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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00028
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Creation Date: January 1, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00028

Full Text




Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 21, No. 1
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY

*MBBANK
Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
�, . Member FDIC


New robber photos
Police release new photos of a
Winter Park bank robber.
Page A2


Family's sweet 'que
A local family tastes sweet
success with their BBQ recipe.
Page A3


Strawberry season
Florida strawberry farmers
offer a tasty dessert idea.
Page A8




Business Briefs...........A5
Community Bulletin........A5
City Talks .............. A6
Play On! ............A12
" Legals....... .... . A13
Marketplace ............ A14
Games........ ...A15


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0 994922 95642 2


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Winter Park residents baf-
fled by the small new cars
zipping around Park Avenue
have Corey Lamb's O-Cartz
to thank. The young entre-
preneur whose business has
blossomed in downtown
Orlando since the start of
2007 has moved north, and
Winter Park was right in the
path of his cars.
Diners andpartiers at the
restaurant and lounge areas
in Hannibal Square have al-
ready discovered O-Cartz'
own electric slide that takes
riders from Park Avenue to
Orlando Avenue and back
again in the zero-emission
vehicles.
And they're catching the
eye of wary walkers.


Thursday, January 1, 2009

Health and Fitness
Two-page guide to a new you


Pages 8-10


Mica vows rail push


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

Central Florida Commuter
Rail may be on the back
burner for some politicians
during the holidays, but for
Florida Congressman John
Mica, all railroads lead
through him these days.
The chairman of the U.S.
House Transportation and
Infrastructure Committee
met with Gov. Charlie Crist
and other state officials
Dec. 18 to outline a new
plan to bring commuter
rail - which was recently
named SunRail - to Cen-
tral Florida.
Now he
says-Crist and
the -sFlorida
Department
of Transpor-
tation are
readytomove .
on securing
funding and Mica
solidifying a
rail deal.
"He's committed to
help, and they've pledged
to help," Mica said of Crist
and the FDOT.
That could be seen as
a change from the most
recent push for a 61-mile
rail system spanning coun-
ties north and south of Or--
lando. Crist had stalled in


rnulO DT orIAA D UlBUBw-- UDtIVER nM o IVE
Renewed efforts by state and federal officials could revive a rejected rail plan.


his support of the rail over
concerns that too much
liability for accidents on
the rails used by the com-
muter trains would fall on
the state, rather than CSX,
*which also uses the tracks.
"It got into trouble at
the end of the last legis-
lative session," Mica said.
"We're trying to make sure
we don't find ourselves in
that position again. They're
all on board."
That change may have
come from a clarification
of the language used to
address accident liability,
which may have painted
the deal in a worse light, he
said.
"The last time, there was


confusion about the terms
of it and who has liability
and who doesn't," he said.
'We surveyed all of the
commuter rail deals in the
country and most were
more favorable to CSX
than our deal.".
Now Mica said he's
pushing to get as much
funding sent toward the
rail system as possible.
Time will be of the essence,
he said. He wants the rail
system to be first to draw
from more than a billion
dollars to be earmarked
for Florida transportation
projects.
With the rail system

> turn to RAIL on page A5


"It's obviously more con-
venient,"-. Lamb said. "And
cheap."
Cheap has certainly
helped O-Cartz along the
crowded streets of down-
town Orlando, where the
business has taken off
thanks to competitive rates
with pedal-powered bicy-
cle rickshaws, and cheaper
fares than the average cab.
That's helped Lamb ex-
pand his business based
on demand. He said that if
demand grows, the service
will expand even farther
beyond the center of Win-
ter Park.
So far Lamb's coverage
area is already large, ex-
panding from Orlando Av-
enue to Lakemont Avenue
west to east, and then Web-
ster Avenue down to Orange


504 + tax
Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL
BANK & TRUST
On the comer of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
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ICili


City cash

could jolt

economy
JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Chambers of commerce
looking to keep shopping
dollars local may want to
print their own money - a
trend during recessions as a
way of guaranteeing locals
spend their money in-town.
Local currency is not a
new concept, although it is
more prevalent during hard
economic times. About a
dozen cities in the U.S. use
some form of the "funny
money," which does not re-
semble federal bills. People
can exchange dollars for the
local currency, often at a dis-
counted rate. For example,
$100 U.S. can be exchanged
for $110 local, netting a 10
percent savings.
"That's one of the ideas
we're putting forward," said
George Herbst, Winter Park
Chamber of Commerce in-
terim executive director. He
said the local currency con-
cept is similar to distribut-
ing coupons and putting on
special sales, but more of a
challenge to implement.
Winter Park is also con-
sidering a discount card

> turn to CASH on page A2


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK
Winter Park officials and an 0-Cartz representative test out the new city shuttle.


Avenue north to south.
Trips in downtown Win-
ter Park near Park Avenue
are paid in tips alone, and
longer trips outside that
area are $4 per person - not
per trip - as taxi services


charge.
Following in the foot-
steps of Orlando Mayor
Buddy Dyer, Winter Park
City Commissioners were

> turn to GREEN on page A4


City hosts its first green Christmas











News



New bank robber photos released


ALEX BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

Police continue their search for the
suspect in a Winter Park Washington
Mutual robbery perpetrated Dec. 18.
New photographs released by po-
lice on Monday, Dec. 29 show the
suspect at a Winter Park restaurant
just minutes after the robbery, having
shed his disguise. He has long dark
hair and wore a dark T-shirt
At 5:37 p.m. the man, dressed in a
camouflage U.S. Army jacket, jeans,
an Atlanta Braves baseball cap and
mirrored sunglasses, entered the


downtown Winter Park Washington
Mutual branch on New York Avenue,
approached a teller and demanded
money using a note. He didn't pro-
duce a weapon though he implied he
had one. Witnesses described him as
heavy-set and in his 30s.
He left the bank heading south
on New York Avenue., Police set up a
perimeter throughout the city and
launched an aerial search but did not
locate the suspect.
Call Crime Line at 407-423-TIPS or
the Winter Park Police Department at
407-644-1313 with any information
about this crime or its perpetrator.


The bank robber, shown at Washington Mutual, at left, and at a nearby restaurant minutes later.


CASH I Local currency could boost city economies


< continued from front page

that can be used at Park
Avenue shops, he said, an
idea based on a discount
card given to Rollins Col-
lege students. "We're
clearly working with the
whole model of 'Shop lo-
cal, shop Winter Park.'"
Berkshire, Mass., has
had its own currency
since fall 2006. Now more
than $2 million "Berk-
Shares" are in circulation
and about 350 businesses
have signed up to accept
the currency, according to
BerkShares.org. Five Berk-
shire banks with a cumu-
lative 12 branches serve
as exchange stations.


"That plays exactly
into what we're trying to
do in Maitland," said Mary
Hodge, executive director
of the Maitland Chamber
of Commerce. While she
said it would work better
in. Winter Park's Park Ave-
nue shopping district, she
was open to the idea. "The
bottom line is, 'What can
I do to help my members
survive?'" she said.
But two'Chamber di-
rectors were skeptical of
the concept, saying there
are too many risks associ-
ated with local money.
Darlene Dangel, ex-
ecutive director of the
Goldenrod Chamber of
Commerce, said stores


don't have to accept the
local bills and the money
might be hard to track.
"What if someone stole
my community money?"
she said. "Would that still
be a crime since it is not
real money?"
Dangel said it's a safer
bet for stores to give dis-
counts to residents and
chamber members, some-
thing they do in Golden-
rod. "I think it might be
an option for a small ru-
ral community but not a
suburb of a major city like
Orlando."
Cory Skeates, executive
director of the Oviedo-
Winter Springs Regional
Chamber of Commerce,


echoed Dangel's senti-
ments. He said he would
be concerned with the
risk of counterfeits asso-
ciated with local bills.
Producing currency
and educating businesses
about it would be a large
undertaking for the al-
ready busy Chamber.
He said the Oviedo-area
Chamber prefers business
expos, seminars and net-
working to creating a lo-
cal currency, adding, "I do
agree we need to continue
thinking outside the box
for the sake of our local
small businesses ... as this
economy is unlike any we
have ever seen."


Some cities print their own cash to help reside
spend locally, with a built-in discount for users of it.


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ORANGE COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER R
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PERSONS 65 OR OLDER MAY QUALIFY FOR ADDITIONAL SAVINGS WITH LIMITED INCOME SENIOR EXEMPTION

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INF-21 REV 11/08


.-~..._.~-~--~--.--~~~~-.-~..;~.~.-...-.


...I-.--~-.-..~...-.I-....-~--..~-.----~


Page 2 ThrdyJaur1,20


Winter Park / Maitland Observer











Sweet barbecue is local fam's secret


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF

When Dan Backhaus
dreams of the ultimate
pulled pork sandwich, it
has just the right amount of
tender, moist meat, smoked
low and slow for 12 hours -
minimum - and piled high
on a kaiser roll. While it may
look ready to go, it isn't a
Barnwood sandwich until
it's topped with his signa-
ture sweet barbecue sauce,
dripping down all sides.
"It's got to be a good sauce
that complements the meat
and doesn't take away the
flavor. And you need a good,
sweet tea to wash it down,"
Backhaus says.
Most Saturdays, the Win-
ter Springs resident can be
seen preparing his legend-
ary pulled pork sandwiches
early in the morning at the
Lake Mary Farmers Market
in his fully equipped trailer.
Dan and his wife, Elaine,
have been cooking award-
winning barbecue with
their own sauce since 2004
when they first entered the
Orlando Sentinel Barbeque
Search Contest on a whim
and their sauce earned a
spot on the top 10 list. "I
remember my first recipe
had 20, 30 things in it - it
was just a big collaboration
of things, like Dr. Pepper


and honey mixed in with
traditional ingredients,"
Dan said.,
Their surprise win
opened up a world of op-
portunities for the Back-
haus family. After tweaking
their winning recipe, they
competed in the brisket and
ribs, chicken and p6rk butt
categories the following
year at the Pig Festival bar-
becue competition, spon-
sored by the Kansas City
BBQ Society in Lakeland,
an event that attracts about
30,000 people.
The couple registered in
the professional division to
compete against the best
from the Southeast and Tex-
as. "We wanted to see how
we could do against these
guys," Dan said. "That was a
whirlwind weekend. It was
40 degrees out and our tents
were blowing all over. I don't
think we got any sleep."
"It was raining when we
pulled up and our wood was
getting wet, and the people
next to us were laughing at
us," Elaine said. "Well, we
had never done this before,"
she added.
Once again, they went
home with high honors.
The Backhaus family
came in fourth place over-
all out of 54 professional
teams. The concoction,
now known as Barnwood
Bar-B-Que Sauce, came in


first place and their ribs
came in fourth. The couple
was showered with tro-
phies and prize money. "We
weren't expecting anything,
we were just having a good
time," Elaine said.
"And that weekend is
when we got hooked, "Dan
said, smiling at his wife.
Last year, they placed sev-
enth out of 107 teams at the
National Open Barbeque
Competition in Georgia,
took first place in the chick-
en category at the Lakeland
event and placed second
overall in the pork category
at the annual Pig in the Park
competition in Kissimmee.
Dan describes his special
barbecue sauce as sweet,
mild, and -tomato-based.
"People are always trying
to pick out what is in it, and
they can never do it," he said
with a laugh.
The bottle lists an inter-
esting combination of in-
gredients that include dark
brown sugar, honey, chili
powder, and Worcester-
shire sauce with cloves. The
sauce, Elaine said, comple-
ments a wide range of foods
from fish and steak to chili
or meatloaf.
Manufactured locally, the
barbecue sauce contains no
artificial preservatives or
other stabilizers typically
found in sauces on the mar-
ket, nor does it contain a


PrnOluo DI .JAMI
Dan and Elaine Backhaus are a fixture at Lake Mary's Farmers
homemade barbecue using an awarded family sauce.


large amount of high fruc-
tose corn syrup, an inex-
pensive ingredient used to
increase product volume.


Barnwood also makes
dry seasoning that can be

> turn to BARNWOOD on page A4


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Thursday, January 1, 2009 Pg


Winter Park /Maitland Observer






Paqe 4 Thursday, January 1, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


GREEN I City shows off new eco-friendly cars


< continued from the front page

given a free ride last week when they test-
ed out the carts at Central Park.
They also showed off electric cars that
the Police Department is already using for
parking and code enforcement in the city.
To show off an even greener image, the
city unveiled even more low-emission ve-
hicles, including hybrid cars used by the
city's building division.
But the greenest of them all will still be
the O-Cartz, with their silent electric mo-
tors that propel up to seven passengers in
three- or four-row cars, seatbelts included
- a feature not often provided in pedal
powered rides downtown.


Lamb has always been a wheel man for
his company, and he still drives customers
just for the experience. He's hoping it's a
more entertaining way to get around in-
stead of hoofing it.
"It's a great experience," he said. "You
get to meet a ton of people from every
walk of life."
And in five to seven minutes, he can
take you from Park Avenue to Winter Park
Village.
Many of the trips are arranged by call-
ing O-Cartz, but with more of the cars cir-
cling the area, it's even easier to get a ride.
"We'll be out there," he said. "You can
always flag one down."


S L


Winter Park leaders displayed the city's new hybrid-powered Ford Escape SUVs on Dec. 23 in Central Park, part of a presenta-
tion about efforts to "go green." The city also recently purchased two parking enforcement vehicles that are electric-only.


BARNWOOD I Family's sauce
takes seventh at national event


< continued from page A3

used on beef, pork and poul-
try prior to cooking and to
flavor burgers, steaks, soups
and stews without the use
of MSG. There are 13 fla-
vors ranging from the typi-
cal mesquite or Cajun to the
more unusual from Bour-
bon Molasses Steak Season-
ing, Sweet Orange Habane-
ro and Key Lime Jerk.
The true secret to their
success, the couple said, is
the right combination and
preparation of ingredients.
The knack for cooking,
Elaine is quick to add, is in
Dan's blood. Dan's father, an
Orlando restaurant owner,
introduced him to the food
industry when he was about
12 years old, and they ran
two restaurants together
during the '80s and '90s.
Now Dan works full-time
for TG Lee Dairy and spends
all of his free time build-
ing Barnwood Brands with
daughter Sarah and son-in-
law Dan Gilmer.
Today, the family travels
around the Southeast, com-
peting in at least eight food
competitions per year, along
with taking local catering


jobs. "I think it is neat we
can work together at some-
thing," Dan said, motioning
toward his wife, Elaine.
The couple agrees that
one of the high points of
selling their products at
community events is that
they get to know their cus-
tomers and get feedback.
"When people come up
I give them a sample- of the
sauce with some pulled
pork," Elaine said. "I like to
watch their reaction - it's
funny because their eye-
brows go up and they say
'Wow!'"







Barnwood Bar-B-Que
products can be purchased
locally at Cavallari Gourmet in
Oviedo. Swim'N Fun in Winter
Springs, Momm's Meats &
Popp's Produce in Orlando,
Petty's in Longwood, Farmers
Market in Lake Mary or online
at BarnwoodBBQ.com


Vehicle burglaries
The rash of literal vehicle break-ins,
with a thief smashing a window and
grabbing items from the interior, con-
tinued the weekend of Dec. 20-23.
Two cars on the 1200 block of North
Lakemont Avenue had a rear pas-
senger window broken and a purse
stolen from each on Dec. 20..
Someone broke the driver's side win-
dow of a vehicle on the 2000 block of
South Lakemont Avenue on Dec. 20
and stole a purse.
A Louis Vuitton purse containing a
checkbook, credit cards and a cell


phone was stolen Dec. 22 from a
vehicle on the 400 block of Fletcher
Place. The thief broke the rear driv-
er's-side window.
Vandalism
Vandals caused damage in multiple
instances during the weekend before
Christmas.
Someone broke a vehicle's rear wind-
shield and rear lights Dec. 20 on the
100 block of North Orlando Avenue.
Someone damaged Christmas lawn
decorations Dec. 22 at a home on
Edwin Boulevard.
Someone using a BB gun caused


damage to windows at seven sepa-
rate businesses on West Fairbanks
Avenue between the 1800 and 2200
blocks, all on Dec. 23.
Business burglaries
At a business on the 200 block of
North Orlando Avenue someone
broke the south side window and
disturbed cash registers at the front
of the building, but an alarm was ac-
tivated and it's not clear if anything
was stolen. The break-in occurred
Dec. 22.
On the 400 block of West New Eng-
land Avenue Dec. 22, someone re-
moved a rear window pane, but an


Dec. 20 to Dec. 23
alarm was activated and nothing ap-
peared to have been stolen.
Arrests
Ten suspects were arrested between
Dec. 20 and Dec. 23, for a variety
of offenses including driving with a
suspended license, an active war-
rant, retail theft, breach of the peace,
disorderly intoxication, domestic bat-
tery, drunk driving and cocaine pos-
session.
Noise complaints
Six noise complaints came in from.
Dec. 20-22, for either loud music, a
loud party or loud people.


rbO Winter Park / Maitland
Observer


Published Thursday, January 1.2009


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
- 407-628-8500, ext. 302
kyle@observemewspapers.com

EDITOR
Alex Babcock
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alexb@observemewspapers.com

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Stephanie Erickson
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Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
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LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
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COPY EDITORS
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COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
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Volume 21, Issue Number 1


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Member of: P.O. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-628-8500 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com I N 1 4-
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland ObserverQ 2008


WE



Mary Ann Washington,
73, of Orlando, Fla.,
died Saturday, Dec. 20,
2008. Her funeral will
be handled by Gold-
en's Funeral Home in
Winter Park.

Funeral notices are
courtesy of Golden's
Funeral Home of Win-
terPark.


----------i--iilii-~-------~---


Page 4 ThrdyJaur1,20


Winter Park / Maitland Observer







VVW1It P.IrlC I M K / Ithn fULC �Lh Vh J2


Lakeside Behavioral Healthcare, Central Florida's pre-
mier behavioral healthcare organization, has appointed
Orlando-based R.C. Stevens Construction Company as
the contractor for a $1.5 million renovation project at its
Princeton Plaza location.
The renovation, which will encompass approximately
25,000 square feet, will include a conversion of former
general hospital space such as surgical suites into office
space in order to make the building more functional for
Lakeside's use. In addition to floor plan conversions, the
renovation will also include upgrades to the building's
fire, air conditioning and phone systems. These system
upgrades make the total .project cost approximately $3.5
million.
Lakeside Behavioral Healthcare expects that the en-
tire project will take about two years to complete.


Community

Florida Department of Transportation crews shifted $12 million multistate settlement with toy maker Mat-
eastbound Interstate 4 lanes to the right Dec. 11 between tel and subsidiary Fisher-Price. The settlement resolves
the exit ramps to Maitland Boulevard (Exits 90A and 90B) a 16-month investigation into the events surrounding a
and the entrance ramp from Maitland Boulevard to east- voluntary recall of the companies' toys for excessive lev-
bound 1-4. The lane shifts will remain in place through els of lead paint in 2007.
January. About 2 million Mattel toys were recalled, and a sig-
nificant number of toys manufactured before Nov. 30 and
The Orange County Retired Educators Association will not recalled underwent further testing, which resulted in
meet at 10 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 8 at College Park United some additional recalls.
Methodist Church at 644 W. Princeton St. in Orlando.
There will be a program on preventing falls by Patrick Just 16 percent of eighth graders are on target to be
Davis of Life Care of Florida. Anyone who has worked in ready for college-level work by the time they graduate
education is invited to join. Visit ocrea-fl.org or call 407- from high school, according to "The Forgotten Middle,"
677-0446 for more information, a new ACT report.
Further, being ready by eighth grade is more impor-
Americans drove more than 100 billion fewer miles tant to college readiness than anything that happens
between November 2007 and October 2008 than the academically in high school.
same period a year earlier, according to the U.S. Depart- But there's no reason to take this sobering news sit-
ment of Transportation, making it the largest continuous ting down. Parents can take steps today to ensure that
decline in American driving in history. their students are making progress toward academic
Americans drove 3.5 percent less, or 8.9 billion fewer and vocational success.
vehicle miles traveled (VMT), in October 2008 than Octo- Focus on key subjects such as reading, writing, math-
ber 2007, making it the sharpest decline of any October ematics, science, and social sciences. Your student
since 1971. needs a foundation in all these areas to succeed in col-
For the second month in a row, the data show the South lege or work.
Atlantic region - a bloc of eight states and Washington, Monitor your student's academic progress beginning
D.C. - experienced the biggest decline of any region, 5 in elementary school. If he/she falls behind, take imme-
percent fewer VMT compared to the previous October. At diate action to help bring them up to academic speed.
8.4 percent fewer VMT, Montana led the nation with the Find a tutor or provide additional help at home. For those
largest single-state decline that month. Utah and South families who qualify, a federal program called Supple-
Carolina followed with declines of 7.4 percent and 6.7 mental Educational Services offers free tutoring to stu-
percent, respectively, dents. Visit www.ed.gov for more information.
Visit www.act.org for more information and a free down-
Florida will receive more than $587,000 as part of a load.



RAIL I Obama plan could help rail funding


< continued-from front page
only needing to clear one
more hurdle, it should stay
at the front of the list for


sure this gets done. We
don't want to leave any-
thing to chance."


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - SERVER A.RCV:VF
Winter Park resident and Congressman John Mica vowed to make a renewed push for commuter rail, which could feature a
stop in downtown Winter Park - where Amtrak currently has a station. Efforts to win state support failed this year.


Business


400 South Lakemont Ave., Winter Park, FL 32792
Phone: 407.647.1467 www.winppc.org





Brandywine Square

* Courtyard Shopping e Sidewalk Cafe *
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum


Brandywine Deli
Enjoy ealing outside on
beautiful Park Avenue Bulfel
Silerinr.] peiaisl since 972

Family Comics & Cards
Fu Tlllll,' Ih lllll" I ' ,rll . )u i .l ,


Barbara Coffee
LMFT. LHMC
NI. II l M , ilil, : , folTil I'


Cida's of Winter Park
Cid '. jil Nfinter Park lealuring
Trre Onrginal Consignmeni
Colllsuliun.
407-644-5635
Essence
Salon & Day Spa
Hair M.3,,,i ur .. Pur ,. - hir ur ;, I.)11
Sx1ien'.iorh, ai; Ii %; W ]iri

Winter Park Hair Studio
*H .I njI Ht :rihir. I

1 . 1 4.I I I..1

Thimble Works
41rrll ,, i i .: .r 31 IIa
40 --1 ' 9*: -"- 699l':^


Antiques
on the Avenue
Quality Aniirlue,;
wrned try Hardy HiIJjUrl
407-657-2100
Luxe Linens
EI.4,l re- ; nr: ,l : ,:l ,r
groiot.nj wIving] Fijliririfi
.r tl ( , : h . IjDI- j . l iur -i ,

Park Avenue Jewelers
II jm ,r., i rr[l . rnif,:



Gr.ap, Clinc
Christi.n iL-urisehing

" Ii - , '.,111,44


'.-- . .


Sigrid Tiedtke, president of Enzian Theater and the
Florida Film Festival, announced Dec. 23 that the orga-
nization has named Mara Shorr as director of develop-
ment and community relations. She will take on her new
role on Jan. 5.
Shorr, currently the radio and Web site fundraising pro-
ducer for WMFE TV/FM, will manage all fundraising activi-
ties for both Enzian Theater and the Florida Film Festival
including sponsor and donor relations and the develop-
ment and implementation of new fundraising strategies.
Additionally, she will oversee all community relations ini-
tiatives and strategic alliances.
Shorr successfully developed and executed several
major television and radio fundraising campaigns which
raised over a million dollars for the member supported
public broadcasting station.


S Hodges Brothers Roofing
Locally owned roofing company serving Orlando since 1978 with shingle, built-
[ up, modified bitumen and metal roof work. Licensed, Bonded and Insured
CCCO42845


Monday through Friday 7 am- 4 pm
Randy Hodges rRsoo
1201 W. Amelia St. Orlando, FL 32805 l ASSOCIATION BB
Tel: (407) 650-0013 info@hodgesbrothers.net MEMBER






Even though 2008 is history, you might still be able
to cut your 2008 tax bill. Possible tax-cutters include
making a deductible 2008 IRA contribution by April
15, 2009, tallying up reinvested dividends on stocks
sold in 2008, and getting written documentation for
2008 charitable contributions. For assistance, please call.

Ana Ivonne Aviles, CPA, LLC
1324 Lake Baldwin Ln, Suite B
Orlando, FL 32814 .L
Tel: 407-228-7333
Fax: 407-228-1104 -
www.aiacpal.com
S--- - - -- --- -- -- -- -


Winter Park Presbyterian Church


YOU ARE INVITED


Worship Services
8:30am Early Service
9:45am Contemporary
11:00am Traditional

Sunday/Youth Groups
4:00pm - 6:00pm Middle School
5:00pm - 7:00pm High School


that money, Mica said.
"Hopefully it'll come at
the beginning of this ses-
sion," he said. "I've been
pretty aggressive to make


Thurday Jauary1, 009 Page 5


WNinter Park/ Maitland Observerr


Business i


,(�







I ctv A Thurs-ay .J a. 2009-WIntr- ak - M-lad-bere


On behalf of the city of Win-
ter Park, I'd like to wish you
all a safe, happy and pros-
perous New Year.

City Hall closed
on New Year's day
City Hall will be closed on
Thursday, Jan. 1, 2009, in
observance of New Year's
Day. City Hall will be open
for regular business on Fri-
day, Jan. 2.

New Year's Eve -
remember firework safety
With New Year's Eve com-
ing up on Wednesday, re-
member to leave fireworks
up to the professionals. In
Florida, virtually all fire-
works except sparklers are
considered illegal and can
turn any amateur fireworks
festivity into a tragedy. Keep
your friends and family safe
this year by letting profes-
sionals do the show.

Recycle your holiday
gift wrapping
Holiday wrapping paper
and gift boxes can be re-
cycled. (Exceptions: foil
and flocked papers) Please,
however, discard any pack-
ing materials such as plas-
tic bubbles and Styrofoam
peanuts into your regular
garbage cart. Be sure to bag
first, especially those flya-
way Styrofoam peanuts.
Holiday reuse-recycle
tips:
Christmas trees in pots
can be re-planted.
Reuse beautiful wrapping


paper and ribbon for future
gift-giving.
Save greeting cards for
craft projects, e.g., cut up
and reuse as gift tags.

Cut up your Christmas tree
if it's too big for trash
You can place your leftover
Christmas tree curbside
for yard waste pickup on
Wednesday. Please cut the
tree into 4-foot lengths. Be
sure to remove all lights and
decorations.

Trash and recycling
schedules for '09 released
If your garbage, recycling or
yard waste collection day
falls on a Waste Manage-
ment holiday, pickup will
take place the following
Saturday. Please mark your
2009 calendar now if one of
your collection days fall on
any of these holidays:
Monday, May 25, Memo-
rial Day
Saturday, July 4,
Independence Day
Monday, Sept. 7,
Labor Day
Thursday, Nov. 26,
Thanksgiving
Friday, Dec. 25,
Christmas day

Orange Avenue ceremony
marks fresh look
The city of Winter Park is
proud to announce that the
Orange Avenue Streetscape
Ribbon-cutting Ceremony
will take place Friday, Jan.
9, at 10 a.m. The ceremo-


ny will be held next to the
clock located at the inter-
section of Orange Avenue,
Minnesota Avenue and Den-
ning Drive in Winter Park.
This streetscape project is
a partnership between the
Orange Avenue property
owners and the city of Win-
ter Park Community Rede-
velopment Agency.
As one of the primary
gateways to downtown
Winter Park, Orange Avenue
welcomes thousands of res-
idents and visitors each day.
After a thorough renovation
and beautification process,
the avenue is now poised to
greet our residents and visi-
tors in style.
In May 2007, the City
Commission passed a reso-
lution that approved fund-
ing for the improvement
project on Orange Avenue
from U.S. Highway 17-92 to
Holt Avenue. Funding for
the project, partially paid
for through assessment of
property owners on Orange
Avenue, has transformed
this section of the avenue
into a premier corridor for
the city.
The first phase of the
streetscape project, which
greatly enhanced the inter-
section of Orange and Min-
nesota avenues and Den-
ning Drive with the instal-
lation of brick pavers and
other amenities, began in
September 2007.
The recently completed
second phase of the proj-
ect includes enhancements
such as decorative street
lights,, new traffic-light
arms, trash receptacles,
landscaping, street bench-
es, newspaper enclosures,
curb bump-outs, pedestrian
crosswalks, drainage inlets
and underground electric
systems. The clock, which
is strategically positioned at
the main intersection of Or-


ange Avenue and Denning
Drive, completes the look
and helps to signify the en-
try into the downtown busi-
ness district of Winter Park.
For additional informa-
tion regarding the Orange
Avenue streetscape project,
please call 407-599-3665.
For more information re-
garding the city of Winter
Park, please visit the city's
official Web site at Cityof-
WinterPark.org.

Upcoming City
Commission meetings
The City Commission will
be holding work sessions
in City Hall Commission
Chambers located at 401
Park Ave. South on the fol-
lowing dates and times:
Monday, Jan. 5, at 3 p.m.
to discuss the survey results
and how they can be applied
to the city's strategic plan
Tuesday, Jan. 20, at noon.
This will be a joint work ses-
sion with the Ethics Board
to discuss campaign finance
reform.
All work sessions are
open to the public; how-
ever, there will be no pub-
lic comment taken at these
meetings.

Reserve now for
Dinner on the Avenue
The city of Winter Park is
proud to announce that
tickets for the 8th Annual
Dinner on the Avenue on
Saturday, April 18, 2009,
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., will
be on sale beginning Mon-
day, Jan. 5. This unique, fun-
filled dining experience
hosted by the city of Winter
Park has become the social
event of the year in Winter
Park.
Gather a table of friends,
family, co-workers or neigh-
bors to dine under the stars
on beautiful Park Avenue.
Tables of eight are available


for just $100 each. Only the
table, white linen table-
cloth, and chairs are provid-
ed everything else is up to
you. Get creative with table
setup and let your appetites
decide whether you bring
your own potluck dinner or
hire a local caterer to satisfy
your palate.
Creativity is encouraged
and each group is chal-
lenged to develop its own
unique look and individual
decor. Awards will be pre-
sented to winners in various
categories including most
colorful, most elegant, most
original, best TV-movie
theme and two honorable
mentions. The judging will
begin at 7 p.m. sharp and
awards will be presented
once the judges have an-
nounced the winners.
Checks for $120 per table
should be made payable
to The City of Winter Park,
Dinner on the Avenue, and
mailed to City of Winter
Park Purchasing Division
at 401 Park Ave. S., Winter
Park, FL 32789-4386.
For more information re-
garding this unique dining
experience, please click on
the Dinner on the Avenue
logo oft the city's official
Web site at CityofWinter-
Park.org or call 407-643-
1627.

Planning and Zoning Board
hosts a hearing
The Planning and Zon-
ing Commission will hold
a public hearing regarding
the adoption of the Com-
prehensive Plan on Tuesday,
Jan. 20, at 7 p.m. in City Hall
Commission Chambers. If
you are interested in shar-
ing your input, please make
plans to attend.

Call City Hall at
407-599-3399 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org


The Maitland Farmers' Mar-
ket has been an incredible
success and has provided
family-oriented activities
and entertainment all year
long. The newyear will bring
many exciting changes to
our city including the move
of the Farmers' Market to
Lake Lily Park, making it
more visible and accessible
for families throughout
Central Florida. As always,


thanks to Mari Smith and
our Leisure Services team
for their contributions to
our city and to this week's
"City Talk."
- Mayor Doug Kinson

On Jan. 6, 2008, a contin-
gent of vendors pulled their
trucks, vans and cars onto
a city property known as
Quinn Strong Park in Mai-
tland. They displayed their


produce, breads, plants and
other goodies. To their de-
light, customers quickly ar-
rived and strolled along the
winding sidewalks purchas-
ing fruit, vegetables and
bread.
The atmosphere was ca-
sual, the open-air commerce
enticing, the goods fresh,
and the result remarkable.
Maitland Farmers' Market
has become an instant insti-
tution.
Our partner, the Perform-
ing Arts of Maitland, brings
talented people to our ven-
ue every week.
Appearing in January:
Jan. 4 - Mountain Brew
Jan. 11 - Dan Jordan and
Rich Walker
Jan. 18 - Davey Rocker
and FiddlinJessy (David Sch-
weizer and Jessy Daumen)
Jan. 25 - Joe Hughes of
Goldenseal and Madison
Meltz
Because of this growth


(from 15 to 42 vendors), we
are now moving to a larger
venue. On Jan. 4, 2009, Mai-
tland Farmers' Market will
be held at Lake Lily Park
on the corner of 17-92 and
Maitland Avenue. Open ev-
ery Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m.
Top 10 Most Frequently
Asked Questions About the
Maitland Farmers' Market:
1. Is the Market wheel-
chair accessible? Yes.
2. Are there ATM ma-
chines on the property? No,
there are plenty of banks
within walking distance.
3. Is the Farmers' Market
open when it rains? Yes, as
we don't endanger patrons
and vendors.
4. Is my pet allowed in the
market? Yes, but pets must
be on a leash at all times.
5. Is alcohol served
at the market? No.
6. How do I rent space at the
Farmers' Market? You can


visit our Web site at ItsMy-
Maitland.com or speak to
an on-site market manager.
7. Is there anything for
my kids at Farmers' Market?
There is a playground at the
park next to the restrooms.
8. Who owns the Farm-
ers' Market? The city does.
9. Do the vendors accept
credit cards? Some vendors
do and some don't. Be pre-
pared to pay cash at most
places.
10. Is entertainment of-
fered at the market? Each
week the Performing Arts of
Maitland provides the en-
tertainment.
- Farmers' Markets are the
newest "meet and greet"
places of the decade!
See you soon!
- Mari Smith, Leisure
Services event coordinator

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at ItsMyMaitland.com


Maitland Farmers' Market

moves to Lake Lily


Pae husdy Jnur 1 20


Winter Park /Maitland Observer












Lifestyles


SThough it's cold and
Sdreary in many parts
of the country, Florida
strawberry growers are
harvesting the first fruit
of the winter strawberry
season under sunny skies
and mild temperatures.
Florida is the only
place in the United States
where strawberries are
marketed in the winter
when many parts of the
country are blanketed
with snow. Consumers
can find fresh Florida
strawberries in super-
markets from December
through April.
Florida strawber-
ries are hand-planted in
September and hand-
harvested beginning im-
mediately after Thanks-
giving and continuing
through April each year.
About 100 growers work
more than 8,000 acres of
berries in the state. Af-
ter changing its prima-
ry crop from cotton to
P rawberries, th


a strawberries


City-Dover area became
recognized as the Winter
St rawberry Capital of the
World. It was strawber-
. ries that made residents
of these communities a
family. That bond and
community spirit con-
tinues to this day.
The Florida strawber-
ry industry has a distinct
transportation advan-
tage, especially to mar-
kets east of the Mississip-
pi. The berries a re rushed
to market fresh and fast
in climate-controlled re-
frigerated trucks for ar-
rival at terminal markets
and supermarkets mere
hours after harvest. Flor-
ida-grown strawberries
are some of the sweet-
est, reddest and juiciest
strawberries consumers
will ever taste.
"We understand that
consumers are thought-
ful in their purchases
of fresh produce today.
Knowing these berries


should give purchasers
confidence in the qual-
ity and freshness of win-
ter strawberries," said
Sue Harrell, director of
marketing for the Flor-
ida Strawberry Growers
Association.
Strawberry-centered
holiday and Valentine's
Day gifts such as choc-
olate-dipped berries,
strawberry pizza, classic
strawberry shortcake
and other special des-
serts can serve as eco-
nomical and creative ex-
pressions of endearment
for family and friends.
Strawberriesare nutri-
tious. Eight strawberries
contain more vitamin C
than one orange. A one-
cup serving (about eight
to 10 medium-sized ber-
ries) contains 45 calo-
ries and has no fat, cho-
lesterol or sodium.
Article courtesy' ofJthe
Flotida Stimibern,
... Gos.t,.ssociatioui


FLOI


in season


RIDA STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM


Ingredients:
1 cup whipping cream
2 tablespoons white sugar
1/2 cup sour cream
1 tablespoon Grand Marnier or
Amaretto liqueur (optional)
1 1/2 - 2 pints ftsh Florida
strawberries, washed and caps
removed

Directions:
In a large mixing bowl using a
hand-held or stationary mixer
on high speed, whip cream and
sugar until thick but not stiff.
The whipped cream should
double in volume. Add sour-
cream and continue beating on
medium speed until mixture
is completely combined. Keep
beating and gradually pour in
the liqueur, if using.
Spoon whipped cream mix-
ture into a pastry bag fitted
with a decorative tip. Before
finalizing the finished product,
practice the flow and resulting
design of the whipped cream


mixture until comfortable with
the result...
Using individual serving
dishes that are shallow or flat,
rectangular or square, make
one row of decorative cream.
SCarefuliyfplace whole strawber-
ries cap-side down alongside
the first row of cream. Overlap
each berry slightly. Make a sec-
ond row of whipped cream on
the opposite side of the straw-
berries. Repeat until all of the
strawberries are used, dividing
the whipped cream and straw-
berries equally to make six to
eight servings.
Note;. Pressurized whipped
cream in cans is a mixture of
cream, sugar, stabilizers, emul-
sifiers and gas and may be pur-
chased in disposable packaging
designed to serve the function
of a pastry bag. The fat content
of real cream mixtures must be
indicated on the product label.
This is a different product than
aerosol dessert toppings.


Operating in the most turbulent time in American
banking history, Commerce National Bank & Trust:
- Has amnplefunds to lend
- Has no "toxic" loans to deal with
S - Is growing steadily,
- W'as recently, ranked as one of the eight
best petformning banks in Florida *
- Has no need to be acquired
- Provides Trust, WVealth Alanagernent
and Fanily Office Services
By sticking to the basics, and focusing only on
our hometown, we're happy to report the
"Brighter side of banking news"
Chances are we have good news
for you and your company too!


I.


COMMERCE NATIONAL
ou BANK & TRUST


1201 S. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park FL, 32789
T. 407.622.8181
www.CNBT-FL.com


*Bank rating statements based on
performance through 9.31.08


YOUR NEW LIFESTYLE BEGINS HERE!


We care about you and the health of your family!
We have a variety of programs designed to promote the development of
Spirit, Mind and Body!


Youth Sports
Basketball
Flag Football
Cheerleading
Soccer
Volleyball
Kids Yoga
Strength Training
Caribbean Dance
Swim Lessons
Swim Teams



I -


A *gg 4
II.sk*a o u
[ 2009Membrshi


Adult Sports
Five on Five Basketball
Three on Three Basketball
Co-Ed Flag Football
Dodgeball League
Kickball tournament
Co-Ed Volleyball "
Five on Five Co-Ed Soccer


--~~--


....... .. .



tsREAKIN

IN CENTRAL-f 7 60-



NEI'


Thurday Jauary1, 009 Page 7


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Paa 8-- Thrsay Jaur 1,20 itrPr atadOsre


Starl

AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF
D-I-E-T - a four-letter word to
many. Judging by the countless
"get slim quick" advertisements
and fad diets, fighting the bat-
tle of the bulge has challenged
millions of Americans for de-
cades. For some, losing unwant-
ed pounds and maintaining a
healthy weight has become one
of life's leading hurdles.
If the trend of obesity contin-
ues, it is anticipated that more
than 86 percent of adults will
be overweight or obese by 2030.
according to a recent study
conducted by researchers at
the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg
School of Public Health.
People are constantly re-
minded that research indicates
significantly overweight people
have a greater risk of develop-
ing diseases such as high blood
pressure, Type 2 diabetes and
stroke, as well as some forms of
cancer. So why are Americans
still gaining?
University of Central Florida
Sports and Wellness dietitian
and nutritionist Meghan Mur-
phy Van Camp blames the obe-


t1Cll :'


small to get thinner


sity epidemic on the lack of
physical activity combined with
people eating out more, skip-
ping meals, having less family
meals, increasing sugar intake
and eating less fruits and vege-
tables. It's still a matter of "calo-
ries in" versus "calories out." "We
need to burn more calories than
we eat to lose weight,"
Van Camp said in an
e-mail.Thebiggest I
struggle for the
average per-
son, she said,
is sticking
with a plan.
" People I
need to . -1
concen- . '
trate on
small
improvements that can be
worked into their lifestyle and
realize that sustainable changes
in health, fitness or weight take
time," she wrote.
Winter Park dietician and
nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell
said the science of nutrition and
weight loss is constantly chang-
ing. One of the most exciting
recent scientific discoveries, she
said, is the role protein plays in


the diet. Consuming adequate
levels of protein, it turns out,
is essential for weight loss and
weight maintenance, and it can
improve metabolism.
People, especially women -
because they tend to cut calo-
ries and skip meals - need at
least the minimum daily-rec-
onmmended levels of
protein, if not more.
S"What most
women do
is skip

fast oro
eatad.







'We are finding for weight
maintenance, weight loss and
maintenanceof fruit,








mass, which is actually the
metabolically active atvery
determines how fast your me-t
lunch,
nike salad, and eat their protein
at night."Mitchell said.
"We are finding for weight
maintenance, weight loss and
maintenance of lean muscle
mass, which is actually the
metabolically active tissue that
determines how fast your me-
tabolism runs, that you really
need to have protein at every
meal," Mitchell said. Protein


needs to be more evenly distrib-
uted throughout the day, with
some at each of your meals, she
added.
Exercise is another impor-
tant aspect of becoming healthy,
Mitchell said. "We have become
a nation that is extremely sed-
entary., from the remote, the
riding lawn mover, the comput-
er, we sit, sit, sit, and because of
that. we get very little exercise."
Mitchell suggests people try
to mix up their exercise and add
strength-training to build and
maintain muscle mass. "What
we need is a lifestyle that looks
at how to get moving. We need
to find activities that are fun;
maybe it's yoga, martial arts,
ballet, ice-skating; whatever it
is, it has to be fun for you so you
are going to do it."
Mitchell also recommends
people re-evaluate their food
choices and portions, especial-
ly when eating out. "Our por-
tions are so obscene; you can
feed two or three people on one
portion. Everyone can stand to
pay attention to what they eat,
eat more fruits and vegetables
> turn to DIET on page A12


Fitness goes high-tech


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF


Americans have a boggling array of gad-
gets to help spur them into healthier life-
styles, even video game systems such as
Nintendo's popular Wii.
Video gamers are often considered
couch potatoes, but more and more
games that emphasize activity, such as
"'Wi Fit," are appearing on the market,
said Rick Hall, production director of the
1orida Interactive Entertainment Acad-
mthy at the University of Central Florida.
+ For more than 20 years, this fitness
Equipment has been shrinking in size
-d cost and growing in intelligence, al-
iowing it to observe and monitor physi-
cal movement, he said.
"This has really been a critical innova-
tion," Hall wrote in an e-mail. "Where pre-
iouslywe could only track gross physical
iorce - like with rowing machines and
Vike machines - now our range of de-
�cting motion has been greatly
increased
and made
more ac-
c.u rat e,
andithas
S' done so
in a cost-
" "efficient,
space -
efficient
L" ,- *' ws -, ^


Here's a look at some options out there
to keep you fit in 2009:

Nintendo "Wii Fit" game
"Fit" is for use with the Nintendo \Wii
game console and the Wii Balance Board,
a small platform that monitors and sens-
es motion during game activities such as
strength training, aerobics, yoga and bal-
ance games. The "Fit" Web site says it can
"bring health and balance back into your
life."
A University of Mississippi professor is
currently researching the possibility that
the Nintendo Wii and other whole-body
movement game consoles could cause a
reduction in obesity, according to a uni-
versity news release.
"We're seeing the Wii used for physical
therapy and in retirement homes, as well
as in schools," Hall said.

EyeToy "Kinetic"
The EyeToy is a small USB camera that
sits on top of a TV and plugs into the Play-
Station 2 gaming console. This motion-
sensitive camera films- the player and
puts his image on the screen. Players then
use their arms, legs, head and buttocks
to play games such as "Kinetic," a virtual
personal trainer. Released in 2005, the
game is "a highly personalized workout
program designed to improve stamina,
body conditioning and relaxation," Eye-
Tby.com states.


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Winter Nark / Maitland Observer


Page 8 ThrdyJaur1,20


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Thursday, January 1,2009 Page 9


WAI;ntpr ir/M I tlAsknd OhcPrv-r


Don't break


your vows


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF


Day one of the new year offers
endless possibilities. It's an op-
portunity to make resolutions
for the future, wipe the slate
clean and start over.
The tradition of resolving
to change is not new - it dates
back -1,000 years when ancient
Babylonians made an effort to
return borrowed items, such
as farm equipment, to their
neighbors at the cusp of their
new year.
Today, it is estimated that
nearly 70 percent of Americans
make at least one resolution.
The most popular pledges in-
clude losing weight, exercising
and quitting smoking. Other
typical resolutions include a re-
newed focus on finances, such
as debt reduction, and making
more time for family.
Unfortunately, it is esti-
mated that approximately
25 percent of people break
their resolution after the first
week, and by -six months,
more than half have given up.


With such a focus on the cur-
rent state of the -economy,
stocks plummeting, and 401(k)
accounts dwindling, it's easy
to feel out of control. It's easy
to succumb to the pressures of
stress and lose sight of personal
goals, such as weight loss, ex-
ercise and general well-being.
January is an opportune time
to regain control on your own
terms.
While it's tempting for some
people, perhaps, to make mul-
tiple promises, experts agree
your chances for success are
higher when you take baby
steps.
Marcia Davis, counselor
and founder of Twelve Stones
Counseling in Oviedo, said the
most common mistake people
make when facing a new year
is making too many resolutions
at once. "They say you have to
do something for 40 days be-
-fore it is a habit, and so trying to
make so many changes at once,
it is really hard to carry that out
and then nothing becomes per-

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Newlyweds John and Jenny move from
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start a new life. Scared by the prospect of
having kids, John gets a ddg to help ease
him into being a parent, only to find the dog
is nothing but trouble.
Photo courtesy of Twentieth Century-Fox


2 hours -PG


Area experts weigh-in on resolutions


KYLE TAYLOR
OBSERVER STAFF

Do you find yourself making New
Year's resolutions every year only to
have them quickly fall by the way-
side? Do you start eachJanuarywith
a commitment to a new health and
fitness regimen - only to lose your
enthusiasm some time after Valen-
tine's Day? Then kick yourself all
through the summer swimsuit sea-
son for not having stuck with it.
This year can be different! The
Observer has compiled a list of tips
and training advice from the area's
top personal trainers. A mix of goal-
setting and consistency seems to be
the key. The personal trainer, much
like a sporting team coach, lends
support, advice and - most impor-
tantly - accountability to your regi-
men. We put our expert panel to the
test and they have narrowed down
the keys to success so that you can
experience successful and lasting
results from this year's health and
fitness resolutions.

Understand the benefits of a
healthy lifestyle. Julie Prince-of Ace
Certified Personal Trainer likes to
ensure that her clients understand


the benefits of improved health
and fitness. Exercise benefits you in
countless ways - it improves your
mood, improves the cardiovascular
system, strengthens muscles and
improves balance, improves lung
capacity, and strengthens and im-
proves bone density - all of which
lead to a longer, healthier and hap-
pier life.

The power of goal-setting: Joe Mabe
of Winter Park's YMCA reminds his
clients that there is more to goal-
setting than just recording your
goals. A goal should be specific in
terms of time and numbers. It is not
enough to just say, "I want to lose
weight."
An appropriate goal is realistic
and well-defined. An example of
such a goal could be, "I want to lose
10 pounds of fat in two months."
By its very nature, a goal also forces
you to track your progress at the
bare minimum with a beginning
and ending assessment. This allows
you to determine if the goal was
reached and then change your plan
of attack if it wasn't.

The basics still apply. A well-bal-
anced fitness regimen includes a


mix of aerobic and strength train-
ing. Nancy Lowe, who indepen-
dently operates Winter Park Jazzer-
cise, tells her students to schedule
three to five aerobic sessions per
week doing an activity you enjoy
such as bicycling, running, aero-
bic class, etc. You should strength
train at least two times per week.
Not only does strength training
tone your muscles, it strengthens
your bones, makes you less prone
to lower-back injury and may re-
verse the natural decline in metab-
olism, which begins around age 30.

Add a social dimension. Many gyms
and. fitness centers offer group.
classes such as yoga, boot camp and
aerobics. Lowe's adage is that it's
important to pick a program that
suits your personality. If you are a
social person that enjoys meeting
new people, then try an aerobics or
dance-based exercise class. "If your
program does not suit your per-
sonality you will not stick with it,"
Lowe said.

Nutrition: Don't underestimate the
role of a balanced diet. No matter
how hard you work out, if you're
putting more calories in than you're


burning, then you can still gain
weight. Ask your gym or personal
trainer for basic nutrition plan-
ning. More advanced nutrition and
diets can be sought from a staff nu-
tritionist or services such as Weight
Watchers and Jenny Craig.

Location: Our experts agree that
location matters. Make sure your
workout location is convenient.
That way you cannot use it as an
excuse to skip your workout. Se-
lect a location or class time that
works with your schedule, change
into your workout clothes and go
straight there before or after work:

Remember, if working out is some-
thing new for you, or if you suffer
from a pre-existing medical condi-
tion, you should consult your doctor
before beginning any fitness regi-
men. Take it slow. You can't achies
your desired results overnight,
the end, if you value your time on
this Earth, then you'll need to ap-
preciate all the benefits a healthy
lifestyle affords.
Take just one hour each day for
yourself - you will be happier and
your family will thank you for it.


GADGETS I Shoes talk to your iPod, broach tracks your calorie burning


< continued from page A8

Similar to the Wii and dance pads
used with games such 'as Dance
Dance Revolution, EyeToy can sense
motion and orientation both physi-
cally and optically, Hall said.

Nike + iPod
The Nike + iPod Sport sensor syncs
running shoes to an iPod Nano or
Touch to monitor distance, pace
and calories burned. The kit can
also be programmed to play a cer-
tain song when the runner needs
"instant motivation," according to


Apple.com. It can also be used in
the gym on cardio equipment. The
workout summary is saved on the
iPod for future review.
"We've only begun to scratch the
surface with how this kind of tech-
nology can be used," Hall said, citing
that GPS systems are also included
in most cell phones nowadays.

Fitbit
The Fitbit Tracker is a matchbook-
sized device that clips on clothing
and tracks data such as exercise in-
tensity levels, calories burned, sleep
quality, steps and distance. It wire-


lessly uploads this data to a Web
site.
"Our goal is to make people
aware of their overall fitness and
well-being - and to use technology
to accomplish this in a motivating
and entertaining way that appeals
to people beyond just hard-core
athletes," James Park, CEO of Fit-
bit Inc., said in a company news re-
lease.

iPhone fitness apps
Apple's iPhone has downloadable
applications that relate to fitness,
such as FitSync's downloadable


exercise programs that track prog-
ress and compare the user's fitness
goals against family, friends or even
strangers across the world. Weight-
Date keeps track of a person's ca-
loric intake and monitors weight
gain or loss. iQuit is the "conscience
on your shoulder," according to
HealthNews.com, helping a person
to kick a smoking habit by encour-
aging them to keep busy.
"It's actually interesting how
much is already out there, but I
don't think we've seen anything
yet," UCF's Hall said of fitness-based
technology.


Calendar


The Park Plaza Gardens Restaurant
and Cafe in downtown Winter Park
will offer a "prix fixe" dinner menu -
with multiple selections from different
courses for the same price - along
with party hats and favors to ring in
the New Year on New Year's Eve.
Brad and Company will play jazz
music from 9 p.m. to closing. An a la
carte menu will be available.
The restaurant is at 319 S. Park
Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407-645-
2475 for more information.


The selection of a Community Ac-
tion Board Representative and Al-
ternate for Orange County District 5
for a four-year term will be sponsored
and conducted by the Jewish Family
Services of Greater Orlando. The CAB
is. advisory to the Board of County
Commissioners in the oversight of
the Community Action Division and its
programs and services for low income
families and individuals. The selection
meeting will be held at 6 p.m. Jan. 6
at 2100 Lee Road in Winter Park.


Call Orange County Community Ac-
tion at 407-836-7577 for more infor-
mation.

The Central Florida Anthropo-
logical Society presents "Exploring
Florida Shipwrecks," a lecture by Jeff
Moates, at 7 p.m. Jan. 8 at Harry P.
Leu Gardens at 1920 N. Forest Ave. in
Orlando. Moates is the regional direc-
tor of the Florida Public Archaeology
Network. He will speak about some
of the state's oldest artificial reefs,


including dozens of shipwrecks, sal-
vage attempts and archaeological
investigations at sea.
Call 407-699-9861 for more infor-
mation.

The Winter Park University Club in-
vites members and their guests for a
New Year's Day reception from 2 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 1. The cost is
$15 per person.
Music will be provided by Velvet
Jazz.


Reservations will be takenjtbr'
Dec. 30 by calling 407-644:5128.
Enjoy hors d'oeulfres, the return
of the shrimp bel, wine, punch and
coffee.
The Club is at the northwest corner of
Park and Webster avenues.

Enzian Theater hosts a "Popcorn
Flicks" presentation of the movie
"The Hustler" at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan.
8, in Central Park on Park Avenue in
Winter Park.


Winter Nark /Maitland Observer


Page 10 Thursday, January 1, 2009






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, January 1,2009 Page 11



Opinion/


[Editor's note: With Chris
Jepson on vacation, we're
re-publishing his New Year's
column from last December,
equally relevant today.]
So many disparate "facts"
suggest 2008 may not be
the happiest of years. A
greeting we all occasionally
hear is, "How-ya doing?" If
I am feeling contrary at all
(frequently the case), I re-
spond with, "Compared to
what?" It makes me laugh
and the other person fre-
quently puzzled. I then re-
peat their question and my
answer and sometimes we
both chuckle. Most times
we simply move on after I
say, "Just ducky, I'm doing
just ducky."
I believe it has finally
moved into the American
consciousness just how dev-
astating humanity is to oth-
er life forms on earth. We
don't want to believe it, that
how we live is killing the
planet, that what it takes to


sustain our pampered lives
wreaks havoc everywhere
humans interface with 01'
Mother Earth. The inher-
ent conundrum we now
acknowledge is nothing we
will do will make a measur-
able difference in our life-
times. Environmental trea-
ties (signed or imagined)
will do nothing to what is
going to occur in the next
50 or so years. Really.
I get a kick out of listen-
ing to Rush Limbaugh (540
AM, noon to three week-
days) wax idiotic on the
subject. He says the science
of global warming is ques-
tionable and that the ver-
dict is still out whether or
not man is contributing to
the warming of the planet.
He blames liberals and the
drive-by media f6r hyping a
problem where none exists
in order to create a world
organization (think UN on
steroids) that will control
(and tax) us into slavery.


Perspectives

by...







An asterisk by our name


Un-huh, Rush. You bet fella,
pave it all and call it prog-
ress. And we will. Pave it all.
And, call it progress.
We care about things
in the abstract. At least I
do. I may never see a polar
bear in the wild but I get
teary over their inevitable
demise, or the gorillas of
Africa or even the springs of
Florida. All over our beauti-
ful state, incredible springs
flow out of the ground and
form rivers. They're dying.
Reduced flow and fertilizers
and septic tanks (all issues
of development) are pol-
luting the waters. It's a first
magnitude loss of nature
right in our own backyards.
And it isn't abstract. It is
real. Hell, Volusia County
recently made a decision to
tap directly into Blue Spring
so they can facilitate yet
even more development.
Progress, don't-cha see.
And there is no answer.
Locally or nationally or
worldwide. Human beings
will always trump nature.
It's progress. More housing
developments, more roads,
more schools, more farm-
ing, more traffic, more eco-
nomic vitality, more shop-
ping centers, more church-
es, more, more, more.
Everything in the American
economy and experience is
predicated on more. There
is no other economic mod-
el. Those who believe more
is the answer for all human


Letters to


Commuter rail system deserves 21 st-century technology


As global oil supplies diminish
past the era of Peak Oil, oil usage
is switching to other energy forms
as much as possible. For rail trans-
portation this means electric pro-
pulsion, with the electricity sup-
plied by efficient stationary power
plants. Amtrak completed the elec-
trification of its northeast corridor
in 2000 so that the Acela Express
high-speed train now travels on
electric power all the way between
Boston, New York and Washington,
D.C. It has a goal of cutting the two
hour 45 minute transit time be-
tween Washington and New York
to a flat two hours.
Joseph H. Boardman, former ad-
ministrator of the Federal Railroad
Administration and now CEO of
Amtrak, said the next leg will be an
extension to Richmond, followed
by electrification of the entire East-
ern seaboard route, from Miami to
Maine. The route from Virginia to
Jacksonville, Fla., will be electri-
fied, as the Southeast High Speed
Rail Corridor is implemented. Visit
www.sehsr.org for information on
that. Ultimately, Boardman says,
the entire U.S. passenger rail net-
work will be electrified.
Electric propulsion is more en-
vironmentally friendly than diesel
internal combustion engines. In
France, where the switchover is
nearly complete, C02 emissions
are falling, while in the U.S., still
largely dependent on diesel loco-
motives, they are rising.


The operating cost for diesel-
powered rail will rise with increas-
es in oil prices as the global reces-
sion ends, and with competing
demand for oil increases in China
and India, among others. Electric-
propulsion rail can be powered
by a variety of efficient stationary
power plants, using coal, nuclear,
natural gas or renewable fuels.
Central Florida Commuter Rail
(CFCR) is a long-term, 99-year
commitment. It would be wise to
plan for the latest environmentally
friendly electric propulsion tech-
nology rather than sticking to 60-
year-old diesel propulsion designs.
The first step would be electrifica-
tion of the 61-mile commuter rail
route with an overhead catenary.
The cost is about $1 million per
mile on existing right-of-way, based
on experience in Pennsylvania.
Other advantages are gained
too:
Electric propulsion requires less
scheduled maintenance than diesel
locomotives.
Faster acceleration and dynamic
braking with electric propulsion
means that the route served can
be covered in less time, especially
where stops are close together. This
translates to fewer train sets re-
quired for the same level of service.
Fewer train sets mean fewer crews
and lower payroll.
There is no need to build trips to
a refueling station into the sched-
ule.


Higher efficiency with electric
propulsion means that only about
half the energy of diesel is required
to move the passengers.
Electric railcars are less complex
than diesel-driven rail cars, and are.
easier to maintain.
CSX and Amtrak ultimately will
agree on electrification of all pas-
senger rail routes in Florida. Expect
to see funding in transportation
and infrastructure upgrade bills. It
may take 15 years to accomplish,
as Amtrak will have to upgrade its
rolling stock, most of which is 35-
40 years old, except for Acela.
If CFCR proactively electrifies
its 61 miles of track it can reap
the benefits early, using electric
propulsion rather than buying
into diesel technology that will
become increasingly expensive to
operate as oil prices escalate, not
to mention the carbon footprint
concern. CSX can continue to. run
diesel-powered freight trains on
the same tracks until it, too, switch-
es to electric propulsion.
When CFCR was announced in
the fall of 2006, the centerpiece
of the project was a bi-level diesel
multiple-unit and trailer. The only
supplier of diesel-powered com-
muter rail cars that responded to
the Florida Department of Trans-
portation's initial request for bids
has become financially unstable
and unable to complete other
contracts throughout the coun-
try. FDOT prudently has issued


another request for bids, but this
time seeking to buy older-design
diesel-electric locomotives that
may have been remanufactured,
and separate bi-level commuter
cars. South Florida's Tri-Rail ran a
test comparing the older locomo-
tive plus two bi-level cars, with the
newer diesel commuter rail cars
originally planned for Central Flor-
ida. On an equivalent passenger ba-
sis, over 144 miles, the older design
locomotive consumed 2.5 times as
much fuel.
But if FDOT continues on the
present path, to purchase older
design diesel locomotives, to push
and pull its commuter rail cars, the
capital investment will have been
spent on obsolete technology, with
most of the 99-year agreement still
to run. We will be saddled with an
inefficient system that will become
increasingly expensive to operate
(as oil prices continue to escalate).
Electrification of the 61 miles
of CFCR rail should be a first prior-
ity - rather than the purchase of
inefficient locomotives that will
significantly increase the opera-
tion and maintenance cost for fuel.
Since we have only one chance in a
century to do this, let's get it right.
Electric multiple units with bi-level
coaches are the ideal answer for
a new commuter rail system. The
technology is available today.
- George F. McClure
Winter Park


problems say, "Yea, sure
there's economic model for
what Jepson describes. It's
called a recession."
And, I agree. If we don't
sell more Pampers, toasters,
toys from China, cars from
Japan, housing develop-
ments and Magic tickets,
we have economic prob-
lems. And if our population
doesn't expand, who will,,
buy those Pampers, toast-
ers, cars, homes and tick-
ets? You? Me? Sure, we'll
upgrade as we can but the
over-arching fact of the
matter, America is well on
it's way to becoming a 500
million population. We
need an ever-increasing
population to sustain our
economic model. Progress,
don't-cha see?
Six and one-half bil-
lion human beings on the
planet today. Is humanity
at risk? No, but the rest of
the planet sure is. Will the
universe cry (other than
sentient humans) when the
last wild Great Ape or Flor-
ida Scrub Jay is determined
extinct? Nah.
About 20 years ago, I
started saying, "Thank gawd
for video tape, without it
we'll never know what we
missed."
Of all Earth's fine natural
treasures, I want to expe-
rience the coral reefs off
Australia. Reefs and their
accompanying life are an
extraordinarily beautiful


world for me and all over
the planet Earth's reefs are
dying. And my flying and
being a tourist to see them
will contribute to their de-
mise.
That, dear reader, is our
modern condition. We are
well aware of exactly how
lethal we Are to the planet.
Yet, we have no real way of
changing course without
the most wrenching of con-
sequences.Will our genera-
tion of humanity have an
asterisk by our name? "Yea,
they (20th & 21st century
humans) were creative, in-
novative, hardworking and,
at times, genuinely pleas-
ant to be around but their
unbalanced lifestyles and
sheer numbers killed much
of what was beautiful, what
made Earth special in all
the universe."
We did it consciously, in-
exorably and with little re-
morse. Progress, don't-cha
see. So what is the correct
response to "How-ya do-
ing?" Fine? It ain't too fine
for the duckies.
Yet my backyard flowers
are abloom and joy remains
in my'heart. That, too, is'
part of the human condi-
tion.


ATJEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.







raDgy 11' 'Tlulbre ii u IuIuIj, 1iVV 90 W P / M a O sre


Play On!


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

Echoes from a
fond past

In 1931 at Christmas
vacation time, I was in
the middle of my sixth-
grade year in Winter Park
Grammar School. My sis-
ter, Peg, was in the fourth
grade. And my father was a
busy member of the Rollins
faculty.
Our family of four lived
in a little house almost on
the Rollins campus, at the
corner of Fairbanks and
Chapman. Chapman was
then a dirt street running
100 yards from then-nar-
row Fairbanks Avenue to
the big red-brick grammar
school facing Park Avenue.
The house we lived in
was one of three later torn
down to make way for the
broad racetrack that Fair-
banks now is.
That Christmas Day, I ran
across the Rollins campus
and down to Lake Virginia.


The day was chilly and gray.
No one was at the lake. I
strolled out to the end of
one of the long Rollins
docks and sat down, think-
ing of warmer weather and
good swimming days to
come.
Soon I noticed a very
well-dressed man coming
out on the dock in my di-
rection. He had on a three-
piece suit and tie. Rather
than tell me to get off the
dock, as I had expected, he
slowly sat down beside me,
his legs dangling almost to
the black water. Turning his
balding head with its deep-
set squinting eyes toward
me full-face, he asked me,
"Do you live here?"
"Yes, sir," I answered,
"What does your father
do?" he asked.
"He's a professor."
"Oh, that's interesting.
What is his name?"
"Same as mine - Louis
Roney," I said.
"What does he teach?" he
asked.
"He teaches languages,"
I answered. "He can speak
about a hundred of 'em.
And he's one of the best
fencers in the world."
"He must be quite a
man," he added, smiling.
"He is!"
I continued to talk full-
speed.
"... and he was an athlete
in college and an officer in
the World War in France
and he's about the smartest
person there is anywhere!"
I launched into a stream
of hyperbolic accolades
that painted my father as
almost superhuman. My
boyish pride in my father
had led me - willingly -
into some wild exaggera-


tions. I probably ended by
saying that there had never
been anyone on the Rollins
campus quite so "swell" as
my dad.
My elderly companion
rose, and said, "I must leave
now. I am very happy to
have met you, and I am glad
you told me about your dad.
He must be quite extraordi-
nary.")
"Oh, he is!" I said.
"When you see him, will
you tell him 'Hello' from
me?" he asked.
"Yes, sir."
I asked him his name. He
told me.
At the dinner table that
night I told my father about
my meeting with the kindly
gentleman on the Rollins
dock.
"Dad, he was really inter-
ested in hearing all about
you."
"That's nice," said dad.
"I'm afraid I made you
out to be the most impor-
tant man in Winter Park."
"My goodness, Louis,
what did you actually tell
him?" asked dad.
"Well, Dad, I guess I said
you are just about the big-
gest person on the Rollins
campus."
"You know that you
shouldn't talk like that!"
said dad.
"Well, this man seemed
so interested, and he kept
on askin' things," I said.
"By the way," I added, "he
said to tell you'Hello.'"
"What's his name?"
"Holt," I said. "Hamilt6n
Holt."
(Dr Hamilton Holt was
president ofRollins College.)
And Later-
In 1932,1 I began seventh
grade in a class of 27 at


Winter Park High School,
over on Huntington Av-
enue.
My family had moved
from the little house almost
on the Rollins campus to
Forest Hills, at that time a
sparsely settled, even lone-
ly, part of Winter Park.
Forest Hills - particular-
ly after dark - had an eerie,
wild beauty with its few
houses, its untended orange
groves, and its palmetto
and pine wildernesses re-
sounding with the cries of
chuck-will's-widows in the
night. Across Lake Sue was
Orlando, another country
we seldom invaded except
for visits to Sears and Roe-
buck.
Our only neighbors my
age were Hope Strong,
across Lake Chelton, Peggy
Caldwell (later Mrs. Hope
Strong), a "next-door"
neighbor a hundred yards
away through the forest,
and Bob Pratt, who lived in
Yankee splendor in a fine
brick house down on the
shores of Lake Sue.
In our house on Rock-
wood Road, I found a large,
hand-crank Victrola in the
room assigned to me as my
bedroom. This outmoded
machine was the last ves-
tige of past tenants. I found
one lone record in the stor-
age compartment at the
bottom of the Victrola.
Presto change-o! I was
the proud owner not only
of an enormous Victrola
but also a record to play.
The one-sided, thick but
fragile record was of Enrico
Caruso, singing in Italian a
song called "Musica Proi-
bita."
Day after day I played
that record, to the distrac-


tion of my parents and
maybe even the Caldwells,
who were in earshot.
Soon I had learned the
song, in Italian, by rote,
though I did not under-
stand a word. I began sing-
ing along with the immor-
tal voice of Caruso. I felt the
power and strength of that
incomparable voice, and
somehow equated Caruso's
natural manly singing
technique with my other
interests, such as the Boy
Scouts, boxing, tennis, and
100-pound football.
I was later the center
on the Winter Park High
School team, the Wildcats.
I don't know what my
rough-and-tumble team-
mates would have thought
of my trying to sing in the
manner of Caruso. I cer-
tainly didn't tell them.
However, after four years
at Harvard College, fol-
lowed by four yeats as a na-
val gunnery officer in World
War II, I became an opera
and concert star in North
America and most of the
countries of Europe.
All my concert programs
since my debut as soloist
with the New York Phil-
harmonic in 1948 included
"Musica Proibita." This was
a piece I never had to learn
- the notes were chiseled
on my heart for all time.
After I learned Italian
the words spoke to me elo-
quently.
Seventy-eight years later,
that song is still a thrill-
ing challenge, just as it was
when it dared me, a kid of
10, to get up on his hind
legs and sing to the world!


DIET I Out of shape? Blame yourself first - then fix it.
< continued from page A8 Chief Dietician Mary Lu "People can't blame the community centers. People scription is the proper diet
Carpenter at the Orlando economy for not taking need to not look at being and the exercise and it's be-
and eat more fiber. Nutri- VA Medical Center said too care of themselves - es- healthy as a cost and look at coming more recognized.
tion plays a very active role often people put getting pecially Floridians, who it as a cost-savings," Carpen- With the cost of health care,
and will play 'a role in the healthy on the back burner, can put on a good pair of ter said. "People think doc- people are expected to take
prevention of disease and thinking they can't afford shoes and go outside. We tors are always throwing a care of themselves and save
will help you lose weight," to, when in fact they cannot have ample resources from pill at them, but we know some money by taking care
Mitchell said. afford not to make changes. the trails and parks to the the foundation of this pre- of their health."


RESOLUTION I Think reasonably when making resolutions


< continued from page A9

manent." Once you fail at one, the
tendency is to give up hope, which
makes it more difficult to carry out
any of the resolutions, she said.
. Davis does offer hope and rec-
ommends people try a gradual
change in behavior. Select a couple
of meaningful resolutions for two
months, she suggested, and then
add on another one every couple of
months. "Once we feel accomplish-
ment then we are more motivated
to change," Davis said.
As a counselor, Davis recom-
mends people also reflect on their
internal selves in the new year.
"There is something about chang-
ing the calendar and a whole new
year ahead of you and a sense of
possibilities," Davis said. "Everyone
has a hope for a better year. A lot of
people look at changing external
things like spending less money and
eating less food. I would like to en-
courage people to look at their core


issues and make internal change as
well."

Be realistic about your goals
Don't expect change to happen
overnight. Set reasonable goals
and keep track of your accomplish-
ments. If you mess up a little, evalu-
ate and jump right back in.

Make time for you and your family
With stress levels high and fami-
lies on overload, make time to play.
Find a common interest, such as
football, biking or running, and do
it with a family member. An hour
exploring one of Seminole County's
parks on the weekend can do won-
ders for both your health and your
relationship.
Make a commitment to help a
child develop better study habits
on the weekend, for example, or set
aside time to read with a younger
child. Designate a family game night
once a week and advertise it on the


family calendar - not only does it
strengthen your bond and promote
camaraderie, it's also free!

Diet and exercise
One of the most important steps in
reaching health goals, it is believed,
is keeping track of your physical
success in a log. Let your doctor
guide you toward a healthy weight
through diet and exercise and stick
to it. Create a diary of your thoughts
along the way to keep you strong
and focused.-

Share a meal
Not only is eating at your own kitch-
en table more cost-effective than
racing through the drive-through,
it's healthier for your relationships.
Experts agree: Children are more
likely to share their day and express
their opinions during family time
when the focus is not directly on
them.


Work together around the house
Cleaning up the yard and making
general home repairs doesn't have
to be a chore when the whole fam-
ily is involved. Allow children to
contribute in their own way, from
keeping rooms clean to painting a
worn fence. Not only does it help
promote teamwork and keep your
home looking great, it will help you
retain your property value.

Ask for support
Enlist a family member or friend for
support - or talk to a counselor. A
common misconception, Davis said,
is that counselors are only help-
ful in crisis situations when in fact
a counselor may give you another
perception, help you think outside
the box and assist with st-rategies to
accomplish objectives.
"Our goal is to help people with
what they want to do differently,"
Davis said.


Wiriter Flark / Maitland Observer


Pnn 19 Thudav.lauar 1.200









Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, January 1, 2009 Page 13


L HNotices


DO,~ ~ e ' I~.7S 1 0 1


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 07-CC-17690
THE REGISTRY AT MICHIGAN PARK CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
NIGEL NEWLAND,
Defendant.
RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to an order reset-
ting the Foreclosure sale dated November 19,
2008, in Case No.: 07-CC-17690, of the Circuit
Court in and for Orange County, Florida, in which
THE REGISTRY AT MICHIGAN PARK CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION, INC., is the Plaintiff and NIGEL
NEWLAND is the Defendant, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the Orange County
Courthouse, 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 350,
Orlando, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., on January 6, 2009,
the following described property set forth in the
Order of Final Judgment:
Unit 1226, THE REGISTRY AT MICHIGAN
PARK, according to the DECLARATION
OF CONDOMINIUM OF THE REGISTRY AT
MICHIGAN PARK CONDOMINIUM, as recorded
in Official Records Book 7941, Pages 2400
through 2456, of the Public Records of
Orange County, Florida
Also described as:
Unit 1226, THE REGISTRY AT MICHIGAN
PARK, together with an undivided inter-
est in the common elements, according
to the Declaration of Condominium thereof
recorded in Official Record Book 7941, Page
2400, as amended fromtime time time, ttime, of the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida
as amended in Official Records Book 7957,
Page 4027, Public Records of Orange County,
Florida.
Any Person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Is pendens must file
a claim within 60 days after the sale.
DATED: DEC 15, 2008.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of County Court
By KATHERINE BERNAL
CIVIL COURT SEAL
Deputy Clerk
Publication of this Notice on December 25, 2008,
and January 1, 2009 in the Winter Park-Maitland
Observer.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION
OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT COURT
ADMINISTRATION, 425 NORTH ORANGE AVE., ROOM
2130, ORLANDO, FL 32801, TELEPHONE (407) 836-
2303 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT
OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771.
CLAYTON & MCCULLOH
1065 Maitland Center Commons Blvd.
SMaitland, Florida 32751
(407)875-2655
12/25,1/1

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-7791-0
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN J. TAMAYO, CLAUDIA LORENA ECHEVERRI
and SOUTHPORT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 22nd day
of January, 2009, at 11:00 a.m.-in Room 350 of
the Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S.
Orange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801 the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:

LOT 42, BLOCK 5, VILLAGES OF SOUTHPORT,
PHASE 1C, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT-
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 40
PAGES 47-50, PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE
COUNTY FLORIDA.

The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgement of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
08-CA-7791-0 now pending in the Circuit Court in
Orange County, Florida.
-In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 17 day of December, 2008.
LYDIA GARDNER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By BELINDA GARRETT
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
12/25,1/1

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR ORANGE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 48-2008-CP-002734-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DANIEL W. NEWHALLER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of DANIEL W.
NEWHALLER, deceased, File Number 48-2008-CP-
002734-0, Is pending in the Circuit Court for Or-
ange County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 425 N. Orange Ave., Orlando, FL 32801.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, including unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedents
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBUCATION OF THIS NOTICE
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is De-
cember 25, 2008.

Daniel James Newhaller, Personal Rep.
P.O. Box 10679, Tampa, FL 33679
JAMES P.PANICO, P.A.
By: James P. Panico, Esq.
111 S. Maitland Ave.
Maitland, FL 32751
(407) 647-7200
Fax: (407) 647-1420
Attorney for Personal Rep.
Florida Bar No.: 105436
12/25,1/1


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-9155 #37
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
YOLANDA CARMONA and FRANK MEDINA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 23 day of
January, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of
the Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S.
Orange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801 the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:
LOT 36, ISLANDS OF CURRY FORD,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 40, PAGE 69
PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be trade pursuant to the
Final Judgement of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
08-CA-9155 #37 now pending in the Circuit Court
in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-8C0-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 18 day of December, 2008.
LYDItGARDNER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By MAYRA I. CRUZ
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk


JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, PA.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157


12/25,1/1


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 200B-CP-2727-0
SDivision: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PRISCILLA M. NELSON,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of PRISCILLA
M. NELSON, deceased, whose date of death was
September 14, 2008, File Number 2008-CP-2727-0,
is pending in the Circuit Court for ORANGE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 N. Orange Ave., Room 340, Orlando, FL 32801.
The names and addresses of the personal repre,
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served, must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM:
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.7Q2. OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. . .
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
December 25, 2008.
* Signed on November 29, 2008.

WILLIAM A. BOYLES
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 228486
GRAYROBINSON, P.A.
301 E. Pine Street, Suite 1400
Post Office Box 3068
Orlando, FL 32802-3068
Telephone: (407) 843-8880
KIMBERLY ELLEN NELSON WINTER
Personal Representative
11 Glover Rd
Wayland, MA 01778
12/25,171


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 08-DR-5257-02D-G
Jennifer N. Seto, Petitioner
and
Juan R. Soto, Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
TO: (name of Respondent) Juan R. Soto
(Respondent's last known address)
YOU ARE NOTIFED that an action has been filed
against you and that you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on (name
of Petitioner) Jennifer N. Soto, whose address is
1026 Contravest Lane, Winter Springs, FL 32708
on or before January 29, 2009, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at (clerk's address) 301
N. Park Avenue, Sanford, FL 32772 before service
on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to
do so, a default may be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You may file
Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers
In this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, Including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated December 19, 2008.
MARYANNE MORSE, CLERK
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Debre A. Jesperson
Deputy Clerk
12/25,1/1,1/8,1/15


NOTICE OF PUBUC SALE
SALE BY CASH AUCTION
THE FOLLOWiNG UNITS
On January 20, 2009, at Assured Self-Storage, Inc.
to the highest bidder for cash, items contained In
the following units:
C1030 - Oneida Quintana- Household Items
TO BE HELD AT
510 DOUGLAS AVENUE
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL
ON January 20, 2008
AT 10:00 A.M.
ASSURED SELF-STORAGE, INC.
Assured Self-Storage, Inc. reserves the right to bid
and to refuse or reject any and all bids.
1/1,1/8


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-23691-0
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RAISA FERNANDEZ and EDISON FERNANDEZ,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE -
Notice is hereby given that on the 17 day of Feb.,
2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801 the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
LOT 181, AVALON PARK NORTHWEST
VILLAGE, PHASE I, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 62
PAGE 10 - 15, PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgement of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
08-CA-23691-0 now pending in the Circuit Court in
Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1 -800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, it any, otheran the property owner
as of the date he Lis Pendens must file a clamn
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 17 day of December, 2008.
LYDIA GARDNER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By BELINDA GARRETT
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, PA.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
12/25,1/1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-23692-0
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JULIO STURUP,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 22nd day
of January, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of
the Courthouse of. Orange County, Florida, 425 S.
Orange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801 the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:
UNIT NO. 3, R/C WORLD I, A CONDOMINIUM,
ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF
CONDOMINIUM DATED MAY 2, 1985,
RECORDED ON MAY 3, 1985 IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 3637 AT PAGE 826, AND ALL.
AMENDMENTS THERETO, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY FLORIDA,
TOGETHER WITH STORAGE SPACE NO. S-3,
TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST
IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTANENT
THERETO.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgement of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
08-CA-23692-0 now pending in the Circuit Court in
Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding--should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not water,
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TOOD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pandens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 17 day of December, 2008.
LYDIA GARDNER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By BELINDA GARRETT
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
12/25,1/1


IN THE CIRCUIT i T. ,',i f i N r in r .ll i I.
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 07-CA-868(34)
SKY LAKE SOUTH HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE E. PANZARDI AND LIZETTE PANZARDI,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated Oct. 22, 2008,
in Case No.: 07-CA-868(34), of the Circuit Court
in and for Orange County, Florida, in which SKY
LAKE SOUTH HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.,
is the Plaintiff and JOSE E. PANZARDI AND LIZETTE
PANZARDI are the Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the Orange County
Courthouse, 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 350,
Orlando, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., on Jan. 15, 2009,
the following described property set forth in the
Order of Final Judgment:
Lot 204 SKY LAKE SOUTH UNIT ONE, accord-
ing to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 5, Pages 51, 52 and 53 of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
A.K.A
Lot 204 SKY LAKE SOUTH, UNIT ONE, accord-
ing to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 5, Pages 51 through 53 of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
DATED: DEC 23, 2008.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of Circuit and County Court
By CYNTHIA ZABETAKIS
CIVIL COURT SEAL
Deputy Clerk
Publication of this Notice on January 1, 2009,
and January 8, 2009 in the Winter Park-Maitland
Observer.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION
OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT COURT
ADMINISTRATION, 425 NORTH ORANGE AVE., ROOM
2130, ORLANDO, FL 32801, TELEPHONE (407) 836-
2303 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT
OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771.
CLAYTON & MCCULLOH
1065 Maitland Center Commons Blvd.
Maitland, Florida 32751
(407) 875-2655
1/1,1/8



FEDERAL LIEN CORP.
318 INDIAN TRACE #540
WESTON, FL 33326
(954)384-7171
NOTICE OF SALE
FEDERAL LIEN CORP will sell at Public Sale at Auc-
tion the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to
Chapter 713.585 of the Florida Statutes on Jan 22,
2009, at 10 A.M.
Lot #: A26125
2003 BLACK TOYOTA 4 DR ,
VIN# 2T1 KR32E63C068824
Located at: COURTESY COLLISION OVIEDO
1441 ALAFAYA TRAIL Oviedo, FL
32765 (407)977-2266
Owner: Devaughn M Collins or Estela Maris
Delgado 1425 Cricket Club Circle 204
Orlando, Fl 32828
Customer: SAME AS REGISTERED OWNER
Lienholder: Drive Financial Services PO Box
560583 Dallas, Tx 75356
Lien Amount: $7,905.96

Pursuant to Florida Statute 713.585 the preceding
claims a lien on vehicle shown for storage, labor
and/or services. Unless charges shown are paid in
cash, said vehicles will be sold for cash by public
auction on date at time shown where vehicle lo-
cated. Owners or anyone claiming an interest have
a right to a hearing prior to the scheduled auction
which can be set by filing demand with Clerk of the
Circuit Court in this County and mailing copies of
demand to all other owners and lienholders. Owner
can recover possession without judicial proceed-
ing by posting bond per Florida Statute 559.917.
Auction proceeds in excess of charges due will be
deposited with Clerk of the Circuit Court.
Any persons) claiming any interests) in the above
vehicles contact: FEDERAL LIEN CORP (954)384-
7171
25% Buyers Premium -*ALLAUCTIONSARE HELD
WITH RESERVE*
LIC# AB0000288


HI.LI: i J: li"CE
The annual return for the fiscal year ending No-
vember 30, 2008, IRS form 990-PF, of THE JENKINS
FAMILY FOUNDATION, INC, will be available for in-
spection at the address noted below during regu-
lar business hours by any citizen who so requests
within 180 days after publication of this notice of
its availability.
The principal manager is William A. Walker II, Presi-
dent
The address of the main office of the foundation is:
2171 Glencoe Road
Winter Park, FL 32789
407-496-2627
1/1,1/8


WPMOBSERVIEiOXG


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE
ansir umu eaft eci
NOTICE is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the Historic Preservation Commission
of the City of Winter Park, Florida on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. in the Commission
Chambers of City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida, to consider the following PUBLIC
HEARINGS:
COR 09-001 Request of Elizabeth Bosserman for a Certificate of Review for alterations to the front
elevation of the dwelling unit located at 818 Antonette Avenue. Contributing element located within the
College Quarter Historic District. Zoned R-1. Parcei ID. #07-22-30-1490-01-110.
All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information will be available in the
Planning Department office so that citizens may acquaint themselves with each issue and receive
answers to any questions they may have prior to the meeting. Planning Department (407) 599-3498.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim, record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (F.5. 286.0105)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's Office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
/s/: Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC
City Clerk
1/1

CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that the Board of Adjustment of the City of Winter Park, Florida on Tuesday
January 20, 2009 will hold a Public Hearing at 5:00 P.M. in the Commission Chambers of City Hall.
At that time, the following variances from Article Ill "Zoning" of the Winter Park Land Development
Code will be heard:
#1 Request of ST MICHAEL LTD for a variance from Sec 58-68 "Medium density multiple family resi-
dential (R-3) District" par (e) to allow the construction of a two story building to be located one foot
from the front lot in lieu of the required front setback of 20 feet and to allow a building coverage of
45% in lieu of the maximum building coverage of 35%.
Property described as TOWN OF WINTER PARK A/67 & B/86 & MISC BOOK 3,220 LOT 11 BLK 55
(LESS S 3 FT PER 9355/1868) as recorded id the Public Records of Orange County, Florida. Parcel ID
05-22-30-9400-55-110.
Located at 354 Hannibal Square East. Zoned: R-3
#2 Request of Mark Nasrallah for a variance from Sec 58-83 "Lakefront lots, boathouses and docks"
par (d) to allow the construction of a residence located a varying setbacks of 9 feet to 18 feet from the
mean water elevation of Lake Maitland in lieu of the required setback of 50 feet.
Property described as Kelsers replat Sicilian Shores, Plat W, Page 76, Jot 8 as recorded in the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida
Located at 510 Via Lugano. Zoned: R-1AAA
#3 Request of Edward and Jennifer Powers for a variance from Section 58-82 "General provisions"
paragraph (p) to allow the installation of fencing with heights of 7 feet along the north lot line, 7 feet to 8
feet along the east side lot line and 8 feet to 10 feet along the south side lot line in lieu of the maximum
allowed fence heights of 6 feet on level ground and up to 8 feet on sloping ground .
Property described as: Forrest Hills, Plat Book K, Page 90, Lot 7, Block J recorded in the Public Records
of Orange County, Florida
Located at 1750 Glencoe Road. Zoned: R-1AA
#4 Request of Thomas Seibert for variances from Sec 58-66 "R-1AA and R-1A districts" par (f) and
Sec 58-82 "General provisions" paragraphs (k), (kk) and (II) to allow the construction of additions to
the dwelling located 7.7 feet from the east side lot line and 19.7 feet from the rear lot line in lieu of
the required side setback of 10 feet and required rear setback of 25 feet, and to allow a two story
garage accessory building higher(19.7 feet) than the principal residence at setbacks of 10 from the
west lot line and.5 feet from the rear lot line in lieu of the required setbacks of 12.5 feet to the second
floor on-the east side, 25 feet to the first floor from the rear lot line and 35 feet to the second floor
from the rear lot line.
Property described as Lot 18, Thomas M. Henkel Addition Plat BookF/Page 61 Parcel ID: 08-22-30-
3488-00-80 as recorded in the Public Records of Orange County, Florida
Located at 742 Osceola.Avenue. Zoned: R- 1AA
IS/Stephanie J Edsall
Stephanie J Edsall
Board Secretary
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (F.S. 286.0105)"Persons with disabilities needing
assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact the Board of Adjustment Secretary
(407-599-3237) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
1/1





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ONE STOP SHOP FOR CENTRAL FLORIDA LEGALS
As the publishers of the Winter Park-Maitland Observer (Orange Counly. FL)
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p.;* men pressing

." -*PRICE GUIDE
Public Ntlice/Public Sale 9/col inch
Notice to Creditors $42 50/week
Notice of Sale $555week
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PLACE YOUR AD
Now Accepting email submlttals. Just email us a
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TTLE 6. CIVIL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (Chs. 45-88)
CHAPTER 50 LEGAL AND OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENTS

� 50 O:i Nlewsparers in wnich legal nobces and process may be
published

No nonce or publication required Io De Dubiisned in a newspaper
in the nature ol or in lieu of process of any kind nature, character
or description provided for under any law of the state whether
herelotore or hereafter enacted, and whether pertaining to
constructive service, or tne Initialing, assuming reviewing
exercising or enforcing jurisdiction or power, by any court in tnis
state, or any notice of sale of property real or personal. for taxes,
state county or municipal. or anentf's. guardian's or administrator's
or any sale made pursuant to any judi
any other publicaton or notl ing to any affairs of the stare.
or any county. munlci' or other political subdivision thereof.
shall De deemed ve been published in accordance witn the
statutes prove ior such publication. unless the same shall have
been pubris or the prescribed period of ame required for such
Dunlicatlo an a newspaper whic the time o such publication
shall hall hv n Tr 1 year n nallave been entered
anicals mabeir at a post tihe .
or In a successor of a newspaper
wnmch together have been so published. provided, however, that
nothing herein contained shall apply where in any county there shal
be no newspaper In existence which shall have been pubilsned
for the length of time above prescriDea No legal puollcation of
any kind, nature or oescription. as herein defined. shall be valid
or binding or held to be in compliance with the statutes providing
for such publication unless me same snan have been published
In accordance with the provsi 0 i jj Proat such P
publication snail be ma y -unlform atfidaj


The Oba perio-ca


pernrat0ou-M B :r


_______~ ~ _~


4wwwmio��


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D.,,. 1-A Thssrcqdq .Inllrv 1. 200f9


rage 14 11 l %ijai 'uai y i , Lvu� j


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


T -Marketplace


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ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
Account Representative needed to work
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Email to mclarkemployment111@gmail.
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OBSERVER NEWSPAPERS IS HIRING
Wanted: Inside Sales Manager to identify,
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and e-commerce. Salary + Commision
+ Benefits. Send resume to kyle@
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the publisher of The Winter Park/Maitland
Observer and Oviedo/Winter Springs Voice.
Find us online at www.WPMObserver.com
or www.SeminoleVoice.com.







LAKEFRONT HOME
4 bedroom, 2 bath lakefront pool home, .60
acres, gated community, $375,000. Call
Tanya @ ReMax Town & Country, 407-695-
2066 x604

LOT FOR SALE
1.5 acres, waterfront off Chapman Road in
Oviedo. 407-371-4860 or 386-576-3179



SENIOR APARTMENTS
Winter Park - The Plymouth Apartments:
Studio/1BR Senior Apts, All Utilities Incl.,
Newly Renovated. Rents start at $591. Call
407-644-4551

HOME FOR RENT
Located in Orl Vista. 3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Garage, central heat and air, plus mother-
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Newly remodeled, new carpet and tile. 407-
925-9502 or 407.-351-3388

OVIEDO ROOM FOR RENT
Huge private room w/ its own private
bathroom, shower, closet, a/c, all utilities
included (including cable), private garage,
407-474-3708



FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.





HOW TO DETOX FOR
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(407) 970-1483





Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanton for more
information, 407-365-7585.



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HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
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HOUSE CLEANING
Licensed and insured, references available,
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St. Luke's Lutheran School
Non-Discriminatory Policy
The St. Luke's Lutheran School admits
students of any race, color, national
and ethnic origin to all the rights,
privileges, programs and activities
generally accorded or made available
to students of the organization. It does
not discriminate on the basis of race,
color, national and ethnic origin in
administration of its educational policies,
admissions policies, scholarship and
loan programs, and other organization-
administered programs.





Announcements
Run your ad STATEWIDE and SAVE $$$!
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Apartment for Rent
Bank Foreclosures! 4 Br $25,000! Only
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Autos For Sale
Police Impounds for Sale! 95 Honda Civic
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Police Impounds! 95 Honda Civic $500! 96
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Miscellaneous
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal,*Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121, www.CenturaOnline.
com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high
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approved program. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

NOW AVAILABLE! 2009 POST OFFICE
JOBS. $18-$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE, PAID
TRAINING, FED BENEFITS,;VACATIONS. CALL
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Real Estate
MID TENN MTNS By Owner, 5 acres, perfect
mountaintop cabin-site w/woods. Small
stream in back of property. A must see!
$26,900. Owner Financing (931)445-3611.

TENNESSEE LAND RUSH! 1+acre to 2acre
homesites, wood, views. Starting at $59,900.
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5263, Ask About Mini Vacation!

4BR, 2 bath home with 3000 square feet.
Great location in Moultrie, GA... Has lots
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269,900... Call Norris Bishop Realty @
(229)890-1186.

Steel Buildings
"BUILDING SALE!"..."ROCK BOTTOM
PRICES" BEAT NEXT INCREASE. 25X40
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40X60 $12,700. 60X100 $33,600. MANY
OTHERS! Pioneer Steel. (800)372-8053.







Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where .you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Front Desk Receptionist
Job Description: Responsible for greeting
inbound clients. Assists clients with filling
out survey forms. Enters information
into database or manifest. Performs
administrative duties including organizing
files and mailing out deals. Makes welcome.
or follow up calls and verifies contracts.
Assists with ordering and maintaining
office supplies. Greets guests and conducts
business. Work 4:00pm-10:00pm, days may
vary.
Pay Rate: $271.60-$300.00 per week plus
commission
Job Order Number: 9375780

Electronic Packaging Engineer
Job Description: Responsible forengineering,
electronic packaging, and support for the
design and fabrication of various equipment
for missile related hardware. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $40.00*$50.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9375462.

Software Engineer III
Job Description: Responsible for tailoring
and integrating the AtlasPro contributions to
the Training Common Components (TCCs).
Adapts AtlasPro software to operate on
the Future Combat System (FCS) common
operating environment, adapts AtlasPro
software components to match Training
Common Component (TCC) requirements,
links Training Management Training
Common Component (TCC) software
with software from the other programs,
participates in system engineering activities
that define all of the former, and executes
formal processes. Work days and hours may
vary. I
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9373712

Recreation Attendant
Job Description: Responsible for
encouraging, recruiting, registering
and scheduling guests to participate in
recreation activities. Explains and enforces
the rules and regulations of the recreation
facility. Provides assistance to injured
* guests until arrival of emergency medical
services. Cleans and maintains recreational
equipment and supplies. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9355899

Operations Manager
Job Description: Responsible for the
organization and logistical planning of the
company's equipment assets and team
resources including purchase, assist, repair,
and integrity of the inventory management


software. Directs all logistical shipping
needs of equipment to and from national
events in coordination with Project
Managers. Requires a hands-on approach
combined with the management and
direction of a team of technicians. Develops
and implements procedures. Mentors and
leads a team of audio visual professional in
a warehouse environment. Work Monday-
Friday, 9:00am-6:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9377507

Sales Manager
Job Description: Responsible for providing
internet marketing solutions to the medical
industry by using its online patient referral
service program. Markets efforts in both
the medical and legal fields. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $32,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9364611

Homemaker/Companion
Job Description: Responsible for preparing
light meals, performing light housekeeping,
anr providing companionship and
transportation. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00-$9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9378445

Parts Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for ordering,
receiving, issuing and maintaining
inventories of parts, accessories and
related equipment. Identifies and issues
correct parts to technicians. Enters data
and provides information. Performs record
keeping and generates a variety of reports.
Assembles and distributes reports and other
written materials. Maintains file system and
performs related work as assigned. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $14.42-$16.82 per hour
Job Order Number: 9379617

Courseware Programmer
Job Description: Responsible for designing
and developing courseware applications.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $40,000.00-$50,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9328699

Data Entry Operator I
Job Description: Responsible for entering
patient demographic information and patient
- results in the Laboratory Information System
(LIS). Performs other supporting clerical
tasks necessary to produce test reports.
Work Monday-Friday, 5:30am-1:30pm.
Pay Rate: $9.53-$14.57 per hour
, Job Order Number: 9380350

Director
Job Description: Responsible for planning,
directing, or coordinating the academic
and nonacademic activities of a preschool.
Oversees staff and collects payments. Work
Monday-Friday, hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.00-$13.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9380037

Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Teacher
Job Description: Responsible for instructing
children in activities. Follows curriculum and
performs developmental skills tests. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:30am-5:30pm.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$10.75 per hour
Job Order Number: 9380042

Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for cold-
calling and following up on new customer
leads. Establishes target lists of desirable
customers/segments. Promotes, sells
and. secures signed contracts with new
customers. Develops and actively maintains
a new opportunity pipeline/sales funnel.
Conducts daily sales calls and appointments.
Maintains customer relationship after the
sales for retention and contract renewal
purposes. Provides new and existing
customers with clear communication and
informative materials on products and
services. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $40,000.00-$50,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9380838

Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for calling on,
all types of businesses including hospitals,


schools, colleges, local business and all
industries. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $22,000.00-$55,000.00 per year
plus commission
Job Order Number: 9380849

Auto Painter
Job Description: Responsible for painting
cars. Work Monday-Friday, 1:30pm-
10:00pm.
Pay Rate: $10.50-$11.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9380677

Executive Chef
Job Description: Responsible for planning
and managing the kitchen staff in the
procurement, production, preparation and
presentation of food in a safe and sanitary
way which conforms to the standards and
regulations of the organization. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9380342

Operator
Job Description: Responsible for operating
switchboard and providing relay of incoming
and outgoing calls to maximize guest
satisfaction. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9380327

Outlets Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for assisting
the Outlets Managers with overall operation
of the outlets. Monitors floor during hours of
operations. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9380359

Host/Hostess
Job Description: Responsible for answering
phones and greeting/seating guests. Work
6:00am-2:30pm, days may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9380368

Inside Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for speaking
with customers directly or indirectly about
sales of audiology products. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9380315

Measurement Technician 2
Job Description: Responsible for applying
natural gas measurement skills and
aptitude to repair, install, troubleshoot and
perform other predictive and preventative
maintenance tasks on assigned
measurement and ancillary equipment.
Recognizes operating deviations and takes
appropriate corrective actions. Maintains
cleanliness and general appearance of
facilities and surrounding work area as
needed. Reads and interprets drawings,
schematics, and technical manuals as
well as other technical resources in the
performance of assigned work. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $22.25 per hour
Job Order Number: 9380426

House Person/Runner
Job Description: Responsible for ensuring
the cleanliness of guest floors corridors,
foyers, stairwells, and public areas. Assists
housekeepers in maintaining company's
standards of quality. Stocks linen closets
with amenities/supplies and empties
housekeeping carts. Work 11:00pm-
7:00am.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9380494

System Engineer
Job Description: Responsible -for
investigating, analyzing, planning, designing,
developing, implementing, testing, or
evaluating systems. Reviews and prepares
engineering and technical documentation,
reports, change proposals, and other
technical documentation. Applies systems
engineering to perform functions such as
system integration, systems architecture,
functional and physical allocation,
synthesis, configuration management,
quality assurance testing, or acquisition and
resource management, requirements and
needs analyzes, trade-off and risk studies.
Work days and hours may vary.


Pay Rate: S94,000.00-S95,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9380845

Customer Service Agent
Job Description: Responsible for handling
pre-arrival amendments and additional
service requests. Researches and handles
in-house customer service queries
from customers, clients and suppliers.
Researches and resolves post-departure
issues. Processes inquiries for visa letters.
Communicates details of the booking being
relocated and follows up on tour operator
acceptance. Resolves complaints and
satisfies customers, clients and suppliers
customer service expectations. Provides
general support to Customer Service
Manager and rest of team. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9381247

Maintenance Mechanic
Job Description: Responsible for inspecting
and identifying issues with equipment and
facilities and making necessary repairs
to equipment and facilities. Performs pro-
active preventive maintenance. Maintains
and cleans work environment. Identifies and
eliminates issues that would result in a loss
of product or that could result in product
contamination. Identifies and informs
supervisor of issues to be followed up on.
Performs a daily walkthrough of support
equipment and identifies/corrects any
issues. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $19.00-$23.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9377996

Seminole County
Log ontoWorkforceCentralFlorida.comwhere
you can enter the Job Title in the "Search For
Jobs" box to see more information on these
jobs and search thousands of additional
openings throughout Central Florida, at
NO COST. Apply by following the directions
listed. For further help visit the WORKFORCE
CENTRAL FLORIDA Seminole County Office
at 1097 Sand Pond Rd., Suite 1001, Lake
Mary, or call (407) 531-1225.

Quality Assurance Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for determining
product specifications in accordance with
internal and customer-supplied documents,
defining inspection methods/processes to
measure quality specifications, tracking
test and inspection results, and preparing/
issuing quality certifications. Work Monday-
Friday, 7:00am-3:30pm.
Pay Rate: $20,000.00-$30,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9374783

Road Service Appliance Technician
Job. Description: Responsible for repairing,
adjusting, and installing all types of electric
or gas household appliances including
refrigerators, washers, dryeis, and ovens.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9376926

Animal Caretaker
Job Description: Responsible for working in
the kennels and at the front desk. Answers
phones and assists customers and their
dogs. Helps with feeding and cleaning in the
kennels. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.50-$10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9379119

Working Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for running
projects and working side by side with the
team to meet deadlines. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.00-$S17.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9380994

Programmer Analyst
Job Description: Responsible for designing,
developing, creating and modifying
computer applications software and/or
specialized utility programs. Analyzes user
needs and develops software solutions.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $23.56 per hour
Job Order Number: 9379280


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_ SPRINKLER SYSTEM REPAIRS


, 4- SERVICE IS OUR SPECIALTY
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www.spiritualperspectives.org
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S5410 Lake Howell Road
Winter Park


Gary W. Summers, preacheki-
407-657-0657-�


Sonia's Quality
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OFFERS MAY BE COMBINED. OFFERS HAVE NO CASHVALUE THEPATIENTANDANY OTHERPERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HASA R GHTTO REFSEO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE RMBURSED FORPAYMENT FOR ANYOTHERSERVICE
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.Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 16 Thursday; January 1, 2009


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