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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00040
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Creation Date: April 2, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00040

Full Text





Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 21, No. 14
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY

*7 .BANK
Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
.... Member FDIC


Thursday, April 2, 2009

Locally owned.

Locally produced.

Widely read.

www.WPMObserver.com


504+ tax
Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL
BANK & TRUST
On the comer of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
407-622-8181 * www.CNBT-FL.com
ty io I '


Thrifty get thriftier


' i Simple Kitchen" shows
how foods can fend off I, -.
Page A8



The Winter Park ', 'crew
team - i . . . -
Page A3


!L4Z



A local mar 1Ldges


show.
Page A7


(* . * .,., ~~~- !


City Talks ...... . . ..... A.
' , On! ... ..... ..... . Al
Legals. .. . . . . . . . . AI
Marketplace .......,.. Al
Games................ A1
" ... . -.. ... .. ...... ...... .. ....... ....."... .. .". ............


C,5
LOP)


0 9 4922 '9 5 6 4 2 2


r'W ui B IY aAu UaBUUU - I B 1 U~tABVE
Thrift shop manager Joyce Colgan says business is good these days, with customers pouring in to her store in Winter Park.


JENNY ANDREASSON
C . ...


Business is good for the ar-
ea's thrift stores.
While most retailers are
A4 i suffering, thrift stores are
seeing an increase in sales,
46 and in some cases, a hike in
12 donations. Some are even
13 opening new locations or
14 expanding current ones.
15 "Thrifty people are
more thrifty than they ever
were," said Joyce Colgan,
manager of the Auxiliary
White Elephant Thrift Shop


in Winter Park, "but people
who were not familiar with
thrift stores before are em-
bracing them."
White Elephant, which
has donated more than $2
million to the Winter Park
SMemorial Hospital, recent-
ly expanded after experi-
encing a continual increase
in both donations and
sales. Colgan said the reces-
sion may be making people
more charitable.
"The community is more
aware of not just getting rid
of their clothing," she said.


Also growing is- nation-
al thrift store organiza-
tion Goodwill, which has
opened new locations in
Casselberry and Oviedo.
Spokeswoman Judith Pari-
seau said Goodwill of Cen-
tral Florida has seen a 6
percent increase in sales.
"People are trying to
make their dollar stretch
farther so they are looking
at an alternative to shop-
ping," she said.
On the other hand, do-
nations are easing at both
> turn to THRIFT on page A5


State

slashes

library aid

BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER
Checkouts at the Winter
'Park Public Library are up
almost 12 percent this year,
while the state has cut its li-
brary aid by 20 percent.
That leaves it with $23,000
less to work with, Library Di-
rector Bob Melanson said.
"When you're experienc-
ing unprecedented growth,
meeting the needs, the de-
mands of the public, it seems
a little incongruous to be
cutting," Melanson said. -
While Library circulation
is up, the state continues to
slash budgets, forcing librar-
ies to cut services and pro-
grams. Winter Park Public
Library gets 2.7 percent of
its operating funds from the
aid the state provides and
about 60 percent of its aid
comes from a city grant.
Since state aid has fallen,
the Library has cut five ser-
vices: an online homework
help service, programs for
"tweens," eliminated an as-
sistant that uploads histori-
cal Winter Park images on-
line for research, discontin-
ued a consolidated database
searching service, and has
reduced the number of ma-
terials it buys.
Not only has state aid fall-
en, but also funding across
the board, including pri-
> turn to LIBRARY on page A2


First-time homebuyers can save $8K


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Central Floridians buying a
home for the first time this
year can get $8,000 added to
their income tax refund.
Part of the American Re-
covery and Reinvestment
Act, the first-time home-
buyer's tax credit is equal to
10 percent of the purchase
price of the home, or as
much as $8,000. It is avail-
able only if the purchase is
made before Dec. 1.
"This is a true credit,
and I don't think people
are aware of what an enor-
mous benefit this is," said
Charlotte Williams, broker


and owner of ERA Williams
Real Estate Group in Winter
Park.
Residential real estate
prices are bottoming out
in the region and interest
rates for mortgages are his-
torically low, Williams said.
"Coupled with a tax credit
of this amount, it's just a
good time to buy."
University of Central
Florida economist Sean
Snaith agreed, but had one
concern.
"The onlypotential bump
in the road is whether or not
you can get financing," he
said. "Until housing finance
is repaired here, people may
not be able to take advan-


tage of that (credit)."
The credit aids the home-
buyer but also the real estate
industry by decreasing the
inventory of existing and
new homes, said Paul Party-
ka, managing partner of NAI
Realvest and president of
the Oviedo-Winter Springs
Chamber of Commerce.
"Right now there's a lot
of home inventory," he
said. "This is the opportu-
nity to have somebody who
couldn't afford it before to
be able to afford that home
that is heavily discounted
anyway."
The credit canr be re-
deemed on either the 2008
or '09 income tax return,


IRS spokesman Mike Dobz-
inski said. But the home has
to have been purchased in
'09.
"You have to buy it to
claim it," he said.
If it's applied on the 2008
return, the homeowner
won't have to wait a year to
get it.
Linda Smith, partner
with Orlando-based Davis
Grennan, said if someone
hasn't filed yet for '08, they
can apply for an extension,
which will give them until
Oct. 15 to close on a house.
If they've already filed, they
can submit an amended re-

> turn to CREDIT on page A3






Page 2 Thursday, April 2, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer





News


LIBRARY I Residents endure
longer waiting time for books


< continued from the front page

vate donations. Melanson
couldn't say whether they
would be cutting more
programs in the future, but
they have considered clos-
ing the Library one day a
month to save money.
At the March 23 City
Commission meeting, the
Library requested that the
city match any fundrais-
ing they do up to $42,500
to reach an $85,000 goal
to sustain current services,
operating hours and staff
so that they can end up in
the black at the end of the
year. The City Commission
approved the request and
has given the Library until
Thursday, May 2 to reach
its goal.
MaryGail Coffee, com-
munity relations coor-
dinator, said most of the
missing services have gone
unnoticed by patrons, but
the decrease in the amount
of bestseller books the Li-
brary has for checkout has
been an issue that some
have complained about.
Patrons have gone from
sometimes not waiting at
all for bestsellers, to wait-
ing a couple weeks.
"People have noticed
a notable. increase in
the amount of time that
they wait for maybe a re-
ally popular DVD or any
of the bestseller books ...
and patrons do comment,
'Boy, you know, I put that
on hold a really long time
ago, is there a problem?'"
Coffee said.
What people aren't no-
ticing, however, is a de-
crease in the service of
those who work at the Li-
brary.
George Hernandez
said he goes there daily to
read the newspaper and
to work on his computer
skills. Anytime he has a
question about how to use
the computer, he "both-
ers" the staff.
"I practice what I for-
got yesterday, and they're
there to help me," Her-
nandez said.
Jerry Lindauer spends a
couple hours a week at the
Library with his 5-year-old
son, who he said loves it
there. Lindauer likes that
he can get work done on
the Library's free wire-
less Internet while his son
improves his math skills
by using the educational
computer games.
What Melanson wants
the state to notice is the
value of the Library as not
only a place for recreation,
but also one of education.
Hernandez is a testa-
ment to that idea. He's
been coming to the Li-
brary every day since he
got laid off in May.
"I've educated myself
more in one year coming
to the Library than I did
during my whole educa-


tion," Hernandez said.
And while the state
may not have voted to in-
crease aid, the residents
of Winter Park support
the spending of their tax
dollars on it, according to
a recent survey done by
the city. Melanson said it's
because the residents ap-
preciate the services the
Library provides through
education.
"There's not another
institution except the hos-
pital that serves everyone
in this community from
pregnancy through death
other than the public li-
brary." ..









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PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, April 2, 2009 Page 3


CREDIT I Deadline for paying
taxes is Wednesday, April 15


< continued from the front page
turn once the house is pur-
chased. But that extension
doesn't preclude filing a tax
return.
"Taxpayers always need
to remember, the extension
is for filing not for paying,"
Smith said. "Taxes must be
paid by April 15."
There are some income
restrictions on the credit. It
is phased out for a married
couple who makes more


F $15.0 OFF..
OF SERVICE IS OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1980


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than $150,000 and single
filers who make more than
$75,000, she said. The home-
buyer must use form 54-05,
which will flow through to
the form 1040 as a credit.
"The credit is putting
money directly into the tax-
payer's pocket," Grennan
said, "and is moving homes
through the process."
For more information,
visit IRS.gov or FederalHous-
ingTaxCredit.com.


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I If your business is a corporation, your 2008 tax return
I filing deadline is March 16, 2009. You can file for an
extension by that date if you need more time and get
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Braving the choppy waters of Lake Baldwin in W
crew team tries out some new members during-an.
team has reached national prominence over the last i
dwindling numbers joining its ranks each year. "We;' .
as little as only 7-8 guys coming out," senior Matt MI
new recruits to the water, the team held a seminar
phies lined a table underneath a tent that team.
out of the occasional sun. But it was a morn"'.
tions rough for a row on the lake. "It's targ. l said.


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER


Thursday, April 2, 209 Pae


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Page 4 Thursday, April 2, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Winter Park


Vehicle burglaries
On March 22, an unknown person entered
an unlocked vehicle parked on the 200 block
of Lakemont Avenue and stole loose change
from the ashtray.
On March 23, someone broke the passen-
ger side window of a vehicle on the 500
block of North Orlando Avenue and stole a GPS
unit.
On March 24, someone broke the rear pas-
senger window of a vehicle on the 2200
block of Lee Road and stole a child's purse,
a pink Nintendo DS and games, and a small
black MP3 player.


On March 24, someone broke the passen-
ger side window of a vehicle on the 2200
block of Lee Road but stole nothing.
On March 24, on the 1300 block of Gene
Street, someone broke a passenger win-
dow of a vehicle and stole a backpack con-
taining an iPod, clothing.and Nike shoes.

Arrests
Someone was arrested on the 500 block of
North Orlando Avenue on March 22 for pos-
session of Alprazolam and retail theft.
Someone was arrested on March 24 on the


500 block of Huntington Avenue for pos-
session of drug paraphernalia and a weapon
on school property.

Residential burglaries
On March 24, on the 400 block of St. An-
drews Boulevard, an unknown person en-
tered a carport and stole a grey Mongoose
model 700C mountain bike with a cargo rack
on the back and a water bottle on the frame.
On March 25, on the 1800 block of Albert
Lee Parkway, an unknown black male,
about 5 feet 8 inches tall and 160 pounds


March 22 to March 25
with short hair, wearing a blue shirt and
baggy blue jeans, broke a rear bathroom
window with a rock inside of a sock.
On March 25, on the 1700 block of Lee
Road, an unknown person broke a rear
sliding glass door and stole GI Joe collectible
dolls, a Panasonic TV, a PlayStation 3 and five
video games.
On March 25, on the 500 block of North
Orlando Avenue, a unknown white male, 6
feet tall and heavyset, punched a door lock
with an unknown tool. He fled the area in a
newer-model blue four-door Chevrolet Blazer
bearing the partial Florida tag of "A98."


Community

The Fifth Annual Winter Park His- information call the Winter Park His- 5 p.m. The event will be held at the training classes and volunteer oppor- keeping the pool properly cleaned
torical Association's Garden Tour torical Museum at 407-647-8180 or Maitland Ballfield Complex. All are tunities, please call Rose van der Berg and maintained, placing alarms in
will be held Saturday, April 4 from e-mail wphistory@aol.com. welcome; sponsors, volunteers and at 407-682-0808 or visit their Web all entrances to the pool area, hav-
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There are two . kick ball participants are still needed. site at HospiceoftheComforter.org. ing rescue equipment, teaching
check-in locations, one is on East The Orlando Idol Voice Competition For more information, call Mark at children water safety and survival
Reading Way near Laurel Road and will be held Friday, April 17 from 7 to 407-353-6538. The Orange County Health Depart- or swimming skills, learning rescue
the other is located off Glen Ridge 10 p.m. at Trinity Preparatory School ment would like to remind all par- techniques such as cardiopulmonary
Way at the entrance to Timberlane in Winter Park. This is a fundraiser for Hospice of the Comforter is looking ents and guardians to keep their resuscitation (CPR) and keeping an
Shores on Blue Ridge Road. In ad- the Orlando Opera Guild and tickets for compassionate volunteers to eyes on their children at all times, emergency phone near the pool.
edition to the gardens, the tour will are $15. For more information, e-mail befriend patients, offer respite to especially around water. Supervision For more information and resourc-
feature free consultation on small Orlandoldol@gmail.com or call 407 caregivers, volunteer in their Hos- is the first step to prevent childhood es on this topic, please call the Or-
garden design, information about bat 862-2799. pice House in-patient facility, assist injuries including drowning. It is ange County Health Department at
conservation and the Central Florida with administrative duties, participate strongly encouraged that pool owners 407-858-1400 ext. 1214.
Plein Air Artists will be painting in the The Friends of First Response- in fundraising events, prepare meals with children use "layers of safety" by
gardens. Tickets are $12 in advance Maitland Kick Ball Fundraiser will or comfort bereaved families. For supervising children at all timespro-
and $15 at the event. For additional be Sunday, May 3, from 2 p.m. to more information about upcoming viding proper fencing and covering,




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b Winter Park/ Maitland

Observer
Established in 1989 by Gerhard-J.W. Munster
Published Thursday, April 2,2009 CONTACTS -Volume 21, Issue Number 14
PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor REPORTERS COPY EDITORS
407-563-7009 Jenny Andreasson Jonathan Gallagher Josh Garrick
kyle@observemewspapers.com 407-563-7026 jgallagher@observemewspapers.com 407-304-8100
jennya@observemewspapers.com
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jenny Andreasson ADVERTISING SALES
Jenny Andreasson Isaac Babcock jennya@Qbservernewspapers.com Tracy Craft
407-563-7026 407-563-7023 407-515-2605
jennya@observernewspapers.com isaacb@observemewspapers.com COLUMNISTS tcraft@observemewspapers.com
Chris Jepson
DESIGNER LEGALS I CLASSIFIED Jepson@MediAmerica.us INTERN
Stephanie Erickson Jonathan Gallagher Brittni Johnson
407-563-7040 407-563-7058 Louis Roney
stephanie@observernewspapers.com legal@observernewspapers.com LRoney@cfl.rr.com

Member of: P.O. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr.
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-563-7000 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer� 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 4 Thursday, April 2, 2009






Winter Park / Maitlanci Observer Thursday, April 2, 2009 Page 5


Business


The American Institute of Archi-
tects Orlando Chapter recently
honored Rebecca Talbert with the
2009 Fred H. Pryor Young Archi-
tects Forum Achievement Award.
She is currently employed as a project
architect by RLF, a Winter Park-based
architecture, engineering and interior
design firm. This award is given to
those the institute recognizes as the
best and brightest future industry
leaders.

Centex Homes has started con-


struction of three new town home
buildings at Emerson Park, located
northwest of Maitland on Ocoee-Apo-
pka Road. Homes available are priced
from $159,990. Carol-Ann Barody,
director of operational marketing for
Centex Homes' East Florida division,
said three- and four-bedroom town
homes at Emerson Park range in size
from 1,650 square feet of living space
to 2,241 square feet and will be ready
for occupancy by fall.

Jessica Simpson, an associate


at Cuhaci & Peterson Architects,
based in Baldwin Park, has suc-
cessfully completed all profes-
sional requirements to earn des-
ignation as a registered landscape
architect.

Maitland-based SIKON Construc-
tion Corporation's Tapestry Park
European Village won the Mixed-
Use Project of the Year Award in
National Association of Industrial and
Office Properties Northeast Florida's
annual awards.


Winter Park-based Palmer Electric
Co. donated labor and materials
valued at $2,100 to West Orange
Habitat for Humanity for the con-
struction of a home in Winter Garden.
Palmer Electric has provided similar
donations to three other Habitat for
Humanity homes in Central Florida in
the past five years.

George Livingston, founder and
chairman of Maitland-based NAI
Realvest, was given the Wilbur


Strickland Award for Lifetime
Achievement during the 14th annual
Central Florida Commercial Asso-
ciation of Realtors Hallmark Awards
ceremony in Orlando recently. This
award is given to individuals whom
the association considers to be found-
ers of commercial real estate who ex-
emplify outstanding dedication to the
profession.


THRIFT I Many area thrift stores see an increase in sales, decrease in donations


< continued from the front page

Goodwill and the Salvation Army
stores.
"We are a little bit soft in our do-
nations," Pariseau said.
The Salvation Army is also ex-
periencing increased sales, spokes-
woman Melissa Temme said, but has
experienced a 20 percent decline in
donations nationally. In its south-
ern territories, the nonprofit orga-
nization has seen a slight increase
in clothes donations but a decline
in the donation of larger items, such
as furniture.
Temme said the decline is tied di-
rectly to slumping sales in the first-
hand retailer market.


"If somebody isn't buying a new
couch, they don't need to get rid of
the old one," she said.
University of Central Florida
economist Sean Snaith agreed.
"People could be holding on to
clothes and household items a little
bit longer than they might during
an economic boom," he said.
While an increase in sales bol-
sters the Salvation Army's adult re-
habilitation centers, a long-term
increase in sales could create a
"perfect storm moment," where the
stores don't have enough goods to
meet consumer demand, Temme
said.
"A short-term increase in sales is
a great thing, but we want to make


sure we're thinking long-term, and
that's where the concerns come,"
she said.
But the country's economy will
recover, and in turn, demand for
thrift store goods should level off,
Snaith said. "People shopping at
thrift stores by necessity will even-
tually have a better option."
One area thrift store seems un-
touched by the economic storm
- the Sonshine Community Thrift
Store and Food Pantry in Oviedo.
Store manager Darlene Colon said
she hasn't noticed any change in
supply or demand.
"It's hard to say (if there's been
a change) because some days it
does increase and other days when


there's less volume," Colon said.
She said there were a few weeks
when donations seemed a bit low,
but that was after the holidays.
"I don't think it's the economy as
much as the time of year," she said.
"All things typically slow down in all
businesses after the holidays, but it
always picks back up."
Sonshine is not short on dona-
tions. In November, the store had so
much that items were spilling out
its doors, causing the city's code en-
forcement to fine them.
"We get a lot of everything," she
said.


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to be enough.

It's not too late to address your financial future and work towards achieving the
retirement you've always wanted. Call today for more information.





!B1S
FINANCIAL GROUP

Denise Addison, Investment Advisor Representative
Jose Sing Po, Investment Advisor Representative

Ibis Financial Group
1900 Summit Tower Boulevard, Suite 450
Orlando, FL 32810

(321) 304-4008 or (321) 304-4018
www.ibisfingroup.com
daddison@ibisfingroup.com or jsingpo@ibisfingroup.com


A -,- e-2J � Jn .r : .! " , .p .: . .l4E r.".. . . . . . . . . . - . ..r' . . . . . . . . . . . .


~---


Thursday, April 2, 209 Pae


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Business






.p 6� aae 6 . Thursday"April.2,2


Garbage contract
awarded to Waste Pro
On Feb. 23, the Winter Park
City Commission award-
ed a seven-year exclusive
contract for all of the city's
residential and commercial
solid waste collection ser-
vices to Waste Pro. This new
provider will begin servic-
ing city residents and busi-
nesses on Friday May 1.
Waste Pro will offer re-
cycling initiatives and re-
cently purchased environ-
mentally conscious vehicles
meeting the 2008 vehicle
emission standards. In addi-
tion, this new contract will
expand recycling services
into multi-family residen-
tial units, city facilities and
special events.
City residents will receive
information regarding this
new service and each house-
hold will have the opportu-
nity to select the number
and size of carts they prefer.
As part of the contract, each
household can receive up to
two new garbage carts to re-
place their current carts. For
residents who prefer more
than two carts, they can be
purchased at an additional
fee.
To encourage more re-


cycling efforts, for those
households that would like
a 64-gallon recycling cart
to replace their current re-
cycling bins, there is a small
additional monthly fee for
this option.
Household trash, yard
waste and recycling days
will remain the same for
city residents, but pickup
times may change. Begin-
ning Friday, May 1, residents
are asked to place their gar-
bage curbside by 7 a.m. on
their normal pickup day.

Economics of historic
preservation
Winter Park provides an ex-
ceptional quality of life and
sense of place for its resi-
dents and visitors. You are
invited to learn how pre-
serving that sense of place,
as reflected in its historic
resources, can continue to
Enhance the quality of life
in Winter Park. Noted ex-
pert Donovan Rypkema
will give a presentation on
the "Economics of Historic
Preservation" at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, April 8, in City
Hall Commission Chambers
located at 401 Park Ave. S.
This lecture is free and open
to the public.


Winter Park City Talk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER


For information regard-
ing the lecture or Winter
Park's historic preservation
efforts, please call 407-599-
3498 or e-mail Lhayes@cit-
yofwinterpark.org.

55th annual
Easter Egg Hunt
Winter Park will hold its
55th annual Easter Egg
Hunt on Saturday, April 11,
in Central Park, downtown
Winter Park.
Children up to 10 years
of age can begin lining up at
9:30 a.m. The hunt will begin
promptly at 10 a.m. when
the Easter Bunny gives the
official starting signal. Chil-
dren with special needs are
also encouraged to join in
the fun.
More than 6,000 eggs,
stuffed with miniature toys,
and 300 pounds of candy
will be hidden throughout
Central Park. Of course, chil-
dren who come up empty-
handed will still be able to
enjoy special treats at the
designated candy area.
For- more information,
please call 407-599-3463.

17th annual Run
for the Trees
In honor of National Arbor
Day, Winter Park will proud-
ly host the 17th annual
Jeannette Genius McKean
"Run for the Trees" at 7:30
a.m. on Saturday, April 25.
This annual 5K (3.1 miles)
run-walk will begin at
Showalter Field, located at
2525 Cady Way, and finish


on beautiful Genius Drive,
which is open to the pub-
lic only once a year for this
magnificent event. Each
race participant will receive
a commemorative T-shirt as
well as a young tree to plant
at a location of their choice.
Funds raised from the
event will support the
Winter Park Tree Replace-
ment Fund. Tree replace-
ment is needed continually
throughout the city as trees
become damaged from
storms or reach the end of
their natural lifespan.
Sponsorships help the
Winter Park Tree Replace-
ment Fund accomplish its
goal. For specific informa-
tion on how to gain expo-
sure for your organization
and become a "Mighty Oak"
or "Prestigious Pine" event
sponsor, please call 407-
599-3463.
For specific "Run for the
Trees" race details and regis-
tration information, please
visit TrackShack.com.

"Ask Winter Park" - get
your questions answered
Winter Park has introduced
a new feature on its official
Web site called "Ask Winter
Park."
This new feature pro-
vides citizens with a simple
way to access city informa-
tion any time of the day
with the simple click of a
mouse. Residents can ask a
question, find the answers
to frequently asked ques-
tions, or submit a service
request through this new


Not a day goes by when I
am not proud of the hard
working men and women
in Maitland. Today, congrat-
ulations go to the Maitland
Fire and Rescue team on
their accomplishments in
achieving accreditation sta-
tus. Kudos to Chief Ken Neu-
hard for all he has achieved
in his career and to both he
and Kristine Neal for their
contributions to this week's
City Talk.
- Mayor Doug Kinson

Maitland ranks in the
top 15 in the state
Maitland's Fire-Rescue De-
partment is constantly
protecting and saving lives,
but most recently, they
achieved a wonderful sta-
tus. On March 10, our Fire
Department became one in
15 Florida fire departments
to be awarded accreditation
status from the Commission
on Fire Accreditation Inter-


-national. There are only 128
agencies internationally
who have received this cov-
eted recognition.
To say we're proud of
what our Fire Department
has accomplished would
be an understatement. This
process has taken nearly
two years and has involved
hundreds of man hours. The
department-wide effort was
led by Battalion Chief Chris
Phelps, who provided di-
rection and coordination
throughout the process as
the accreditation manager.
Our firefighters volunteered
their time to work with
management and put in the
time and energy needed to
accomplish this amazing
goal.
To receive this status, the
department went through
a detailed department self-
assessment, established a
Standard of Response Cov-
erage, updated their strate-
gic plan, and participated in


an independent peer review
and validation of their ef-
forts.
During their self-as-
sessment, our firefighters
looked at every aspect of
their department, from gov-
ernance and administration
to financial responsibilities
to goals and objectives. This
process looked at 10 indi-
vidual categories and the
department was responsi-
ble for measuring their per-
formance in comparison to
the core competencies laid
out by CFAI.
Also included in the ac-
creditation process is the
establishment of a Standard
of Response Coverage. This
required extensive analy-
sis of our department's risk
assessment, on-hand re-
sources, goals and objec-
tives, and citywide capacity
to distribute resources. As a
result, the department has
outlined a baseline for de-
fining emergency response
performance, a guide for
measuring performance im-
provements on a continual
basis, and has established
a planning tool for making
decisions concerning re-
source procurement and al-
location as the department
continues to grow over the
next five to 10 years.
One of the last aspects of
the accreditation process
was an independent peer
review and validation pro-
cess from an outside team.
A team of four individuals


PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF MAITLAND
Fire Chief Ken Neuhard presents the Accredited Agency Award to Mayor Kinson.


from different fire agencies
throughout the country
visited our fire department
and evaluated our efforts
and validated the self-as-
sessment that the depart-
ment had established.
There are many benefits
to becoming accredited.
One of the most notable
benefits of going through
this process is the self-as-
sessment process that al-
lows our department to
systematically analyze their
internal structure.
- "This process has given
us the opportunity to look
at how well we're doing our
jobs and what we can do to
continuously measure our
impact on our community,"
Chief Ken Neuhard said. "It
gives us the tools to be able


to look at our operation
with a critical eye."
Once accredited, an or-
ganization must submit a
yearly report to update the
Accreditation Board on
their actions to improve
their department. To retain
accreditation, the Maitland
Fire-Rescue Department
will have to reapply every
five years, but this first step
is a major milestone and
one that our entire city can
be proud of.
A huge congratulations
goes out to Chief Neuhard
and our entire Fire-Rescue
Department!

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at ItsMyMaitland.com


program at their conve-
nience. They can also search
a knowledgebase library in
the information center for
answers to questions.
If residents are unable to
find what they are looking
for, they'll have the capabil-
ity to post their questions to
be added to the knowledge-
base library.
The service center of "Ask
Winter Park" also allows
residents to submit a service
request to the city, such as
reporting a streetlight out-
age or requesting a pothole
to be filled. The service cen-
ter then captures routes,
manages, searches and re-
ports on all service requests
that are submitted. Both the
resident and the city staff
will have the ability to track
and check the status of any
given service request.
This great new service
will enhance organiza-
tion and create a conve-
nient form of communica-
tion between the city and
its residents. If you would
like to ask a question, post
a question, search through
the knowledgebase library
or submit a service request
through "Ask Winter Park,"
please log on to CityofWin-
terPark.org and click on
the "Ask Winter Park" icon
found on the home page of
the city's official Web site.

Call City Hall at
407-599-9933 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org


Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


Fire-Rescue Department

earns accreditation


Winter Nrk / Maitland Observer


Page 6 ThrdyApi2,09


_�!






Thursday, April 2, 2009 Page 7


Lifestyles


Local judge's crownin

N McENANY-PHILLIPS
7 C '- STAFF a uIll [


Winter Park resident David Gilbert
is getting noticed - while buying
coffee, scanning a bookstore's aisles,
even at the restaurant where he's
worked for 17 years. Maybe it helps
that he's the head judge on the WE
tv's original series "Little Miss Per-
fect."
In six episodes, the "docu-reality"
show shadows the journey of 12 lit-
tle girls preparing to compete in the
Little Miss Perfect beauty pageant,
and Gilbert calls the shots. They call
him the show's Simon Cowell, mi-
nus the mean.
It's a role custom-made for Gil-
bert, who has been involved with
the pageant industry for more than
30 years. As a child he was fascinat-
ed with the selection process of na-
tional beauty contests.
"I used to keep score," Gilbert
said.
He sang, acted and performed
locally .at his church and schools
including Winter Park High. At
Stetson University he majored in
speech and theater, performing in
the prestigious the School of Mu-
sic's concert choir and its public
speaking team.
"It helps a judge to be well-
rounded, familiar with the arts,
music, theater and performing,"
Gilbert said. He judged local con-
tests and gained experience within
several pageant systems such as
Miss Florida, Miss America and Miss
USA. Gilbert assisted in the success
of two Miss America winners and
believes a good judge shows integ-
rity, is thoughtful and takes the role
seriously..
"So many positive things come
from this, the lifelong friendships



worthy ofyour calendar




April brings us

variety...and Easter

Two operas on the same night -
an operatic double bill
April's art offerings begin with
two (short) operas in one perfor-
mance, offering first-timers the
perfect chance to see how much
they would enjoy a real perfor-
mance in the theater.
The Orlando Opera is offering
the pairing of two examples of
verismoo" opera (opera that deals
with the "truth" of the struggles
of the common man). This double
bill brings us musical stories of the
19th-century working class. Pucci-
ni's always amazing music in "Suor
Angelica" presents the heartache
of arnunwed mother forced to join
a nunnery and lose her child.
The second half of the evening
is "Cavalleria rusticana" by Pietro
Mascagni. Again (with verismoo")
truth, it tells of a tragic love trian-


For more information about local judge
David Gilbert and the "Little Miss Per-
fect" television program go to http://
www.wetv.cori/little-miss-perfect. The -
show airs at 10 p.m. Wednesday on
WEtv.

with contestants, judges, directors,
plus the growth of the contestants,"
he said.
Mary Sullivan, executive direc-
tor of the Miss Florida Scholarship
Pageant, has worked with Gilbert
for many years through numerous
pageants.
"David Gilbert is the epitome of
what a judge should be in the Miss
America program," Sullivan said.
"He is well-prepared, thoughtful,
professional and skilled in the judg-
ing process. His ability to make each
young woman feel comfortable and
confident during competition is in-
comparable."
Gilbert recalls helping a Miss
Winter Park contestant prepare
for her talent portion of the Miss
Florida competition. "She received
a standing ovation, which had nev-
er happened before," Gilbert said.
"There's an old pageant saying,
'let's go change a life', and some-
times you really do."
Gilbert notices details. "If the fit
is wrong even the most expensive
gown won't win. When I watch tal-
ent or listen to an interview, I ask
myself, do.I want to keep on watch-
ing and listening?"
Gilbert was pleased with the
"Little Miss Perfect" show.
"Most people don't see the real
world of beauty pageants," he
said. "\Ve wanted to showcase this
world by doing it in a positive way.

gle between two women, a hand-
some dockworker, and his over-
protective mother. A significant
highlight of the opera is its choral
work, including (appropriate to
the season) a hymn to Easter. Con-
ducted by Metropolitan Opera
conductor Joseph Colaneri, the
production's massive choral forces
are led by Orlando's own Robin
Stamper.
Performances (at the Bob Carr)
are 8 p.m. Friday, April 3; 2 p.m.
Sunday, April 5; and 7:30 p.m. Tues-
day, April 7. Call 407-426-1700 or
visit OrlandoOpera.org

More great music -
this time from the Russians
There is something big and special
about the sound that comes from
a Russian orchestra - especially
an orchestra "created" to celebrate
the great heritage qf Russian mu-
sic. This Saturday, April 4, at 3 p.m.,
the National Philharmonic of
Russia will close the Festival of Or-
chestra's 25th Anniversary Season
with a performance of (almost all)
Russian music.
Founded in 2003 by then-Presi-
dent Vladimir Putin and the Minis-


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
With an eye for shining stars, David Gilbert has built a reputation for being one of the best judges on the
beauty pageant circuit. Above, he sits in a den in his home filled with memorabilia from pageant,winners.


I wasn't interested in participating
in a format with bratty kids, horri-
ble moms or stupid judges. This was
a completely professional produc-
tion."
Michael Galanes, pageant direc-
tor for "Little Miss Perfect," said he
respects Gilbert. "David brings pro-
fessionalism and acute experience,
coupled with a stern kindness. He
is-our Simon Cowell - without the
mean factor."
Gilbert admits pageants aren't for


everyone. "In any competitive ven-
ue involving children you will have
overzealous parents. The children
have to have a good time because it
is a learning and growth experience
for them and their families."
Galanes summed up David Gil-
bert's contribution. "David was
instrumental to the success of the
show. We were honored and privi-
leged to have him serve as our head
judge."


2'J VMl of tieA


SPONSORS
City of Maitland
Costco
Embarq
Klonel
Chiropractic
Central Florida
Lifestyle
Magazine
Gutter Toppers
of Central
Florida
Mercantile
Bank
The Park Press


4AITLAN D


-. :-of the

)Arts


SPONSORS
Polio Tropical
Progress
' Energy
The Q-Luxury
Apartments
Simply Well
Special
Editions
Publishing
Winter Park /
Maitland
Observer
WLOQ
Smooth Jazz
103.1


Hosted by the Maitland Area Chamber of Commerce

April 18 & 19, 2009
Sat, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.-Sun. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
S On the Shores of Beautiful Lake Lily
(17-92 and Maitland Avenue)

Juried Art Festival with more than 150
Artists and Fine Crafters


Free Admission


Parking Available ($3)


> turn to GARRICK on page A10


KARE


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


I. IA � , a-. - I13;






S 0 flu[ A r2 09itr rk M ilndOsre


G.O.


For Greater Orlando's


2 nily





The Orlando Science Center
is hosting a variety of spring
break day camps for students in
kindergarten through fifth grade.
The session begins on Friday,
March 27, and will continue
until Friday, April 3. Classes are
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., but early
and late care are also available
and included in the cost. You
can pay by the day or for all five
days. These camps, themed to
the new exhibit, Grossology: The
Impolite Science of the Human
Body, are designed to challenge,
entertain and enrich the children's
lives. Students can discover their
inner grossness with Human
Grossology-GROSS Me Out Camp
the next Monday through Friday.
To register your child, visit www.
osc.org or call 407.514.2112 for
more information.

This spring the Orlando Museum
of Art is hosting a variety of
art programs for students
entering grades one through five.
The session begins on Monday,
March 30 and will continue until
Friday, April 3. Students will learn
about American artists inspired
by Florida's sights. The spring
camp atOMA will include creating
masterpieces each day and
exploring the current exhibition
"Therman Statom: Stories of the
New World," a glass installation
by a Florida native.
Students will be able to do
a variety of art projects, from
watercolor painting to sculpture.
Call 407-896-4231 for more
information.

On Saturday, April 11 at hoon,
Guitar Center, located at 520
N. Orlando Ave., will be hosting
Camp Jam's "Ready-Set-Rock
Tour," a free, interactive event.
The event includes a live band
karaoke contest for moms, a rock
solo contest for children 7 to 17
and an open jam session. Winners
of the two contests will get a free
weekto Camp Jam summer camp.
To sign up or for more information,
visit CampJam.com.

YMCA Camp Wewa, an overnight
camp in Apopka, is accepting
reservations for the summer.
They offer residential and day
camps for children 7 to 15 years
of age. For more information visit
www.ymcawewa.org.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -THE OBSERVER
Rick Sostre hopes he has a winning recipe with "The Simple Kitchen," filmed in an Altamonte Springs home by Sostre, left, and starring chef Bryce Balluff, right. The show, which
showcases how some foods can help prevent cancer and other serious illnesses, will air this fall. Exotic food from around the world will also find its.way onto the show.

Chef dishes how foods can prevent serious illness


KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS
i!,. i: ,; STAFF

Blend one part visionary producer, one
part innovative chef. Then sprinkle in
a spatula-wielding animated mascot,
add an unexpected silver lining and
you have a winning recipe called "The
Simple Kitchen," a new television se-
ries set to air nationwide this fall on
the Food Network.
The pilot episode, "The Simple Kitch-
en presents Food For Life," is currently
in production within a Mediterranean
model home in Altamonte Springs.
"The Simple Kitchen" brand is the
brainchild of Executive Producer Rick
Sostre and will be hosted by French
Culinary Institute graduate Chef Bryce
Balluff. Sostre knows his way around
a television set - he's worked both
sides of the camera for 25 years. Bal-
luff knows his way around a kitchen
- for over a decade he's practiced the
culinary arts in a variety of settings, in-
cluding several four-star restaurants in


v-ase * -''*-^y"^ ^' ^ r
.~ ~ ~~~~' **^^;:^ ^a -7
^ ^..'^J. - '- ' -. f , .- !'i 1


New York City and the world-famous
Per Se. Balluff currently serves as Chef
De Cuisine at Poff N Stuff Catering, the
oldest and most successful catering
business in Central Florida. Sostre au-
ditioned more than 50 chefs when he
met Balluff. "He had a hunger, a passion
for food," Sostre said. The duo share a
passion for doing what they love with
precision.
The idea of a cooking-based enter-
tainment program changed when Bal-
luff's wife, Kerri, was diagnosed with
multiple sclerosis at 35. "I felt com-
pelled to do something," Sostre said.
"A few years ago we lost my son's mom
to cancer. I decided to change the for-
mat."
"The Simple Kitchen presents Food
for Life" is the only cooking-based pro-
gram to showcase original recipes that
target serious illnesses such as cancer,
heart disease, anemia, stress, osteopo-
rosis, sickle-cell anemia, arthritis and
diabetes. "The Simple Kitchen" has,
received support from organizations


I - - ."-. . .' ._ ,, - . - . ... . ... . ..
PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
Not just a two-man show, "The Simple Kitchen" will bring medical experts to show viewers how some simple foods
can make healthier eaters who live longer. The concept was inspired by Sostre's and Balluff's families' experiences.


including the National Multiple Scle-
rosis Society, The American Heart As-
sociation, and Susan G. Komen for the
Cure. Each week, registered dietitians,
medical experts and representatives
of charitable organizations will join
Balluff to share statistics, research and
tips, making the connection between
nutrition and a specific disease.
"We have a responsibility to our
audience. If you make these small di-
etary changes you will reap long-term
benefits. Metaphorically it's Julia Child
meets Dr. Sanjay Gupta," Sostre said.
Balluffs enthusiasm is palpable, but
he stays focused. "We're changing the
paradigm of food television. This is ap-
proachable cuisine for the soccer mom
and the dad on a tight budget. It's de-
licious and healthy. People are apt to
eat better food if they know how to*
prepare it in a fun, delicious way and it
won't take four hours to prepare."
Two additional pilots are planned:
"The Simple Kitchen" and "The Simple
Kitchen Goes Global Cuisine." The first
requires original, creatively prepared
recipes at low cost that feed at least two
people and most importantly have an
interesting story behind them. Balluff
will offer "The Simple Kitchen Chal-
lenge" asking for recipe submissions
and their stories. The Global Cuisine
series will showcase original recipes
from places around the world - in-
cluding Greece, Cuba and Vietnam -
and the stories behind them.
The Simple Kitchen Chef, an ani-
mated whimsical character, will open
each 30-minute show with his signa-
ture spatula and may pop in to assist
Balluff. Merchandise and cookbooks
are also planned to encourage chil-
dren to eat healthy. "Our audience is 5
to 105," Sostre said. "This platform has
become a mission - a cause greater
than ourselves. You can't put a dollar
amount on that."
For more information on The Sim-
ple Kitchen visit TheSimpleKitchen.tv


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Panre 8 hrdv pi2,09





Winter~~~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Pak/Miln bevrTusaArl2 09Pg


Cinema


Coming April 17


'Fast & Furious' - Opens Friday


'17 Again'


Coming April 24







'Earth'


'Battle for Terra'


WILD OCEAN noon, 3:00pm
GRAND CANYON ADVENTURE
2:00pm
ORLANDO BY NIGHT 4:00pm












Coming May 8
[-.:. .. . f .". -~ .


'Star Trek'


The feud between ex-con Dominic and cop Brian is reignited by a crime,
but when they realize they have a common enemy, they team up once again.

1 hour 47 minutes - PG-13


Also opening Friday: 'Adventureland'


In the summer of 1987,
a college grad takes a
nowhere job at his local
amusement park, only to
find it's the perfect course
to prepare him for the real
world.


1 hour 47 minutes - R


r*~- ~4t4..


Sponsored in part by United Arts of Central Florida and the State of Florida, Department of the State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Arts Council, National Endowment for the Arts and
Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. In addition, this project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts and Cultural Affairs Cultural Tourism Project.
0 FULL SAIL i .' __ REGAr _____ __
UNIVV E R S I T Y. i - . .. �}Gi l h.
,'-. ,ssoc,, ri es (,nH:IACA


Phtoto courtesy of Miramax Films


'Observe and Report'

1 hour 26 minutes'- R


l9qol4 --m


Winter Palrk/ Maitland Observer


Thusda, Aril2, 009 Page 9


* "=*. ' - '
" -'--�





Page 10 Thursday, April 2, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


GARRICK I Pysanky-inspired eggs laid at Albin Polasek Museum


< continued from page A7

try of Culture, the National
Philharmonic of Russia is
young in age and vibrant in
spirit. Led by the brilliant
conductor and Artistic Di-
rector Vladimir Spivakov,
the orchestra is already
a musical symbol of the
new Russia. Joining it will
be guest violinist Mayuko
Kamio who also represents
the youthful side of clas-
sical music. At 22, Kamio
has performed with 16
international orchestras
including the Boston Pops.
The program will include
an excerpt from Mussorg-
sky's "Khovanshchina," the
Sibelius "Violin Concerto,"
Shostakovich's "Ninth
Symphony," and will end
most romantically with
Tchaikovsky's "Sleeping
Beauty Suite."
This performance will
take place at 3 p.m. on Sat-
urday, April 4, in the Linda
Chapin Theater at the Or-
ange County Convention
Center. Phone 407-539-
0245 or 407-956-5378 for
tickets and information

Selling paintings
by the highway
The ever-resourceful Cre-
aldW School of Art will pres-
ent an intriguing and his-
torically important exhibit
called "Against All Odds:
The Original Highwaymen
Painters." The exhibit will
be presented at Crealde's
beautiful Hannibal Square
Heritage Center at 642 W.


New England Ave. in Win-
ter Park. If you've never
visited the Center, which
opened in 2007, this ex-
hibit is the one that should
bring you there.
The exhibit will include
paintings from 19 of the
original "Highwaymen"
artists - all from Florida.
These painters represent
a group of black men and
women, who in the midst
of post-war segregation
painted Florida's natural
landscapes and then liter-
ally sold their works as
"souvenirs" by the side of
the road. Originally sell-
ing for a few dollars, these
beautiful works have be-
come collectible, valuable,
and a recognized part of
Florida's cultural history.
James Gibson, one of the
original Highwaymen,
will be at the opening.
The exhibit will run from
April 7 to June 27 with an
Opening Reception set for
Thursday, April 16, from
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more
information, call 407-
539-2680 or visit Hanni-
balSquareHeritageCenter.
org

And the "Artist of the
Month" is Patricia Zalisko
Each month the Orlando
Museum of Art picks a
Florida Artist of the Month
and invites the artist to
exhibit his work beside the
museum gift shop. It's a
terrific program that offers
a unique opportunity for a
different artists' work to be


seen each month through-
out the year.
The artist for the month
of April is Patricia Zal-
isko, whose exhibit, called
"Degrees of Abstraction,"
opens on April 1 and ends
on April 30. We have two
opportunities to meet Ms.
Zalisko - the first is dur-
ing OMART's 1st Thursday
event from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
on Thursday, April 2, and
from noon to 3:30 p.m. on
Sunday, April 5.
While Zalisko is now
a wonderful abstract art-
ist, her first memories of
childhood art are painting
intricate Ukrainian eggs -
a process called "pysanky."
Years later, her abstract
works echo the bright col-
ors of those painted eggs.
Zalisko's work has been
shown in New York City
and in the Southeast, most
recently in a prestigious
exhibit in New Orleans.
And it's important to know
that all of the works ex-
hibited by OMART's Artist
of the Month are available
for purchase. Call 407 896
4231 or visit OMART.org

Pysanky - a great way to
celebrate Easter
Speaking of "Pysanky" -
the colored eggs that first
inspired Patricia Zalisko
- examples of those eggs
are on view at the Albin
Polasek Museum and
Sculpture Gardens through
April 18. Since Easter is
April 12, this exhibit of
100 magnificently painted


eggs could be the perfect
way to celebrate with your
family. Examples of the art
form, including traditional
dyed eggs, carved eggs and
hand-painted modern in-
terpretations, are included.
Egg painting, through-
out Europe, can be traced
back 3,000 years. This art
form - called "pysanky,"
from the Ukrainian verb
meaning "to write" - uses
eggshells, beeswax and
dyes to create masterpieces
in miniature. While half of
the painted eggs are tradi-
tional pysanky, there are
also contemporary eggs
hanging from ribbons. The
European painted eggs are
from the collection of Mi-
chael and Aimee Rusinko
Kakos of Winter Park. The
museum is located at 633
Osceola Ave. in Winter ,
Park. Call 407-647-6294 or
visit Polasek.org


> GARRICK
Josh Garrick is curator of the Millenia
Fine Art gallery east of Maitland in
Orlando. He is also an art collector,
writer and photographer. Garrick can
be reached at 407-304-8100.


5410 Lak'flbwell Road
Winter Park


Calendar
Jim Dorman, of Dorman Financial
Management, will be hosting an
open discussion on financial plan-
ning on April 8 at 10 a.m. and April 2
and 9 at 8 a.m. at Einstein's Bagels
on 441 S. Orlando Ave. in Maitland.
The discussion is free to attend and
complementary bagels and coffee will
be served.
The Maitland Art Center is hosting
a lecture on the art of the Florida's
Seminole by Rosalyn Howard, Ph.D.,
on April 3 at 6 p.m. in the Germaine
Marvel Building. Immediately following
the lecture will be a gallery walk of the
exhibit, The Seminole: Art of the Semi-
nole 1820 -1950. The event is free.
The program "Roses in the Culinary
World" will be presented Sunday,
April 5 at the Orlando Area Historical
Rose Society's meeting at Leu Gar-
dens, 1920 N. Forest Ave. in Orlando.
Doors open at 2 p.m., and the program
begins at 2:30 p.m. The event is free.
Bethune-Cookman University's Con-
cert Chorale will perform at all three
morning worship services at First Unit-
ed Methodist Church in Winter Park on
Sunday, April 19. First United Method-
ist Church is located at Interlachen
Avenue and Morse Boulevard in Winter
Park. Sunday morning services begin
at 8:30 a.m., 9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m.


Gary W. Summers, preacher
407-657-0657


Florida


Film


Festival


*All shows are afternoon/evening unless otherwise noted


NEW FRONTIERS IN DISTRI-
BUTION FORUM 11:00am-12:30
(FREE!)

EM 1:30-3:20

LIGHTBULB 4:30-6:20

AN EVENING WITH GLENN
CLOSE, FEATURING FATAL
ATTRACTION 7:30-10:30

SEVENTH MOON midnight-
1:45am


AWARDS BRUNCH 10:00am-
11:30am

(500) DAYS OF SUMMER 1:00-
2:35

IL DIVO 4:00-6:00

THE ANSWER MAN 7:00-8:35

LYMELIFE 9:30-11:10

DEADGIRL midnight-1:45am


INTERNATIONAL SHORTS
1:30-3:15

INTERNATIONAL ANIMATED
SHORTS 4:15-5:45

FORBIDDEN FILMS: AN
EVENING WITH JON VOIGHT
FEATURING MIDNIGHT COW-
BOY6:45-9:30

AMERICAN SWING 10:15-11:35
REGAL CINEMAS 20




FILMMAKER FORUM 1:00-2:30

PRESSURE COOKER PRECEDED
BY THE LOST TRIBES OF NEW
YORK CITY 1:30-3:30

SERAPHINE 3:00-5:05

ART + COPY PRECEDED BY
SELL IT TO THE HEDGE
FUNDS 4:00-5:45


INTERNATIONAL SHORTS
5:45-7:30

THE ENGLISH SURGEON 6:15-
7:50

SHORTS #5 ANIMATED
SHORTS 8:00-9:45

PARDON US FOR LIVING PRE-
CEDED BY CRACKING THE EGG
8:30-10:30

IDIOTS AND ANGELS 10:15-
11:30

DEADGIRL 11:00-12:45am

SQUEEZEBOX! midnight-
1:30am


SCHOOL PLAY PRECEDED BY
HOW MY DAD KILLED
DRACULA 12:15-2:00

FLORIDA SHORTS: BEST OF
BROUHAHA 1:30-3:30

THE WRECKING CREW 2:30-4:10
J


FLORIDA FEATURE: THE ATTIC
DOOR 4:00-5:45

SHALL WE KISS 4:45-6:30

MANAGEMENT 6:30-8:05

RAMCHAND PAKISTANI 7:00-
8:45

INTERNATIONAL ANIMATED
SHORTS 9:00-10:30

ALIEN TRESPASS 9:30-11:00

MIDNIGHT SHORTS 11:30-
1:15am

SQUEEZEBOX! midnight-1:30am


RAMCHAND PAKISTANI 1:00-
2:45

IL DIVO 2:00-4:00

NEIL YOUNG: DON'T BE
DENIED PRECEDED BY THE
ARCHIVE 3:15-4:25
\1._


THE ANSWER MAN 4:30-6:05

ALIEN TRESPASS 5:00-6:30

THE MERRY GENTLEMAN
7:00-8:40

SERAPHINE 7:30-9:30

SEVENTH MOON 9:30-11:15

ANVIL! THE STORY OF ANVIL
10:00-11:20




FRIDAY NIGHT AT WILL'S
7:00-10:00





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"Over 600 articles available on a t ana'y of spnrtual, moral, and social topics."

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- -- --


Page 10 Thursday, April 2, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, April 2, 2009 Page 11



Opinion/ i


I must have started this col-
umn half a dozen times and
nothing seems right. I am
keenly, deeply disappointed
in Obama for committing
us so much deeper into Af-
ghanistan. I want to weep.
What in the hell are we
doing in that gawd-awful
cesspool of male craziness
called Muslimland? Are we
nuts? I just don't get it. Call
your stockbroker now and
invest in the manufacturer
of body bags (Bodybagsdi-
rect.com). I see growth. And
we win when? We leave Af-
ghanistan how?
I simply do not want
to think about America's
never-ending warfare. Is
that what this nation is all
about? Will we ever in any-
one's lifetime quit killing
people around the world in
the name of peace and free-
dom? Are we so colossally
stupid as a people that we
don't see the worst irony
imaginable in America's
endless warring for peace?
Orwell wrote about it in his
book, "1984." "War is peace!
Freedom is slavery. Igno-
rance is strength."
How many armed Chi-
nese troops are there (that
have died) in the Middle
East? Uh, uh, uh? Hmmm?
And what do the Chinese


pay per barrel of oil? Not
the same as the United
States. Tell me it ain't so!
We're always at war but
few ask why that is. Why is
America always at war? In
my 60 years of life, we've
been warring all over the
planet. Constantly. We have
not known peace. America
is either preparing for war,
going to war, threatening to
war, at war or pulling back
from war. But it is sooooo
good for business (some),
don't-cha-see. What was
it Ike warned the nation
about? Oh, but what did
that old goat of a gen-
eral know? It is argued the
world is a nasty, scary place.
Indeed it is. Particularly for
the mindless, pitiful war-
rior, better known as the
United States of America.
The only war in the en-
tire 20th century I would
have unequivocally com-
mitted American forces
to was World War II. Much
of the rest of our warring
was criminal intervention
- profoundly criminal in
the sense of what the na-
tion lost in men, resources,
wealth and stature. Imag-
ine if we hadn't warred in
Vietnam, hadn't bombed
Cambodia, hadn't "egged"
China on in Korea, hadn't


Perspectives ..

by.. .







The fool on the hill


practiced imperialism
(ironically/hypocritically)
on Spain, hadn't occupied
Iraq? Not to mention the
countless decades of our
many despicable interven-
tions in South America.
So now our president,
the man I enthusiastically
voted for, ratchets up the
war in Afghanistan. Paki-
stan just turned over to the
Taliban the Swat Valley, a
Delaware-sized chunk of
that nation. Tell me again,
why are we in Afghanistan?
To prevent that nation from
once again becoming a ter-
rorist "camp" from which
to plan and execute attacks
against America. That's it,
correct? Are we going to
now invade or attack the
Taliban in the Swat Valley
of Pakistan, too?
Recall the chorus lyric
from the 1957 Coasters
song Charlie Brown, "Why
is everybody always pickin'
on me?" Oh, it's because
America stands for good-
ness, Wonder Bread,
wholesome family values,
"Bonanza," short skirts
and unfettered financial
markets (gollleee, Gomer!
Just like the ones Ronald
Reagan and George Bush
unleashed!). Seriously, over
the dinner table tonight,
pose this question: "Why
does so much of the Islamic
world have such animos-
ity (fear and hatred) of the
United States such that
their sons will fly suicide
missions into New York
City buildings? Or bomb
our embassies around the
world? Or attack our war-
ships (the Cole) in port?
Why?
Oh, it is argued, for two
reasons: 1.) America's sup-
port of Israel at the expense


Letters to


Library endowment
in Hough's honor
I have appreciated your Observer
articles about late former Maitland
Mayor Homer Hough. He was a
great supporter and friend of the
Maitland Public Library.
I assume you know that City
Council voted a couple of weeks
ago to rename the park at Lake Sy-
belia Point in Mayor Hough's hon-
or. At their meeting on March 18,
the Library Board voted to estab-
lish a memorial book endowment
in his name. The interest from the
endowment will provide one book
for the library collection each year
in perpetuity.
Contributions to the endow-
ment may be sent to the Maitland
Public Library, 501 S. Maitland Ave.,
Maitland, FL 32751.
- Karen Potter
Director of Library Services

Get the facts straight
about election
I read with interest the letter from
Mr. William Shallcross titled "Win-
ter Park voters apathetic" in the


March 19 edition of your newspa-
per. I believe Mr. Shallcross' pur-
pose was to malign the victory of
Mayor Ken Bradley. As he stated, it
was a "marginal victory." I wish Mr.
Shallcross had taken a few minutes
to review the records of past Win-
ter Park elections before writing his
letter because he is incorrect.
Let me provide your readers and
Mr. Shallcross with some facts:

Election Voter Results
year turnout
2009 33.28% Bradley 53%
Strong 47%
2008 57.01% Anderson 57.6%
Weldon 42.4%
Dillaha 53.5%
Pepper 46.5%
2007 34.79% Diebel 50.9%
Dillaha 49.1%
Bridges 51.9%
Pepper 54.6%
2006 32.59% Strong 54.6%
Marchman 45.4%
2005 26.32% Eckbert 52.2%
Hotard 47.8%
*Figures compiled by David A. Johnston


I think if Mr. Shallcross will re-
view, the above information, he
will realize that elections in Winter
Park do not have a high voter turn-
out; I personally think that is not
good and is the result of having the
elections in March rather than in
November when other items are on
the ballot. My opinion is substanti-
ated by the percentage turnout in
2008 where the local election took
place at the same time as a presi-
dential preference primary.
Mr. Shallcross should also no-
tice that the percentage turnout
in 2006 when Mayor Strong was
elected was 32.59 percent. This
percentage is less than the percent-
age of voter turnout in the most
recent election where there was a
33.28 percent voter turnout when
Mr. Bradley was elected mayor. Fur-
thermore, if Mr. Shallcross had ex-
amined the actual number of votes
cast for each candidate in 2006 and
2009, his statement of Mr. Bradley's
victory being "marginal" is again
proven false. In 2006, Mayor Strong
received 3,338 votes to Mayor
Marchman's 2,776 votes, and in
2009, Mayor Bradley received 3,400


votes to Mayor Strong's 3,016 votes.
Mayor Bradley won with more
votes than Mayor Strong received
in 2006, and I must point out that a
difference of 6 percent (53 percent
to 47 percent) is not "marginal." It
is, in my opinion, a mandate.
If Mr. Shallcross were to do some
more research, he would determine
that I served as mayor of Winter
Park for two terms. I was elected by
56 votes over my opponent for the
first election and was unopposed
for my second election. Election
records will also reveal that Joe Ter-
ranova was elected a city commis-
sioner by only 1 vote. Those elec-
tions were close; Mayor Bradley's
election was not a close election.
In closing, I would suggest to Mr.
Shallcross that before he writes a
letter for publication in the future,
he should check out his facts. The
public should be given correct in-
formation.
- David A. Johnston
Former Winter Park mayor


of Palestine and 2.) America
best represents the epitome
of Western modernity,
which is so "at odds" with
Islamic history, religion and
culture. But go ahead and
throw in America's meddle-
some history throughout
the Middle East of propping
up corrupt regimes for ac-
cess to oil. Sigh. *
I sincerely question
whether our foreign policy
and national interests are
inextricably tied/linked to
Israeli national interests.
But to suggest as much in
America is political suicide.
I believe many of America's
Jews are in a quandary.
They unquestionably love
this nation but for all the
apparent reasons (and
legitimate justifications)
they are tied to Israel, too.
I do not have an answer
for Israel's problems. They
have the extreme and pro-
foundly sad misfortune of
being a 21 st-century island
democracy surrounded by a
roiling sea of 12th-century
idiocy.
It would be funny except
it isn't. I've talked to a num-
ber of Muslims from that
part of the world. Do you
know how they referred to
the Palestinians? They used
the same derogatory lan-
guage to describe Palestin-
ians as did much of Amer-
ica when once referencing
blacks before integration
(the "N" word). Go figure
that one.
We can mind our own
business, however, when it
comes to modernizing the
Middle East. I am profound-
ly sorry for the women
.in that part of the world.
Their status is an affront
to humanity, and I've writ-
ten countless essays on the


TALK
> oJEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmedca.us.


subject. The Middle East is
severely handicapped and
will continue to be a back-
ward hole of repression -
and Third World - as long
as the women there are
considered unequal to men.
But as sad as that is, I do
not want our soldiers dying
because Islamic women are
repressed.
That ties into America's
history of propping up
questionable regimes. Iran
continues to beat that
drum loudly because of
how America once sup-
ported and propped up
the Shah. The oil nations
want to sell their oil as
much as we (the industrial-
ized world) want to buy it.
China has clearly demon-
strated that a nation does
not need to have any troops
in the Middle East in order
to have access to oil. So why
does America?
Obama now has his war.
And it is his war. It's Ameri-
ca war. It's what we do best.
Sadly.
"No protracted war can
fail to endanger the free-
dom of a democratic coun-
try." - Alexis de Tocqueville
"It would indeed be a
tragedy if the history of the
human race proved to be
nothing more than the sto-
ry of a [fool] playing with a
box of matches on a petrol
dump." - David Ormsby-
Gore
Indeed.






Paje1 Thrdy Api- ,20 itrPr atadOsre


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

How's business?
You might think that talk-
ing about business with an
opera singer is like talking
to Bill Clinton about chas- -
tity.
However, every one of
us is in business one way or
another. We're all buyers
and - at least at times -
sellers.
Most of us work together
on projects, and are in a
pecking order of some de-
scription. We're over some
people, and under other
people. We have to get
along in order to accom-
plish our goals, to do our
best.
We all find ways of ad-
vertising ourselves, our
children, our careers, our
skills, even our superiorities
in one thing or the other.


In short, all of us are in
business with the rest of the
human race.
I've been looking for
advice most of my life. It
may have been Mark Twain
who said, "The trouble with
the eternal verities is that
they're so damn true!"
Here are some purported
business verities:
Always tell the truth to
your employees and your
boss. It's easier to remem-
ber what you said.
Never make those claw-
ing quotation marks in the
air with your fingers.
Beware of those who ask
for feedback. They're really
asking for your validation.
Anytime you go to your
hotel room, expect the
maid to be cleaning it.
Don't put your com-
pany's name on a vanity li-
cense plate. If you get fired,
you'll have to re-register
your car.
Create your own small
personal Board of Directors
to help you make decisions.
Learning when to say no
may help your career more
than always saying yes and
then sometimes not being
able to live up to expecta-
tions.
Spend as much time
communicating as on tech-
nical matters.
Devote yourself more to
results than to methods.
There's never only one
solution to organizational
problems.
Rely on clear criteria, not
on suggestions from ma-


nipulative colleagues.
Trust your instincts. Oth-
er people have reason to
value your experience. You
should do so as well.
Even sweeter than being
offered the job you always
wanted is the freedom to
turn it down.
if you think you're
smarter than the boss, be
quiet about it, the boss al-
ready knows it.
When you write some-
thing, make the first sen-
tence an attention-grabber.
Don't offer the follow-
ing excuses: We don't have
time. (We're too small.)
We don't know how.
(Our training is lousy.)
We tried that before. (We
couldn't cut it.)
We don't have the data.
(Our systems are down.)
Never confuse making
people happy with what
needs to be done.
Make decisions based on
what's best for those buying
your product.
If you get fired, allow two
days for feeling sorry for
yourself.
Focus on your next job,
not on the last one.
Most organizations have
the right number of people
- they're just doing the
wrong things.
If employees sat in on
management meetings,
would they think manage-
ment is as smart as they do?
Hope is a necessary in-
gredient for success. Never
start a talk with, "Bear with
me while I...." If a project


is going to fail, announce it
pronto and have a recovery
strategy ready.
Progress depends on
choices being limited and
clearly defined.
Don't ever try to get even
- no one will win, and you
will lose.
Don't roll your eyes in
meetings.
There are two ways to
travel: first class and with
children.
Occasionally sit in a win-
dow seat and wonder how
airplanes ever get off the
ground.
Water-cooler scuttlebutt
is about 90 percent right.
The Golden Rule: Em-
ployees should feel a sense
of reward and recognition
equal to or greater than
their contributions.
Keep a record of the
good things you do - your
boss will keep a record of
the not-so-good.
No matter what the
numbers are, if you're in the
middle, you're only average.
When the outcome of
a committee meeting is to
have another meeting, or
form another committee, it
has been a lousy meeting.
When hiring a future col-
league, ask yourself, "Would
I invite this person to din-
ner in my home?"
When you interview, be
sure you get the facts you
needed.
"To what end?" is a
necessary question to ask
yourself at the beginning of
important projects.


No matter how we like
critics, they can help us if
they are fair-minded and
educated.
Don't give up on any-
thing that hasn't yet been
put into action.
Resume-scanning soft-
ware looks for traits, not ac-
complishmerits.
Remember all the things
you have pioneered or initi-
ated.
Employees need to vent
their feelings and opinions.
Consultants can help with
this.
More schooling never
hurts.
Ask yourself during the
day, "What am I doing,
anyhow? Is it high priority?
Is it helping me reach my
goals?"
The goal is not to keep
busy but to contribute
something that makes you
glow inside.
Cutting prices to get
business rarely works and
often backfires.
Put training into prac-
tice as soon as you can.
Use "ASAP" only when
it's urgent.
Don't ever give a bad
reference - simply decline
comment.
If the above maxims ap-
peal to you, and you like to
collect items of practical
business savvy, spring for
Richard A. Moran's book,
"Beware of Those Who Ask
for Feedback," A Harper-
Business Book.


WEATHER

THURSDAY, A'P RI 9 I SATIW S


'9


I I

690 900 600
6 a.m. I 3p.m. I 6a.m.
Friday


I
'A


7


UV INDEX ")E High



MORNING LOW 65�
DAYTIME-HIGH 80*

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance Wind
7:13 a.m. 7:45 p.m. of rain SW 16 mph



MORNING LOW 670
A DAYTIME HIGH 85�

Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
7:12 a.m. 7:46 p.m. of rain NNW8 mph



MORNING LOw 680

DAYTIME HIGH 86�

Sunrise Sunset 50% chance Wind
7:11 a.m. 7:46 p.m. of rain SSE 12 mph


TODAY: Mostly sunny, with
a high near 90. South wind
between 5 and 15 mph.


.. _. _ - - --- -- - . __ --
..H.. . .n iHT,, - . 1:-" YOUR NAME HERE, FROM YOUR CITY
Want to see your picture in The Observer? Please e-mail it to editor@
observernewspapers.com. Files should be at least 1MB in size. Please
include as much information about the picture as possible, for example
where the image was taken, what time and who is in it.


NATIONAL


Seattle


Friday Sat.
34/48 39/55


Los Angeles 49/63 50/63
Houston 55/76 62/81


City
Atlanta
Chicago
New York


Friday
41/67
33/48


Sat.
50/72
38/52


46/56 42/56


TE^^HI3^S WEEK ^
n Al 3,19Oawi ndO
gus to11 mph wasm~
destr. Thndrtom
U 'Mihga."dIdin


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High
Saturday 10:09 a.m. 3:55 a.m.
April 4 10:38 p.m. 4:19 p.m.
Sunday 11:10 a.m. 4:56 a.m.


April 5


11:37 p.m. 5:24 p.m.


FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.
Jacksonville 60/79 65/79
Miami 75/83 74/82
Tampa 65/80 66/85
Pensacola 54/72 64/75


INTERNATIONAL
City Friday
London 44/66
Paris 44/66


Tokyo


44/61


Sat.
48/62
42/61
49/62


THE VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS


Page 12 ThrdyApi2,09


Winter Park /Maitland Observer








Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, April 2, 2009 Page 13


-Notices


ALT ,


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 48-2008-CA-028239-0
Div. 33
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
LEXON HOMES, INC.; MOSHE ZIV, Individually, and
JOSEPH KANTOR, Individually,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 21 day of April,
2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Flonda, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
Lot 77, Tuscany Ridge, according to the plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 50, Pages
141 through 144, inclusive, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
And
Lot 7, Tuscany Ridge, according to the plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 50, Pages
141 through 144, inclusive, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
And
Lot 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 40, 41, 42, 43,
44, 45 CALABAY PARC AT TOWER LAKE,
according to plat recorded in Plat Book 129,
Page 6 and 7, of the Public Records of Polk
County, Florida.
And
Tract "A"
Begin 478.72 feet West and 15.00 feet North
of the Southeast corner of the Northwest _
of Section 17, Township 27 South, Range 27
East, Polk County, Florida, run West 70.30
feet; thence N44v40'00"W, (Parent deed calls
for W45�20'00"N which is the same but
incorrect), along the Southwesterly right-
of-way line of an existing road, 478.66
feet to the Point of Beginning, thence con-
tinue N44�40'00"W, 100.00 feet, thence
S45020'00"W, 204.00 feet more or less
in the waters edge of Tower Lake, thence
Southeasterly along said waters edge to the
intersection of line bearing N45�20'00"E,
220.00 feet more or less to the Point of
Beginning; being a part of Tracts 27 and 28
in the Northwest in the Northwest _ of said
Section 17, as shown on the plat of Florida
Development Company Subdivision recorded
in Plat Book 3, Pages 60 through 63 of the
Public Records of Polk County, Florida.
And
Tract "B"
Begin 478.72 feet West and 15.00 feet North
of the Southeast corner of the Northwest
of Section 17, Township 27 South, Range 27
East, Polk County, Florida, run West 70.30
feet; thence N44140'00"W, (Parent deed calls
for W45�20'00"N which is the same but
incorrect), along the Southwesterly right-
of-way line of an existing road, 578.66
feet to the Point of Beginning, thence con-
tinue N44�40'00"W, 100.00 feet, thence
S45�20'00"W, 220.00 feet more or less
in the waters edge of Tower lake, thence
Southeasterly along said waters edge to the
intersection of line bearing N45020'00"E,
204.00 feet more or less to the Point of
Beginning; being a part of Tracts 27 and 28 in
the Northwest _ of said Section 17, as shown
on the plat of Florida Development Company
Subdivision recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages
60 through 63 of the Public Records of Polk
County, Florida.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2008-CA-028239-0, Div. 33 now pending in the
Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
-ri0- orange Avenue. Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/835-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus.
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 17 day of March, 2009.
LYDIA GARDNER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: DEBRA S. MILLS
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk


J Y-FFY RH. JUNIZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157


3/26,4/2


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2002-CP-002610-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEE JEROME HAGOOD
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in the
estate of LEE JEROME HAGOOD, deceased, File
Number 2002-CP-002610-0, by the Circuit Court
for ORANGE County, , Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Ave, Suite 340,
Orlando, Florida 32802; that the decedent's date of
death was October 6, 2002; that the total value of
the estate is $30,000.00 and that the names and
-addresses of those to whom it has been assigned
by such order are:
Name / Address
THOMASA. HAGOOD, JR. as Co-Trustee of the
FIRST AMENDMENT AND RESTATEMENT OF
THE LEE JEROME HAGOOD, JR. REVOCABLE
TRUST, dated October 4,1990 / 2729 Willow
Creek Lane, Oviedo, Florida 32765
MICHAEL HAGOOD as Co-Trustee of the
FIRST AMENDMENT AND RESTATEMENT OF
THE LEE JEROME HAGOOD, JR. REVOCABLE
TRUST, dated October 4, 1990 / 901
Sweetbriar Road, Orlando, Florida 32806
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
April 2,2009.

Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
Matthew H. Roby, Esquire
Attorney for Petitioners
Florida Bar No. 0505641
831 West Morse Boulevard
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-8065
Fax: (407) 647-3880
Persons Giving Notice:
THOMAS A. HAGOOD,. JR.
2729 Willow Creek Lane
Oviedo, Florida 32765
MICHAEL HAGOOD
901 Sweetbriar Road
Orlando, Florida 32806
4/2, 4/9


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 09-CP-310
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LINDA K. BISHOP,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of LINDA K.
BISHOP, deceased, whose date of death was Janu-
ary 21, 2009; File Number 09-CP-310, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 301 N.
Park Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The names
and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice Is:
March 26, 2009.
RICHARD A. LEIGH, ESQUIRE
Attomey for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 119591
Swann & Hadley, PA
1031 W. Morse Blvd., Suite 350
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: 407-647-2777
MARY KATHRYN HEARNE
Personal Representative
2204 Carolina Avenue
Kannapolis, NC 28083


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 48-2009-CP-341 -0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
James Pfohl Martin a/k/a James P. Martin,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration-of the estate of James Pfohl
Martin a/k/a James P. Martin, deceased, whose
date of death was June 30, 2008, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 425 North Orange
Avenue, Room 340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names
and addresses of the Co-Personal Representatives
and the Co-Personal Representatives attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unllquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is 4/2/09.
Co-Personal Representatives:
Cynthia Jane Finsie
Carol Lynn Crawley
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor
P.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
Lance A. Ragland
Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives
Florida Bar No. 0122440
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
329 Park Avenue North. 2nd Floor. P.O. Box 880.


3/26, 4/2 Winter Park, FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY, 4/2, 4/9
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2009-CP-00396-0 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
IN RE: ESTATE OF CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Dolores Stillman, Case No. 08-CA-23692-0
Deceased, TRUSTCO BANK,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS Plaintiff,
The - administration of the estate of Dolores vs.
Stillman, deceased, whose date of death was JULIO STURUP,
February 6, 2009 , is pending in the Circuit Court Defendant.
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the NOTICE OF SALE
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Notice is hereby given that on 30 day of April,
Room 340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and 2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
addresses of the Personal Representative and of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
the Personal Representative's attorney are set Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
forth below. for sale the following described real property:
All creditors of the decedent and other persons UNIT NO. 3, R/C WORLD I, A CONDOMINIUM,
having claims or demands against decedent's ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq- CONDOMINIUM DATED MAY 2, 1985,
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is RECORDED ON MAY 3, 1985 IN OFFICIAL
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN RECORDS BOOK 3637 AT PAGE 826, AND ALL
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE AMENDMENTS THERETO, OF THE PUBLIC
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS TOGETHER WITH STORAGE SPACE NO. S-3,
NOTICE ON THEM. TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST
All other creditors of the decedent and other IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT
persons having claims or demands against the THERETO.
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
this court within 3 months after the date of the first 08-CA-23692-0 now pending in the Circuit Court in
publication of this notice. Orange County, Florida.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER In accordance with the Americans With
BARRED. Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET a special accommodation to participate in this pro- i
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
IS BARRED. 32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later i
The date of the first publication of this Notice than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear- 1
is 3/26/09. ing impaired, (TOO) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Personal Representative: Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
Patricia A. Stillman from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor as of the date of the date of the Lis Pendes must file a claim
P.O. Box 880 within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Winter Park, FL 32790 Dated this 26 day of March, 2009.
Lance A. Ragland LYDIA GARDNER
Attorney for Personal Representative Clerk of the Circuit Court
Florida Bar No. 0122440 By: BELINDA GARRETT
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A. . CIVIL COURT SEAL
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor, P.O. Box 880, As Deputy Clerk
Winter Park, FL 32790 JEFFRY R. JONTZ
Telephone: (407) 423-4246 SWANN & HADLEY, PA
3/26, 4/2 Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL Telephone: (407) 647-2777
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
Case No.07-CA-32550 Div. 35 4/2, 4/9


IH USTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARLVIN ABRAHAM,
Defendants.
. NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 2 day of June,
2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
LOT 4, BLOCK G, PINE HILLS SUBDIVISION
NO. 11, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK T, PAGES 99
AND 100, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
08-CA-32550 Div. 35 now pending in the Circuit
Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate In this pro-
ceeding should contact Cou Administrabton at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing Impaired, (TODD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest In the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 19 day of March, 2009.
LYDIA GARDNER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: NORMA J. FELSHAW
CIRCUIT COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, PA.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
3/26 4/2

PUBLIC NOTICE
The annual return for 2008, IRS form 990-PF, of
THE JCS CHRISTIAN TRUST, will be available for
inspection at the address noted below during regu-
lar business hours by any citizen who so requests
within 180 days after publication of this notice of


its availallliy.
The principal manager is Charlotte P. Scruggs,
Chair
The address of the main office of the foundation is:
C/O William A. Walker II, Attorney
2171 Glencoe Road
Winter Park, FL 32789
407-496-2627
4/2, 4/9


"" J
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IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CC-21723
DIVISION: 71
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
HECTOR RODRIGUEZ, and JOHN DOE and JANE
DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: HECTOR RODRIGUEZ,
JOHN DOE, as tenant of property described
below, and
JANE DOE, as tenant of property described
below.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lign on the following described property in Orange
-County, Florida:
Unit 101, Parcel 5, THATCHER'S LANDING
CONDOMINIUM NO. 11, a condominium
according to the Declaration of Condominium
recorded in Official Record Book 5345, Page
2790, and as amended, Public Records of
Orange County, Florida. Together with an
undivided share in the common elements
appurtenant thereto.
has been filed against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to
it on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is POHL & SHORT, P.A., 280 W.
Canton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box 3208,
Winter Park, Florida 32790, on or before April 14,
2009, and file the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED this 9th day of March, 2009.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: Parris Sachse
Civil Court Seal
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
3/26, 4/2

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009CP0386
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEON L. CRAWFORD, JR.,
Deceased.
. NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Leon L.
Crawford, Jr., deceased, whose date of death was
October 13, 2008, and whose social security num-
ber is XXX-XX-4603, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 301 North Park Place, Sanford,
Florida 32771. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is April
2,2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
I. MICHAEL TUCKER
Florida Bar No. 0326003
LAW OFFICE OF I. MICHAEL TUCKER, PLC
100 SunTrust Bank Building
498 Palm Springs Drive
Altamonte Springs, Florida 32701
Telephone: (407) 977-8836
Personal Representative:
Esseline Crawford
303 Woodleaf Drive
Winter Springs, Florida 32708
4/2,4/9


*PRICE GUIDE .
Public NoncesPunic Sain $9/cil incht
Notice tI, Credditors 42 50/week
Notice of Sale I,.55,'treerk
Dis.olubon ,jI Marriage $125
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2009-CP-000502-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LOUISE B. PALMER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Louise B.
Palmer, deceased, whose date of death was Febru-
ary 13, 2009, and whose social security number is
XXX-XX-3759, file number 48-2009-CP-000502-0,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 North Orange Avenue, Room 310, Orlando,
Florida 32801. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
March 26,2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Daniel M. Hunter
Florida Bar No. 038132
Hunter & Marchman, PA.
227 West Park Avenue
Winter Park, FL 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-6900
Personal Representative:
Jottie Van Palmer
1183 Windy Way Court
Apopka, Florida 32703
3/26, 4/2


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the high-
est bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons Interested ph
(954) 563-1999
Sale date April 10 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
181.7 1979 Mana hs vin3: F0691004495 tenant:
estate of maria Milagros almodovar c/o Rafael Ro-
driguez almodovar
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
& 1911
3/26,4/2


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR ORANGE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 48-2009-CP-000496-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RUTH B. RUDOLPH,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of RUTH B.
RUDOLPH, deceased, File Number 48-2009-CP-
000496-0, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange
Ave., Oriando, FL 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, including unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
March 26, 2009.
Donald A. Rudolph, Personal Rep.
104 Trafalgar Place
Longwood, FL 3.4799
JAMES P. PANICO, PA.
By: James P. Panico, Esq.
111 S. Maitand Ave.
Maitland, FL 32751
(407) 647-7200
Fax: (407) 647-1420
Attorney for Personal Rep.
Florida Bar No.: 105436
3/26, 4/2




















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CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE


Notice is hereby given that public hearings will be held by the City Commission of the City of Winter
Park, Florida, on Monday, April 13, 2009, at 3:30 p.m. in the Commission Chambers of City Hall, 401
Park Avenue, South, to consider the following:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA, AMENDING CHAPTER 58 "LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE," ARTICLE IV, "SIGN REGULATIONS" SECTION 58-134, TEMPORARY SIGNS SO AS TO ADOPT A
NEW SUBSECTION (g) "PORTABLE SIGNS" WITH RESTRICTIONS.
All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information is available in the City
Clerk's office so that citizens may acquaint themselves with each issue and receive answers to any
questions they may have prior to the meeting. "If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need
a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105) Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in
any of these proceedings should contact the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in
advance of the meeting.
Is/ Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC, City Clerk
4/2


."." -- - - - - --- .--

J nr " 0




,sre,,pi ,n.,d Quick, inexpensive and

O bserver meets all statutory requirements


ONE STOP SHOP FOR CENTRAL FLORIDA LEGALS
As the publishers of the Winler ParK.-Maaltand OBserver (Orange County FL)
and the Oviedo-Winter Spnnrns Voice (Seminole Counly. FLU we are your 1 stop
shop for central Fiortoa legal notice advertising

MPROVEO CASE MANAGEMENT
Start the statutory clock quickly Sena us your noince ov Monday arna we'l
publish it on Thursday Observer Newspapers improves your case management
by sending oul the notanzM eaffiaavlt immediately Following Mhe ad run
Thsa lets you file it wrns the Courl quickly ana avoid the costly delays many
publishers impose by holding back re- affidavit wnie waiting for invoicing 3na
payment processing


TITLE 6. CIVIL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (Chs. 45-88)
CHAPTER 50 LEGAL AND OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENTS

� 50 031 Newspapers in wttrn legal norces anrd troccss may be
punished

No nollce or publication required to be puDlisned in a newspaper
in Ine nature of or in lou 01 process ol any lkin. nature, character
or descnprion provided for under any iaw of the stale. whearne
hererefre e or nereaner enacted, an d whether perrnirng rto
conGstrctve service or the uinrtialg, assuming, reviewing
exercising or enforcing jurindicton or power, by any courl in tis
Stae ui any rnonie ol sale of property real or personal. for taxes,
sale. county or municipal or shenf 's. guarOian s or administrator s
or any sale made pursuant ro ariy rlu
any other pulicahton or ritiOl ningy o any i 3tairc of trie slate
or any c-uny mrunlicir oroner rolmcal suDbailson thereri
sna ide deeme veberen pubihe indo accordance win tried
5t'r prju.i i for such Duttiiation unless Ine same shall aive
been puoa 1 d lor ingS presrnv;d penol 0 nme requires lor suu h
[1iJuoiCda, in a. soar rnic a e e o n ijblicaloni
snall n n or 1eal a ll have trean entered
SPeluical' m tter aI n f-s .C [ne
'. in r 1 a c rieiD3[,a ier
wnli:n htoi]etrlr idae Deen :5) pubisr 3 provided nowe-ver [nali
rc. ninc nerefn co'maine snall apply were in 3ov county theie sralli
vDe -,.:, nw-3varr rin e men:Pr wr in ri all ave Deern puDii;rnd
1.,. frip I.r- i Ti Of hm e S )'VP Dies,;rif- ed Nr., 1g.i puOi,.:aiori ..I
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S . a - .







Page 14 Thursday, April 2, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Th ^Marketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
.Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
Account Representative needed to work
on behalf of our company. 18+, needed
and must have computer skills. Accounting
experience needed. Any job experience.
Email to mclarkemploymentl111@gmail.
com for more information.

DIAMOND CONSULTING INVESTMENTS
We need people that would work for us as
discreet shoppers. All applicants would be
given a free work guide. The requirement:
must be computer-literate, be devoted
and honest. For more details contact us:
asmith05@live.com

OFFICE ASSISTANT
Oviedo Firm is looking for an office assistant.
Responsibilities will include receptionist,
filing, general office help. Construction
experience helpful but not necessary.
Position will start as a part-time position
with the possibility of full-time in the future.
Please fax resume to 407-268-3320









CHULUOTNA/OVIEDO EFFICIENCY
Chuluota/Oviedo efficiency for. one. Quiet,
private, all utilities included. Cable. $575
a month. Call 407-341-5400 and leave a
message

SEEKING ROOMMATE - MAITLAND
W. Maitland. NS Christian female seeks
NS female. Clean Lk front home. $440 mo
includes electric, water, cable tv, Internet,
security alarm. Dep/Reft 407-620-5164




MAKE THIS HOUSE YOUR HOME
Much care and planning went into the
rebuilding of this 1959 three-bedroom and
two-bath home. We've opened it up so that
when you walk in the front door you see
the huge backyard. This home met all 2008
building codes and is so energy efficient the
electric bills have averaged less than $80
per month.
This charming home will be worry-free for
years. Priced at $185,000 it's a good value.
Owner financing will make it quick and easy
to purchase. Call 407-396-6830 or 407-
592-7407 for a private showing or drive by
2106 Dorris Drive for a quick look. It is close
to Full Sail University and UCF and across
the street from a private school. Homes in
this quiet area feed into top-rated Winter
Park schools.
Features:
* New Torch down roof
* All-new high-efficiency a/c
* New aluminum soffit and fascia
* All new duct work
* New double-hung thermal windows (Solar
shield in Florida room)
* All new electrical wiring, receptacles,
switches, fixtures and service panel
* Window'treatments throughout
* All new interior and exterior doors, locks
and hardware
* All new 150 amp underground service
* Reconditioned allergy-free terrazzo floors
* Underground phone and cable
* All new plumbing, plumbing fixtures,
faucets and water heater
* All new insulation, drywall
* Cable and phone in every room
* All new paint inside and out
* Extra receptacles in the kitchen
* New tile in baths, Florida room and butler's
pantry
* New all wood kitchen cabinets
* All new Energy-Star Frigidaire stainless-
steel dishwasher, refrigerator, stove,
microwave/hood
* Washer/dryer included
* No HOA
* No city taxes
* Central fire alarm system
* First-time buyer credit




FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.

OVIEDO BRAND-NEW
OFFICE OR RETAIL
Space on Oviedo Blvd. for lease. 1,300
square feet. Carolyn Canada, 407-921-
2496. Coldwell Banker Commercial NRT


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do - yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scofftt at 321-460-3905.

CARPET/STEAM CLEANING
Special! 3 rooms $69, no hidden charges.
Powerful truckmount system. Quality
service for 33 years. Major credit cards. Call
1A1 STEAM. 407-366-3900





THREE-FAMILY GARAGE SALE,
APRIL 3RD AND 4TH
8am-5pm. 4206 Ivey Glen Ave., Orlando, FL.
Mens, women, Junior Clothes, Electronics,
household goods, bedding, new designer
clothes, new racer bike, convertible sleigh
crib, antique dining set, misc items.

AUCTION
Liquidating the Estate of the Late Tom
& Jane Siebel. Saturday 4-11-09 10:00
A.M. - Preview 9:00 A.M. 2600 Crest Drive,
Haines City, FL 33844. Antique Furniture,
Glassware, Collectibles, Garage Items &
Lots More! All in excellent Condition. Large
Auction. Bring your Chairs and spend the
day. Food Available. Bev Hovious Auction
Co. AB 935, AU 1344. 863-299-9227. See
.Listing & Pictures at: www.hoviousauction.
com. TERMS: Cash-Check-10% B/P





DETOXIFICATION EBOOK
(4) Detoxification Ebook - Super Sale: $7.99
each. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.
org/order.html. How to Detox for Overnight
Pain Relief. Flatter Tummy - Colon Cleanse.
Reclining Detox - Migun Thermal Bed. 500
+ Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar. Carol Miller,
(407) 970-1483





Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school.year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.
























IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 09-DR-925-02D-L
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
ESPERANZA LEON, Wife,
and
HECTOR LEON, Husband
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLICATION
TO: Hector Leon
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution
of Marriage, including claims for dissolution of
marriage, payment of debts, division of real and
personal property, and for payments of support, has
been filed against you. The cause of action includes
Wife's claim for exclusive use, possession and title
(ownership) of real property located at 471 Eagle
Cir, Casselberry, FL 32707 legally described as Lot
1, Block G, Sterling Park Unit 3, according to the plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 18 pages 52 to 54,
Public Records of Seminole County, Florida. You are
required to serve a copy of your written defenses,
if any, to this action on Francisco Colon, Jr, of Law
Offices of Francisco Colon, Jr., PA., Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is PO Box 948181,
Maitland, Florida 32794-8181, on or before April
9, 2009, and file the original with the clerk of this
court at Seminole County Courthouse, 301 N Park
Ave, Sanford, Florida 32771, either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the petition.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
DATED this 5th day of March, 2009.
MARYANNE MORSE, CLERK
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Debr A. Jesperson
Deputy Clerk
3/19. 3/26. 4/2. 4/9


Auctions
AUCTION! 882 Acrest HUNTSVILLE
(ALABAMA) CITY LIMITS. Saturday April
11. Just North of 1-565. Sewer available.
Adjacent to Megasite. Gamer Auctions, Inc.
gamerauctionsinc.com, Ken Garner ALSL
1002, 877-914-SOLD.

Auto Donations
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON UNITED BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION Free Mammograms, Breast
Cancer Info wvTh.ubcf.info FREE Towing,
Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted,
(888)468-5964.

SBuilding Supplies
METAL ROOFING. 40yr Warranty-Buy direct
from manufacturer 30/colors in stock,
w/all accessories. Quick turn around.
Delivery available. Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg,
(888)393-0335 www.GulfCoastSupply.com

Business Opportunities
Sick-and-Tired of Struggling? STAYATHOME
Get Out Of Debt Get Your Life Back $2000.to
$4000 WEEKLY Untapped Market ACT NOW!
1-800-508-0585 fatimak.com

100% RECESSION PROOF! Do you earn
$800 in a day? 25 Local Machines and
Candy $9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033
CALL US: We will not be undersold!

Cars for Sale
Police Impounds! 95 Honda Civic $600! 95 .
Toyota Camry $550! 97 VW Jetta $550! for
listings call 800-366-9813 ext 9275

Police Impounds for Sale! 95 Honda Accord
$500! 95 Honda Civic $600! for listings call
(800)366-9813 Ext 9271

Health
ONLINE PHARMACY Buy Soma, Ultram,
Fioricet, Prozac, Buspar $71.99/90
$107/180 Quantities, PRICE INCLUDES
PRESCRIPTION! Over 200 Meds $25Coupon
Mention Offer:#91A31. (888)389-0461. tri-
drugstore.corn

Help Wanted
Colonial Life seeks licensed Life & Health
agents to market voluntary employee benefit
programs to employers. First year potential
60K and up. Call Meredith at 904-424-5697
or MeredithBrewer@comcast.net.

OTR Drivers- Join PTL! Up to 34cpm.
REQUIRED 12 months experience and
CDL-A. Out 10-14 days. No felon or DUI past
5 years. (877)740-6262.
www.ptl-inc.com

HVAC Tech Training. EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES for EPA & OSHA Nationally
Certified 3-5wk training program. Local
Job Placement and Financing available.
(877)994-9904

$12.00 GUARANTEED for every envelope
stuffed with our sales material plus a free
sign on bonus. FREE 24 hour information.
(888)250-8110

$600 Weekly Potential$$$ Helping the
government PT. No Experience. No Selling.
Call: (888)213-5225 Ad Code: M

Pickup truck & Commercial truck drivers
needed. Deliver RV trailers and commercial
trucks and buses to all 48 states and Canada.
Log on to www.RVdeliveryjobs.com

Homes For Rent
3Br 2Ba Foreclosure! $10,500! Only $199/
Mo! 5% down 15 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4
Br $259/Mo! for.listings 800-366-9783 ext
5798

HUD HOMES! 4bdr 2ba $217/mo! 3 br
Foreclosure! $199/mo! Stop Renting! 5%
dw, 15yrs @ 8% apr For Listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5853

3Br 2Ba Foreclosure! $10,500! Only $199/
Mo! 5% down 15 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4-
Br $259/Mo! for listings 800-366-9783 ext
5796

Homes For Sale
FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION FLORIDA
STATEWIDE Auction starts April 18 1000
Homes MUST BE SOLD! REDC Free Brochure
800-756-2155 USHomeAuction.com

6/BR Bank Foreclosure! $29,900! Only
$238/Mo! 5% down 20 years @ 8% apr.
Buy, 4 Br $326/Mo! for listings 800-366-
9783 ext 5760

Lots & Acreage
Final Closeout! Golf Lot Bargains from
$19,900 (was $69,900) Golf & Amenity
Package included! Developer closeout on
remaining lots at championship 18 hole
course in Blue Ridge Mtns - near Asheville
NC. All infrastructure completed - build
when ready. 1 lot per customer! Excellent
financing. Call now (866)334-3253, x2192

FL LAND BARGAINS! 2 to 150 acres. From
Sebring to Gainesville. $49,900 to $499,900.
Tremendous land value below mkt prices.
Financing. Call Jack at (800)242-1802

Miscellaneous
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers,


*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121, www.CenturaOnline.
com.

AIRLINES ARE, HIRING - Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

Real Estate
VIRGINIA MTN CABIN, Ready to move in!
Great views! Near large stocked trout strm,
private, 2 acres, only $159,500 owner.
(866)275-0442








Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Phone Surveyor
Job Description: Responsible for conducting
phone surveys over the telephone. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:00am-3:00pm.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9388024

Cable/Small Assembly Technician
Job Description: Responsible for building
and assembling cables, reading schematics,
and soldering. Work Monday-Friday,'
5:30am-3:30pm.
Pay Rate: $13.00-$15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9393074

Accounting Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for assisting in
the preparation and analysis of the annual
operating budget and capital budget for
advertising sales. Sets up and maintains-
company credit policies. Oversees all
billing functions and does monthly review
of aging with credit manager. Reviews cash
and aging reconciliation's as prepared by
accountants. Reviews and approves the
coding of all invoices to ensure compliance
with budget and chart of accounts. Prepares
the annual operating budget. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:30am-5:3Opm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9392206

Maintenance Specialist
Job Description: Responsible for general
hotel maintenance including basic plumbing,
electrical, mechanical repairs. Performs
maintenance of heating, ventilating, and
air conditioning (HVAC) and' swimming pool.
Performs the preventative maintenance
function for guest rooms. Work 7:00am-
11:00pm, days may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$11.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9391320

Sous Chef
Job Description: Responsible for assisting
the Executive Chef in the daily running of the
kitchen. Orders, stores, and prepares food
for all outlets and banquets.-Creates and-
implements menu and inventory controls.
Trains staff. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $32,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9392449

Night Audit Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for checking
guests in and out. Assists guests with
questions and issues. Performs night audit
and creates/delivers express check out bills
nightly. Answers hotel phones as needed.
Work 11:00pmn-7:00am, days may vary.
Pay Rate: $11.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9392441

Project Manager
Job Description: Responsible for managing
government programs of moderate risk and


complexity or may have deputy responsibility
for program. Oversees program budget
and schedules prepared by subordinate
staff. Serve as primary customer contact.
Develops business within current customer
base and new customers. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $56,000.00-$87,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9393779

Contract Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for contract/
subcontract administration and general
documentation support including all facets
of subcontract administration including
development of work statement, bid
packages, awards. Analyze subcontract
costs and data. Advises management of
contractual rights and obligations. Maintains
historical information. Work Monday-Friday,
8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9394245

� Vacation Planner
Job Description: Responsible for making
outbound calls to sell preview vacation
packages. Work Monday-Friday, 5:30pm-
9:00pm.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour plus bonus and
commission
Job Order Number: 9392451

Shop Manager
Job Description: Responsible for managing
daily shop activities. Maintains daily logs
or records, inspects tools or equipment
and inspects facility. Operates power
construction equipment. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9391595

Diesel Engine and
Generator Service Technician
Job Description: Responsible for operating
machine equipment and servicing/
repairing generators and industrial engines.
Operates machinery and performs routine
maintenance calls. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9392591

Building Cleaner
Job Description: Responsible for cleaning
bathrooms, dusting, mopping, and
sweeping. Keeps buildings in clean and
orderly condition. Performs heavy cleaning
duties such as cleaning floors, shampooing
rugs, washing walls and glass, and removing
rubbish Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $9.50-$10.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9397148


Caregiver/Certified Nursing Assistant/
Medical Assistant/Home Health Aide
Job Description: Responsible for assisting
elderly or disabled adults with daily living
activities. Keeps house (makes beds, does
laundry, washes dishes) and prepares meals.
Provides meals and supervised activities.
Advises families, elderly, and disabled
on such things as nutrition, cleanliness,
and household utilities. Provides in-home
support, companion services, repetitive
care, personal care assistance, supported
employment and supported living to
individuals with developmental disabilities.
-Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$16.00 per hour
Job Order Number:9396431

Paralegal/Legal Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for performing
family law paralegal duties. Assists
lawyers by researching legal precedent,
investigating facts, or preparing legal
documents. Conducts research to support a
legal proceeding, to formulate a defense, or
to initiate legal action. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9395219

Business Development Manager
Job Description: Responsible for developing
a local sales force by increasing the
involvement of every area and district
offices in independent sales. Seeks out and


engages new revenue stream possibilities.
Gains contacts and new business in both the
retail and non-retail sectors. Sells services
to retailers/distributors/manufacturers
within assigned territory. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9397137

Marketing Coordinator
Job Description: Responsible for marketing
business t6 local doctors and the community.
Answers questions about product features
and benefits. Arranges buying parties, and
solicits sponsorship of such parties, in order
to sell merchandise. Contacts customers to
persuade them to purchase merchandise or
services. Delivers merchandise and collects
payment. Develops prospect lists. Distributes
product samples or literature that details
products or services. Explains products or
services and prices, and demonstrates use
of products. Work Monday-Friday, 8:30am-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based uportexperience
Job Order Number: 9396834

Project Manager I
Job Description: Responsible for the
progress and final estimates throughout
the project duration as well as completing
constructability reviews. Directs and
assigns specific tasks to inspectors as
well as assisting in all phases of the
construction project. Establishes a project
schedule consistent with client needs and
expectations. Work days and hours may
vary.
OPay Rate: $45.00-$55.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9396874

Automotive Body Person
Job Description: Responsible for performing
collision and quality paint work. Repairs and
refinishes automotive vehicle bodies and
straighten vehicle frames. Adjusts or aligns
headlights, wheels, and brake systems.
Applies heat to plastic panels, uses hothair
welding guns or immerses in hot water,
and presses the softened panels back into
shape by hand. Chains or clamps frames
and sections to alignment machines that
use hydraulic pressure to align damaged
components. Work Monday-Friday, 7:00am-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $650.00-$1200.00 per week -
Job Order Number: 9396565

Industrial Machinery Mechanic
Job Description: Responsible for
construction, modificallon, and maintenance
of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning
(HVAC) refrigeration and electrical, dry
and bulk liquid conveyance, plumbing,
pneumatic, and factory oven systems.
Installs, modifies, and maintains equipment
according to engineering principles and
safety regulations. Maintains plant buildings,
electrical,, plumbing, heating and cooling
systems, equipment, and machinery. Tests
newly installed machines and equipment
to ensure proper operations and safety.
Maintains clean equipment and shop area.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $16.40-$20.15 per-iour
Job Order Number: 9395984

Office Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for performing
administrative and office support activities
for multiple supervisors. Clerical duties will
be assigned in accordance with the office
procedures and may include a combination
of bookkeeping, typing or word processing,
stenography, office machine operation,
fielding telephone calls, receiving and
directing visitors, word processing, filing,
and faxing. Work Monday-Friday, 12:00pm-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9395477

Dishwasher
Job Description: Responsible for washing
dishes, pots, pans, utensils and glassware
for local restaurant. Keeps kitchen area in
clean and orderly fashion. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.25-$9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9395955











Lun &Games

sota Day every Aug. 12. I have in my library are 160. The highest recorded body odor.
those which people have IQ is 210, with those brains
President Abraham Lin- lent me." belonging to a Korean
UT mTR U coin's widow, Mary Todd named Kim Ung-Yong.
U T U Lincoln, did not attend her There are 147,000 identi- Thought for the Day: "Elec-
husband's funeral. fied species of moth. If you're visiting San Luis tricity is actually made up
By Samantha Weaver Obispo County in Califor- of extremely tiny particles
It was Nobel Prize-winning Have you ever had your nia and want to check out called electrons, that you
There are so many Swedes French poet, journalist and IQ tested? If not, I'm sure a book at the local library, cannot see with the naked
and people of Swedish novelist Anatole France you've wondered how your you'd better be sure to take eye unless you have been
descent in Minnesota that who gave the following intelligence would rate a shower first. It's legal drinking." - Dave Barry
the Scandinavian country sage advice: "Never lend on that well-known scale. there for library officials � 2008 King Features Synd., Inc.
created a holiday for them: books - nobody ever re- Famed theoretical physicist to kick out anyone who is
Sweden celebrates Minne- turns them; the only books Albert Einstein had an IQ of deemed to have offensive

changes. A little flexibility decision might be more -..o
can go a long way. Good luck. difficult with inaccurate
, lm information. Best to recheck
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. the data you have at hand right Elephant God
t, 22) A major change could now to be sure it won't mislead
-- -prompt more adjustments. you later.
ARIES (March 21 to Some of them might be
April 19) Putting yourself difficult to deal with at PISCES (Feb. 19 to March
in someone else's shoes first. But hang in there, and 20) An offer you previously
isn't easy for you. But if you before you know it, you'll be turned down might no longer
do it, you'll gain a better coasting to your next goal. be available. But if you do some
perspective of what you checking around, you could
need to do to achieve you LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. find something else that would
goals. Be open to new ideas. 22) Your sense of justice suit you just fine.
prompts you to speak out
TAURUS (April 20 to May against an unfair situation, BORN THIS WEEK: You
20) There are still some even if you seem to be the believe in helping those who..................................
problems you might have only one who feels that way. cannot help themselves. 0 HENRY BOLTINOFF
to deal with before moving But you soon learn that Although it embarrasses you,
on to your next project. It's many others agree with you. the fact is, people like you and
a good idea to accept help tl you SO.
gromd thisewto shaccet h SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to . �2009 King Features Synd., Inc.
from those who share your
objectives. Nov. 21) Creating a fuss
is not usually your style.
GEMINI (May 21 to June But that doesn't mean
20) It's time to recognize the you should tolerate an ill- YA "
difference between those mannered attitude. Speak up by Linda Thistle
who are truly concerned for for yourself, and you'll earn by Linda Thistle
you and those who simply the respect of others. I
plan to use your good nature SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 6 8
totheiradvantage.New 6 8 2to Dec. 21) You might
ideas become increasingly to Dec. 21) You might 1 -
attractive. have a few loose ends to tie 7 1 2 8 Find at least six differences in details between panels. I
up before you can stamp 4 8 3
CANCER (June 21 to July your project as complete. 94 / |
22) Depending on a promise But once that's done, you - -
made becoming a promise might want to celebrate with 3 7 15 6.
kept could be more than a someone special in your life. 6 5 3
mite unwise at this time..It's
best to proceed on your own CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to _ 83
rather than wait for aid that Jan. 19) Disappointment 7 4 2 1
.darkens the Goat's mood. -- - - --
might never arrive. da ls rken dsh G alt' mo ll Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way \ .^ --.
might never arrive. But close friends rally to pull that each row across, each column down and each nI -
LEO (July 23 to Aug. you through with words of sma ll -box square contains all of the-
22) A recently revitalized encouragement. Use their numbers from one to nine.
relationship might not confidence in you to rebuild DiFFICULTYT HISE EK: I
be quite what the Big Cat your own self-esteem.
be quit what te Big Cat* Moderate ** Challenging "uts --- 'o -eno- "
expected. But give yourself ** HOO BOYI *6ussu si qwui eaji -9 uo6 s! se!lddns o xog g *inu
more time to deal with the AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to * * * H uo peppe uaeq seq qsng "i -6u!ss!us si lapoed peeaS
e m e t dFeb. 18) An upcoming 02009 King Features Synd..Inc. -je6BJ si 1.eq S,ueiLj - -uajayp s i L13ja 1-. :s0eouaJai4O
.. ...b ..... . .. .. ... ....A n. ....... .. . .... ..m-i..... .. .. . .. ... .. .. .. . .. ...


� 2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
World rights reserved.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, April 2, 2009 Pae1






Paae~ ~~- 16 TusaArl2 09WntrPr tadOsre


Financial

Straight Talk

with

Jim Dorman


Jim Dorman, CFP", CPA/PFS
Dorman Financial Management PA.

,_ ,: n
*^


F . ....



w.4m
ie
1 r ~ '~ ' i L
S . " ._ .... ,, . _


::i "+~~~~~~. . .....;.... / ...........;" :....-.-; '
- i . . '. .. ' _ .. . ..i. .._- . - .. .. . .


5 rl i/c Zjirezion Va6am oe/ooo & inna Deer
ppresents on
Sunday, April 19, 2009
Trinity Prep Auditorium
Snow White Tea - 12:30 pm
Performance - 2:00 pinm ,


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I ..A ".i.dOds.o'. F-FiW ... 349-351 N. Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789
LI~UflA1ONrrAION407-647-9646 407-599-9797
I"0* 44 L4 V WHSTTIN


i


Winter Park /Maitland Observer


Page 16 ThrdyApi2,09











en !rrO server


Est. 1990


Volume 19, No. 4


i: msr aRNI


PHOTO BY ISM
Cradling a nutritious meal provided by Seniors First, Marylin Uptenheim expresses how thankful she is to be a part of the Meals on Wheels program. Seniors First helps seniors to col


KRISTY VICKERY


Marylin Uptenheim makes her way
through her craft-filled apartment
one step at a time, careful not to let
her oxygen cord get tangled as she proudly
shows off her crafts: angel ornaments made'
from pasta, Easter eggs fashioned into peo-
ple, porcelain-dipped flowers, and minia-
ture dollhouses.
She is grateful for all she has, but it is the
knock at the door every morning that she
thanks God for.
"It is a blessing to me," Uptenheim said. "I


don't know what I would do without it."
Uptenheim is one of the many seniors
in Central Florida who receive the Meals
on Wheels program from Seniors First, a
nonprofit organization that recently joined
forces with the Visiting Nurse Association
of Central Florida/Community Care for the
Elderly to provide seniors with the services
that enable them to live independently for
as long as possible.
"Our mission is to help seniors stay inde-
pendent," said .Marsha Lorenz, president
and CEO of Seniors First, "to give them that
choice to age in place, with dignity, inde-
pendence, have choices and stay in their


own home as long as possible."
By joining forces, the organizations
hope to better utilize their resources, while
decreasing the reliance on government-
subsidized skilled nursing facilities and sav-
ing taxpayer dollars.
"Coming together we now have a whole
continuum of community-based services,"
Lorenz said.
Their services include everything from
Meal on Wheels, guardianship, home
improvement, transportation, financial
counseling and in-home services.

see MEALS on page B3


There's no 'free lunch'



Many free investment seminars are sales pitches


K,





110

He I-P J5 e
AN


407-8- 157


Older Americans are frequent-
ly solicited with "free lunch"
investment seminar invitations.
This is particularly true during
tax season, when the invitations
make claims that they can teach
you to avoid paying any taxes.
Although many of these sem-
inars sell legitimate products,
there have been many reports
of people being scammed out of
their life savings.
Recent investigations show


that four out of five investors
age 60 and older received at
least one invitation to a free
lunch investment seminar in
the past three years. Typically,
an expensive meal is provided
at no cost, and seminar attend-
ees are promised advice about
investing strategies or managing
money in retirement.
But a yearlong examination
conducted by state securities
regulators, the Securities and


Exchange Commission and the
Financial Industry Regulatory
Authority found that while
many seminars were advertised
as "educational" or "workshops,"
100 percent were instead sales
presentations;- 50 percent fea-
tured exaggerated or mislead-
ing advertising claims; and one-
quarter involved recommenda-

see LUNCH on page B6







Se~iiorObserver April 2009


SeniorObserver


NEWS SENIORS CAN USE, SINCE 1990

Kyle P. Taylor
Publisher
kyle@observernewspapers.com


Jenny Andreasson
Associate Editor
jennya@observernewspapers.com


Isaac Babcock
Reporter
isaacb@observernewspapers.com


Jonathan Gallagher
Copy Editor
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com


1500 Park Center Dr., Orlando, FL

Observer Newspapers is a member of:
*Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
eMaitland Chamber of Commerce
*The Florida Press Association
*Central Florida Press Club


Stephanie Erickson
Designer
stephanie@observernewspapers.com


Tracy Craft
Advertising Sales
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


I 407-563-7000 I WPMObserver.com

Published monthly by Observer Newspapers,
publishers of the:
*Winter Park/Maitland Observer
*Seminole Voice


E utii:ri . r. m I r igh ov. r -tu: ur edit advertisements, it: .:r ii .:.a
letters to the editor for reasons of libel or space availability.
vWe -,c -u , ,ou i, 1 , , u: '.our opinion.
All N ' inai i u.ej I i p.i:, rnit ih Senior Observer.



..Freuentl Use


by Matilda Charles

With the economy slowing
down the way it has, it's no
wonder some people are
desperate for money. Un-
fortunately, some of them
are perpetuating scams on
seniors.
Also unfortunately, it's
not always easy to tell when
you're faced with a scam.
Sometimes the fraud in-
volves getting you to help
scammers move money out
of a war-torn country, and
"you" are the one they've
picked to trust with their
millions. Of course, to show
good faith, you need to
send them money first.
Rule of thumb: Anytime
a stranger wants you to do
anything involving cashing
checks or accessing your
bank accounts, it's a scam.
Then there's the scam
that tries to get you upset
about a grandchild. You get
a phone call, and the per-
son at the other end says,
"This is your grandson. I'm
in trouble. Don't tell my
parents." The hope is that


you won't bother to verify
that it really is your grand-
child, and that you'll imme-
diately rush down to wire
funds to bail him out of his
problem.
Rule of thumb: Verify, ver-
ify, verify. Don't send a dime
until you do.
One scam that's espe-
cially sneaky and plays on
our wish to be good citizens
is about jury duty. You'll get
a call saying you're about
to be arrested for failing to
show up for jury duty. When
you say that you never got
the notice to appear, you'll
be asked to give your Social
Security number and date
of birth so your name can
be verified on the list. Don't
do it. The instant you give
that information, you're in
line to become a victim of
identity theft.
Rule of thumb: Nobody
in the court system is going
to ask you for that infor-
mation or intimidate you
about jury duty.
* Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot
personally answer reader questions, but will
incorporate them into her column whenever
possible.
Write to her in care of King Features Weekly
Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475, or send e-mail to
columnreply@gmail.com.
Copyright 2008 King Features Synd., Inc.


Beardall Senior Center
800 S. Delaney Ave.
Orlando
407-246-2637


St. Cloud Senior Center
Indiana Ave. & 8th St.
St. Cloud
407-892-2533


Marks Street Senior Center Osceola Senior Center
99 E. Marks St. 1099 Shady Lane
Orlando Kissimmee
407-254-1066 407-846-8532

Maitland Senior Center Sanford Senior Center
345 S. Maitland Ave. 401 E. Seminole Blvd.
Maitland Sanford
407-539-6251 407-302-1010

RSVP Senior Volunteers Senior Resource Alliance
407-422-1535 407-228-1800

Alzheimer Resource Center Seminole County
407-843-1910 Better Living for Seniors
407-228-1800


* Private and semi-private rooms
* Shaded outdoor patio
+ Individual care plans for each
resident


* Close to shopping and parks
. Located in a quiet family
. neighborhood


'A true homejeel with an attentive and caring staf


DON'T MISS





APRIL 18TH AND 19TH


Beware scammers


targeting the elderly


. . . . . . . . . .
son
imunitil
J
...... ....


SeniorObserver


April 2009









Menopause affects sexual ability


According to a survey of adults aged 50 to
70, the majority of both sexes agree that
decreased frequency and physical ability to
have or desire sex is expected with age, and
women were less likely than men to antici-
pate experiencing sexual symptoms as they
aged& According to the "Sex, Menopause &
Relationships" survey conducted by Harris
Interactive and commissioned by Duramed
Pharmaceuticals, 65 percent of women who
experienced menopause-induced symp-
toms reported they did not anticipate that
they would. This compares to 51 percent
for men.
Despite the fact that the majority of those
surveyed agreed that men would be more
likely than women to experience physi-
cal symptoms that decrease their ability to
have sex with age, more women (67 per-
cent) than men (59 percent) reported hav-
ing experienced symptoms that affected
their ability to have sex.
"The survey reveals a knowledge gap
about the challenges women and men expe-
rience as they age," said David B. Schwartz,
M.D., practicing obstetrics and gynecology


For more information on the survey and menopause-in-
duced symptoms, visit www.CopeWithMenopause.com.

at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. "The
majority of people surveyed believe men
are more likely to experience sexual symp-
toms than women. This may be due to the
volume and ease of accessibility to informa-
tion about erectile dysfunction. Conversely,
most women face sexual symptoms as they
go through menopause, with less informa-
tion readily available to them."
The survey also revealed that of those
who reported experiencing symptoms,
nearly two-thirds of women (63 percent)
and 59 percent of men have sought treat-
ment. Fifty-one percent of men seeking
treatment reported seeking prescription
medication while 55 percent of women
seeking treatment reported use of over-
the-counter lubricants, creams or herbal
supplements.
"There seems to be a lack of knowledge


about the vaginal symptoms of menopause
in women and the treatments available. If
women are experiencing vaginal dryness
and painful sex, these may be symptoms
associated with their menopause," said
Schwartz.
While 63 percent of women surveyed who
had symptoms reported seeking treatment,
the majority have turned toward over-the-
counter lubricants, creams or herbal supple-
ments - many of which may not be com-
pletely effective. Women should understand
that their symptoms are medical issues that
should be discussed with their health care
provider before they seek treatment.
Schwartz also said, "Women experienc-
ing these symptoms may be candidates for
estrogen therapy applied locally, which can
be prescribed by a health care practitioner.
I encourage women to explore treatment
options with their health care providers
and discuss these with their partners."
Courtesy of NAPSA


MEALS I Nonprofit organization serves up meals, companionship to seniors


< continued from the front page

Last year, Seniors First served
more than 4,000 people, and
Meals on Wheels, the organiza-
tion's most recognizable service,
delivered more than 242,000
meals to nearly 1,200 clients in
Central Florida.
Uptenheim, 79, is especially
grateful for the Meals on Wheels
program, since she can no lon-
ger use her stove.
"I can only use the microwave
with the oxygen," she said, "and
with the meals, I can pop them
right in the microwave. For me
it's wonderful."
In Orange andSeminolecoun-
ties, a combined 1,439 seniors
are waiting for assistance from
Community Care for the Elderly,
and 973 seniors are on the wait-
ing list for both the Meals on
Wheels and Neighborhood
Lunch Programs. But it didn't
take Uptenheim long to receive
the meals she needed.
"The next morning [Seniors
First] called and said, 'You're
on,'" she said.
She also said the meals have
helped her to stay healthy.
"I had blood tests recently and
three doctors said everything is
right where it should be, and
I'm diabetic and my sugar was
down and my cholesterol was
good, everything was where it
should have been," she said. "So
the meals are working good for
me. Plus I gained two pounds ...
so that's a good sign."
But to Uptenheim, being on
the program is. not just about
the meals she receives - it's
also about seeing a friendly face
every day.
"We look forward to seeing


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - SENIOR OBSERVER
Marylin Uptenheim's home displays a two-week meal schedule from Seniors First, which delivers Meals on Wheels food packages to many area seniors. Some
of the nutritious selections include chicken cutlet with cacciatore sauce, parsley rotini noodles, and swiss steak with brown gravy. They are microwaveable.


[the volunteers] come," she said.
"They are very pleasant, every
one of them, and the concern
they show is amazing."
Meals on Wheels volun-
teer Missy Alvarez delivers
Uptenheim's meals every Friday
and said it brings her as much
joy as it brings her clients.
"They're all very, very appre-
ciative. It's been a very positive
experience. It's very rewarding
for me," she said.
Alvarez has been a volun-
teer for Meals on Wheels for
four years and said the positive
response she receives from her
clients motivates her to contin-
ue doing it as long as she can.
"It's not the idea of going
ahead and delivering the meals
and then be on my way," she
said. "It's about visiting the peo-
ple and giving them a little bit
of companionship."


Seniors First is a nonprofit social service organization dedicated to the needs
of Central Florida's senior citizens. The organization's mission is to enhance the
quality of life for seniors by maintaining their independence through nutrition,
home improvement and support services. To learn more about Seniors First,
or to make a donation, call 407-292-0177 or visit SeniorsFirstlnc.org or
CCEcares.org.







"'hViere elegance andiaffordability have a new address"
14-story high rise offering Independent Senior Living (age
55+) Cocatednear downtown Orlando; 2 blocks west of
Bumby .Ave. & CoConialDr. Newly renovatedapartments
starting at $525 including utilities.

Call Patty at 407-894-3031
GREAT LOCATION, NEWLY RENOVATED APTS
2000 E. illCCcrest Street - OrCando, f'L 32803


SenioarObserver


Anril 200n


I








Cat overpopulation is rampant issue


Ifyou're feeding cats outdoors
- whether tame or feral -
you're not alone. Experts say
the welfare and management
of these unneutered and un-
spayed cats is an issue in al-
most every community.
Problems associated with
these cats include: a grow-
ing population, frequent and
loud noise from fighting and
mating behavior, strong foul
odors from unneutered male
cats spraying to mark their
territory, and visible suffer-
ing from dying kittens and
injured adults.
In addition to nuisance
calls about these problems,
shelters in a community with
large homeless cat popu-
lations usually experience
higher animal control costs
due to trapping efforts and
costs associated with caring
for and euthanizing home-
less cats. Trap-Neuter-Return
(TNR) is an effective method
for improving the lives of fe-
ral cats, and reducing their
numbers.
The cats targeted for TNR
are feral cats. Feral cats are


To learn more about managing cat
overpopulation, visit
www.HumaneSociety.org/FeralCats.
the offspring of lost or aban-
doned pet cats or other feral
cats who are not spayed or
neutered. They do not easily
adapt or may never adapt to
living indoors as pets in close
contact with people.
At a minimum, feral cats
that are part of a TNR pro-
gram are spayed or neutered
so they can no longer repro-
duce. In addition, they are
vaccinated against rabies,
surgically ear-tipped on one
ear and returned to their ter-
ritory. Ear-tipping - cutting
off the tip of the cat's ear, usu-
ally the left ear - is the uni-
versally recognized sign of a
cat that has been TNRed.
Dedicated caretakers feed
and provide shelter for these
cats, monitor them for sick-
ness and trap new cats that
appear. If the captured cats
are feral, they are TNRed; if
the captured cats are lost or


-'i'. ..: , .'I 'TL' , I' ISTOCK
The Humane Society of the United States supports the TNR method - trap-neuter-return - to reduce the
number of feral cats living in communities and hopefully improve the quality of their lives.


abandoned pet cats, they are
reunited with their families
or adopted into new homes.
If they are kittens young
enough to be socialized, they
are also adopted.
The Humane Society of the
United States believes that
cat overpopulation is a com-
munity-generated problem
and that every community
has a responsibility to work
toward an effective long-


term solution.
TNR of feral cats is part of
that solution. In addition, pet
cats must be spayed or neu-
tered before they can repro-
duce at 5 months of age, kept
indoors or safely confined to
their property, provided with
safety collars and ID, and
searched for immediately if
they go missing.
Courtesy of NAPSA


"f*T omaA k'e.


* Your Diabetes
Headquarters
* Power Scooters


* Lift Chai~r
* Masectomy
Supplies
* Ostomy
Supplies
* WoundCare


* .Adult Diaper
Home Delivery
Program
* Bath Safety
Equipment
* Oxygen
Supplies
* Hospital Beds
* And So-Much
More!


April 2009


Senii,)~-rObserver


rl M

- Ro pufflmm� &[I@


2/m C�)["









Studies: Coffee can perk up your health


Your morning coffee could be good for
more than an a.m. pick-me-up. It might
also help your health.
That's the finding from recent studies
that show caffeine in moderation could
be good for you.
While energy drinks, cola and other
beverages contain caffeine, coffee and
tea in particular have emerged as good
health food sources. Doctors now say
they can help lower the risk of diabetes,
heart disease, Parkinson's disease, colon
cancer and cirrhosis of the liver, as well
as lift your mood, treat headaches and
even lower risk of cavities. Caffeine also
enhances athleticism, endurance and
performance, according to health care
experts.
The studies likely come as good news
to the 49 percent of Americans who said
they drink caffeinated coffee every day
when asked by a national survey. Cola
and tea tied with a 20 percent daily con-
sumption rate.
The survey, called the HealthSaver
Caffeinated Cities Survey, was com-
missioned by HealthSaver, a national-
emerging health care discount service.
"This groundbreaking research is an im-


For more information, visit
www.HealthSaverCaffeineSurvey.com.

portant tool to help educate about the
health benefits of moderate caffeine
consumption in the United States," said
Brad Eggleston, the company's vice
president.
The survey found that the most-caf-
feinated city in the country is Tampa,
followed by Seattle, Chicago, New York
and Los Angeles.
The least-caffeinated cities were Riv-
erside/San Bernardino, followed closely
by Atlanta, San Diego, Minneapolis/St.
Paul and Dallas.
For the second year in a row, Seattle
ranked No. 1 in coffee consumption,
with 55 percent of residents surveyed
saying this elixir of alertness would be
the most difficult caffeine product to
give up. But then again, say experts,
there's probably no need to.
"Even though at one time coffee was
considered harmful to your health, at
this point there is no compelling re-


ii-

PHOTO COURTESY OF NAPSA
Recent studies show coffee in moderation can actually improve one's
health. Doctors say it lowers the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

search to indicate that, in fact, is true,"
said Dr. Peter R. Martin, professor of
psychiatry and pharmacology and the
director of the Institute for Coffee Stud-
ies, Vanderbilt University School of
Medicine. "Newer studies actually prove
coffee in moderation is good for one's
health."
Courtesy of NAPSA


"The Mayflower Gives Us Freedom
To Pursue Our Passions"


Tom and Anna Polgar appreciate
living in a community that fosters
continuing education and gives
them freedom to pursue their
passions. Tom, a former CIA and
Army intelligence officer, heads
The Mayflower's Current Events
Club. Anna, a certified Master
Gardener, volunteers at the
Orange County Extension office.
"We love living in a community
where we can have a home and
garden - without having to


worry about maintenance issues,"
the couple says. "But The Mayflower
offers far more than that. We love
the security of knowing we will
both be cared for ... no matter
What happens in the future."
If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at
The Mayflower. It's a good plan
for the future.
Call today to secure a spot on
our waiting list.

(407) 672-1620


0
TH[E ,AYFLOWER
.4 Plan for the Future"
1620 Mayflower Court
Winter Park, Florida 2r792
www.thcinayflower.com


inmteginety

...firm adherence to a high code of
values; trustworthy

Wouldn't it be great if you could,
rely on everyone you deal with?
Unfortunately, too many people
will promise you anything if they
think it will get you to buy some-
thing from them.
That's too bad.
But what happens when you do
find someone with integrity?
Someone you can trust? You go back to them, don't you?
That's what we think most people do. And while it-might
sound old-fashioned, that's why we put integrity and honesty
up there with education and experience as qualities we think
you want in a hearing-care practice.
Of course we can't guarantee that you'll always like what we
tell you, but we can--and do-guarantee that we'll always tell
you the truth.
So if you believe that old-fashioned qualities like integrity
and honesty are important, you might want to choose us to
care for your hearing.
Just give us a call to set up an appointment.


1460 Lake Baldwin Lane
Baldwin Park

'A SOciATE. 407-898-2220
or CENTRAL FLORIDA www.OrlandoHears.com


B55


,Observer


9 002l irpA


4'� �1- 7! v 4�










Monitor records irregular heartbeat


To Your

Good

Health



by Paul G. Donohue, M.D.

DearDr. Donohue:
During the night and mostly
early in the morning hours, my
heart speeds up to 200 beats a
minute. There is no pain, but it
wakes me up and seems to hap-
pen ifI am lying facedown. I sit
up and take my pulse, which is
about 70 to 72. Ifeel my heart
slowly return to normal in two
to three minutes. I have worn a
Holter monitor for 24 hours.
My doctor says not to worry
about it. Do you think I have
anything to worry about?
- S.

Answer: For readers: A Holter
monitor is a device worn exter-
nally that records all heartbeats


in a given time period. They
can be worn for three or more
days. The doctor sees on the re-
cording what kind of abnormal
heartbeats occurred.
I have to clear something
up with you, S. Is your pulse 72
beats a minute when you feel
your heart beating fast? The
heartbeat and the pulse are
one and the same. How are you
counting your heartbeat?
If the episodes occurred
while you were being moni-
tored and did not last long,
then the doctor can dismiss
it as not being worrisome. He
should name the rhythm; ask
what it is.
If the fast heartbeats oc-
curred at times you weren't
wearing the monitor, you need
to wear it longer so that the
rhythm can be identified for
what it is.
The booklet on heartbeat ir-
regularities describes the more
common kinds of these beats
and how they are treated. Read-
ers can order a copy by writing:
Dr. Donohue -- No. 107W, Box
536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475. Enclose a check or money


order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6
Canada with the recipient's
printed name and address.
Please allow four weeks for de-
livery.



Dear Dr. Donohue:
My husband and I take Lipitor.
We take it before dinner in the
evening. We eat half a grapefruit
after breakfast. Is that OK?
-M.L.

Answer: You can take Lipitor
any time of the day, and you can
take it with or without food. It's
one of the station drugs - the
drugs that are such effective
cholesterol-lowerers.
Grapefruit and Lipitor are
not a good combination.
Grapefruit can increase the
blood concentration of this
drug. It does the same with a
few other medicines. This effect
of grapefruit lasts for 24 hours,
so even letting 12 hours pass
before taking the drug after eat-
ing grapefruit doesn't lessen the
chance of this interaction oc-
curring.


Dear Dr. Donohue:
None of my 21 grandchildren
has had their tonsils out. All of
my seven children did. Is this
no longer done? I wish doctors
would make up their minds
about these things.
- B.B.

Answer: When your children
were young, it was almost stan-
dard practice to remove tonsils
as a way to protect against strep
throat. We now know this isn't
necessary, and we now have an-
tibiotics to treat strep throat.
Children who have repeated
strep throat infections still have
their tonsils removed, but the
operation is no longer done for
prevention.


Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer
individual letters, but he will incorporate them
in his column whenever possible. Readers may
write him or request an order form of available
health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475.
� 2008 North America Synd., Inc.


Bulletin


Paul Ziajka, M.D., director of the Florida Lipid Institute
in Winter Park, is one of the first doctors in Winter
Park to use a new FDA-approved test that helps identify
hidden risk for heart attack and stroke for his patients. It's
called the PLAC Test.
The PLAC Test is a simple blood test that goes beyond
traditional risk factors to identify patients at increased risk
of heart disease and stroke. This is a medical breakthrough
for 2008. The test measures Lp-PLA2 (lipoprotein-asso-
ciated phospholipase A2), a vascular-specific inflamma-
tory enzyme implicated in the formation of rupture-prone
plaque, and is the only FDA-cleared blood test to assess
risk for heart attack and stroke. The results of this test can
enable doctors to initiate an aggressive treatment program
to prevent these events from occurring.
Recently, a group of leading cardiologists and neurolo-
gists published a consensus recommendation in a supple-
ment to The American Journal of Cardiology proposing
Lp-PLA2 testing for individuals identified at moderate
or high risk by traditional risk factor assessment. More
information can be found on The American Journal of
Cardiology Web site at:
http://www.ajconline.org/issues/contents?issue-
key=S0002-9149(08)X0017-7


For the 12th straight year, the Alan Shawn Feinstein
Foundation in R.I. will divide $1 million among non-
profit agencies throughout the country who help to fight
hunger. Seniors First, Inc., of Orlando, Fla., is participating
in this challenge to support vital services including Meals
on Wheels, Neighborhood Lunch, Home Improvement and
Durable Medical Equipment.
All designated check and cash contributions, pledges
and food donations made to Seniors First in April will
be matched through the Feinstein Foundation challenge.
Seniors First will receive a share of the $1 million equal
to the proportion of the total amount raised by all partici-
pants.
Meals on Wheels is a home-delivered meal program that
provides a hot, nutritious lunch to more than 600 seniors
each weekday. The purpose of this program is to enable
the elderly in our community to remain independent in
their own homes, while ensuring that their daily nutritional
needs are being met. The average client is living at or
below poverty level and has little or no family support.
Volunteers deliver Meals on Wheels Monday through Friday
and are often the only person the seniors see each day.
There are currently more than 400 seniors on the wait-


ing list for Meals on Wheels.
Alan Shawn Feinstein's $1 million challenges to fight
hunger have raised more than $940 million to date for
agencies nationwide.
"We were each put here on Earth to do what we can to
help those in need. Someday, all that will matter to us is
what we did while we were here to help those who needed
us," Feinstein said of his reason for making this donation.
Anyone wishing to support this project and increase
the match from the Feinstein Foundation can send a tax
deductible donation to: Seniors First, Inc., Attn: Feinstein
Challenge, 5395 L.B. McLeod Road, Orlando, FL 32811.
To donate food items, make a pledge, or for questions
regarding Meals on Wheels and other senior services,
contact Jan Ingrando at (407) 628-2884 ext. 205 or jan.
ingrando@ccecares.
Seniors First Inc. is a nonprofit social service organiza-
tion dedicated to the needs of Central Florida senior citi-
zens. The organization's mission is to enhance the quality
of life for seniors by maintaining their independence and
dignity through nutrition, home improvement and support
services. To learn more about Seniors First, or to make a
donation, call (407) 292-0177 or visit www.seniorsfirstinc.
org.


LUNCH I Join free lunch monitor program to combat investment fraud


< continued from the front page

tions for products not right for the indi-
vidual clients' circumstances.
AARP, in collaboration with the North
American Securities Administrators
Association, is working diligently to fight
this type of fraud by encouraging people to
join their Free Lunch Monitor program. The
program is part of a national campaign to
monitor whether older investors are being
pressured into purchasing investments that
are not right for them.
"A solid investment portfolio is the bed-


rock of a financially secure retirement," said
Jean Setzfand, director of Financial Security
Outreach at AARP. "By empowering indi-
viduals with knowledge and information,
we aim to create educated and financially
savvy investors,who can spot a scam when
they are being targeted."
Oftentimes, consumers go to these semi-
nars with the expectation of learning how
to grow and protect their investments or
how to shield their retirement savings from
taxes. But during the seminar, or during
f6llow-up phone calls and in-home visits,
they may be pressured to make quick, risky


investment decisions without sound finan-
cial advice.
AARP is encouraging everyday citizens to
get involved by visiting the program's Web
site at www.aarp.org/nofreelunch to learn
ways to detect scams or by becoming a
Free Lunch Monitor and printing the "What
to Listen for Checklist." Individuals who
receive invitations and choose to attend can
take the checklist with them to the seminar
and report their findings back to AARP.
Courtesy of NAPSA


April 2009


SeniorObserver









Six ways to get the most money for your home


Buying and selling homes in
today's market may appear
overwhelming. However,
don't let the poor economy
fool you. The housing market
can be easy and profitable if
you focus on the basics.
Successful selling can be
boiled down to six factors:
price, presentation, appeal,
staging, exposure, and hiring
a seasoned real estate agent.
Here's a closer look:

Presentation
Presentation is key to increas-
ing the likelihood of selling a
property. It's simple really -
clean it up, straighten it up
and create a clutter-free envi-
ronment.

Price
In many cases, your home's


value will be based only on
what your competitors are
offering, not its actual worth.
You can show a home's val-
ue at $300,000 all day, but if
everyone in your neighbor-
hood is asking $280,000, then
you should list it in that price
range.

Appeal
First impressions are your
one and only chance to reel
in a potential buyer, so make
it count. Before you paint
that dining room bubblegum
pink,- think about what will
appeal to the masses. Stay
neutral by using whites and
tans.

Staging
If no one is currently living in
the home, staging is crucial


to creating an inviting and
attractive atmosphere. Emp-
ty rooms make it hard for a
potential buyer to visualize
themselves living there.

Exposure
In a slow market, massive ex-
posure is critical. Exhaust ev-
ery available avenue, includ-
ing MLS and online exposure,
print advertising, signage,
flyers, directional signs, and
bulletin boards. Free, easy-
to-use Web services such as
Craigslist and YouTube let
you maximize exposure with
a minimized budget. Just buy
a cheap, user-friendly cam-
era, shoot footage, and plug
the camera into your com-
puter and hit upload. Drag
and drop that fdotage into
Windows Movie Maker, click


"publish movie" and you've
got a finished video product.
You can shoot and create
movies in less than 30 min-
utes.

Agent
Although you can be your
best asset when marketing
a property, enlist the help of
an expert, preferably a vet-
eran who knows the market.
Not all agents are the same.
You need a heavy hitter who
knows the business and un-
derstands what it takes to
sell in this climate. Stay away
from newbies unless there is
overwhelming evidence they
can outperform most others.
Courtesy of NAPSA


Money managementtips help boomers' finances


In today's turbulent economy, it is more
important than ever for consumers to
be on top of their finances. For baby
boomers, it's especially critical. Whether
they are approaching retirement or just
sending kids off to college, they have a
lot to consider. More than one in eight
boomers age 40 to 60 is caring for both
a child and an aging parent. This "dou-
ble duty," coupled with saving money,
managing debt and building budgets, is
an often daunting task.
Many financial services companies
offer tools and resources that can help
baby boomers manage their financial
demands. Through its relationship with
AARP, Chase has created interactive on-
line tools, calculators, worksheets and
other financial resources for consumers
age 50 plus. One particularly useful tool
is Chase's interactive financial guide, "50
Ways to Love Your Money," developed in
collaboration with AARP Financial and
Visa.
A few of the 50 tips in the guide for
boomers include:
* Question Your Needs and Wants:
Asking yourself some simple questions
can help you understand the difference
between what you need and what you
want. Armed with this information,


you'll do a better job building a budget
that lets you live well within your means
- something particularly important
when planning for retirement and fixed
incomes.
* Make No Mistakes: More than, 13 mil-
lion people a year find inaccuracies on
their credit reports. Do you know what
is in yours? The "50 Ways" guide provides
a sample credit report and instructions
on what to look for and how to get er-
rors corrected.
* Clean Your Financial House: You
can't predict life events, but you can plan
for them. Take steps to protect yourself
and your family by getting your finan-
cial house in order. It will give you some
breathing room when you most need it.
Organize your financial life and let your
children or trustees know where impor-
tant documents are kept.
'"We are constantly thinking of new in-
teractive tools and resources to help our
customers better meet their ,financial
challenges," said Mark Conces, general
manager, Chase Card Services. "With our
enhanced clear and simple approach
and new financial, guide, we are work-
ing to empower consumers age 50-plus
with useful tools and information."
While financial planning is crucial for


PHOTO COURTESY OF NAPSA
Creating a budget for both the present and the future is a key element
of any financial plan.

boomers, it's no less important for those
of other generations. Chase's Clear &
Simple Web site also offers tools, calcu-
lators, worksheets and other financial
literacy resources to help consumers in
all phases of life manage their finances.
Chase financial tools including the
"50 Ways to Love Your Money" guide are
available at www.chase clearandsimple.
com/aarp..
Courtesy of NAPSA


Medicare AAA screening benefit now offered for 12 months


A one-time, free Abdomi-
nal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)
screening for at-risk Medicare
beneficiaries is now available
for 12 months after enroll-
ment. Men who have smoked
sometime during their life,
and men and women with a
family history of AAA, qualify
for the free screening benefit
as part of their Welcome to
Medicare Physical Exam.
AAA is an enlargement or


"bulge" that develops in a
weakened area within the
largest artery in the abdo-
men. The pressure generated
by each heartbeat pushes
against the weakened aortic
wall, causing the aneurysm to
enlarge and, in time, weaken.
If undetected, the aneurysm
becomes so large, and its wall
so weak, that rupture occurs.
Nearly 200,000 people in
the United States are diag-


nosed with AAA annually; ap-
proximately 15,000 of these
cases may be severe enough
to cause death if not treated.
Talk to your family physician
about being screened for AAA
and see a vascular surgeon if
AAA is detected. Visit www.
VascularWeb.org for more
vascular health information.

Courtesy of NAPSA


April 2009


SeniorObserver







Observer April 2009


Contract Bridge


Redux 'bonus' is


THE BIDDING TELLS THE TALE
West dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
4J 754
VJ98
*A65
4843


WEST
*KQ8
YKQ4
+ 1098
4Q976


EAST
49632
V 10 763
*K43
+52


SOUTH
*A10
VA52
*Q J72
4AKJ 10
The bidding:
West North East Soul
1 4 Pass Pass Dbk
Pass 1 + Pass "2 NI
Pass 3 NT
Opening lead - ten of diamonds.


th
r


As the play progresses, declarer's
picture of how the unseen cards are
distributed steadily becomes clearer.
Sometimes he gains all the informa-
tion he needs almost immediately,
and sometimes he must wait until lat-
er in the play.
Take this deal where declarer, at
trick one, learns essentially all he
needs to know about West's hand.
Let's say that after declarer plays low
on the opening diamond lead, East
wins with the king and returns a dia-
mond to dummy's ace.


It isn't difficult for declarer to con-
clude that West must have the K-Q of
spades, K-Q of hearts and queen of
clubs for his opening bid. Only 12
high-card points are missing at this
point, and West must have them all.
Accordingly, declarer leads a club
from dummy at trick three and finess-
es the jack, knowing it will lose. West
wins and returns a diamond to the
jack, whereupon South cashes the A-
K-10 of clubs and queen of diamonds.
On the fourth diamond, West -
now down to six cards - must dis-
card a spade or a heart. Let's say he
discards a spade, in which case dum-
my discards a spade. South then plays
the ace and another spade. West wins
and is forced to lead a heart from the
K-Q-4.
If he leads the king, South has an
easy time making a second heart trick,
so let's say he returns the four instead.
Ordinarily, declarer would play the
eight from dummy in the hope that
West had the K-10-4 or Q-10-4, but
here, with the knowledge accumulat-
ed earlier, South goes up with the jack
to score his ninth trick.
Sadly, many experienced declarers
would fail to draw the obvious infer-
ence at trick one about the nature of
West's hand. East's king-of-diamonds
play clearly marks West with the five
other missing high cards, and South
should shape all his subsequent plays
to fit that assumption.
� 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


by Steve Becker


by Freddy Groves
When you hit the 15-year mark,
were you offered a Redux bonus
and asked to stay for 20? Is that bo-
nus being offered to you now?
Also called the Career Status Bo-
nus, that "bonus" is anything but.
Those who accept it are in effect
agreeing to lose hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars in retirement pay
over the course of their lifetime.
Here are a couple facts to con-
sider:
* Taxes have to be paid on the bo-
nus, so it's not even the full $30,000,
unless you accept it while in a war
zone.
* On the alternate High-3 plan,
if you stay for 20 years, your retire-
ment will be based on 50 percent
of your highest three years pay. On
the Redux plan, after accepting the
bonus and getting out at 20, you're
locked in at 40 percent, with a one-
time catch-up increase at age 62. If


you retire at age 40, it's a long wait
until age 62. Your COLAs (Cost of
Living Adjustments) won't equal to
those on the High 3 plan, either.
If you don't stay in as agreed,
you'll have to pay back a share of
that Redux bonus.
I'll leave it to others to verify the
math, but it appears that to make
up for the amount lost over the
years, you'd have to take your "bo-
nus" and invest it at a 14 percent to
24 percent return, depending on
rank and length of service. Is any-
body getting that rate of interest
nowadays?
Why are so many servicemen
and women taking the Redux bo-
nus, in spite of how much they'll
lose? Bills to pay, most likely, and a
bad economy with nottoo many
potential jobs if they get out.
To check your own situation,
search online for "Redux bonus
retirement calculator" and plug in
your numbers.

Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475, or send e-mail to columnreply@gmail.com.
Copyright 2008 King Features Syndicate, Inc..


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S-rObserver


April 2009