Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00038
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: March 19, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00038
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

Full Text





Winter Park /Maitland


.Volume 21, No. 12
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY

*(BBANK
Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
SMember FDIC


Ciao spring break!
An Oviedo High School class
heads to Italy during the break..
Page AIO


Sradley dishes
Winter P5i 0-,a,,,r-elect Ken
Baj -,Loit h-r, vision.
Page A3


Big screen talent
The Florida Film Festival fea-
tures three local filmmakers.
PageA9


Business Briefs ............ A5
Community Bulletin ........A5
Cit Talks................A8
PlayOn! ................ A16
Legals.... .... .. A17
Marketplace...........A18
Games................A19


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Thursday, March 19,2009

Locally owned.

Locally produced.

Widely read.

www.WPMObserver.com


Students at St. Margaret Mary Catholic School celebrate St. Patrick's
Day Tuesday in full Kelly green regalia. The students danced and sang songs
with a Celtic flair, while authentic Irish teachers played ditties from the old
country in honor of the Emerald Isle's most celebrated patron saint.


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1 School begs parents

S for donations


ISAAC BABCOCK
:E .'Er; STAFF

Last Thursday let-
ters started landing
in parents' mailboxes
all over Winter Park.
What they said would
shock the Orange
County School Board
and get parents up in
arms, but ready to help
save their school sys-
tem from their own
wallets.'
The letter was a
plea from Audubon El-
ementary School Prin-
cipal Trevor Hohohan,
asking for $500 to pay
for education fund-
ing for each student at
the school. And he was
asking the parents to:
donate it.
The reaction was
mixed from the School
Board, questioning
the decision to go di-
rectly to parents, with
the Board's lawyers
questioning wheth-


er the idea was even le-
gal. For some parents,
the idea was too good
to resist.
William Shallcross,
a parent of an Audu-
bon student, wanted to
help immediately, of-
fering to get the word
out that the school
had a plan to save it-
self from a $500,000
budget cut coming
next year. He wanted
to assure parents that
the money would be
going straight back to
their kids.
"I'm developing an
action plan to make it
unambiguous for any
donor to know how
the school is going to
use the money," Shall-
cross said. "If I' Fm go-
ing to go out and do
fundraising, I'm going
to need to be able to
tell people that it's not
just going into a dis-
cretionary fund."

> turn to AUDUBON on A7


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -- THE OBSERVER
Hoping for a helping hand, Audubon Elementary's principal has
asked parents to donate $500 per student to save teachers' jobs.


FBI: Meeting didn't break any laws


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
FBI spokesman Dave Cou-
vertier said Monday that
the agency did call Mait-
land \mayoral candidate
Patricia Fox about a meet-
ing she had with two city
councilmen.
"Contact was made with
her by the FBI," Couvertier
said, "however there did
not appear to be any feder-
al crime committed based
on the initial informa-
tion."
During the meeting
with Councilmen Jeff


Flowers and Phil Bonus and
several residents, Fox said
she felt they were trying to
convince her to suspend her
campaign for mayor. Flow-
ers and four of the residents
said that wasn't the case, but
that they were just trying to
get to know the candidate.
Fox, who lost her bid for
mayor last week, said she's
fine with the agency not
looking' further into the
matter because she never
felt threatened. "For me it
was more trying to dissuade
me," she said.
Flowers, who was on va-


cation when interviews for
the March 5 article "FBI asks
Fox about meeting" were
conducted, wasn't surprised
by the agency's findings. "I
didn't think much of it ini-
tially, and I still don't," he
said of the meeting.
Fox also filed a com-
plaint with the Orange-Os-
ceola State Attorney's Office
at the urging of a resident.
That complaint is being pro-
cessed. "I don't think there
was any criminal intent, so
I don't know what they're
looking for," she said.
Incumbent Mayor Doug


Kinson beat out Fox on
Election Day, taking 68 per-
cent of the vote.
"I had very little money
to go and didn't have the
ability to do three different
mailings in order to reach a
lot of the residents," she said.
"But with less than $2,000, I
think we did very well."
She hasn't ruled out a
run for elected office in the
future, and said she plans
to stay active in Maitland's
government as a member of
citizens' boards.
"I had a blast," she said of
her run.


Member FDIC


-I







Page 2 Thursday, March 19, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer




News-


Three years celebrating the arts in Baldwin Park

Artists show off their handiwork at Baldwin Park's Third
Annual Arts Festival on Saturday, March 14. More than
80 artists packed The Village Center to display and sell their
works in the middle of Baldwin Park, with art ranging from
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Thursday,- March 19, 2009 Page 3


'sntpyor steps in Mond1


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Ken Bradlev said he has hit craft an agenda and we'rego- prop
-," the ground running, even ing to begin speaking with the A. E-
before becoming the new Commission about the Arext
mayor of Winter Park. The step."
mayor-elect was voted into One of his proposed ch ig-
'- office last Tuesday, ousting es may already be in pflce,
incumbent David Strong when he bangs the gavel, at.
after his first term in office. Monday's Commission m
Now it's Bradley's turn to ing. He'll have taken the oIt
try to make good on cam- of office at the start of t
paign promises he made meeting. By the end of n
in the last two months. He ings he's hopingithec ftk.
Sl, .i;, i h haic lreadv lstartedl rei-d nIrk thlou h mal\e nanci


* .


"There, are two pai..
a action
9m ened sai0&,


not in his., f.
#-the. Co


make more decisions so the coriidor
Commission spends less time up.
grappling over them. "I've
To that end, Bradley said talked t<
he's already started getting ac- said. "Th
quaintedwiththe innerwork- air on th
ings of the staff offices. He's I
"We've already begun optlmlis
working with city staff," he. by his f
said. "I'm very appreciative of empty u
and believe.the city is hi great and keej
hands with them. We've aisp. .b f
begun looking into the 2010. oto
budget and asking the de- be'.ol
mepts to bring us' up to. Bt- te
ed.1" t t.." i .
e's hoping to put to bed ahead t1
Immediately fears of. salary y.m
4 wage freezes in futiage :- a as
budgetss. which' he'-wi -' es
Y ly ,opposed durin-g
ose measures ...


S 'is ip

walked the a
o.merchfai,
here's a breath '(d
ie avenue right now."
hoping that newfound
m will be bolstered
rnomised ilans to fill
nits aloihg the streets
phe dtys dowstown
o.onaya-ight w hetV:
kI*'' "! TL.'. 1*li'.' ---iA ^-Z.;J ..^*.1 .. ':.


Three Maitland councilors push for funding in D.C.


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF

Three Maitland City Council mem-
bers will trek to the nation's capital
Thursday, March 26, to put a face on
the city's plea for federal dollars.
"The most important thing is
to keep a local presence up there,"
Councilwoman Linda Frosch said.
"Personal touch is always impor-
tant."
Frosch and Councilors Phil Bo-
nus and Jeff Flowers will meet with
congressional delegates, including
Sen. Mel Martinez, to discuss proj-
ects for which they're requesting
funding.
"We aren't the biggest fish in the


Orange County pond, so we need
to be a little bit more vocal," Bonus
said.
Their plane tickets and the one-
night hotel stay will run the city
about $1,500, City Clerk Maria Wal-
drop said.
Staff and the city's lobbyists iden-
tified priority projects, including a
renovation to the 20-year-old water
and recreation building that is used
as an emergency operations center
during hurricanes.
"The project is essential for the
continued use of the EOC at the ex-
isting site as a safe and secure facil-
ity," the letter from staff states.
The document also outlines a
$2.5 million funding need for a com-
muter rail station parking facility, a


$1.7 million upgrade to the public
safety radio system, and $600,000
to preserve 10-acre Battaglia Park,
which is one of the last remaining
undeveloped tracts of land with a
mature hardwood forest.
Also requested is $1 million to
put toward the renovation and ex-
pansion of the Maitland Art Center,
which is applying for National His-
toric Landmark status. The Mait-
land Public Library is also on the list
for the creation of a master plan, a
cost of about $150,000.
Of the nine projects on the list,
Flowers said they'll get funding for
two at the most, and it could take
years.
"We're telling the federal officials
if you give us this money we're go-


ing to manage it and be good stew-
ards," he said. "We worked heavily
over the last three years for the po-
lice funds we just received."
Last week, Maitland was award-
ed $170,000 for its computer-aided
police-dispatch system, one of more
than 350 earmarks for Florida in a
$410 billion federal spending bill.
Several cities have partnered
with University of Central Florida
students to develop the software,
which allows police officers to sub-
mit information to the same elec-
tronic network, Flowers said. It
solidifies interagency cooperation
and keeps the police on the streets.
"None of this .would have hap-
pened if we didn't go up to Wash-
ington," Flowers said.


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First Colony Bank settles in


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF

A 31,000-square-foot office building is the
newest addition to the community rede-
velopment corridor in Maitland.
The building, called Northbridge Of-
fice Centre, is a piece of the city's plan to
revitalize the 2-mile-long Highway 17-92
business district, built in the 1950s and
60s.
Northbridge, a Trevi Development
project, is the new home of Maitland's
only locally owned community bank, First
Colony Bank of Florida. A ribbon cutting
was held March 12.
Maitland Chamber of Commerce Exec-
utive Director Mary Hodge said Fifth Third
Bank started out as a Maitland-based bank
but has been sold several times, losing its
"hometown flavor." ,
"Maitland is smaller than its surround-
ing communities, and now we have a
hometown bank," she said, "and it's also a
good anchor for our new downtown that
is gaining momentum."
Maitland's commuter rail station will
be built on this site and the neighboring
Parker Lumber site.. '
"It was somewhat incredible when we
held the ribbon cutting to be able to look
out and envision the commuter rail sta-
tion right outside their front door," Mayor


Doug Kinson said.
Developer Vincent Pellicane, Trevi
president, said last March that the de-
velopment will have almost 200 feet of
train tracks running across it and he will
eventually provide 255 parking spaces for
commuter rail riders.
Kinson said that as far as he knows,
Northbridge is the first building complet-
ed on any commuter rail site.
"It's a good location now without a
doubt," said Bruce May, president and CEO
of First Colony and longtime Maitland res-
ident. "With commuter rail, it goes from a
good location to a great location."
First Colony was in a modular facil-
ity for about a year while it waited for
its new digs. The new location features a
full-service ATM, a night.depository, drive-
through tellers and safe deposit boxes.
"We couldn't have any of those over at the
old facilities," May said. "It enhances our
product offerings."
The days of customers parking in a
gravel lot are over, he said, with paved
parking allowing easy access in and out of
the bank.
First Colony is currently the only ten-
ant in the building, but Pellicane said he
has a host of prospective occupants lined
up.
"We're pleased to have first colony as
a tenant," Pellicane said. "We're looking
positive in 2009."


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -THE OBSERVER
Banking on new business, First Colony Bank just moved into a new building in Maitland. It
will be adjacent to a commuter rail station, providing parking for riders.


Winter Park


Arrests
Someone was arrested on the 2600 block of West Fairbanks
Avenue on March 9 for driving under the influence.
Someone was arrested on the 900 block of West Fair-
banks Avenue on March 8. They were arrested for driving with
a suspended license, possession of oxycodone, possession of
marijuana, and possession of drug paraphernalia.
For driving under the influence, someone was arrested on
the 600 block of South Orlando Avenue on March 8.


and Shoreview Avenue on March 8 for loitering and prowling,
and fleeing and eluding.
On March 8, someone was arrested on the 400 block of
South Harper Street for driving under the influence.
Near the corner of Aloma Avenue and Sylvan Drive, some-
one was arrested on March 8 for driving under the influence:
Someone was arrested near West Fairbanks Avenue and
Interstate 4 for driving under the influence, possession of
marijuana, and possession of drug paraphernalia on March 8.


March 8 to March 14
Noise complaints
Police received a noise complaint on the 100 block of South
Orlando Avenue on March 8. The noise came from a loud par-
ty.
Police received a noise complaint on the 500 block of West
New England Avenue on March 8. The noise came from a loud
party.
Police received a noise complaint on the 2500 block of Via
Tuscany on March 9. The noise came from a loud party.


Someone was arrested near the corner of Killarney Drive











S.Winter Park-/ Maitand

Observer
Established in 1989 by GerhardJ.W Munster
Published Thursday, March 19,2009 CONTACTS Volume 21, Issue Number 12
PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor REPORTERS COPY EDITORS
407-563-7009 Jenny Andreasson Jonathan Gallagher Josh Garrick
kyle@observemewspapers.com 407-563-7026 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com 407-304-8100
jennya@observernewspapers.com -
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jenny Andreasson ADVERTISING SALES
Jenny Andreasson Isaac Babcock jennya@observernewspapers.com Tracy Craft
407-563-7026 407-563-7023 407-515-2605
jennya@observernewspapers.com isaacb@observernewspapers.com COLUMNISTS tcraft@observernewspapers.com
Chris Jepson
DESIGNER LEGALS I CLASSIFIED Jepson@MediAmerica.us INTERN
Stephanie Erickson Jonathan Gallagher Brittni Johnson
407-563-7040 407-536-7058 Louis Roney
stephanie@observernewspapers.com legal@observernewspapers.com LRoney@cfl.rr.com

Member of: P.O. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Drive
Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32825 USPS 00-6186
Maitland Area/Winter Park/ -SSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-563-7000 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
..................................................... .. ....... Winter Park / Maitland Observer@ 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 4 Thursday, March 19, 2009 ,






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Thursday, March 19, 2009 Page 5


vviILet rdu i/ mValiain 1serei V-


Business
Realtors David Francetic- and located in Winter Park, ranks as one Kelly Price and Co., a small real added Andy Matthews and Jack in Orlando, managed and leased
Shelley Heistand have formed a of the eight most "green" homes in estate company in Winter Park, Ballard to their real estate team. by the Allen Morris Co., has earned
partnership and will operate as the the state. has reported $125 million in closed Together they bring more than 50 the U.S. Environmental Protection
Francetic & Heistand Team. They will property sales in 2008. years of experience in serving the Agency's Energy Star. Commercial
work out of Coldwell Banker Residen- SchenkelShultz Architecture, an real estate needs of Central Florida. buildings and industrial plants that
tial Real Estate's Park Avenue office in Orlando-based firm, designed Or- Palmer Electric Co. has completed rate in the top 25 percent of facili-
downtown Winter Park. ange County Public Schools' new its tenant improvement contract NAI Realvest recently negotiated ties in the nation for energy efficiency
Memorial Middle School in Or- with Turner Construction Co. for a sublease agreement for 2,564 may qualify for the Energy Star.
The U.S. Green Building Council has lando. The campus was redesigned the electrical wiring and fire alarm square feet of office space in Mai-
acknowledged Phil Kean Designs using the academic house concept, system for Dynetech Corp.'s 40,000- tland. Mary Frances West brokered Mary Ann Morgan of Winter Park
as a participant in LEED for Homes. with each grade level located on a square-foot corporate headquarters the transaction, representing the has been elected to the Board of
LEED stands for Leadership in En- separate floor to create small learn- in Orlando. landlord Realvest Partners. Governors of The Florida Bar.
ergy and Environmental Design. Phil ing communities.
Kean Designs' newly certified home, Fannie Hillman and Associates has Pembrook Commons at Maitland


Community
Chris Berube is a member of the line and in the Chamber e-newsletter. showdown between the Eagles and oping diabetes. You can take the test ers getting to and from their jobs. The
Lycoming College men's lacrosse Visit the Winter Park Chamber of Lake Mary in the state semifinals online by visiting www.diabetes.org/ shelter project. alone will create or
team. Berube, a sophomore general Commerce Web site at www.winter- Thursday in Lakeland. Edgewater's risk-test.jsp. For more information on sustain more than 85 jobs.
studies major, plays the midfield po- park.org for details and a "work day" team includes Alexis Prince, a fresh- diabetes alert day visit www.diabetes.
sition. He is a resident of Winter Park application, man, who is the Metro Conference org/alert or call 1-800-DIABETES. The United States Tennis Associa-
and a graduate of Lake Howell High co-player of the year. tion posthumously honored Patri-
School. Cathaleen Nelson Graham, a resi- Congressman Alan Grayson ac- cia Graham from Winter Park with
dent of Winter Park has earned The Orange County Health Depart- knowledge one of the benefits of the 2008 Seniors' Service Award. It
Patrick Chapin, new president of an associate degree in applied ment recognizes American Diabe- the American Recovery and Rein- is awarded on the basis of the recipi-
the Winter Park Chamber of Coin- science in nursing from Excelsior tes Alert Day on March 24 as a way vestment Act recently. The plan will ent's willingness, cooperation, and
merce, announced that he will be College. Excelsior College is an in- to raise awareness about diabetes in supporttransitagenciessuchasLYNX, participation, either in play or organi-
working a shift a month-at different stitution that focuses on the needs of the community. American Diabetes which plans to build new shelters at national work for the betterment and
Chamber, businesses. Participants working adults. Alert Day is an opportunity for those bus stops all along the workforce cor- furtherance of senior competition in
will be selected by his staff from sub- at risk of developing type two diabe- ridors of Central Florida. LYNX plans tennis.
missions made by local businesses The Edgewater Lady Eagles bas- tes to take the Diabetes Risk Test. By to spend nearly $2.8 million in recov-
and organizations. The experience ketball team is headed to the state answering a few questions, you can ery funds to build 120 shelters at the
will then be highlighted monthly on- semifinals. It will be a Central Florida determine if you are at risk for devel- bus stops most often used by work-


L WE EMEMBER..o
The March 12 article "Hough dedicated until last day" incorrectly
stated the day of the week of former Mayor Homer Hough's funeral. Mr. Joseph Lampkin, 77, of Orlando,
It is 6 p.m. Saturday, March 21, at Baldwin Fairchild Funeral Home. Fla., died Wednesday,March 11,2009. Arrangements are being anded210N.
Also, the Council declared March 9 as Homer Hough Day, not May 9, Mr. Wilbur Adams, 55, of Orlando, PennsylvaniaAve. in WinterPark. Call
as was previously reported. Fla., died Saturday, March 7, 2009. 407-740-6784 for more information.










City gets nod from National Geographic


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF

Winter Park is the 38th most
desirable historic place to.
visit in the world, accord-
ing to a ranking by National
Geographic Traveler maga-
zine,
The annual Places Rated
survey ranks sites and mea-
sures how well they have
weathered time and the
pressures of mass tourism.
Winter Park placed right
after fellow Sunshine State
city St. Augustine.
"This gracious town man-
ages to retain its reputation
as an oasis within the hel-
ter-skelter growth of Cen-
tral Florida. Brick streets
(which provide natural
drainage into the aquifer)
are still found throughout,"
the magazine states.
Winter Park Senior Plan-
ner Lindsay Hayes said the
ranking is significant be-
cause it promotes tourism
to the little city, especially
those who want to witness
"the charm of old Florida."


"If you want to go to the
new shiniest mall you can
go somewhere else," Hayes
said. "We're the real Florida,
but you can still have a won-
derful lunch and go shop-
ping."
But National Geographic
did warn that that special
quality could be tarnished:
"The location does run the
risk of losing its'old Florida'
feel to too much 'new Flori-
da' architecture."
"It not only shows that
Winter Park is doing what
we can to preserve what we
have," Community Redevel-
opment Agency Manager
Sherry Gutch wrote in an e-
mail, "but needs to continue
to do more."
On Feb. 23, the CRA ap-
proved two economic in-
vestment initiatives tar-
geting Park Avenue, the
shopping district. The first
involves retail expert Britt
Beemer conducting two
studies to identify what av-
enue merchants can do to
boost their customer base.
The second initiative in-


Ri-, rHi' fi, ISAAC BABCOCK IHE :B -.':FR
Casa Feliz was named to the National Register of Historic Places on Dec. 31, 2008. The home, now used for special events, is just
one of the historic structures that earned Winter Park the 38th spot on the National Geographic Traveler's Places Rated survey.


volves qualifying for "his-
toric district" status on the
National Register of Histor-
ic Places something that


adds more than an educa-
tional benefit, Hayes said.
"In dollars and cents it
makes 'perfect sense to do


that because you are pre-
serving the draw for why
you would come* here,"
Hayes said.


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Psnp R Thursdav. March 19, 2009


F


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Thursday, March 19, 2009 Page 7


AUDUBON I Winter Park principal to discuss funding with new mayor


< continued from the front page
With a child at Winter Park High
School already, Shallcross knew
that parent fundraising could
work. The Wildcats already have a
fundraising organization set up to
ensure the school meets its budget
every year, regardless of state and
local shortfalls.
Honohan had already "taken
the bull by the horns," he said, and
begun spreading news of the pro-


gram since January. It would have
to work, he said, or eight teachers
would be laid off to pay for a budget
in the red.
Shallcross said that it might be
possible to use Winter Park's fund-
raising model to help Audubon
Elementary. The school's funding
problems hit home for him. One of
his children is still enrolled there.
So far parents' reaction to the
plan is positive, but the money isn't
pouring in yet. That's because the


word is just starting to spread, de-
spite the letters that have already
hit parents' mailboxes, Shallcross
said.
Winter Park High School Prin-
cipal Bill Gordon said he plans to
meet with incoming Mayor Ken
Bradley to spread the word from
the official desk, of the city. It's all
designed to help a school that has
never been involved in a full-blown
fundraising effort to save itself be-
fore the next budget hits.


With official state funding not
secure until the end of April, the
school won't know how deep in
the red it'll be until then, and even
at that point the budget may not be
finished.
"It's going to take a lot more of a
community effort than just relying
on state money," Shallcross said. "I
can't think of anything more im-
portant than education."


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Paae 8 Thursday. March 19, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


City Commission
meeting topics
There will be a City Com-
mission meeting held at
3:30 p.m. on Monday, March
23, in City Hall Commission
Chambers. Below are a few
topics of interest:
Oath of Office:
Newly elected Mayor Ken
Bradley will be adminis-
tered his Oath of Office by
The Honorable -Lydia. Gard-
ner, Orange County Clerk of
Courts.
Mayor's report:
Commission meeting
adjournment time.
Mayor and Commission
meeting process discussion.
Proclamation' for Na-
tional START! Walking Day
Consent agenda:
Approve the minutes of
March 9.
Approve award of IFB-
11-2009, Construction of
East Gate Lift Station, to
Price Construction; $65,500
Accept the Comprehen-
sive Annual Financial Re-
port
Approve the three-year
conditional use extension
for the Mayflower Retire-
ment Community expan-
sion at 1620 Mayflower
Court.
Action items requiring
discussion:
ASTRO Project 25 up-
grade
Property purchase at
796 Nicolet Ave., to be used
to create a. regional storm
water treatment facility.
Winter Park Public Li-
brary's supplemental fund-
ing request.
Public hearings:
First reading of ordi-
nance adopting new land-
scaping regulations.
First reading of ordi-
nance adopting new irriga-


I was once told to always
remember that a campaign
is different than being an
elected official. Campaign-
ing is a time when you out-
wardly look to connect with
voters of your community
in order to relay your posi-
tion on the issues such that
they are able to discern the
differences between the
candidates. Being an elect-
ed official is the time when
you actually make decisions


tion regulations.
First reading of ordi-
nance adopting new sub-
section (g) "Portable signs."
Non-action items:
City manager's report.
Electric Utility review.
You can find the Com-
mission's full agenda and
more detailed information
on specific agenda items by
logging on to the city's offi-
cial Web site at CityofWin-
terPark.org and clicking on
"Government" then "City
Commission."

Mayoral election
results
On behalf of the city staff,
thank you to Mayor David
Strong for his dedicated
service to our city. His com-
mitment to our community
is greatly appreciated and
we thank him and his fam-
ily for their dedication and
continued support.
We also congratulate
Mayor Elect Ken Bradley.
We look forward to working
with Bradley to continue to
serve the citizens of Winter
Park, the City of Culture and
Heritage.

Economics of historic
preservation
Winter Park provides an ex-
ceptional quality of life and
sense of place for its resi-
dents and visitors. You are
invited to learn how pre-
serving that sense of place,
as reflected in its historic
resources, can continue to
enhance the quality of life
in Winter Park. Noted ex-
pert Donovan Rypkema
will give a presentation on
the "Economics of Historic
Preservation" at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, April 8, in City
Hall Commission Chambers
located at 401 Park Ave. S.


that will positively impact
your community.
To me, campaigning al-
lows you to further connect
with residents throughout
the community and allows
you to hone and fine-tune
your perspective on any is-
sue. There is something
about knocking on the
door of a friend and hear-
ing them voice their oppo-
sition to your stance, just
as there is something about


Winter Park City Talk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER


discussing the issues of the
day to somebody you have
never met and having that
resident see your side of it
and want to put your sign in
their yard.
I often drove though
neighborhoods, stopping
at homes where residents
were. busy working in the
yard. Every person was glad
to talk, no matter how the
discussion progressed. In'
the end, I would always ask
if they would like a sign to
put in their yard. Fortunate-
ly for me, most of them said
yes. It was in those moments
that I knew I must be doing
something right as most felt
as I did" on a wide majority
of the issues.
Although it is easy to say
now, I am thankful that I
did not run unopposed.
Having an opportunity to
connect with homeowners
associations, businesses and
citizens only comes when


This lecture is free and open
to the public.
Donovan Rypkema is
the Principal -of PlaceEco-
nomics, a Washington, D.C.,
based real estate and eco-
nomic development firm.
He is the author of numer-
ous publications and his
articles have appeared in
the Journal of the Ameri-
can Planning Association,
Architectural Record, The
Journal of Commercial
Bank Lending, Preservation
Forum, Real Estate Finance
and several Qthers.
For more information
regarding the "Economics
of Historic Preservation"
lecture or Winter Park's his-
toric preservation efforts
in general, please call 407-
599-3498 or e-mail Lhayes@
cityofwinterpark.org.

Winter Park Sidewalk
Art Festival
The city of Winter Park is
proud to host the 50th Win-
ter Park SidewalkArt Festival
this weekend, Friday, March
20, through Sunday, Jlarch
22. We hope you find time to
experience this Winter Park
tradition that is known as
one of the most prestigious
art festivals in the United
States and attracts the most
talented artists from across
the country.

Green gardening in
Winter Park
From 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
on Saturday, March 28, the
Winter Park Neighborhood
Council invites you to take
a green approach to your
lawn and garden with ad-
vice from the Orange Coun-
ty Extension Office's Florida
Friendly Landscape Pro-
gram, and a Florida Smart
Plants seminar by Kristin
and Stephen Pategas.
This event is free to the
public,, although space is
limited, so registration is re-
quired. It will be held at the
Winter Park Welcome Cen-
ter located at 151 W. Lyman
Ave.
For more information


the voters have a choice to
make in the voting booth.
I have always believed that
having multiple candidates
run for a single seat makes
for more informed voters.
My thanks go out to all
Maitland residents who vot-
ed, both those who voted
for me and those who did
not. And my hope for future
elections is that more reg-
istered voters in Maitland
decide that elections are
important enough to voice
your opinion to vote and
that any resident who is not
a registered voter take the
time to register and become
more involved in the great
American process of cam-
paigning and running for
office.
Deciding to run for of-
fice, actually running for
office, and eventually being
elected to office, is one of
the most satisfying accom-
plishments of my life ex-


and to register, please e-mail
Lhayes@cityofwinterpark.
org or call 407-599-3498.

Bike from Park to Park
event March 26
Gov. Crist has proclaimed
March as Florida Bicycle
Month and the City of Win-
ter. Park Pedestrian and Bi-
cycle Advisory Board is cel-
ebrating by hosting "Bike
from Park to Park" at 8 a.m.
on Thursday, March 26. Bi-
cyclists will begin their ride
through scenic Winter Park
at Mead Gardens, located at
1300 S. Denning Drive, and
will conclude in Central
Park's West Meadowwith re-
freshments courtesy of Pan-
era Bread. Bike from Park to
Park supports the mission
to promote a viable and
safe pedestrian and bicycle-
friendly infrastructure.
The city of Winter Park's
"Green Local Government"
initiative is an environmen-
tal action agenda designed
to transform Winter Park
into one of the most con-
servational cities in Ameri-
ca by encouraging environ-
mentally friendly lifestyles
through alternative trans-
portation modes, such as
bicycling. Today, millions of
Americans engage in bicy-
cling because it is a viable
form of transportation, an
excellent form of fitness,
and it provides quality fam-
ily recreation.
Investing in road im-
provemtents such as bicycle
lanes, bicycle routes, off-
road trails and bicycle park-
ing to enable safe access for
all users are all ways the city
encourages bicycling. "Bike
from Park to Park" is an
additional way to encour-
age and promote alternate
forms of transportation.-
Those interested in par-
ticipating in this exciting,
green event are asked to
please RSVP by Monday,
March 23, by e-mailing traf-
ficguy@cityofwinterpark.
org or calling 407-599-
3233.


City chosen as a top
historic destination
National Geographic Trav-
eler magazine has ranked
Winter Park No. 38 in its
list of the world's top his-
toric destinations for its
fifth annual "Places Rated"
survey. The survey ranks the
world's top historic sites
and how well they have
weathered time and the
pressures of mass tourism.
The results, which included
cities across the world such
as Sydney Harbor, Australia;
York, England; Ghent, Bel-
gium; and Monticello, Va.,
were announced in the final
2008 issue of National Geo-
graphic Traveler.
This prestigious rank-
ing in National Geographic
Traveler refers to Winter
Park as follows: "Winter
Park's small downtown has
a commercial district with
some interesting historic
buildings and small busi-
nesses. It also has a nice
historic residential area.
There is a clear sense that
this is very much a place
where people live, work, go
to school not just a show-
piece-for tourists."
The judging panel of 280
travel experts was asked to
evaluate specific qualities
that make a destination
unique by measuring the
"integrity of a place" and as-
sessing its authenticity and
stewardship. Judging guide-
lines included six criteria:
environmental and eco-
logical quality, social and
cultural integrity, condition
of historic buildings and ar-
chaeological sites, aesthetic
appeal, quality of tourism
management, and outlook
for the future.
To review the entire His-
toric Destinations article,
please visit NationalGeo-
graphic.com/traveler.

Make sure to visit the
city's newly designed 'Web
site at CityofWinterPark.org

Call City Hall at
407-599-9933 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org


cept of course, for getting
married and raising three
outstanding kids. I highly
encourage anyone who has
contemplated representing
their community to plan ac-
cordingly, and take the steps
necessary to run for office. I
am not sure what the future
holds as I will, unfortunate-
ly, be "termed out" of the of-
fice of mayor after this term,
but whatever my future
holds, I relish the future op-
portunity and challenge of
being able to campaign and
connect with voters once
again.
Thank you to all of Mai-
tland for having the con-
fidence in me for another
three years!

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at It'sMyMitland.com


A campaign to remember


Paqe 8


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, March 19, 2009





VVIlW:i FC Ir rI-/ 4IIMIC IUkIt d Lh'pr IVlrThrda, ach1, 001ag1


Lifestyles


L


Locals featured in film festival


JENNY ANDREASSON

Three local filmmakers will make their debut at the 18th
annual Florida Film Festival in Maitland.
The festival, hosted by the Enzian'Theater, runs from Fri-
day, March 27, to Sunday, April 5. Organizers expect more
than 20,000 people to attend screenings of hundreds of
films at both the Enzian, at 1300 S. Orlando Ave., and Re-
gal Winter Park Village, at 510 N. Orlando Ave.


"Seventh Moon"
Maitland resident Robin Cowie is
best kilown for being one of the pro-
ducers of "The Blair Witch Project."
His film "Seventh Moon" starring.
Amy Smart will make its East Coast
debut at the Enzian midnight Satur-
day, April 4.
Although Cowie lives three streets
away from the Enzian, this is a home-
coming of sorts for him. The full-
length cut of "Blair" played at the
Enzian. long before the film gained.
notoriety.
"I've had a long and happy rela-
tionship with the Enzian, but this
is the first time one of our films has
been in the festival," Cowie said.
"Seventh Moon" depicts an Amer-
ican couple trapped in China during


Halloween.
"It's based on real Chinese my-
thology that happens every year on
the seventh moon," he said. "De-
mons called hungry ghosts roam the
countryside for one night... all kinds
of crazy things happen."
The University of Central Florida
grad's 8"-minute film will be re-
leased in October by Ghost House
Underground 'Lions Gate Films.

"Sam Rivers: Jazz Master
of the Moment"
Also new to the festivities is Sanford
resident and UCF radio,'TV instruc-
tor Stephanie Rice, who directed
"Sam Rivers: Jazz Master of the Mo-
ment."
Thedocumeritaryon the Maitland


musician will make its -World pre-
miere at .L30 p.m. Saturday, April 4,
at the Regal Win ter Par ilage.
Rice's film focused: o6f, the re-
nowned jazz nuisiciani .aid com-
poser's "Loft Era." During the 1970s,
Rivers and his wi fe, Bea, ran a noted
jazz performance loft called Studio
Rivbea in i.New York City's NoHo
district.
"His family lived upstairs but he
invited all the musicians to come
into his downstairs and jam," Rice
said. ..
There. were clubs, she said, but
the loft was a nt concept that at-
tracted the likes of Miles Davis and
Dizzy Gillespie.
Her team shot the 15-minute
film when Rivers. and all the folks
he used to perform with at the loft
converged at Columbia Universi-
ty. At 85, Rivers still performs on a
weekly basis. -
-"He's written over-.400 original-
compositi6ns and is still ws i,-
she said. !'He's a, pretty- a-asp ig-.
mian.

"Oviedo Chickens"
Full Sail grad Kevin Provost will get

>tiirnto FILM on page A13


r TECOESTeONCPTNALUEFURIHNSSOPN!'


349-351 N. Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789


Thursday, March 19, 2009 Page 9


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


16






Paae 10 Thursday, March 19, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Go i For Greater Orlando's Active Families


Family

Calendar


Children ages 11 to 15 can learn
the importance of leadership,
infant care, accident prevention
and basic CPR and first aid on
Friday, March 27 from 8:30 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. at the Oviedo Gym
on 148 Oviedo Blvd. The cost for
city residents is $45 and $60 for
non-city residents. The deadline
for registration is Friday, March
20 at 5 p.m. For more information
contact Jenette McKinney at:
407-971-5591 or jdmckinney@
cityofoviedo.net.

There is a My Tot and Me
program at the Oviedo Gym on
148 Oviedo Blvd. for children ages
one to four, on Sunday, March 29
from 9:30 a.m. to noon. There will
be games, craft time and much
more. The cost for city residents is
$5 and $8 for non-city residents.
Prepayment and registration
are required to attend. For more
information contact Jenette
McKinney at 407-971-5591 or
jdmckinney@cityofoviedo.net.

There is a Free To Be Me
program for children ages three
to five at the Oviedo Gym on 148
Oviedo Blvd., on Tuesday, March
24 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
There will be games, craft time
and much more. The cost for
city residents is $7 and $20 for
non-city residents: Prepayment
and registration are required to
attend. For more information
contact Jenette McKinney at
407-971-5591 or jdmckinney@
cityofoviedo.net.

Riverside Park in Oviedo is
offering a School's Out Fun Day
on Friday, March 27. Children aged
five to 12 can swim, play games,
and do arts and crafts. The cost is
$25 for Oviedo residents and $45
for non-city residents. For more
information call 407-971-5575.

This spring the Orlando Museum
of Art is hosting a variety of
art programs for students
entering grades one through five.
The session begins on Monday,
March 30 and will continue until
Friday, April 3. Students will learn
about American artists inspired
by Florida's sights. The spring
camp at OMA will include creating
masterpieces each day and
exploring the current exhibition
"Therman Statom: Stories of the
New World," a glass installation
by a Florida native.
Students will be able to do
a variety of art projects, from
watercolor painting to sculpture.
Call 407-896-4231 for more
information.


. e -


^y^^a ^e&
5*~n $pec "4'!


KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS
OBSErVER STAFF '


Medieval castles, gondolas, andpriceless artwork-a
faraway dream you say? Not for some lucky Semi-
nole County students who will be spending spring
break visiting the heart of Italy with teacher Mar-
zia Vitali. Oviedo High School is the only school in
Seminole County to offer four years of Italian for-
eign language classes, and Vitali, originally from
Rome, has been teaching Italian and Spanish for
12 years, in addition to offering a once in a life-
time trip for students.
"It's a nine or 10 day trip which-fits into the
scheduled vacation- time," she said. "Over the past
eight years we've had groups as large as 40 or-as
small as six." ..
-This year they will visit -Milan, Venice, Assisi,
Florence, Siena and Rome and see the Vatican, the
Colosseum, works of Michelangelo, leather facto-,
ries and Murano glass makingin Venice.-
"I know Italy very well and,can show my group


"This trip will allow me to visit my future
college and immerse myself in the Italian
culture," Jaye said.
.Of course as soon as they return, Vitali
will start planning next year's trip. "We try
to give everyone enough time to save for
the trip and I try to make it affordable so as
many students as possible can go."
Her students agree that this trip will help
them to fully experience the country, its cul-
ture, and their love for it.
"I'm going to Italy to immerse myself in
the culture and gain a once-in-a-lifetime
experience ... I've been taking Italian for 3
years now, and now I'm finally going to ex-
perience why," said Miranda Harmon, a ju-


places they would-not see on a regular tour," Vitali said..
..The trip is not sponsored by the school, but came about
from Vitali's desire to share her appreciation of the Italian
culture with her students. Vitali's husband is also from Rome
and both of their families still reside there.
What surprises her students the most?
"Well it is very different from Orlando where Disney cre-
ates a world that is basically artificial, compared to Italy
where they may b-e standing in a field looking at a castle that
was built in the time of Christ," shesaid.
Past trips have also included visits to Sorrento where they
sawlemons the size of a human head, night trips up the high-
est hill in Rome and sightseeing in Verona where Juliet's bal-
cony still beckons.
"My students love the country and the language and many
have returned to study and live there after they graduate,"
said Vitali.
Caitlin Jaye, a senior at Oviedo High and student of Vita-
li's for five years, plans on going to John Cabot University in
Rome after she graduates.


-aia tal's~alianst tl plst oa asCtrtravelingt


nior at Oviedo High.
Spring Break can't come soon enough for Vitali. "Where
else can you go that lhas such beautiful sights, wonderful
food, true Italian, and nice people who know how to have a
good time with life- all rolled into one place? We always have
a great time."

A* here e/<5e cn /cy 50 ad Z/1Cs ,IAS Suc

3eaid:fa/ s'Q/iz^k5, wondet/'/ food




-.... / -a/I '-o//ed mn o o'e ,P/3Ce? A i)e aely, ave
- a ,-lea.' ---.


- ~ Ma-z~ ~


Page 10 Thursday, March 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, March 19, 2009 Page 11


Cinema


Area movie tIIU 113(imsfrFid[ayzkMarch I' 20
Tiesmy e aid fo Saurda an Suday oo cal tobe ure


DUPLIDITY (PG-13) 12:15, 1:00,
3:50,4:30,7:00,7:45, 10:15, 10:45
I LOVE YOU, MAN (R) noon,
12:30, 2:30,3:15,5:00,5:45,7:30,
8:15,10:00,10:55, 12:30am
KNOWING (PG-13) 11:45am,
12:45, 2:35,4:00, 5:25, 7:20, 8:20,
10:30, 12:05am
THE LAST HOUSE ON THE
LEFT (R) 11:55am, 2:45, 5:30,
8:05,10:55
MISS MARCH (R) 5:10,9:50
RACE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN
(PG) 11:45am, 12:35,2:10,3:10,
4:55,5:35,7:15,7:55,9:45, 10:20,
12:10am
WATCHMEN (R) 12:20,3:40,
6:55,10:25
FIRED UP (PG-13) 12:05, 2:50,
7:40, 12:15am
TAKEN (PG-13) 11:50am, 2:20,
4:50, 7:05, 9:30, 12:20am
J.________/


MADE GOES TO JAIL (PG-13)
11:40am, 2:15,4:45, 7:35,10:05,
12:25am
CONFESSIONS OF A SHOPA-
HOLIC (PG) 12:10,2:40,5:05,7:25,
10:10, 12:35am
HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO
YOU (PG-13) 12:40, 3:45, 7:10,
10:35
THE CLASS (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15,
8:00,10:50
THE WRESTLER (R) 11:40am,
2:25,5:15,8:10,10:50
GRAN TORINO (R) 12:25,3:25,
6:50, 9:35
THE READER (R) 12:55,3:55,
6:45, 9:40
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (R)
1:05,4:10, 7:50,10:40




WENDY AND LUCY (R): 4, 6:30
TIMECRIMES (R): 9:00


'Knowing' Opens Friday


A teacher's son digs up a time capsule that contains a
message written in numbers that foretells worldwide disasters.


2 hours 2 minutes PG-13

Also opening Friday: 'Duplicity'
Ray and Claire, two ex-
lovers in the business of cor-
porate espionage, team up
to pull off a mammoth con
on their respective bosses,
but things get complicated
When their feelings get in the
way of the job.


2 hours 5 minutes PG-1 3


HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF METRO ORLANDO
:: ORLANDO, FLORIDA ::


2008 BUILDER CLOSEOUT SALE

BIDS STARTING FROM $175,000


FEATURING 25 NEW HOMES BUILT BY CENTRAL FLORIDA'S FINEST BUILDERS


ODenina next week


1 hour 34 minutes PG


Thursday, March 19, 2009 Page 11


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Paae 12 Thursday, March 19, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Culture

worthy of your calendar


(^4


Milestone anniversaries


.50 years at the Winter Park
Sidewalk Art Festival
It may have begun as a
small festival 50 years ago,
but the Winter Park Side-
walk Art Festival, March 20-
22, has become one of our
country's leading outdoor
art festivals each year at-
tracting more than 350,000
visitors over its three-day
celebration of fine art and
craft. Throughout its now
venerable history, the fes-
tival has been run entirely
by community volunteers
- an almost unbelievable
achievement for a festival
that has grown to include
international artists, 14
categories of art, and over
$67,1000 in prize money!
It may be that the 50-year
landmark worked to the
committee's advantage, be-
cause over 1,100'artists ap-
plied to exhibit this season
- with 225 accepted. In
other words, there is a pre-
judging of the art to ensure


a level of quality worthy of
a leading festival.

Why you want to go:
Everyone seems to have
his or her own reason for
attending this three-day
event, but for those of us
who live here, the festival
has become a sure harbin-
ger of spring. Through luck
and positive thinking, the
festival provides ts with a
weekend of almost assured
great weather in which to
stroll Winter Park's beauti-
ful downtown park filled
with white tents, which are,
in turn, filled with art. As
to variety, those tents will
exhibit the work of fiber,
glass, jewelry, photography,
sculpture, wood, graphics
and mixed media, as well
as fine art paintings. It's
free to view the art, and it's
a great way to support the
work of the artists as well as
your neighbors who work
so diligently to make this


event a success. More im-
portantly, it's a great way to
spend time with your fam-
ily: introducing the little
ones to the concept of what
art is or can be. For a full
schedule of events, visit wp-
saf.org.

Orlando Ballet celebrates
35th season
The Orlando Ballet will cel-
ebrate its 35th anniversary
season in performances
from March 27-29 with
three much-anticipated,
high-energy performances
that will also serve as the
debut for the company's
new artistic director, Robert
Hill. With all of the excite-
ment of a gala, the perfor-
mance will include solos,
duets and group perfor-
mances from the company
as well as guest dancers
and Orlando Ballet School
students. Do not miss the
opening number "Defile"
- often presented by ballet
companies to introduce the
whole company and the
future of the company by
bringing together dancers
from the main company,
Orlando Ballet II, and stu-
dents from the Orlando
Ballet School.

Why you want to go: This
gala evening will introduce
the company's new artistic
director in the best pos-
sible way by including
three works by Mr. Hill. Hill


is visibly excited when he
describes his duet "Revelry,"
a rousing pas de deux that
he created to hold the stage
with classic gala blockbust-
ers like "Don Quixote."
"Revelry" was seen by the
head of The Royal Ballet in
London who asked him to
do another "high-energy"
ballet which he did. We'll
see that ballet as well. It's
called "Piano Concerto #2."
In addition, Hill is creating
a brand-new piece so
new that he hasn't even
named it yet for the men
of the company. This high-
energy evening will also-
include classical ballet in
the "Diana and Acteon" pas
de deux, the "Dying Swan,"
and sections from "Cor-
saire" a dance including
pirates and harem girls!
Hill, who grew up in
Merritt Island, said, "One of
my goals is to change the
preconceived idea of what
ballet is. I know I've suc-
ceeded when I hear, 'I never
knew ballet could be like
that.' Of course we respect
the traditions, but it's my
job to bring it up to date -
to 2009. It's so satisfying to
work with these dancers
who are really hungry to re-
alize their talent and go be-
yond their wildest dreams."
The Ballet will present
its 35th Anniversary Cel-
ebration at the Bob Carr at
8 p.m. on Friday and Satur-
day, March 27 and 28, and 2


p.m. Sunday, March 29. Call
407-426-1739 or visit tick-
etmaster.com.

Shakespeare Theater
celebrates 20 years
In its 20th-anniversary
season, the Orlando Shake-
speare Theatre will perform
two plays (both by Shake-
speare) in "rotating reper-
tory." That means "Much
Ado About Nothing" will be
performed in the salhe five-
week period with "The Mer-
chant of Venice." The rep-
ertory idea goes back hun-
dreds of years to the days of
Shakespeare himself when
plays were written, re-
hearsed and "added" to the
repertory while other plays
were being performed. It's a
time-honored tradition for
Shakespearean theater.
In the first of the two
plays, we encounter Shake-
spearean lovers, always
known for their battles
with words. Beatrice and
Benedick (of "Much Ado")
are among Shakespeare's
wittiest. Mistaken identi-
ties and bald-faced trickery
eventually lead to love and
marriage.
The second play pro-
vides more young lovers
and more disguises, but
asks the very serious ques-
tion of what is mercy and
what is justice? Shylock, the
moneylender, has reason
> turn to GARRICK on next page


Financial


Straight Talk


with


Jim Dorman


Page 12 Thursday, March 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland- Observer









Calendar


During the month of March, Curves
of Winter Park West will partici-
pate in the 11th Annual Curves
Food Drive to benefit local food
banks. Anyone wishing-to donate may
drop off non-perishable food items at
Curves located at 501 N. Orlando Ave.
Monday through Friday during busi-
ness hours. For more information,
please call Angelika Bartenbach at
407-667-9100.
Celebrating Central Florida Photog-
raphers, an exhibit of photographs
taken by members of the Orlando
Camera Club, will run through April
26 at the Albin Polasek Museum &
Sculpture Gardens. The show features
37 prints by 12 local photographers.
A multimedia exhibit honoring the
heritage of Puerto Ricans and their
important role in forging Central Flor-


ida's history at the Winter Park Public
Library, 460 E. New England Ave., is
on display until April 18. For more
information, visit www.create.cah.
ucf.edu. Click on the image of Florida
with the Puerto Rican flag.
Winter Park Towers, a not-for-
profit active living community, is
seeking clothing donations for its
Thrift Store's annual fashion show to
be held on April 1. The purpose of the
fashion show is to generate aware-
ness for the Thrift Store. All pro-
ceeds generated by the Thrift Store
go to the WPT Resident's Council,
which uses its resources to purchase
various resident amenities and facil-
ity improvements. Anyone wishing to
donate clothing should contact.Camri
McCormick at 407-647-4083.
On Friday, March 20,.from 10:30


a.m. to 11:30 a.m. the Maitland
Public Library will be hosting blood
pressure checks by the Maitland
Fire Department. No registration is
necessary.
On Friday, March 20 from 6 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. the Maitland Public Li-
brary will be hosting a game night
for children ages 12 to 18.
The Moscow String Quartet will
perform a program of Russian mu-
sic on March 22 at 3 p.m.'in Tiedtke
Concert Hall on the Rollins College
campus. Ticket cost ranges from $30
to $40. On March 21 at 11 a.m. the
Quartet will perform a family pro-
gram for audiences of all ages, also
in Tiedtke Concert Hall on the Rollins
College campus. Tickets are $15 for
adults and $10 for students 18 and
Sunder. To purchase tickets or for more


information, call the Box Office at
407.646.2182 or visit www.bachfes-
tivalflorida.org.
The Orange Blossom Jubilee 2009,
Winter Park Day Nursery's fund-
raising event, will be held March 27
from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Winter
Park Civic Center, 1050 W. Morse Blvd.
The event will feature a sampling of
food from area restaurants, live and
silent auctions and entertainment.
All proceeds from the jubilee will be
used to fund the nursery. For more
information, contact Judy Nelson at
407-647-0505.
The Winter Park Neighborhood
Council is offering a Florida Smart
Plants seminar by two local land-
scape architects. Sign-in begins at
8:30 a.m. at the Winter Park Welcome
Center on March 28. The event is free,


but space is limited so registration is
required. Call 407-599-3498 for more
information.
The Orange County Retired Educa-
tors Association will meet April 2 at
10 a.m. at College Park United Meth-
odist Church, 644 W. Princeton Street.
Anyone who has worked in education
is invited to join. Visit our Web site at
ocrea-fl.org or call 407-677-0446 for
more information.
Join the Humane Society Legisla-
tive Fund at their nationwide Put
an End to Puppy Mills Party on
Sunday, April 19th at 6 p.m. at Whole
Foods Market at 1989 Aloma Ave. in
Winter Park. Every contribution will
help the HSLF's education and lob-
bying campaigns against puppy mills.
Please RSVP to 407-617-5572.


FILM I 'Oviedo Chickens' debuts at festival


< continued from page A9

his first taste of the Florida Film
TFestival when his short film "Ovie-
do Chickens" premieres at 1:30 p.m.,
Saturday, April 4, at Regal.
The six-minute documentary
details the significance of the herds
of free-roaming chickens in down-
town Oviedo. Provost interviewed


author and former Observer News-
papers columnist Ben Wheeler for
the film.
This is the New York resident's
first film festival.
"I hope a lot of people get to see
it," he said.
For more information about
these films and the festival, visit
FloridaFilmFestival.org.


GARRICK I Shakespeare, times two


< continued from the last page

to seek revenge, while a brilliant
young woman provides a thought-
provoking mixture of compassion
and poetry in a struggle that has-
intrigued audiences for centuries;

Why you want to go: Rotating
repertory is how the Shakespeare
Festival began 20 years ago.
It's a wonderful opportunity for
both the actors and theatre-goers;
the audience gets to see actors
"stretch" themselves in very differ-
ent roles, while the additional run-
ning time for the two plays allows
for longer rehearsals and more
in-depth performances. New lev-
els of appreciation are inevitable


. when you see the same actor act as
a generous host in one play only to
turn around and play a character
driven by vengeance the next.
"Much Ado About Nothing" and
"The Merchant of Venice" are be-
ing performed at the Shakespeare
Center in Loch Haven Park (across
from the Orlando Museum of Art)
now through April 26. Call 407-
447-1700, extension 1, for dates
and times.


: AGARRICK
Josh Garrick is curator of the Millenia Fine Art
gallery east of Maitland in Orlando. He is also
an art collector, writer and photographer. Gar-
rick can be reached at 407-304-8100.


Thank You!




Dear Winter Park Residents,


Thank you for your confidence and the opportunity
you have given me to serve as your Mayor for the
next three years. I look forward to working hand in
hand with all residents, city staff and City Commis-
sioners to insure that Winter Park has a bright and
successful future. I submit to you my commitment to
protect and enhance our way of life in Winter Park.
Thank you.


Respectfully,
Ken Bradley
Mayor Elect


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Ken Bradley,
nonpartisan, for Mayor of Winter Park


-1.


Thursday, March 19, 2009 Page 13


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Calendar









0 p nIo nt/


Perspectives

by...-


The many uses of history


I attended college so many
years ago, during a time
when a liberal arts degree
was still acceptable. This
was a pre-MBA era. For any
number of reasons, I ma-
jored in history and ended
up with a Masters in 19th
century European history.
Ah, the 19th century! A
great century for art. Today,
I lament ever so slightly the
fact that I didn't take more
literature classes. So many
books, sigh, so little time.
To a degree, we can
know our story. It is not like,
humanity has been writ- -
ing about itself for 200,000
years. Can you imagine if.
it were the year 200,009-
and you were enrolled in
a general World Civiliza-
tion course? Will the 20th
century rate a paragraph?
Seriously! Will we get even
a photo? We are so into our
events and times that we
understandably lose "our"
perspective.
But we've not been
writing about ourselves
for 200,000 years, maybe
6,000 or 7,000 years is the
approximate number.
We've been doing art far
longer than any critic's
quill has written on how
we should feel/think about
it. The Lascaux cave paint-
ings, located in France, are
sublime creations and are
17,000 years old. (A critic


then might have written
if she could have, "It's just
a bunch of bull!) It would
take another 10,000 or so
years for humans to create
written symbols for lan-
guage. My sister refers to
us humans as clever little
monkeys. Indeed. Nasty,
too. And violent.
But the story of human-
ity is only a few thousand
years old, and we can get
our minds and imagina-
tions around our story. Sure
there are many gaps in our.
knowledge. Even our mod-
ern times have lapses of
"factual" information. One
immediate example is the
former Bush administra-
tion's attempt to cloud the
record :on why we invaded
Iraq, a completely unnec-
essary, illegal, immoral
and tragically costly war
foisted off on America for
bogus, deceitful reasons. We
may never get the straight
"poop" from our govern-
ment officials, but histo-
rians will have enough of
the story to flesh out the
account.
Our history, some 7,000
years of it, has to varying
degrees been recorded and
can be absorbed, distilled
and taught. Ah, but there is
a rub and it is a major one.
Alas, sigh. We humans agree
on so little and history is no
different. Examine our eco-


logical history.
In the March edition
of Harper's Magazine is
a timely essay by Edward
Hoagland on dying and
its acceptance. Hoagland,
78, is a delightful writer.
He writes from a distinctly
male perspective that I do
appreciate. For any number
of considered reasons, he
accepts his mortality with
few regrets. He speaks poi-
gnantly about why he will
miss living. He doesn't want
to be alive, however, as our
fertility eats what's left of
dear ol' Mother Earth.
He writes, "Yet, we've
had too much fecundity; it's
now no virtue; it's eating
us out of house and home,
The strangulations of fe-'
cundity precipitate African
and Asian extinctions, and
there will be a worldwide
avalanche of these.
"Death will save me from
witnessing the drowned
polar bears, smashed el-
ephant herds, wilting frog
populations, squashed
primate refuges. Believ-
ing life has universal value.
I'm worn quite threadbare.
from caring already-as
early as age eighteen, I
knew a chimp and an
orangutan, and my concept
of genocide never excluded
them."
That is the price we pay
for knowledge. Oh, Eve!
What have you done? The
forbidden fruit was what?
Some suggest it was a meta-
phor for the knowledge of
the duality of life/living.
Good/evil, etc. Fecundity/
extinction.
I've had a growing
number of individuals an-
nounce, "I am not going
to read the papers, listen
to the radio or watch TV,
so, disturbing are today
events. I inwardly laugh
and think whatever we are


experiencing this moment
is but (x) when compared
to other "bad" historical
times. History has recorded
our story warts and all,
and believe me if you are
reading this you may have
only the foggiest idea of
how wretched humanity's
lot can be. Oh, sure, we
can read about the Black
Plague, the Hundred Years
War, the Trail of Tears,
the Holocaust, the Kill-
ing Fields, Stalin's purges,
Mao's marches or America's
200-plus years of slavery.
And that just scratches the
surface of our illustrious
history.
I was fascinated by a re-
cent story out of Brazil. A,
9-year-old girl was raped by
her stepfather and had an
abortion. The girl's mother
and the physician were
excommunicated from
the Catholic Church by
Archbishop Jose Cardoso
Sobrinho. The girl was preg-
nant with twins, and the
doctor said her tiny 9-year-
old hips wouldn't accom-
modate such a pregnancy.
For being concerned for the
health and welfare of the
9-year-old child, the family
and physician were kicked
out of the Church. It is too
funny. Except it isn't.
History has not been
kind to the many religions
spawned from our imagi-
nations. Did you know
the Pope wears red Prada
loafers? Yes, Prada. Did you
know there is a "small"
controversy going on right
now in Rome over who is
the "official" clothier of the
Pope? Too funny. That actu-
ally is too funny. Red Prada
shoes. And sometimes a
large white conical hat with
gold trim. The last word on
human fertility for millions
on the planet is determined
by an I-can't-possibly-be-


TLK JEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters to


Principal on the right track
I am 100 percent behindAudu-
bon Elementary Principal Trevor
Honohan in his solicitation of pri-
vate funds from the community
to supplement next year's budget
shortfall, and intend to pick up the
ball and run with it hopefully
with the support and involvement
of Orange County Public Schools
and the Winter Park High School
Foundation.
We all know these times are
most difficult, but there is a lot of
money in Winter Park. The city's
outgoing mayor solicited individ-
lal private donations of $100,000
to buy out a developer's interest in
a condominium project (purport-
edly) to block its construction and
protect the well-being of the city,
and received more pledges than
you would imagine.
Winter Park's mayor-elect, Ken
Bradley, includes in his action plan
to "Assure Winter Park schools are
consistently 'A' rated." I encour-
age the principals of WPHS and
its feeder schools to meet with


Mr. Bradley immediately to solicit
his involvement, cooperation and
assistance. I can assure you the
city has no funds to contribute,
but it can get the word out to the
community beyond the schools'
networks, perhaps through a reso-
lution and in its newsletter. I will
-volunteer to facilitate this meeting.
This weekend I will put together
an action plan and circulate for
your consideration.
P.s. Our family is personally
pledging $500 for each of our chil-
dren (one each in Audubon and
WPHS).
William Shallcross
Winter Park

Train noise disturbs many
The City Commission and the
lame-duck mayor killed quiet
zones in their Jan. 26 meeting by
a vote of 5 to 0. They are not both-
ered by the loud train horn whis-
tles at 2 or 3 or 3:30 or 5 a.m.
Perhaps they do not live in
mid-Winter Park although they
deftly plan development for it. This


NIMBY (not in my backyard) at-
titude was clear in their discussion
of legal issues regarding extending
restaurant hours for special events
on New York Avenue. "I would not
want restaurants near my home
community" was often repeated
by the elected officials. This is the
NIMBY approach to legislating
equitable community law. Some
might call it capricious.
No vocal constituency for quiet
zones currently exists in Winter
Park, so it was easy for the city
manager to convince the legisla-
tors that its priority was low. He
said that plans for the future com-
munity rail included quiet zones,
installing fewer than 14 quiet
zones was a waste, and failed to
disclose that CSX is allowed "an
unlimited number of freight trains
between the hours of 5 p.m. and
7 a.m. under the state DOT agree-
ment."
So the future holds increased
train noise. Trains will blow their
horns at 110 decibels at the dis-
cretion of the train engineer, who


wears specially designed protec-
tion to avoid deafness. Currently
most are set at 90 decibels.
The level exceeded EPA levels
for unprotected sound. The Fed-
eral Railroad Administration es-
tablished the 110 decibel level by
conducting extensive tests of cars
with windows closed, running mo-
tors, noisy air-conditioning on, and
passengers engaged in conversa-
tion. Both the elderly and youth
populations are especially harmed
by proximity to the noise. The City
Commission, the lame-duck mayor
and the city manager could care
less.
I for one am indignant. Every
Winter Park resident is affected and
is ill-served by the manager's and
Commission's priorities.
Stephen J. Ziffer
Winter Park

Winter Park voters apathetic
"In a Democracy, the people get the
government they deserve" -Alexis

> turn to LETTERS on next page


"with"-a-woman priest-
hood, led by a red Prada
loafer-wearing-celibate
priest. Hmmm? It's just
another case of "The Boys"
once again deciding for
"the girls" what's in their (a
woman's) best interestss.
Except in this particular
case the boys don't know
from Eve about women and
the head-honcho wears red
Prada loafers and a large
conical hat. Could you even
imagine such a sitcom?
And that, Dear Reader, is
a big, big theme in history.
Men telling women what
they can and cannot do.
But it's for their own good,
don't-cha see. It saves them
from having to think, don't-
cha know. Can they think?
It is reprehensible. It is
12th century. History will
judge us by what "good" we
did with the information
(knowledge) we had on
hand. We subjugate women
and knowingly consume
(destroy) our planet and
perversely call it God's will.
Imagine the history texts
5,000 years from now. The
entire 20th century may be
summed up with just a sin-
gle photo of an old, bent-
over white man, decked
out in a long, flowing dress,
wearing bright red Prada
loafers and a large conical
hat with gold embellish-
ments, sitting small in an
oversized ornate throne.
The caption will read:
"What were they thinking?"
We aren't. Thinking. His-
tory will say as much.


Page 14 Thursday, March 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






VV~A~flnt ~rdl /I NVItLancl flhepr- p ThrsdayMarchI1, 2009 Page-1


Editorial


Opinion/

LETTERS I Voter turnout sends message


< continued from last page
de Tocqueville
My disappointment over David
Strong losing the Winter Park may-
oral race to Ken Bradley nmorphed
to outrage after reading mayor-
elect Ken Bradley's assertion that
"The citizens have clearly said
there needs to be a new approach,
a new way of getting things done
[in Winter Park]" (Orlando Senti-
nel, March 12).
There are about 18,000 regis-
tered voters in Winter Park. What
a whopping 65 percent of them
said "clearly" is that they didn't


care enough about the candidates
(read, issues facing Winter Park) to
even vote.
Bradley's marginal victory con-
veys and confers little more than
a win. What it tells me is that the
city's merchants, believing that
their livelihoods depended on the
outcome, were able to rally more
votes for Bradley than Strong. And
the dog park dust up a most un-
important issue for the city's well-
being pushed Bradley over the
top. God bless us and keep us.
William Shallcross
Winter Park


"Copyrighted Material


vil Syndicated Content .


Available from Commercial News Providers"

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/.L.'It:i w


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~bI4bi


5 k -
.... .. ... ... -.


A Musical Adventure for All Ages

Moscow String Quartet


Saturday, March 21 at 11 am

on the Fred Rogers Family Series

Casual, hour long performance

$15 for adults, $10 for students


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F69243 9-2008
DOFU 9-2008
A02475-0708


Products are not federally
(FDIC/NCUSIF) Insured May lose
value No financial Institution
guarantee.


Thursday, March 19, 2009 Page 15


Wintpr Park / Maitland Observer


oa







Page 16 Thursday, March 19, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney


A fateful dream

L ast night I dreamed a
strange, scary dream.
I dreamed that our
American lives are being
controlled from above by a
mighty, unseen hand and
it isn't the hand of God!
This all-powerful hand
is leading our American
destiny inexorably toward
collectivism.
In this nightmare, Amer-
ican style individualism was
being eroded and replaced
by an ideological system
that we have historically.
distrusted and even feared.
Somehow, this fateful
dream grew out of my recall
of a several-days meeting
behind locked doors that
George Soros held some
summers ago in Phoenix
for a group of 60 of the


international super-rich.
When the media had asked
what the topic of the meet-
ings was, the answer was
"Marxism."
Afterward, in my article
titled "High Marx," I ex-
pressed curiosity as to how
the very rich could possibly
be fascinated by Marxism.
Then I recalled that a
number of dictators had
ridden into power wearing
the "socialist" label.
After all, NAZI is simply
an acronym for Hitler's
Nationalsozialismus Na-
tional Socialism.
Cuba's communist dic-
tator Castro grabbed the
top-dog spot by saying he
was eventually going to
deliver supreme power to
the Cuban proletariat the
common people. Dictators
such as Russia's Joseph Sta-
lin, China's Mao Tse-Tung,
Argentina's Peron, Yugosla-
via's Marshal Tito, and Ven-
ezuela's Chavez all found
the name Socialism tempo-
rarily expedient .'.
Usually, the dictator who
has seized power by riding
in on the "Marxist train"
has disembarked before the
last stop.
Marx's promised "dicta-
torship of the masses" has
thus often been neatly side-
stepped before the masses
got any power at all.
The absolute power at
the top simply adopts a
new title, takes command
of all armed forces, and
concomitantly wipes out all
other opposition.


Using this ruse, history
illustrates the usefulness of
flying the socialist banner
for a while, on the way to
achieving supreme auto-
cratic power.
For a long time, I've had
a queasy feeling that our
American democracy is be-
ing cleverly, but assiduously,
manipulated toward the
left.
Can we possibly identify
the destructive, subver-
sive power that I believe
is abroad in our land?
Are there several possible
sources? Importantly, who
would gain the most from
the annihilation of U.S.
capitalism?
Will a means to this end
involve a leftist takeover
of private enterprise by a
much-altered U.S. federal
government?
Such things are under
way even now: With tax
money, the government
has bought up controlling
interesting corporate big
losers such as AIG. (The top
boys still get bonuses!)
Additionally, haven't
Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac, CitiBank and Bank
of America, among others,
now lost their private sta-
tus?
In my bad dream, we had
recently elected a president
who looked like a socialist
to many of us before he was
voted in, and since then,
has acted to prove that we
probably were absolutely
right.
In a perilousrecession,


President Obama has spent
more taxpayer money
than all U.S. presidents
combined, and Treasury
Secretary Timothy Geithner
has overlooked the banks,
which most need fixing.
Obama's unprecedented
transfer of taxpayer money
into various governmental
areas was accomplished,
in my dream, in an atmo-
sphere of crisis and sleight-
of-hand haste.
The $787 billion stimulus
bill crafted by Nancy Pelosi
and cohorts was passed in a
rush by the House and Sen-
ate without anyone's hav-
ing had time to read it!
Strangely, the bill had
later lain on the president's
desk for four days before he
personally took it to Colo-
rado to sign.,
During his campaign,
Obama had expressed dis-
dain for "earmarks." How-
ever, the ensuing hotly-
contested $410 billion "om-
nibus" bill, signed by him
in private, contains some
9,000 earmarks!
So much for President
Obama's pledged word...
The governors of South'
Carolina, Louisiana and
Texas refused to accept any
of this bill's money,
The U.S. public was
tricked into buying insur-
-mountable debt via a trans-
ference of private industry
and wealth into govern-
ment hands, i.e., an act of
undisguised socialism.
Where were Obama's
promised five-day online


display of all unpassed bills
and transparency of all
bills' intricate contents?
This nightmare of mine
took place at a uniquely
vulnerable time in our his-
tory, when both our House
and Senate were dominated
by Democrats to such an
extent that no vetoes were
likely.
The Democrats had been
buying votes with every
available political currency.
In my nightmare, the
scenario depicted ways to
accomplish the "leveling"
to a third-rate nation of the
mighty American democ-
racy.
The steps to accomplish
this abysmal end included:
The debauching of the
American monetary system,
destroying the stability of
the dollar and the integrity
of our various stock ex-
changes;
The outsourcing of
American industry and
means of production;
The dumbing-down of
the American public by hir-
ing left-wing teachers at
all levels of public educa-
tion, and the defeat of the
voucher system;
The cooperation with
Hollywood left-wingers in
producing a plethora of
America-hating films;
The leftists' takeover of
all available American me-
dia outlets to promul-



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-- Syndicated Content "..


Available.from Commercial News Providers"


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Page 16 Thursday, March 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer








Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, March 19, 2009


Page 17


ices


IN TiFf CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNT,
fLORIODA PROCBATE Iu ,viSIC
HI 1|,:, sit'h' Cf xi,. l C i
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAXINE Z. BECTON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in
the estate of MAXINE Z. BECTON, deceased, File
Number 2009-CP-000241-0, by the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando,
FL 32801; that the decedent's date of death was
September 19,2008; that the entire estate consists
of assets designated as exempt; and that the
names and addresses of those to whom it has been
assigned by such order are:
BRENDAAKERS
12757 Coursey Blvd., No. 2124.
Baton Rouge, LA 70816
AMY AKERS LOWRANCE
15331 Honors Court Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70810
The property so assigned that is petitioned to
be declared exempt homestead is legally described
as:
Commence at SW corner of the. SW 1/4
of the NW 1/4 of Section 32, Township
22 South Range 30 East, Orange County,
Florida; thence run East along the South line
of the aforementioned SW 1/4 of the NW
1/4 for a distance of 30.0 feet to a point on
the Easterly right of way line of Crystal Lake
Drive, said point being the SW corner of the
point of beginning of the tract about to be
described; thence continue East for a dis-
tance of 219.04 feet into Lake Arnold; thence
run N 44 04' 45" W for a distance of 271.75
feet to a point on the Southerly right of way
line of Clemwood Drive; thence run West
along said right of way line for a distance of
30.0 feet to the Easterly right of way line of
Crystal Lake Drive; thence run South along
said Easterly right of way line for a distance
of 195.22 feet to the point of beginning.
Parcel I.D. no. 32-22-30-1408-00-141; located
at 901 South Crystal Lake Drive, Orlando, FL-
32806
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate including unmatured, contingent, or unliqui-
dated claims and on whom a copy of this notice is
served within three months after the first publica-
tion of this notice must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the de-
cedent's estate including unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED. '
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice Is
March 12, 2009.
Attorney for person giving notice:
PatrickA. Raley, Esquire
'"" frifantino ad Bermad n
180 S. Knowles Avenue, Suite 7
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 644-4673
Facsimile: (407) 644-4128
Florida Bar No. 264202
Person giving notice:
BRENDA AKERS
12757 Coursey Blvd., No. 2124
Baton Rouge, LA 70816
3/12, 3/19
IN THECIRCUIT COURT, OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2008-CP-002868-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAMES TOMMY BOWERS,
Deceased. '
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JAMES
TOMMY BOWERS, deceased, whose date of death
was December 10, 2008; Ale Number 48-2008-CP-
002868-0, is pending in the Circuit Court for Or-
ange County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida
32826. The-names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
-sAll creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims-or demands against decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served, must filetheir claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS.
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. '
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBUCA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. --
SALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is:
March 12,2009.
Signed on March 4,2009.
RICHARD A. LEIGH, ESQUIRE
Attomey for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 119591
Swann & Hadley, PA
1031 W. Morse Blvd., Suite 350
Winter Perk, Florida 32789
Telephone: 407-647-2777
JOCELYN M. CROSBY
Personal Representative
929 49th Street Ensley
Birmingham, AL 35208
3/12,;3/19

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Public notice is hereby given that, on the date and
at the time listed below, and continuing from day
to day until all goods are sold, we will sell at public
auction, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the ware-
house of United Stor-All, at 965 S. Semoran Blvd.,
Winter Park, FL 32792, the contents of the following
storage units containing household and/or business
goods, for rent and other charges for which a lien
on same is claimed, to wit.
DATE OF SALE: March 26, 2009
TIME OF SALE: 12:00 PM or thereafter
Martin Lane #193, Household Items; Sean Madden
#208 Household items, Furniture; Alicia Stinnett
#240 Furniture; Sean Morgan #416 Furniture,
Household Items; Salaam Alnur #44 Household
Items, Computer; April Hart #540 Household Items;
Hope Ligon #592 Household Items; Hope Ligon
#594 Household Items;
Auctioneer: Storage Protection Auction Services
-license 593. The above notice is to be published
once a week for two consecutive weeks. Said sale
-to be under and by virtue of the statues of the State
of Florida, in such cases made and provided.
Thank you
JORGE HITSCHFELD PROPERTY MANAGER
3/12, 3/19


IN THE CiR(i.ilT I.1.1RT FOR IRAN JE 1 ir i
FLi)mliA mOBATE liVi 'i 'l
FIi Nu 4, ".;'ri .I':y .ri:'iiiJl'lii..i
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TIMOTHY S. FEENEY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Timothy S.
Feeney, deceased, whose date of death was Dec.
18, 2008, and whose social security number is xxx-
xx-8824, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address bf
which is 425 N. Orange Ave., 3rd Floor, Orlando, FL
32801. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be -
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is:
March 12, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
James Scott Mills, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0913154
P.O. Box 2386
Goldenrod, FL 32733
Telephone: 407-538-2421
Personal Representative:
Thomas M. Feeney
P.O. Box 2386
Goldenrod, FL 32733
3/12, 3/19
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 09-DR-925-02D-L
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
ESPERANZA LEON, Wife,
and
HECTOR LEON, Husband
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLICATION
TO: Hector Leon
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution
of Marriage, including claims for dissolution of
marriage, payment of debts, division of real and
personal property, and for payments of support, has
been filed against you;The cause of action includes
Wife's claim for exclusive use, possession and title
(ownership) of real property located at 471 Eagle
Cir, Casselberry, FL 32707 legally described as Lot
1, Block G, Sterling Park Unit 3, according to the plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 18 pages 52 to 54,
Public Records of Seminole County, Florida. You are
required to serve a copy of your written defenses,
if any, to this action on Francisco Colon, Jr, of Law
Offices of Francisco Colon, Jr., P.A., Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is PO Box 948181,
Maitland, Florida 32794-8181, on or before Agril
9, 2009, and file the original with the clerk of this
.court at Seminole County Courthouse, 301 N Park
Ave, Sanford, Florida 32771, either before service
:oh Petitioner's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the petition.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, Including dismissal.
or striking of pleadings.
DATED this 5th day of March, 2009.
MARYANNE MORSE, CLERK
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Debra A. Jesperson
Deputy Clerk
3/19, 3/26, 4/2, 4/9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2008-CP-2225-0
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM L. GORE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in
the estate of WILLIAM L. GORE, deceased, File
Number 48-2008-CP-2225-0, by the Circuit Court
for ORANGE Coupnty, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801; that the decedent's date of
death was December 14, 2007; that the total value
of the estate is $3,750.40 andthat the names and
addresses of those to whom it has been assigned.
by such order are:
Name / Address
POLLYANNA MCKINNEY / 3108 Helen Avenue,
Orlando, FL 32804
JON T. GORE / 29851 Coconut Avenue, Eustis,
'Florida 32736.
DOUGLAS L. GORE / 2933 Oberln Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32804
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED'THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Adminstration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
'FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
March 19, 2009.
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Matthew H. Roby
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0505641
831 West Morse Boulevard
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-8065
Fax: (407) 647-3880
Person Giving Notice:
Pollyanna McKinney
3108 Helen Avenue
Orlando, Florida 32804
3/19,3/26


IFr THf ri (1 iT i" TfliT :f FOR i'R J I 'lE .(1rT
1 L' II' IA MII orE Llvil ii:J
Division: ProoaLe
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THOMAS A. KOHN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of THOMAS A.
KOHN, deceased, whose date of death was January
25, 2009, File Number 2009-CP-000311-0, is
pending in the Circuit Court for ORANGE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 North Orange Avenue, Orlando, FL 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this notice Is required
to be served, must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
March 19, 2009.
Signed on February 16, 2009.
MICHAEL J. CANAN
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 154967
GRAYROBINSON, P.A.
301 E. Pine Street, Suite 1400
P.O. Box 3068
Orlando, FL 32802-3068
Telephone: (407) 843-8880
SALLY M. KOHN
Personal Representative
2111 Huntleigh Pointe
Orlando, FL 32835
3/19, 3/26


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2008-CP-002134
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT S. BAZZO,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration has been entered in the es-
tate of ALBERT S. BAZZO, deceased, File Number
2008-CP-002134; by the Circuit Court for Seminole
County, Florida, Probate Division; the address of
which is P.O. Box 8099, Sanford, FL 32772; that the
decedent's date of death was July 2, 2008; that the
total value of the estate is $8,860.80, and that the
names and addresses of those to whom it has been
assigned by such order are:
Creditors: None
Beneficiaries: John Bazzo & Angela Bazzo, as
Co-Trustees of the Albert S. Bazzo Revocable
Trust dated 8/15/95, 601 Newport Ave., Alta-
monte Springs, FL 32701
SALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order of
Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS ORE
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
March 12, 2009,
James P. Panico, PA.
By James RP. Panico, Esq.
111 S. Maitland Ave., Suite 100
Maitland, FL 32751
(407) 647-7200
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No.: 105436
Angela Bazzo, Petitioner
601 Newport Ave.
Altamonte Springs, FL 32701
.3/12, 3/19


RONEY I A socialism nightmare


< continued from the last page


gate every socialist-leaning politi-
cal cause and candidate;
The loss of the traditional self-
sufficiency, responsibility, account-
ability, civility and patriotism of
American citizens;
The closing tight of American
borders to illegal immigration;
The allowance of U.S. employers
to pay unlawful low wages to ille-
gal immigrants;
The overt plan to grant citizen-
ship to all illegal aliens in order to
assure permanent political domi-
nation by the Democratic party;
Congress' shocking attempt
to abolish the heretofore secret
Union membership ballot;
The slow erosion of our wonder-
fully conceived Constitution;


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-10580-0; Div. 43A
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FILIPE JARAMILLO,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: FILIPE JARAMILLO
5474 Grove Crossing Boulevard
Orlando, Florida 32829
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint to Foreclose
Mortgage on the following described real property
located in Orange County, Florida, to-wit:
LOT 22, JOHN YOUNG CROSSINGS, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
.PLAT BOOK 35 PAGE 38, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF ORANGE COUNTY FLORIDA.
has been filed against you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on, Plaintiff's Attorney, whose address is: Swann &
Hadley, PA., 1031 West Morse Boulevard, Suite 350,
Winter Park, Florida 32789, on or before 4-13-2009,
and file the original with the Clerk of the 'range
County Court either before service on Plaintiff's at-
torneys, or immediately thereafter, otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for relief demanded
in the Complaint.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court
Administration at 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando,
Florida 32801, or call (407) 836-2000, within two
(2) working days of your receipt of this notice. If you
are hearing or voice impaired, call (800) 955-8771.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this
12th day of March, 2009.
LYDIA GARDNER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Kerry Brickner
Civil Court Seal
Deputy Clerk
3/19,3/26


The attack on American culture
and the English language.
My nightmare ended with the
U.S. a dumbed-down, "spread the
wealth Socialist society" ripe for
inclusion in a North American
Union alongside Mexico and Can-
ada, a Union soon to be swallowed
up in a Global Union of low-rate
socialist states.
Lots of the curious things we

have been doing recently fell into
logical place, after I woke up drip-
ping with perspiration.
I climbed out of bed, showered,
and got dressed.
I walked out into the beautiful,
free America, which before our
eyes may be changing into a tragic
nightmare from which there is no
possible return.


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by aBnding out the notarized affidavit immediately following ine ad run. In the nature, or lieu prices of anyKin
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Notice to Credilors $42 50vveek or any sale made pursuant to any qudi
Police of Sale 55.'weev any other publication or notic 1mng to a
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Paae 18 Thursday, March 19, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


TheMarketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars., Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626.

ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
Account Representative needed to work
on behalf of our company. 18+ needed
and must have computer skills. Accounting
experience needed. Any job experience.
Email to mclarkemployment111@gmail.
com for more information.

EXPERIENCED DRIVERS WANTED
Experienced Drivers W/ Class A CDL. Home
weekly, East Coast Runs, Fruit and Foliage
up and refrigerated back. MCT @ 800-814-
2934

DIAMOND CONSULTING INVESTMENTS
We need people that would work for us as
discreet shoppers. All applicants would be
given a free work guide. The requirement:
must be computer-literate, be devoted
and honest. For more details contact us:
asmith05@live.com

EXPERIENCED DRIVERS WANTED,
Experienced Drivers W/ Class A CDL, Home
weekly, East Coast Runs, Foliage up and
refrigerated back. Call MCT @ 800-309-
0942

OFFICE ASSISTANT
Oviedo Firm is looking for an office assistant.
Responsibilities will include receptionist,
filing,. general office help. Construction
experience helpful but not necessary.
Position will start.as a part-time position
with the possibility of full-time in the future.
Please fax resume to 407-268-3320






HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No' job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

CARPET/STEAM CLEANING
Special! 3 rooms $69, no hidden charges.
Powerful truckmount system. Quality
service for 33 years. Major credit cards. Call
1A1 STEAM. 407-366-3900.

GENERAL CONTRACTOR
General Contractor (25+ .yrs exp) --
Residential or Commercial construction
or remodeling roofing, electric,
air conditioning, carpentry, painting,
landscaping & more. CGCA 20769,
407-908-9694




DETOXIFICATION EBOOK
(4) Detoxification Ebook Super Sale: $7.99
each. http;//www.ebook-detox-patches.
org/order.html. How to Detox for Overnight
Pain Relief. Flatter Tummy Colon Cleanse.
Reclining Detox Migun Thermal Bed. 500
+ Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar. Carol Miller,
(407) 970-1483




Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.







V. *


GREAT HOME FOR RENT
3 bd 11/2 bth,2 gar,1800 sq ft. Northwood
Circle Subdivision. Near Winter Park Village.
Frank 407-645-2181

LAKEFRONT LIVING
Condo on Lake Maitland, with boat dock,
full-mirrored dining. 2 SPACIOUS bedrooms,
1 bath. Clubhouse with pool. QUIET. $850/
month. 706-825-6151 or 407-539-2706



FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.



MAKE THIS HOUSE YOUR HOME
Much care and planning went into the
rebuilding of this 1959 three-bedroom and
two-bath home. We've opened it up so that
when you walk in the front door you see
the huge backyard. This'home met all 2008
building codes and is so energy efficient the
electric bills have averaged less than $80
per month.
This charming home will be worry-free for
years. Priced at $185,000 it's a good value.
Owner financing will make it quick and easy.
to purchase. Call 407-396-6830 or 407-
592-7407 for a private showing or drive by
2106 Dorris Drive for a quick look. It is close
to Full Sail University and UCF and across
the street from a private school. Homes in
this quiet area feed into top-rated Winter
Park schools.
Features:
* New Torch down roof
* All-new high-efficiency a/c
* New aluminum soffit and fascia
* All new duct work
* New double-hung thermal windows (Solar
shield in Florida room)
* All new electrical wiring, receptacles,
switches, fixtures and service panel
* Window treatments throughout
* All new interior and exterior doors, locks
and hardware
* All new 150 amp underground service
* Reconditioned allergy-free terrazzo floors
*Underground'phone and cable.
* All new plumbing, plumbing fixtures;
faucets and water heater
* All new insulation, drywall
* Cable and phone in every room-
- Au nr-ew ',ii 'i-r' 5, 1 1d :ui -
* Extra receptacles in the kitchen
* New tile in baths, Florida room and butter's
pantry
* New all wood kitchen cabinets
* All new Energy-Star Frigidaire stainless-
steel dishwasher, refrigerator, stove,
microwave/hood
* Washer/dryer included
*No HO4
* No city taxes
* Central fire alarm system
* First-time buyer credit




Auctions
AUCTION! 882 Acres HUNTSVILLE
(ALABAMA) CITY UMITS. Saturday April
11. Just North-of 1-565. Sewer available.
Adjacent to Megasite. Garner Auctions, Inc.
garnerauctionsinc.com, Ken Garner ALSL
1002,877-914-SOLD.

Auto Donations
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON UNITED BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION Free Mammograms, Breast
Cancer Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing,
Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted,
(888)468-5964.

Building Supplies
METAL ROOFING. 40yr Warranty-Buy direct
from manufacturer 30/colors in stock,
w/all accessories. Quick 'turn around.
Delivery available. Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg,
(888)393-0335 www.GulfCoastSupply.com

Business Opportunities
100% RECESSION PROOF! Do you earn
$800 in a day? 25 Local Machines and
Candy $9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033
CALL US: We will not be undersold!

Sick-and-Tired of Struggling? STAYAT HOME
Get Out Of Debt Get Your Life Back $2000 to
$4000 WEEKLY Untapped Market ACT NOW!
1-800-508-0585 fatimak.com

Cars for Sale
Police impounds! 97 Honda Civic $500! 95
Toyota Camry $550! 97 VW Jetta $750! for
listings call (800)366-9813 Ext 9275

Police Impounds for Sale! 97 Honda Accord
$500! 97 Honda Civic $500!!! for listings call
(800)366-9813 Ext 9271


Honda Accord 95 $500! Acura Integra
94 $750! Nissan Altima 97 $800! Police
Impounds for Sale! hondas chevys jeeps! for
listings (800)366-9813 ext 9499

Health
ONLINE PHARMACY Buy Soma, Ultram,
Fioricet, Prozac, Buspar $71.99/90
$107/180 Quantities, PRICE INCLUDES
PRESCRIPTION! Over 200 Meds $25Coupon
Mention Offer:#91A31. (888)389-0461. tri-
drugstore.com

Help Wanted
HELP WANTED: No Truck Driver Experience-
No Problem. Wil-Trans will teach you how
to drive. Company Sponsored CDL Training.
(888)368-1205. Must be 23

OTR Drivers- Join PTL! Up to 34cpm.
Required 12 months experience and CDL-A.
Out 10-14 days. No felon or DUI past 5
years. (877)740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com

EARN Extra Income Mailing Brochures.
Weekly pay check! Free 24 hour information.
(888)250-8110.

$600 Weekly Potential$$$ Helping the
government PT. No Experience. No Selling.
Call: (888)213-5225 Ad Code: M

Homes For Rent
3Br 2Ba Foreclosure! $11,000! Only $199/
Mo! 5% down 15 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4
Br $259/Mo! for listings (800)366-9783 Ext
5798.

HUD HOMES! 4bdr. 2ba $246/mo! 3br
Foreclosure! $199/mo! Stop Renting! 5%
dw, 15yrs @ 8% apr For Listings (800)366-
9783 Ext 5853

Homes For Sale
6Br 5Ba Foreclosure! $29,900! Only $238/
Mo! 5% down 20 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4
Br $326/Mo! for listings (800)366-9783 ext
5760

FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION .FLORIDA
STATEWIDE Auction starts April 18 1000
Homes MUST BE SOLD! REDC Free Brochure
800-756-2155 USHomeAuction.com

Lots & Acreage
Florida Land Bargain of the Century! 2
acre waterfront homesite only $69,900.
(appraised at $169,900). Private, gated
community with 2 recreational lakes.
Municipal water & sewer. Low taxes. Just 90
minutes Orlando! Excellent financing. Call
now (866)352-2249 FLlandbargains.com

Miscellaneous /
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical,*Business,*Paralegal,*Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121, .www.CenturaOnline.
com.







Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
corn. where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply'by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Senior Systems Engineer Aerospace
Job Description: Responsible for performing
a variety of engineering work in designing,
constructing, and testing aircraft, missiles,
and spacecraft. Conducts basic and applied
research to evaluate adaptability of materials
and equipment to aircraft design and
manufacture. Recommends Improvements
In testing equipment and techniques. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $60,000.00-$140,000.00 per
year
Job Order Number: 9387787

Letter Shop Supervisor/Manager
Job Description: Responsible for preparing
and coordinating daily production for the
letter shop department. Maintains daily
production by jobs in process add upcoming
jobs with the status of each. Recommends
modification for. product or equipment-
improvements. Responsible for all staff
in different shifts to meet the workload
deadlines. Keeps track of employee
attendance and performance. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9389784

Staff Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for the
installation, maintenance, and repair of


various digital video equipment that makes
up a digital cable network. Performs both
planned and unplanned maintenance,
integrates all changes into the digital
video core platform, and provides a Level
3 technical escalation point. Provides
Level 3 operational support. Verifies all
maintenance window prerequisites, assists
in lab evaluations and trials as required, and
participates in the testing and validation of
new procedures, software upgrades, and
platform changes. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9390002

Food/Beverage Server
Job Description: Responsible for taking
orders and serving food and beverages to
patrons at tables in a dining establishment.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9385212
How to Apply: Call for an appointment after
registering atwww.WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com or in your local WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA OFFICE.

Paramedic Crew Chief Operations
Job Description: Responsible for
monitoring the operation and system status
management. Meets the requirements to
function as a Paramedic. Interacts on a
daily basis with Management to ensure
the operation is operating effectively.
Communicates with both internal and
external clients. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $14.25 per hour
Job Order Number: 9390912

Vehicle Supply Technician
Job Description: Responsible for processing
field crew supply requests and maintaining
related systems. Processes documents and
tracks the disbursement of supplies. Obtains
documentation and follows up on employee
reported equipment failures to insure timely
repair or replacement. Performs other duties
necessary to insure that units are ready for
service as scheduled. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$11.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9390747

Registered Nurse Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for handling
operations in the home care office. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:30am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9390346

Financial/Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for helping
clients develop and implement a plan to
provide for their financial security. Work
Monday-Friday, hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $24,000.00 per year plus
commission
Job Order Number: 9386955

Commercial Plumbing Foreman
Job Description: Responsible for overseeing
job site operations.-Work Monday-Friday,
7:00am-3:30pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9391209

Tow Truck Driver
Job Description: Responsible for driving tow
trucks to niove motor vehicles damaged
by accidents, stalled, or ticketed by police..
Delivers vehicles to repair facilities. Makes
minor repairs to vehicle at the scene
(replaces batteries, tires, light bulbs, etc).
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience.
Job Order Number: 9391944

Termite Technician
Job Description: Responsible for checking
termite bait stations around structures.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-4:30pm. -
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9392579

Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for working
with a high profile credit card program in
a high profile theme park. Invites guests
to complete a brief credit card application


(with the client's logo on the credit card).
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9388572

Computer Software Engineer -
Applications
Job Description: Responsible for developing,
updating, executing test procedures,
analyzing trouble reports, testing trouble
report fixes, and updating software manuals.
Uses critical thinking skills to thoroughly
code and test application software
components in an effort to discover, identify,
reproduce, and document bugs. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $50,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9391896

Accounting Supervisor
Job Description:Responsiblefordocumenting
and designing business processes and
work flow for sales system and contract
administration. Ensures compliance with
terms of customer contracts. Works with
information technology (IT) and customers
on data transmission. Coordinates billing
procedures for point of sale at over 55
locations and develops price audits.
Implements process improvements and
automate processes. Researches customer
billing issues and researches/processes
client refunds. Designs and maintains
internal controls for sales systems. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $50,000.00-$60,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9394063

Legal Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for the
maintenance of all case files and preparation
of all correspondence and court documents.
Maintains all case files, prepares all
correspondence and court documents, and
schedules all appointments, depositions,
mediations and hearings. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:30am-5:30pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9393468

Sheet Metal Worker
Job Description: Responsible for installing.
sheet metal ductwork. Work 7:00am-
3:30pm, days may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.00-$15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9393069

Facility Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for assisting
in security, maintenance and operation of
facilities and equipment. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour ;
Job Order Number: 9394108

Case Manager/Inside Sales
Job Description: Responsible for taking
inbound calls, in a call center environment, to
assist homeowners requesting information
on how to change their mortgage loan. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.21 per hour
Job Order Number: 9393902

Sumnier Camp Teacher Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for performing
duties relating to the operational aspects of
weekly Summer Camp sessions. Aids with
check in and checkout procedures and
assists teachers in a classroom. WoFk days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.21-$8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9393903

Account Advisor
Job Description: Responsible for working
with clients who are interested in a loan
modification and tends inbound calls.
Directs client to the in-house legal team for
processing once client has been determined
to be qualified for a loan modification
product. Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-
9:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number; 9393210
I Warehouse Helper
Job Description: Responsible for counting
and verifying all incoming product Ibads
and Incoming returns. Breaks-down tray
stacks of cake and arranges all products for


efficient loading and operations. Pulls route
salesperson orders to insure a quick and
smooth loading process in the depot Counts
and Verifies loads before route salesperson
begins loading their trucks. Processes
required paperwork and communicates
information to/from the routes for Sales
Management. Maintains a clean, safe, and
secure depot environment. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $14.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9394296

Software Engineer III
Job Description: Respqnsible for authoring
and proofing technical documents for both
high and low level client tasks. Defines
efficient and user friendly code interfaces,
works with existing interfaces, and suggests
areas of technical improvement across
interfaces within the product. Diagnoses
problems all the way to the compiler and/or
hardware level. Coordinates effectively with
Art, Production, and Development teams
across the project and company to achieve
team and company objectives. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9389324

Computer Software Engineer-
Applications
Job Description: Responsible for identifying
the needs and technical requirements for
new and existing applications. Designs,
develops, and implements software for
bankcard and retail card applications using
mainframe applications. Uses authorization
simulators and edits package skills to
simulate authorization and settlement
process through network. Handles activities
such as region maintenance and source
code management using source code
management software. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9389086

Administrative Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for providing
administrative and general office duties in
support of the Marine Corps' MAGTFTraining
Support Services (MTSS) Program. Supports
site manager and the Program Management
office. Answers the telephone, takes
messages, greets visitors, and schedules
1 meetings and conferences. Verifies time
sheets and expense reports and responds
to routine correspondence. Researches
background material. Prepares and types
general correspondence, travel requests,
equipment requests and requirements,
and visitor rosters. Work Monday-Friday,
8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $15.00-$20.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9389092

Travel Agent
Job Description: Responsible for interacting
with clients and vendors via telephone and
the Internet to secure cruise and vacation
land packages. Answers inbound calls,
handles leads as assigned, and sells and
up-sells travel products. Researches and
compiles information as requested by
caller. Informs Independent Travel Agents
or their clients of current promotions and
incentives to increase sales. Demonstrates
ability to sell and maintain closing ratios
and performance standards as set forth by
Management Maintains positive outlook
and professional work ethic. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$12.00 per hour plus
commission
Job Order Number: 9388710






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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


THE BEAUTY OF WINDSONG IS ETERNAL.

UNFORTUNATELY, THE OPPORTUNITY TO OWN HERE IS NOT.


I-


It is the old-world charm of Winter Park. It is ancient, resident pontoon boats, a dock, private pools, and
moss-draped oaks and stately cypress trees. It is also playgrounds. And it's just five minutes from downtown
your last chance to own a new home or homesite at Orlando as well as to the shops, restaurants, and
Windsong. Knowles Place is Windsongs final offering boutiques on Park Avenue.' For information, call
of prime homesites and exquisite homes by the areas 407-644-4411 or visit our on-site Information Center
most prestigious custom builders. Here, you'll at 1803 Laurelton Hall Lane today. Because,
enjoy first-class neighborhood amenities while the beauty of Windsong is forever, this
as wefl as access to the chain of lakes, Wng opportunity will soon be gone for good.

Old Winter Park's last new neighborhood.
407-644-441I
HOMESITES FROM THE LOW $4OOS. HOMES FROM $1 MILLION.







1444 HoLTs GROVE CIRCLE 1512 HOLTs GROVE CIRCLE 1721 LDOKOLrr LANDING CIRCLE 1753 LOOKOUT LANDING CIRLE
$2,550,000 $2,499,000 $2,495,ooo $2,349,000



Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate, Licensed Real Estate Broker. Prices subject to change without notice. East West Communities/Keewin Real Property Company.
L .9 S. I


Page 20 Thbrsday, March 19, 2009




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