night plus tax. Primitive
camping is available for or-
ganized youth groups. Assis-
tant Park Manager Christine
Dorrier invites park visitors
to visit the Silver River Mu-
seum (within the park) on
weekends to learn about
Marion County and Florida
> turn to NEXT PAGE


Holiday Classes and Workshops at the MaitlandArt Center!
November 22, Sunday November 24, Tuesday November 29, Sunday November 29, Sunday
Holiday Card Workshop Parent & Child Holiday Napkin Rings Workshop Adult Holiday Card Workshop Parent & Child Holiday Pop-up, 3-D & Lace cut Cards -
Fold out, easy pop up, Paint on Velvet, trim with pearls, beads Fold out, easy pop up, Adults Workshop
pocket & money cards sequins etc. Painting placemats optional. pocket & money cards Figures, Images, Scenes & Snowflakes
1:00- 3:00 pm Studio 4 $50.00 6:00 9:00 pm Studio 4 $50.00 1:00- 3:00 pm Studio 4 $50.00 6:00 9:00 pm Studio 4 $50.00
No material fee $5.00 material fee No material fee $5.00 material fee
For sign up, call 407.539.2181 ext. 3, Ann Colvin or visit MaitlandArtCenter.org


-111 ~


Page 8 Thursday, November 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, November 19, 2009 Page 9


Calendar


Events this week at Maitland Public Library,
501 S. Maitland Ave.:
From 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Nov.
19 is Twilight's New Moon Celebration. Come
dressed as your favorite character from the
movie. There will be games, food and prizes.
Registration is necessary.
From 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 20 in
the lobby will be Brain Health: Blood Pressure
Check by the Maitland Fire & Rescue.
At 10 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 23 is PC Acad-
emy: Introduction to e-mail. Registration re-
quired.
At 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 25 the library
is closing early for Thanksgiving.
On Thursday, Nov. 26 the library will be
closed for Thanksgiving.

"Tellabration" will take place from 7 p.m. to
9 p.m. on Sat. Nov. 21 at St. Richard's Epis-
copal Church, 5151 Lake Howell Road, Winter
Park. The fundraiser benefits the Children's
Home Society. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and
tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door
plus one canned good. For ages 16 and older,
seating is limited. Contact Ms. Charlie at 321-
279-1089 or Lynn at 407-366-1773.

The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture
Gardens presents "Yonetani at the Polasek"
at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 22. Tickets are $30
online at www.polasek.org or 407-647-6294.
A ticket for all three concerts is available for
$80 per person. Seating is limited.

The following are free Morse public pro-
grams and events:
From 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 27
there will be live music and the Harpist Bizarre
Quartet.
From 6:15 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Dec.
3 is the annual lighting of Tiffany windows in
Central Park with an outdoor concert.

The sport division of The Turkey Burn Ad-
venture Race begins on Saturday, Nov. 28 at
noon and is a four-hour event. The elite divi-
sion begins at 4 a.m. and is a 12 hour event.


The start and finish are at Wekiva Falls Resort,
30700 Wekiva River Road, Sorrento. Register
online at www.pangeaadventureracing.com or
e-mail info@pangeaadventureracing.com. For
additional information, contact Cristina Calvet-
Harrold 407-832-4814 or cristina@cchmar-
keting.com.

The second CEO Nexus Forum will be hosted
on Wednesday, Dec. 2, with guest speaker
Steve Miller, former CEO of Sawtek, Inc. Con-
tact Cari Coats, executive director of Rollins
College Center for Advanced Entrepreneurship,
at 407-646-2067 or ccoats@rollins.edu.

The Tip-Off Classic Invitational high school
basketball tournament will be at 7 p.m. from
Wednesday, Dec. 2 to Saturday, Dec. 5 at the
Winter Park High School Gymnasium, 2100
Summerfield Road, Winter Park.

"Cookies, Cocoa & Carols" will be from 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. on Dec. 3 at Casa Feliz, 656 N.
ParkAve.,Winter Park.All are welcome to come
see the house decorated for Christmas, listen
to Dickens carolers, enjoy some hot cocoa and
cookies, and visit with Santa Claus. There is a
suggested donation of $3 per person or $10
per family. Children can have their photo taken
with Santa by a professional photographer, Art
Faulkner for $10. No reservations are neces-
sary. Visit our Web site at casafeliz.us.

Holler Family Fun Day will be from 1 p.m. to
5 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6, in Central Park. Af-
ter a stop at the Holler-Classic tent, head next
door to the West Meadow Ice Rink for more
fun. Participation in Holler-Classic activities is
free; ice skating is $10 per person.

The Music & Drama Ministry of College
Park Baptist Church will present Gian-Carlo
Menotti's work "Amahl and the Night Visitors"
at 7 p.m. on Dec. 13 and 14 at 1914 Edgewa-
ter Drive, Orlando. Contact Colleen Cart at 407-
843-0140 ext.233 or http://www.mycpbc.org.


CAMPING I Many parks offer camp sites


< continued from previous page
history and ecosystems.
352-236-7148, 1425 N.E. 58th
Ave., Ocala www.floridastateparks.
org/silverriver.

Buck Lake Conservation Area
and The Little Big Econ State
Forest offers primitive camping
for physically fit families and youth
groups looking to rough it on over
15,000 acres off of State Road 46
and Snow Hill Road. Campers
should be experienced in outdoor
survival, prepared to purify water
on trail and pack in all supplies.
There are no restroom facilities.
St Johns River Water Management
District Divison of Land Manage-
ment Little Big Econ State Forest
407-971-3500
http://sjr.state.fl.us/recreation-


guide/little-bigecon/index.html
Buck Lake: 386-329-4404
http://sjr.state.fl.us/recreation-
guide/bucklake/index.html

Disney's Fort Wilderness Resort
& Campground which sprawls
700 acres within the Walt Disney
World Resort provides nearly 800
campsites with basic to deluxe
amenities. Surrounded by cypress,
pine trees visitors enjoy wildlife
and winding trails in a wilderness
setting. Extensive recreational ac-
tivities are available. Site fees begin
at $43 per night plus tax but vary
by season, dates and occupancy.
407-934-7639 4510 N. Fort
Wilderness Trail, Lake Buena Vis-
ta, disneyworld.disney.go.com/
resorts/campsites-at-fort-wilder-
ness-resort


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer









High schooler aims to feed 500


CARMEN CARROQUINO
GUEST REPORTER

Holding the sealed, white
envelope up to the light
didn't reveal its contents.
After an hour of delib-
eration and prayer, Hagerty
High School senior Zavia
Menning said she slid a de-
cisive finger beneath the
seal and found a task from














wil*el II cinfood for
00I6 lSS S








**SO


God: Feed 500 families on
Thanksgiving.
Menning received the en-
velope at a summer youth
group conference in Ten-
nessee and was told to only
open it if she was ready to
accept the challenge with-
in.
"I thought the task was
a little crazy to accomplish
at first," Menning said. "But
after thinking about it, I re-
alized that God had faith
in me and chose me to do
this when anyone else's en-
velope could have said the
very same thing."
Brian Dorn, Zavia's youth
pastor at River Run Chris-
tian Church in Chuluota,
said he never doubted her
capability to handle such a
daunting task.
"I'm very impressed with
Zavia," Dorn said. "She re-
ceived this mission and
made a commitment be-
tween herself and God to
accomplish it by opening
that envelope. Even if she
doesn't reach her goal, she'll
learn valuable lessons of
giving and generate a sense
of outreach in our commu-
nity, not only for the holi-
days, but for every day of the
year."
Supported by River Run
and her friends and family,
Menning started the "Feed
500 Families" campaign,
hoping to raise $5,000 to
dress the tables of local fam-
ilies in need with turkey and
all its trimmings.
Pounding the pavement


of Oviedo businesses such
as Winn Dixie and Wal-Mart
asking for donations, Men-
ning also recruited a local
Girls Scouts troop, her soon
to be alma mater, Hagerty
High School and River Run
Church to hold food drives
and collect monetary dona-
tions.
With the $5,000 goal,
Menning said she would
like to be able to give fami-
lies at least a $10 gift card to
buy Thanksgiving groceries.
She also said that she hopes
the food drives at Hagerty
and River Run accumulate
enough food items to make
pre-packaged bags to hand
out to families and make
deliveries downtown and to
those homebound.
Not only is Menning col-
lecting food for families,
but for their pets too, saying
that everybody should eat
well on Thanksgiving.
Janette Menning, Za-
via's mother, said she is very
proud of her daughter's self-
less act. She said that she's
always taught her children
that it's better to give than
receive, and wants them
to pass that message to the
community, even in these fi-
nancially difficult times.
"This was a big undertak-
ing for everyone involved,
Zavia too," Janette said.
"But I've seen her grow
from this experience and
learn the appreciation of
what she has. She's worked
really hard and appreci-
ates all help she's gotten on


her mission... I couldn't be
prouder that she accepted
the challenge to do good for
her community."
With about $1,000 col-
lected as of Nov. 16, enough
to feed about 100 families,
Menning said she's got a
long way to go, but a short
time before Thanksgiving.
"Even if we don't reach


our goal, it's still a gratifying
experience," she said. "I just
hope to give as many fami-
lies as I can throughout the
community a good Thanks-
giving. I just want to make
them happy and spread the
love since God has blessed
me with so much."


VETERANS I Almost 20 volunteers worked on Saturday to patch a veteran's roof


< continued from page 7

said. "One day my arm
swelled up like a balloon. I
couldn't bend my fingers or
feel my hand anymore."
Standing on the roof,
Gary Davis and his name-


sake remodeling and repair
business rips soggy boards
out of the roof and slices
and installs new ones. Look-
ing across 30 feet of black
tar paper, the tall, slender,
gray-haired building con-
tractor said the roof was


much worse than he'd ex-
pected. He'd donated his
time and equipment ex-
pecting a few small repairs.
When he climbed onto the
roof he almost fell through.
"This used to be a lake,"
he said. "It's a good thing
we got here now, because
this could have been a lot
worse."
Still smiling in the cool
autumn air, nearly 20 vol-
unteers worked from sun-


rise until the mosquitoes
came.
Ginny Hillman, from the
Office of Veterans Affairs,
mills about near a table full
of catered barbecue, talking
excitedly about the project
she calls one of a kind.
"This is a different kind
of project," she said. "I've
never seen anything like
this before."
Designed to start and fin-
ish all on one day, the proj-


ect stalled when the roof
damage was found to be so
extensive that it couldn't
be completed. She said that
didn't matter.
"We've been working on
this for months," Hillman
said. "If we don't get it done
today, we'll be back."
And Hansen will be able
to sleep.


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pabalismichael@hotmail.com
407-267-3091


I


I I


Page 10 Thursday, November 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


1,"- -i -"i


PHOTO BY CARMEN CARROQUINO -THE OBSERVER
Hagerty High School senior Zavia Menning buys groceries for people and their pets at
a grocery store last week. Her goal is to raise $5,000 in food and cash donations.





Thursday, November 19, 2009 Page 11


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'Brothers'


Coming Dec. 11
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Coming Dec. 25


A showcase of this week's releases,
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'TeTiih aga: ew oon -Ipen Fida


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Coming Dec. 25


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THIE WEEKZTPENII4
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at www.good-sam.com/kissimmee


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


I E Z 3


N










Opinion/ Editorial


Perspectives

by...



e6cka 044,


A little fascism


for the girls?


I nearly always have a chap-
book with me to jot down
ideas, observations, over-
heard quips, personal in-
sights, article ideas and just
stuff that makes me laugh
(or rage). I also track my
weight, distance and times
of my bicycle rides, quarter-
ly cholesterol numbers and
during my recent bout with
the flu, a daily, sometimes
hourly recap of the ill-
ness. I'm trying to lose four
pounds off my gut (vanity
thy name be man). Ah, van-
ity. Men are as vain (if not
more so) as women but it is
considered unmanly to ac-
knowledge such a timeless
verity.
Here are few recent
chapbook entries:
July 5 (5:11 a.m.) -
Question: Whether it is bet-
ter to have been created or
to have evolved? I got out
of bed to write this down. I
will definitely write on this
idea.
Aug. 26 Things we wish
we never hear: "Did your
husband get his girlfriend
pregnant?" Or, "Get your
girlfriend pregnant?" Adds
a certain tension. Ha!
Aug. 28 Things my
mother didn't teach me:
"Don't drink through the
swizzle sticks, Dear." I had
to read that bit of decorum.
Just recently I might add.
How gauche is that?


Aug. 30 Moral crime
scenes. They need police
tape around them, too.
Sept. 2 "Not letting the
perfect be the enemy of the
good." Liberal B.S. dealing
with health care reform.
Sept. 12 How do you
get the kind of women you
want to be around? This is
a question that should be
legitimately asked of men,
too.
Sept. 12 That strikes
me as socialism for the
business class.
Sept. 12 All it was,
was that Casey couldn't be
bothered and the little dar-
lin's death was an accident
don't-cha see. This will be
the "exculpatory" argu-
ment (such as it is) at the
sentencing hearing.
Sept. 13 Let's play like
Gods.
Sept. 22 Even your fun
is stressful! Jeeeez!
Sept. 22 A metaphor.
Life around a crumb. Little
teeney ants set up a colony
-their entire universe
around a "crumb" in my ca-
bana cushions.
Oct. 20 Another an-
swer for yes. Does a bear s---
in the woods? Is a 40-pound
robin fat? Are there pedo-
philes in the priesthood?
Yes, yes and yes. I was think-
ing about the "Sins of the
Fathers" visited upon...
Oct. 25 The problem of


having the wrong doctor?
That killed Michael Jackson
as surely as any other cause.
Oct. 25 On cruise
ships. It's not a "sailing"
experience they crave. Is it
time to eat yet? Soooey!
Oct. 27 While watch-
ing "Inherit the Wind" I
learned that the Earth was
created by God on Oct. 24,
4004 B.C. at 9 a.m.
It was an entry from Oct.
8 that will consume the re-
mainder of my words this
week. I was watching TV
and there was an advertise-
ment for a product I failed
to note but basically the
visual image was of women
liking men. And I thought
to myself, "Why is this nec-
essary? Why do we require
advertisements that depict
women actually enjoying
the company of men?
This is a man's world.
Where we have arrived is a
product of male behavior.
History validates that fact.
Have women in the West
made incredible strides
towards equality in the last
150 years? Yes, of course.
That is historical fact, too.
Do I feel women have
been treated shabbily by
men, seemingly, since we
first "hooked up?" Yes.
Is cruel, indifferent and
brutish behavior a fact?
Was sexism institutional-
ized and a cultural norm
throughout human history?
Did (do) our religious in-
stitutions and secular au-
thorities oppress women? A
resounding yes that women
have been suppressed, op-
pressed and marginalized.
My grandmother could
not vote, once upon a very
short time ago in America.
America gave the vote to
former slave men decades
before they afforded wom-
en the same consideration.
Emancipated black slave
men were considered more
worthy of the vote than the


white wives of America's
19th & 20th century legisla-
tors. Go figure.
As a student of his-
tory, I've wondered how
could any of this occur?
Why would men not view
or consider women their
equal? It is inexplicable.
Was it because women are
physically smaller, that they
have the babies and are, as
a result, at times more vul-
nerable? But where did the
stigma come that women
were unworthy of educat-
ing, lacked the mental
horsepower or were too
flighty and "emotional" for
serious consideration, to
be at the decision making
table.
And these are just the
"benign" facts concern-
ing the status of women.
A cursory examination of
the male/female dynamic
frequently has violence as a
real and probable outcome.
Again, it is inexplicable to
me when I hear that "rape"
too often becomes a battle-
field tactic, if not an out-
right war strategy. In Africa,
during the Balkan conflict
of the 1990s, anywhere on
the planet where authority
breaks down (or, authority
is actually sanctioning), the
first victims are frequently
women. Do not the perpe-
trators of rape have moth-
ers, sisters daughters
even who give them suf-
ficient pause to say, "What
am I doing? There, but for
grace of God is Mom or Sis
or my brother's daughter?"
But, no, that does not seem
to be so much the case.
You talk with women
and you'll hear, "Oh, some
individual men are just fine
(my boyfriend, my son, my
brother, etc.) but as a sex,
men leave so much to be
desired." And then you have
marriage. Can you count
on two hands the number
of genuinely "happily mar-


rieds you know? Okay, one
hand. But then again, it's
proven everyday that we re-
ally do not know what goes
on behind closed doors.
Smiling faces...
The history of the sexes
is a long history of female
oppression and subjugation
by men. That is undeniable
fact. Such a profound, sad
loss for our species. Imag-
ine how much further ad-
vanced we'd be if all those
thousands of years, men
and women had been pur-
suing dreams, harnessed,
working together as genu-
ine equals?
And that is why the
debate over reproductive
rights is so abhorrent and
unfortunate it is part
and parcel of the histori-
cal suppression of women.
The historical issue is: Who
owns a woman's body, her
uterus to be specific? The
woman herself? Or...?
Anything less than
confirming the individual
woman, alone, has com-
plete control of her body
is undeniable sexual to-
talitarianism of women.
A little necessary fascism
for the girls? It's for their
own good, don't-cha know.
Spare the rod, spoil the...
Hey, a little Sharia Law
might be just what all our
uppity American women
require. Lobotomies next?
Why not? They obviously
can't think for themselves.
Doesn't history (his story)
suggest as much? And the
men say...?


JTALKEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters tothe Editor


Health care woes
hold back prosperity
The Legatum Institute just
released its annual Prosper-
ity Index, which ranks 104
countries in the only global
assessment of wealth and
well-being. It should come
as no surprise that the Unit-
ed States ranked quite high
overall, coming in ninth
place.
In the health category,
though, America ranked a
weak 27th. In other words,
the Index found that
America's prosperity is held
back by its health care sys-
tem. This is not because the
American people are less
healthy then the rest of the
world on life expectancy
and infant mortality, the
United States does quite
well.
Rather, the American
health care system has be-


come a victim of its own
success. It provides the
most advanced health care
in the world, so this has led
most Americans to believe
that every pain can be al-
leviated and every sickness
cured. This demand has
driven costs to staggering
levels.
For decades, medicine
has been the only sector of
the economy immune from
the consumer forces that
drive down prices and im-
prove quality everywhere
else. Consequently, Amer-
ica's health care system
needlessly drains billions of
dollars annually from the
economy.
Per-capita health care
spending is at $7,200 an-
nually the highest in the
world. And costs are rising.
National health spending
will hit about $2.5 trillion
this year, or 17.6 percent


of GDP. In a decade, that
figure is expected to reach
$4.4 trillion!
Americans are getting
crushed by these costs. By
2018, higher health ex-
penses are expected to trim
$834 billion from employee
paychecks at small busi-
nesses. Plus, the high cost
of health care leaves mil-
lions without any coverage
whatsoever.
Yet if the Prosperity In-
dex finds bad news for the
United States on health, it
also has some promising
results in other areas. This
success demonstrates that
America has the capacity to
solve its health care chal-
lenges.
America ranks second in
the world on democratic
institutions, which the In-
dex calibrates to civil liber-
ty protections, the political
participation of a country's


citizenry, and the transpar-
ency and accountability of
government.
America also does well
in the "social capital" cat-
egory, placing seventh.
This measures community
engagement, donations
of time and money, the
strengths of family and
friendships, and whether
citizens believe they can
trust one other.
America benefits most
from its first place rank
in the "entrepreneurship
and innovation" category,
which measures the ease
and rate of business start-
ups and the prevalence of
new technologies.
It is these dynamics that
put America at ninth on
the Prosperity Index, the
highest-ranked large coun-
try in the world. These same
strengths can help America
tackle the health care chal-


lenges of driving down
costs and improving quality
of care.
The 2009 Legatum Pros-
perity Index is available at
www.prosperity.com.
-William Inboden, Ph.D.
Senior vice president of the Lega-
tum Institute

State budget funding
sources deciphered
The state budget consists of
several major sources that
include federal assistance,
general revenue, local gov-
ernment revenue sharing,
and trust funds. For fiscal
year 2007-2008, the state's
funds came from these
sources in the following
percentages: general reve-
nue at 39.8 percent, federal
assistance at 29.6 percent,
trust funds at 23.6 percent,
and local government

> turn to NEXT PAGE


Page 12 Thursday, November 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Winter Park/Maitland Observer



Play On!
y *


Conservative commentary
& opinions of Louis Roney
Harvard'42-Distinguished Prof, Em.-
UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
(Assisted by b.w.:Joy Roney)

"You are entitled to your own opinions-
you are not entitled to your own facts"
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Alone in
wedded bliss
-original fiction-
he Japanese husband,
according to Pucci-
ni's "Madama Butter-
fly," tells his wife monthly
if he wants to continue
the marriage for another
month.
What kind of marriage
has ever been more logical
for a tenor's opera plot?
One thing for sure:
I'd bet that the Japanese
husband is treated very
well the last week of every
month!
Japanese wives are then
as lovable as a politician
right before an election.
Do women change
minds too often? Well, Wi-
fie changes my mind often,
and she did change her
own mind once, at the end
of the first month we were
married.
I came in the kitchen
that morning and Wifie
said, "I can't stand this! This
marriage is getting on my
nerves!"
"But, honey-bunny," I


Thursday, November 19, 2009 Page 13


said, "I've been away on a
concert tour for the whole
month."
"Quit making excuses,"
she snapped.
Next month, Wifie-poo
said, "Leave, and get out of
here!"
"Which one?" I asked.
"Don't get funny with
me, big shot, and bring me
more coffee and a towel.
I spilled the first cup you
brought me on my pillow-
case."
I retied my apron and
left in a huff.
On the way to the bank
to deposit my most re-
cent paycheck, Wifie said,
"You're impossible but I
hear there's a great short-
age of attractive men these
days, like there was when I
met you."
"That's mean," I said.
"Like accurate, though,"
she said, looking straight
ahead.
The only hint of any-
thing amorous in our re-
lationship was last month
when I was packing up to
move out.
Wifie pulled a shirt out of
my suitcase and said, "This
needs washing. Put it out
in the laundry." And so we
were romantically reunited

I admit you can't build a
lasting marriage on a dirty
shirt, but you gotta start
somewhere.
"Wifie," I said, "you
keep all my money in your
checking account, and I'm
not to sign anything, ac-
cording to your brother the
bank teller. Why should I
receive bills at all?"
"I just think it's good to
make you to feel impor-
tant," she said.
"Yes, dear, but not too
important ..."
"Right!" she said.
Every month, once our
checks had cleared, I began
to sense a cooling off, a
"bum's rush" aura in which


I lost what little I had
gained psychologically.
One evening, I thought
I would give Frika (which
was also her mother's
name) a surprise, so I
brought home some turnip
greens and some nice lean
fatback.
She said, "I hope you
know how to cook those
weeds for yourself. Did
you forget that when we
got married I told you I am
from Ohio?"
I didn't have a clue how
to cook greens myself, and
I couldn't eat what I finally
fixed neither could our
dog.
Whenever Ohio State
plays Michigan on TV, my
life's partner turns on all
the TVs, locks all the doors,
and forbids any talking. You
would think a new Pope
was being installed.
When the Harvard/Yale
game is on TV she keeps
singing the Ohio State
Fight Song fortissimo while
chomping on roasted buck-
eyes, which I don't have the
heart to tell her are inedible
chestnuts.
I was single through
grammar and high school,
and began to assume that
you had to get married
if you wanted to live in
a house and have three
squares a day. Where else
does one find those conve-
nient appurtenances Oh!
I forgot: In jail too! I liked
being a child. I didn't want
to grow up ever.
The Navy helped me get
rid of that notion on the
double. Afterward I lived
alone and all the bills were
on my desk.
I brought a talented,
pretty chick home with
me one day and my dog
signaled to me, "This one's
a keeper." Now, my Wife
and I often have single guys
over to dinner. They eat as
though they just got out of
Leavenworth. That tells me


something. And I'm listen-
ing.
We live in a quite plush
town, with lots of big, beau-
tiful houses that make you
think everyone here is rich
as Croesus.
Only the banks know
who owns anything, and
who has listened too care-
lessly to Barney Frank.
They say that owing
money is for the birds, but
birds are smarter than that.
They eat everything in sight
and fly right past the ca-
shier on the way out.
A male bird meets a fe-
male bird and says, "I'm a
nest-lovin' man, and I don't
care whose nest it is."
There are exceptions, of
course. No cardinal with
a capital C would ever say
that.
When we first met, Frika
seemed skeptical about my
character. I was too smart
to lie to her by saying that
I had never known any
girls before that would
have finished me. But I did
say off-handedly that I was
waiting for the "right" girl
to come along, and was
very proud of my morals.
"I'm pure as the driven
snow," I said.
"That's why I've got cold
feet," Frika replied.
"You're nobody's fool," I
remarked.
"Not yours anyway, El
cheapo," she retorted.
After she received my
FBI and Dunn & Bradstreet
reports, she loosened up a
bit, and even let me put my
arm around her.
The biggest change came
after the purchase of our
house was signed, sealed
and delivered.
The lawyer asked, "In
joint name?"
"Oh! No," Wifie an-
swered. "You see, women
live longer than men. And
men are more susceptible
to the strains of house own-
ership. So put it in my name


- and put in your notes
that I am accepting the
house against my expressed
will."
(To myself, I thought,
married men may live lon-
ger than single men, or
does it only seem longer?)
Anyhow, being married
is something that's ex-
pected like taxes, chinch
bugs, weak eyes and hip
pain.
My Wifie is a psychiatrist
who was assigned to me by
the state on condition that
I pay half her fee.
After four years I figured
it would be cheaper if I
married her. My payments
to Wifie would stop and the
state's would continue.
Let me admit that I
flunked math all the way
through school, and warn
kids not to emulate me.
They say figures don't lie,
but mine told me nothing
but tall stories.
I told Wifie that she
should be a joke-tester for
comedians in the Catskills,
because she never thinks
anything I say is funny. The
only time she ever laughed
at me was when I said "I do"
at our wedding.
She fell down on the
floor then.
"Do joke writers laugh?"
Frika asked.
"Heavens no," I said.
"Can you imagine one of
Milton Berle's joke writers
laughing at a joke by one
of Bob Hope's team? Joke
writing is a highly competi-
tive profession."
"What can get them to
laugh?" she asked.
"Well one top banana's
writer might cut loose and
hee-haw if another top ba-
nana drops dead."
"You can't expect some
comedian to make that
sacrifice every week on TV,"
Wifie said.
"You're learning fast,
Frika," I said, patting her on
the head.


LETTERS I Trust fund money borrowed to fill budget gaps


< continued from previous page
revenue sharing at seven
percent. I'd like to take this
opportunity to provide an
overview of these funding
sources and explain how
they affect our community
and Floridians across the
state.
General revenue is
money received by the state
from a variety of sources
including receipts from
sales tax, documentary
stamps and intangible tax,
corporate income tax, and
the insurance premium tax.
It serves as the foundation
of Florida's budget and is
the main source of fund-
ing. General revenue can be
used for any state govern-
ment purpose or agency,
thus making it the most
flexible part of the state
budget.
Federal assistance serves
as the second largest source
of funding for the state and


comes in a variety of forms.
Federal funds usually are in
two forms: grants that the
state receives and matching
funds. The largest amount
of support from the fed-
eral government is for
health and human services,
namely Florida's Medicaid
program. An example of
grant money is the Tempo-
rary Assistance for Needy
Families program, known
as TANF Florida this year is
eligible for $622.7 million
in TANF Block Grant funds
for needy families in dire
situations.
Turning our attention to
trust funds, these are funds
that are supported through
a specific source for a spe-
cific cause or program.
Trust funds are normally
used for a specific purpose,
such as procuring land for
preservation or facilitating
the processing of concealed
weapons permits. However,
in difficult economic times


such as the last few years,
these trust funds may have
their monies transferred to
general revenue in order
to mitigate revenue short-
falls. However, the budget
stabilization trust fund will
be repaid, as it is required
by Florida Statutes starting
in Fiscal Year 2011-2012 in
the amount of $214.5 mil-
lion annually. Other trust
funds are replenished by
legislative actions.
As you can see, the state
budget is composed of
many different sources that
require smart fiscal policy,
accountability and govern-
ment efficiency. If you have
any questions about the
state budget or any other
state agency or issue, please
do not hesitate to contact
my office at 407-884-2023.
As always, it is an honor to
serve you.
-State Rep. Bryan Nelson


II


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Page 14 Thursday, November 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CC-4131
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
DEBORAH M. JORDAN, a/k/a DEBORAH M. JORDAN
GILL, and JOHN DOE, and JANE DOE, as unknown
tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 15 day of De-
cember, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 64, Huckleberry Fields N-1 B, as recorded
in Plat Book 15, Pages 121 and 122, of the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on November
4, 2009.
DATED this 4 day of November, 2009
Alex C. Costopoulos, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 0112429
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff

If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court
Administration at 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone (407)836-
2303, within 2 working days of your receipt of this
Summons; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-
955-8771; if you are voice impaired, call: 1-800-
955-8770.
11/12, 11/19
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CC-3912
DIVISION: #72
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
JUAN 0. GUERRA, and JOHN DOE, and JANE DOE,
as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 10th day of
December, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Condominium Unit No. 915, Building No. 9,
of THE CREST AT WATERFORD LAKES, A
CONDOMINIUM, according to the Declara-
tion of Condominium thereof, recorded in
Official Records Book 8170, Page 1746, as
amended, all of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on September
21,2009.
DATED this 21st day of September, 2009
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 381144
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff

If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court
Administration at 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone (407)836-
2303, within 2 working days of your receipt of this
Summons; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-
955-8771; if you are voice impaired, call: 1-800-
955-8770.
11/12,11/19
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE No. 2009-CA-007896
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE C-BASS MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-CB8
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
RAUL 0. TORRES, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Patricia Santana
RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1405 Meadowlark Street,
Longwood, FL 32750
AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through,
under, or against the aforesaid defendant(s).
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following described
property located in Seminole County, Florida:
Lot 5, Block C, SKYLARK SUBDIVISION,
according to the Plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 17, Pages 84 and 85, of the Public
Records of Seminole County, Florida.
has been filed against you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this
action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A., attorneys for
plaintiff, whose address is 101 Plaza Real South,
Suite 217, Boca Raton, FL 33432, and file the
original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days
after the first publication of this notice, otherwise
a default may be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
This notice shall be published once a week for
two consecutive weeks in The Winter Park-Maitland
Observer.
DATED: November 5, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Linda Passow
Deputy Clerk of the Court

If you are a person with a disability who needs
accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, for
the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administration at 301 N. Park Avenue,
Sanford, Florida 32771, telephone number (407)
665-4227, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this document; If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771.
11/12,11/19
NOTICE OF SALE OF VESSEL
Pursuant to FL. Stat. 328.17(7) the following de-
scribed vessel will be sold in a public sale to the
highest bidder to satisfy a claim lien by lienor for
labor and/or storage: 2002 BENNINGTON MARINE
CORP HIN#: ETW15734J102. Owner/ RANDALL S
LUGENBEAL LAKE MARY, FL. L/H Lienor/ BOAT
TREE MARINA 4370 CARRAWAY PLACE SANFORD,
FL 407-322-1610. Sale Date: December 07, 2009
at 10:00 a.m. at 4370 CARRAWAY PLACE SANFORD,
FL 32771. For additional information call 407-657-
7995.
11/19,11/26


IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CC-3732
DIVISION: #72
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
ASHLEY FLASH, JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as
unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: ASHLEY FLASH
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Unit 738, Building 7, THE CREST AT
WATERFORD LAKES, a Condominium,
according to the Declaration of Condominium
thereof recorded in Official Records Book
8170, Page 1746, and any amendments
thereto, of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida; Together with an undivided
interest in the common elements appurte-
nant thereto.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is POHL & SHORT, P.A., 280 W.
Canton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box 3208,
Winter Park, Florida 32790, on or before Dec. 10,
2009, and file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
DATED this 5th day of November, 2009.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: CHRISTINA BUSTAMANTE
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V)1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
11/12, 11/19
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009 CP 1994
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NORA KELSO
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Nora Kelso,
deceased, whose date of death was September 26,
2009, is pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is P. 0. Box 8099, Sanford, FL 32772 8099.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate mustfiletheir claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is No-
vember 19, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Jeanette Triacca
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794 1251
Telephone: (407) 645 4833
Fax: (407) 645 4832

Personal Representative:
Jeanette Triacca
110 Foxridge Run
Longwood, Florida 32750
11/19, 11/26
Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the Divi-
sion of Corporations, Department of State, State of
Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Naturally Yours
under which the undersigned expects to engage in
business at
6407 Merriewood Drive, Orlando, FL 32818
and that the party interested in said business enter-
prise is as follows:
Akasha Akasha
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 19th day of
November, 2009
11/19
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Number: 48-2009-CA-019467-0
Division 32A
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TITO RAMIREZ; and GLORIA LOPEZ,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 14 day of De-
cember, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described real
property:
LOT 30, BLOCK 162, MEADOW WOODS
SUBDIVISION, VILLAGE 10, AS PER PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 24
PAGES 17 & 18, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2009-CA-019467-0; Division 32A, now pending
in the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 6 day of November, 2009.

By: Eric Jontz
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905


JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157


11/19,11/26


IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.:08-CC-21724
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
SANDRA PATRICIA HURTADO, and JOHN DOE, and
JANE DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 10th day of
December, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Condominium Unit No. 821, of Building No.
8, of The Crest at Waterford Lakes, a Con-
dominium, together with all appurtenances
thereto, according and subject to the Dec-
laration of Condominium recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 8170, Page 1746, and
any amendments thereto, Public Records
of Orange County, Florida. Together with an
undivided interest in and to the common ele-
ments appurtenant to said unit.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on September
21,2009.
DATED this 21st day of September, 2009
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 381144
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court
Administration at 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone (407)836-
2303, within 2 working days of your receipt of this
Summons; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-
955-8771; if you are voice impaired, call: 1-800-
955-8770.
11/12, 11/19

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009-CP-2097-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GERALDINE M. BALLARD,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of GERALDINE
M. BALLARD, deceased, whose date of death
was September 22, 2009; File Number 2009-CP-
2097-0, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida
32801. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: Nov.
12, 2009.
Signed on November 6, 2009.

RICHARD A. LEIGH, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Personal Representatives
Florida Bar No. 119591
Swann & Hadley, PA
1031 W. Morse Blvd., Ste 350
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: 407-647-2777
JASON BALLARD
Personal Representative
113 Poinciana Lane
Deltona, Florida 32738
STEPHEN BALLARD
Personal Representative
819 Grand Regency Pointe #201
Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714
11/12, 11/19

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.:08-CC-21723
DIVISION: 71
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
HECTOR RODRIGUEZ, and JOHN DOE and JANE
DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 15 day of De-
cember, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Condominium Unit No. 101, PARCEL 5,
THATCHER'S LANDING CONDOMINIUM NO.
11, a Condominium, according to the Decla-
ration thereof, as recorded in Official Records
Book 5345, at Page(s) 2790, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida. Together
with an undivided share in the common ele-
ments appurtenant thereto.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on November
4, 2009.
DATED this 4 day of November, 2009
Alex C. Costopoulos, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 0112429
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff

If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court
Administration at 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone (407)836-
2303, within 2 working days of your receipt of this
Summons; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-
955-8771; if you are voice impaired, call: 1-800-
955-8770.
11/12, 11/19


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2009-CP-2279-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT FERRO
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Albert Ferro,
deceased, whose date of death was August 27,
2009, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 340,
Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
November 19, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Teresa Pancotto
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794 1251
Telephone: (407) 645 4833
Fax: (407) 645 4832
Personal Representative:
Teresa Pancotto
9487 Wickham Way
Orlando, Florida 32836
11/19, 11/26

NOTICE OF SALE OF MOTOR VEHICLE
Pursuant to Florida Statute 713.585, Mid-Florida
Lien And Recovery, will sell at public sale for cash
the following described vehicles located at lienor's
place to satisfy a claim of lien. 1992 FLEETWOOD
BOUNDER VIN: 1GBKP37N9M3313421. Lien
Amt:$2930.83. Lienor/B & H TRUCK & RV SER-
VICES, INC. 180 HOPE STREET LONGWOOD, FL
407-834-0224. 2001 CHEVROLET VIN: 1G1ND-
52JX16134082. Lien Amt:$3835.32. Lienor/AUTO
CARE CLINIC 1208 S ELM AVENUE SANFORD,
FL 407-688-9399. 2001 MERCEDES-BENZ VIN:
WDBPJ75J1A014039. Lien Amt:$2918.28. Lienor/
EXECUTIVE AUTO SERVICE 207 E PALMETTO AVE
LONGWOOD, FL 407-767-0688. Sale Date: De-
cember 07, 2009, 10:00 AM. At Mid Florida Lien &
Recovery 3001 Aloma Ave. Winter Park FL 32792.
Said vehicles may be redeemed by satisfying the
lien prior to sale date. You have the right to a hear-
ing at any time prior to sale date by filing a demand
for hearing in the circuit court. Owner has the right
to recover possession of vehicle by posting a bond
in accordance with F.S. 559.917. Any proceeds in
excess of the amount of the lien will be deposited
with the Clerk of Circuit Court in the county where
the vehicle is held.
11/19


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-CP-1967
IN RE: Estate of
EVELYN C. BREEZE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of EVELYN
C. BREEZE, deceased, whose date of death was
October 26, 2009, File Number 2009-CP-1967, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
is Seminole County Courthouse, 301 North Park
Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The names and
addresses of the Personal Representative and
the Personal Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is:
November 12, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle & Wigle, P.A.
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone (407) 644-9801

Personal Representative:
ROBIN B. BASILE
2460 Mclntosh
Maitland, Florida 32751
11/12, 11/19

Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the high-
est bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999
Sale date December 4 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
1921 1997 KW trl vin#: 1XKADB9X8VJ741345 ten-
ant: watec inc brant smith
1922 1996 Great Dane trl vin#:
1 GRAA9623TW032303 tenant: watec inc

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
11/19, 11/26


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CA-18849
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
JOSE E. COLON, ELADIA TAVERAS, and JOHN DOE
and JANE DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 10th day of
December, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Courts will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Unit 316, Building 3, THE CREST AT WATER-
FORD LAKES, a Condominium, according to
the Declaration of Condominium thereof re-
corded in Official Records Book 8170, Page
1746, and any amendments thereto, of the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida;
Together with an undivided interest in the
common elements appurtenant thereto.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a
Final Judgment entered in this cause on September
29, 2009.
DATED this 29th day of September, 2009
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 381144
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff

If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court
Administration at 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone (407)836-
2303, within 2 working days of your receipt of this
Summons; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-
955-8771; if you are voice impaired, call: 1-800-
955-8770.
11/12, 11/19

Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant F.S. 328.17, United American Lien & Re-
covery as agent w/ power of attorney will sell the
following vessel(s) to the highest bidder
Inspect 1 week prior @ marina; cash or cashier
check;15% buyer prem; all auctions are held w/ re-
serve; any persons interested ph 954-563-1999
Sale Date December 4 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
V11434 2003 YAM1 FL9886ML hull id#: YAM-
A1668J203 inboard pleasure gas white fiberglass L
9ft r/o ronald g Lesage lienor: jp cycles inc seminole
powersports 1200 rinehart rd Sanford fl

Licensed & Bonded Auctioneers & Surveyors
FLAB422 FLAU765 & 1911
11/12, 11/19


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Buy THERA-GESIC


uOferea in Iracts rrom 1 Acres to 41i Acres
Prime Lake Oconee Real Estate
SELLING ON SITE Greene County, GA

Friday -:- December 4 -:- 10:00 a.m.

Q800-323-8388
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Thursday, November 19, 2009 Page 15


TheMarketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626
ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
Account Representative needed to work on
behalf of our company. 18+ needed and
must have computer skills. Accounting
experience needed. Any job experience.
Email to mclarkemployment111@gmail.
com for more information.
DRIVERS:
$.40 cpm, Great Benefits run flatbed OTR!
Run Canada make $.50cpm! 2yrs OTR Exp.,
clean MVR Req., Loudon County Trucking:
800-745-7290
WORK FOR GOD!
Get Paid Well To Teach Others Prepared
Lessons From The Bible. Part Or Full-Time.
The Home Church Network 407-309-9864






FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.
OVIEDO OFFICE FOR RENT
Oviedo Office for rent. 1,640 sq. ft., $14/
sq. ft. + tax, no CAM. Reception, kitchen,
conference offices. Near 417 Red Bug exit.
815 Eyrie Drive. Call 407-365-3490.

GREAT OPPORTUNITY
Unique location in Maitland. 2 office spaces
still available. Amazing Rate $16/sf Full
Service. Call 321-436-8650


m
HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.
SCAN PHOTO PRINTS
TO CD OR DVD
$15 per order box (up to 600 prints) plus 12
cents per print. Free pick-up and delivery in
Winter Park, Maitland, Altamonte Springs
for orders of 500 scanned prints or more.
In-home service for qualifying orders. 407-
862-5449
IT'S TIME TO SPRUCE-UP FOR THE
HOLIDAYS
Craftsman Custom Installations, LLC is ready
to take care of All Your Home Repairs and
is now setting appointments to install your
holiday light displays. Pressure Washing -
Painting Trim Flooring Licensed Insured
-References Over 30 Years Experience
-Your Neighbors Handyman. Owned and
operated by Greg Martin a Florida State
licensed Building Inspector certified in
all areas of home construction. Contact
Greg Martin, 407-925-7085, gwmartin@
meandmycci.com

ATTORNEYS PROBATE /
BANKRUPTCY I FORECLOSURE
LAW OFFICES OF ADAMS & JAMES P.L.,
415 South Orlando Ave, Suite 1, (Across
from Burger King), 407-679-3111, www.
adamsjameslaw.com, Julie Jo Adams,
Esq., Mark A. James, Esq., Free initial
consultation. Hours by appointment. Cards
accepted. Serving Central Florida. Contact
Adams & James, P.L., 407-679-3111,
mjames@adamsjameslaw.com


Einre m


LOST FEMALE BLACK LAB
She is a 10-year-old Black Lab, about 70
Ibs. and has been spayed. She has white
on her chest. She was last seen wearing a
pink collar. If you've seen her, please e-mail
me at fanderson3@gmail.com or call me at
407.383.6984 ASAP Any hour. Thank you!



OUTDOOR MARKET
COMING IN NOVEMBER
NEW OUTDOOR MARKET WITH VENDORS
COMING IN NOVEMBER AT LA VINA
PLAZA,NONA. CALL 407-459-3149 FOR
DETAILS.
WINTER PARK
11/21/09, 8 AM 3 PM. Huge multifamily
sale, hundreds of items, including Christmas
decorations. 1505 Bonnie Burn Circle, off PA
Ave.



GUN SHOW
GUN SHOW GUN SHOW. Kissimmee Osceola
Heritage Park. Nov 21, Sat, 9-5, Nov 22,
Sun 9-4. Concealed Weapons Classes
Daily. Bring your GUNS to sell or trade.
GunTraderGunShows.com. Contact Terry,
352-339-4780, info@GunTraderGunShows.
com



Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.


Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.
Urodynamist
Job Description: Responsible for performing
catheterizations and/or cystometrograms.
Administers local, inhalation, intravenous,
and other anesthetics and assesses the
needs of individuals, families or communities
including assessment of individuals' home
or work environments to identify potential
health or safety problems. Conducts
specified laboratory tests. Consults and
coordinates with health care team members
to assess, plan, implement and evaluate
patient care plans. Work Monday-Friday,
8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9411032
Cashier
Job Description: Responsible for providing
customer service, processing parking fees
accurately, and completing daily cashier's
report. Uses a variety of revenue control
systems, completes accurate cashier's
reports, and balances all transactions at
the beginning and closing of shift. Ensures
inventory of operational supplies are at hand
and informs manager if restock is needed.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9440960
Accounts Receivable Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for invoicing,
collections and working disputes for clients
in a timely manner. Participates in the
collection process for all assigned clients.
Supports the use of e-mails, faxes, and
phone calls. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $13.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9440699
Concrete Superintendent
Job Description: Responsible for safety,
scheduling, and supervision of the job site.
Work Monday-Friday, 7:00am-3:30pm.
Pay Rate: $40.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9440218


Looking for in home Sales Persons
(closers).


* We are an established corporation
operating since 1910. We offer full
benefits, 401 K, paid training, and a great
commission plan.


* Our top producers earn a 6figure income.


* In home sales experience preferred.


For interviews call 407-898-8111 ext. 230
and leave a brief message with your name
and telephone number. Or, Fax your
resume to 407-897-3795.

We will be conducting interviews through the
month of November.


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The Florida State StampShow a WSPevent!
Central Florida Fairgrounds
4603 West Colonial Drive (SR50)
Orlando, Florida 32808

Friday, December 4 from 10:00 AM 6:00 PM
Saturday, December 5 from 10:00 AM 5:00 PM
Sunday, December 6 from 10:00 AM 3:00 PM

BUY SELL TRADE
52 DEALERS PUBLIC AUCTION (SATURDAY, 5:30PM)
* USPS PARTICIPATION SOCIETIES (CSA, CSS, GPS,AND OTHERS)
* 180 EXHIBIT FRAMES SPONSERED BY FSDA, HOSTED BY CFSC
SHOW CACHET AND CANCEL (LINCOLN)

Contact: Mr. Francis Ferguson 407.493.0956


Swww.FLOREXStampShow.com

Abb Iffy Z.lM^Mtg- ..^


MORE THAN JUST A GAME


SEast-West Shrine Game will
AW EST ~be played on Saturday,
LT V IJanuary 23, 2010, at 3:00
S H R I N E G A M E p.m. EST at the Florida
Citrus Bowl Stadium in Orlando, Florida. The East-West Shrine
Game is played for the benefit of Shriners Hospitals for
Children and is one of our cornerstone events every year This
year's game will be televised on ESPN2, which will ensure
national television exposure reaching in excess of one million
households.
TICKET INFORMATION
Premium Sideline Reserved Seating $50
Sideline Reserved Seating $25
General Admission Seating $15
Questions? Call 407-467-1885
Jin UatiHi B, f rh


(~)


Shriners Hospitals
for Children"


EAST-WEST TICKET ORDER FORM
Kiwanis Club of Oviedo/Winter Springs
* Buy tickets from any Oviedo/Winter Springs Kiwanian or Key
Club Member
* OR at any branch of Citizens Bank of Florida:
-Main Branch: 156 Geneva Dr., Oviedo
-Alafaya Office: 10 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo
-Red Bug Branch: 8305 Red Bug Lake Rd., Oviedo
Winter Park Branch: 7250 Aloma Ave., Winter Park
Longwood Branch: 410 S. Myrtle St., Longwood
* OR Mail to East-West Game Tickets, PO. Box 196983, Winter
Springs, FL 32719-6983
* Make Checks Payable to: Kiwanis Foundation
Name:
Address:
Contact Phone #:
Number of Tickets: $50 $25 $15
Amount Enclosed: $
Tickets will be mailed or hand-delivered.
SHRINERS AND KIWANIANS HELPING CHILDREN


The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce proudly presents
the
Successful Strategies for 2010 Series
Please join

ROLLINS COLLEGE bright house
NETWORKS
For a Leadership Breakfast Seminar entitled,

"You,* Tor CtL- Crezte ke Ma-c2l"'


Featuring Lee Cockerell,
Former Disney Executive
& author of Creating Magic:
I0 Common Sense Leadership
Strategies from a Life at Disney
This seminar is a must for those looking to
take themselves or their organization to
the next level of excellence
Supporting Sponsors:
Obs6Ni .- You may also pal
Observer Questions_?


Wednesday, December 2nd
S7:30-9:30 am
The Orlando Science Center
777 East Princeton Street
Orlando, FL 32803
Free Parking in OSC Garage
Registration:
S15 for Chamber Members
520 for Non-Chamber Members
520 at the door
y online at www.winterpark.org
Please call 407-644-8281.


Please Join


WORKFORCE plr l
CENTRAL FLORIDA
For a human resources seminar entitled,
"Hire Hard, Manage Easy & Retain Talent"
Featuring Jean L. Seawright, CMC of Seawright & Associates


This FREE Workshop will address such topics as:
* Workforce realities: laying the foundation
* To hire talent, you must first attract talent
* Managing effectively begins with hiring effectively
* Retaining talent


Wednesday, December 9th
7:30- 9:45am
Winter Park Welcome Center
151 W. Lyman Avenue
Winter Park


To RSVP or for questions, please call Judy at 407-644-8281 or wpcc@winterpark.org


Obs(


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Page 16 Thursday, November 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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