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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00026
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Creation Date: December 18, 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00026

Full Text



Winter Park/ Maitland


Volume 20, No. 51
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Thursday, December 18,2008

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Commun~~itBulCmuiyOnd


Wildcats with heart
While fundraising for a coach's
medical bills, the Cats win.
Page A2

Holiday calendar
See the best the season has to
offer in The Observer's calendar.
Page A10


It's A Chick Thing
A novelty shop's new Winter
Park spot offers affordable gifts.
Page A7




Community Bulletin........A3
Business Briefs............A5
City Talks....... .........A6
Play On! .............A12
Legals........... . .A13
Marketplace. .........A 14
Games..... ........ A15









--
0 I -
0 41 - 9.,4 2
















I94922 95642 2


Santa sightings soar


Pioi0 lE'i ISAAC BABCOCK- THE OBSERVERh
Santa Claus greeted guests, including Malik Vanderpool, 2, at Barnie's Coffee on Park Avenue. He'll make another appear-
ance this weekend as well as travel Winter Park's streets with Mrs. Claus. Check G.O. Family for a listing of Santa's events.


'Tis the season


for rise in crime


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF

Thefts usually increase dur-
ing the holidays, and police
say the economic downturn
could be making things
worse.
Maitland Police Officer
Allison Diller said the city's
burglary and theft numbers
have been above average
during the last month and
a half. She said you can't of-
ficially tie the economy to
the increase, but she sus-
pects that's the case.
"We are watching busi-
nesses more closely this
time of year," she said, add-
ing that law enforcement
agencies will commonly
put together special en-
forcement units that patrol
businesses only, mostly in


the evening.
Business owners can pre-
vent thefts by making sure
their stores are locked and
well-lit overnight arid that
valuable items, such as TVs,
are out of sight, she said.
Shoppers should seek out
security escorts when bring-
ing packages to their cars.
In Oviedo this year, bur-
glaries to businesses, includ-
ing forced and attempted
entry, have nearly doubled
compared with this time
last year, from 33 to 60. Car
burglaries in that time frame
have increased by 52 per-
cent. Burglaries to residenc-
es stayed about the same.
"The holiday season al-
ways gives people looking
for something to steal op-

> turn to CRIME on page A4


City OKs

red light

cameras

ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

Winter Park may soon have
its own "red light" district af-
ter city commissioners voted
unanimously last week to al-
low cameras that can catch
drivers running red lights.
Mayor David Strong had
spoken favorably of the
cameras earlier in the year
when asked about Apopka's
system, which was the first
in Florida. That system com-
pleted an 8 1/2-month pilot
study in March.
Now he's adamant about
implementing a similar sys-
tem.
"If you asked me I'd
put them everywhere you
could;" Strong said. "People
> turn to LIGHTS on page A5


Schools face deeper cuts


MARY-ELIZABETH HITTEL
GUEST REPORTER

Having recently reversed
a decision to flip school
start times, Orange Coun-
ty School Board members
may be feeling a reprieve
from public criticism, but
they still face tough budget
decisions.
After cutting 7 percent
from each district and 6
percent from each of the
schools for this year's bud-
get, Orange County Pub-'
lic Schools was forced to
make a $23 million cut to
next year's budget.
School Board Chair-
woman Joie Cadle said
while Orange County will
maintain what it can, cuts
are inevitable. OCPS used
its non-recurring expenses
line item to cover the cost
of the current $23 million
holdback, Cadle said. A hir-


ing freeze is also in place,
and at this time, no ad-
ditional cuts to the class-
rooms will be made.
Cadle added that the re-
cent rumors that OCPS may
be cutting sports teams or
going to a four-day week
are false and not options
the Board is considering.
"I want to put one thing
to rest, the superintendent
will not be recommending
a four-day school week,"
Cadle said. "It would re-
quire statutory change, and
quite frankly, it does not
make sense for academic
achievement and success. I
do not know why the me-
dia ran with the four-day
week."
Terry Forrester, Winter
Park High School Band
Booster president, said
the school schedule flip

> turn to SCHOOLS on page A3





ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

A local coach nearly killed by a
heart attack four years ago has a
new lease on life, thanks to a bas-
ketball tournament named in his
honor. And last weekend Win-
ter Park's boys basketball team
helped raise money to help Coach
Rob Graham, who was left unable
to walk after the devastating heart
attack.
With microphone in hand, Gra-
ham waved to the fans at home
court before watching his team
play.
"Thank you all for making this
all possible," he told the fans.
The house was packed to cheer


Touramen res


Winter Park beat Bishop Verot 55-46 on
Saturday's Hoops With Heart tournament.
Wildcat Austin Rivers scored 18 points;
teammate Robert Lovaglio scored 17 and
had 12 rebounds. The Cats are now 7-1.


on the coach and 12 of the top
teams in the state, who battled
each other for eight hours on the
court.
For the first time at the tourna-
ment, which w1as held at Oviedo
High School, Graham's Bishop
Moore Hornets played the host


team.
"I said 'Forget about who wins
or loses,' but we won't forget about
who's helping people," Oviedo
Coach Ed Kershner said.
In front of that packed house,
the Winter Park Wildcats found a
way to win anyway, staying consis-
tently ahead of Bishop Verot until
the game tightened, then swung
open, in the final minutes.
They won 55-46, with forward
Robert Lovaglio leading the way
with 17 points and 12 rebounds.
Next year, they'll be back. They
may have more competition,
though.
"It's bigger every year we've
done it," Kershner said. "It keeps
getting better."


S- -
PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -THE OBSERVER
Winter Park faced tough competition from Bishop Verot
High School of Ft. Myers, but the Cats triumphed late.


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Page 2 Thursday, December 18, 2008


Neiwswi w



Cats win while raising money


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


I


'~" sd ~ ~






VVIntI r RA1 0 1 M I I VMliahn ObserVe Tr


The week in pictures
Tuba players from .-
throughout the area gath- ..' ,
ered in downtown Winter
Park Saturday, Dec. 13 in
Central Park for the 12th
annual Tuba Christmas
concert, played for free to
a sprawling crowd at the .. ...
main stage. Players of all _
ages came in Christmas Sons of the American Revolution on Saturday, Dec. 13
outfits and even decorated rededicated a "Liberty Tree" planted' at the Mayflower
their instruments. Retirement Center in Winter Park.

UCF's College of
Medicine received an
$80,000 donation Friday
from the Winter Park
Chamber of Commerce
and the Edyth Bush
PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER Charitable Trust.

Com mun it

'Comm-unitv B. 11 1i


Army Reserve Private Thomas Lever has grad-
uated from basic combat training at Fort Jack-
son, Columbia, S.C.
He is the cousin of Beth Cates of Charleston,
S.C., and Ryan Lightbourn of Winter Park.
Army Private Atreyu K. Hirst has graduated
from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Co-
lumbia, S.C.
Hirst is the sen of Jeffry and Dawn Clark of
Winter Park and grandson of Kenneth Hirst of St.
Augustine.
Jewish Community Center Idol was held Nov.
29 at The Plaza Theatre on Bumby Avenue. Pat-
terned after the TV show "American Idol," audi-
tions were held for several months leading up to
the final event where nine finalists competed for
$1,000 and a chance to sing the national anthem
at the Jan. 6 Orlando Magic game. Marni Becker of
Maitland won singing "And I am Telling You."
Funds raised were to benefit scholarships for
the Maitland JCC and Jack and Lee Rosen JCC in
Southwest Orlando..


Florida Department of Transportation crews
shifted eastbound Interstate 4 lanes to the right
Dec. 11 between the exit ramps to Maitland Bou-
levard (Exits 90A and 90B) and the entrance ramp
from Maitland Boulevard to eastbound 1-4. Crews
will close one or two eastbound 1-4 lanes between
the exit and entrance ramps from 11:30 p.m. until
6 a.m. nightly through Thursday, Dec. 17, for mill-
ing and resurfacing, weather permitting. The lane
shifts will remain in place through January.
The Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation of
Winter Park has elected University of Central
Florida College of Medicine Dean Deborah C.
German M.D. to the Board of Directors of the
Foundation. German joins the board during its 35th
year of giving in Florida.
German was selected after an extensive search
process that included an internal assessment of
skill sets of current board members along with the
board's projected skill needs for its future work in
a dynamic and forward-looking Central Florida.


Habitat Orlando was recently notified of the
single largest commitment of financial support
in its 22-year history: $462,000 from Thrivent
Financial for Lutherans, coupled with a $71,000
commitment from members of Thrivent Financial,
Lutheran congregations, Lutheran schools and
other supporters from throughout Central Florida.
The Habitat Orlando funding will be used to help
build five of 58 town homes at Staghorn Villas, a
new multifamily community located on the corner
of Silver Star Road and LeHavre Boulevard. The
3.9-acre community will feature 10 buildings with
four to eight town homes each, surrounded by
green spaces and play areas.
U.S. Marine Colonel Paul E. Wilson of Long-
wood has published a new book, "China Ma-
rine," about the political situation in China and the
Far East after World War II.
It's a love story set against the backdrop of.
communist China, following a young Marine who
marries a Chinese woman and struggles to evacu-
ate his family as the Communist Party comes to
power.


SCHOOLS I Vote
flops schedule
< continued from the front page
- putting middle school
start times ahead of high
schools - has been awful
for her family. Her Winter
Park High student keeps get-
ting sick and Forrester feels
that if she were not a stay-
at-home-mom, her middle
school student would not
have enough supervision
during the week.
Newly elected School
Board member Vicky Bell
led an effort to switch the
start times back to the way
they were before, with mid-
dle schools starting later
than high schools.
The motion passed 4 to 3
and will be in effect as of Au-
gust 2009.
"Having studied the re-
port from (School Superin-
tendent) Mr. (Ron) Blocker,
there is no clear evidence
that the actual time change
had anything to do with the
cost savings," Bell said. "I
have studied this issue for
months now. The money
saved was because of bus
consolidation schedules."
She said the key was to stag-
ger start times.
Parents have also thought
up ways for OCPS to save
costs.
"They could cut costs
by turning off all electric-
ity when the campuses are
closed," Forrester said. "I
walk by Maitland Middle
School on the weekends,
and every time I hear several
air conditioners running in
portables. No one is there,
turn off the A/C."


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Thursday, December 18, 2008 Page 3


Winter Park / Maitla r







e~~' uy 'A~~ gaPI~fl.,, 4 hu rs ayo, ,l~mo IL AlWitrPk/MatndOsve


Home burglary and theft
More than $100,000 in jewelry
was stolen Dec. 6 from a residence
on Shepherd Avenue, after the bur-
glar pried open a rear door.
Two men knocked on the front
door of a home on Granville Drive on
Dec. 3, and when no one answered,
one of the suspects went to the back
of the home and broke a rear glass
door. The suspects, described as
two black men, one 5-foot-10 and
275 pounds, another 5-foot-9 and
175 pounds (about 25 years old),
fled in a gray Honda four-door with
Florida license plate D42 6KS.


Homes were burglarized multiple
times. Stolen items included a Sony
Playstation 3, a Kenmore 790 elec-
tric stove, a MacBook laptop, a Sony
video camera model DCR-DVD610,
$3,150 worth of jewelry, $3,000
worth of silverware, cash, a Xbox
and five games, and a HP Pavilion
laptop model #1PFE654VA.
Strange crime
Someone dumped trash on the
dining room table of a home on
Oakhurst Avenue on Dec. 2. The
suspect may have entered by ma-
nipulating a door lock. Nothing was
reported stolen.


A man was seen masturbating in
a parking lot on the 1900 block of
West Fairbanks Avenue on Nov. 28.
Another man was caught mas-
turbating publicly Dec. 8, this time
at a business on the 1300 block of
Orange Avenue. The unknown black
male, who stood 5-foot-6 wilh a thin
build, fled when discovered.
Auto theft and burglary
Eight vehicles were burglarized,
most by having a window broken,
between Nov. 28 and Dec. 9.
The biggest theft was on the 300
block of South Park Avenue. Taken
were a Kodak digital camera, co-


logne, $400 in cash, a briefcase,
gift cards, a checkbook, Blackberry
8600 cell phone, Dell Inspirion lap-
top and an Acer laptop.
Among the other stolen items
were six purses (three from one car),
a backpack, two Pioneer stereos
and a Garmin Nuvi 200 GPS.
A red 1966 Chevrolet Impala con-
vertible was stolen Dec. 5 from
Osceola Avenue by a thin black man
in a dark four-door vehicle.
A white 2003 GMC truck stolen
in Lake County was recovered on
West Fairbanks Avenue.


Statistical wrap-up
Residents called with noise com-
plaints 23 times between Nov. 28
and Dec. 9 for offenses ranging from
a loud alarm system to a loud hum-
ming noise (reported twice). Parties
were the most common complaint.
Police arrested 48 people between
Nov. 28 and Dec. 11 for a range of
offenses, mostly drunk driving.and
marijuana possession. Two people
were arrested for domestic battery,
one for leaving the scene of an acci-
dent, one for prescription fraud, one
for defrauding an innkeeper, two for
burglary and two for grand theft.


CRIME I Cities see rise in thefts as economy sours


< continued from the front page

portunity," Oviedo Police Chief
Jeff Chudnow said. The reces-
sion, which the U.S. entered
a year ago, may be adding to
those theft numbers. As unem-
ployment rises, "people who
wouldn't usually do it become
desperate," he said.
Winter Springs hasn't taken
a big hit, Interim Police Chief
Kevin Brunelle said. From Janu-
ary through November the city
experienced 299 thefts com-
pared with 285 in 2007. Com-
mercial burglaries did increase,


from 13 in 2007 to 23. Robber-
ies - violent burglaries - slid
from 12 in 2007 to six this year.
Not included in larcenies are
car burglaries, Brunelle said, in
which more than 75 percent of
the cars were unlocked, making
swiping GPS devices and purses
easy.
"What's happening is kids out
there are carhopping," Brunelle
said. He said most of the perpe-
trators are juveniles on break
from school who find unlocked
cars and steal electronics and
even Christmas gifts. Then they
sell the goods online on sites


such as eBay and craigslist or
pawning them.
"GPSs are a hot item," Ovie-
do's Chudnow said, confirming
'that the majority of burglarized
cars in Oviedo are unlocked too.
He warned people not to leave
valuable items visible in the car.
Even if a person is leaving the
car for two minutes, such as to
drop off a child at day care, they
should take their valuables with
them and lock the car door..
Winter Park's Police Depart-
ment was contacted for this
story but did not respond to re-
quests for comment.


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Winter Park /Maitland

Observer


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-628-8500, ext. 302
kyle@observemewspapers.com

EDITOR
Alex Babcock
407-628-8500, ext. 304
alexb@observemewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-628-8500, ext. 306
stephanie@observemewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-628-8500, ext. 311
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-902-8563
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-628-8500, ext. 309
legal@observemewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observemewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us


ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-628-8500, ext. 303
tcraft@observernewspapers.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Shelly Langston
407-628-8500, ext. 303
slangston@observemewspapers.com


Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-628-8500 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer� 2008


______________________________________ C


WE




John Lattanzio, 87, of
Orlando, Fla., died Dec. 7,
2008. He was a World War
II veteran.

Marthinus G. Jooste, 81,
of Orlando, Fla., died Dec.
12,2008.

Funeral notices are courtesy ofGolden's
FuneralHome of WinterPark.


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Published Thursday, December 18, 2008


Volume 20, Issue Number 51


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


hT d December 18 20 8









Business


A convoy of three Bright House
Networks pickup trucks and three
vans filled to the brim, along with a
dozen employee volunteers, deliv-
ered 650 wrapped holiday gifts for
more than 120 children to the Hope
and Help Center of Central Florida
headquarters in Winter Park on Fri-
day, Dec. 12, to support the center's
Angel Tree Campaign for the children
and family members of clients.
The Hope and Help Center of Flori-
da at "1935 Woodcrest Drive in Winter
Park provides information, referrals,
resources -and support services for
people with HIV and AIDS.
The Bright House Networks em-


Employees of Bright House Networks
wrapped 650 gifts for children at the Hope
and Help Center in Winter Park.

ployee volunteer gift drive for Hope
and Help Center's Angel Tree Cam-
paign started with just a handful of


employees eight years ago.
Geof Longstaff, who earned his
MBA from the Crummer Graduate
School of Business at Rollins Col-
lege and has more than 30 years of
experience in banking, real estate
development and community service,
has a stirring question for U.S. bailout
managers, not the least of whom is
U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Pauls-
en: Where were the boards? -
The longtime area entrepreneur,
who is heading the effort to open a
new bank in Winter Park, said he
fears that some corporate boards in
America may have lost their way.


"Where is their vision?" Longstaff
asked in a press release. "Where is
their oversight? That's what corporate
governance is. Only lately, it isn't. Af-
ter the bailout, after the recovery gets
under way, we need to address this,"
he said. "Boards have a responsibil-
ity to channel management and that
doesn't seem to be happening"
Keene Construction Company of
Maitland recently completed Wool-
bright Development's new $20 mil-
lion, 203,263-square-foot Build-
ings A and B at its London Square
retail "power center" in Miami.
The one-story, 108,747-square-


"London Square" was recently com-
pleted in Miami by Keene Construction.
foot Building A is anchored by TJ
Maxx, Ross, HomeGoods and Famous
Footwear. Building B is two stories
and 94,516-square-feet.


LIGHTS I Cameras cited for reducing red-light running in Apopka


< continued from the front page
run lights like crazy, and it's-pretty
dangerous."
SThe city could vote to finalize
approval of the cameras at its first
meeting in January, opening the
door to companies who design and
operate such monitoring systems.
Cities in Florida have been
watching Apopka's trial run for
clues as to how well the system will
work. Apopka city officials took
notes, but at the conclusion of their
red light camera pilot study, they
conspicuously left out information
about whether accidents were re-
duced by the.cameras.
Apopka's system ticketed drivers
from July 2007 to March 2008, hit-
ting more than 800 cars with fines
during that period.
The system quickly proved valu-
able for pulling in money in fines,


ticketing 289 cars in the first 15
days alone. Red-light running in
monitored intersections dropped
off dramatically after the first two
months, leveling off at about two
dozen per month for the remain-
der of the study..
Apopka kept detailed figures on
how and when drivers were cited
for running red lights, but Police
Chief Charles Vavrek said it would
be too costly to study how many ac-
cidents occurred before and after
the cameras were put in, so there
were no such statistics.
An absence of crash data and a
large quantity of citation data is
prevalent in many studies of red
light cameras, according to a recent
research study by the University of
South Flqrida published in the Flor-
ida Public Health Review Journal.
"Local governments have used
changes in violations or profit-


ability as proof of successful cam-
era performance instead of using
changes in crashes and injuries,"
the study said.
That study also found that in
many cities employing the systems,
total accidents at the intersections
with the cameras increased due to
rear-impact crashes.
Winter Park Commissioner Phil
Anderson said that the city's Police
Department has looked into the ef-
fectiveness of the cameras, and that
he is listening to the department
for its recommendations.
"I'm trusting our Police Depart-
ment who feel strongly that this
will improve our safety," he said.
But those improvements to safe-
ty may have already been occur-
ring. According to Florida Depart-
ment of Highway Safety statistics,
'injuries and property damage due
to red light running crashes de-


creased steadily from 1998 until
2006, before the first red light cam-
era system was installed. Injuries
dropped nearly 40 percent in that
time period.
Strong said he attended a Metro-
plan Orlando presentation that
showed the Apopka study saw re-
duced accidents, and that he trusts
the Police Department's opinion
about the efficacy of the cameras.
What's in question is how the
city will pay for the camera systems,
which Strong said the city can't af-
ford on its own. He's hoping for a
similar agreement that other cities
have met with camera system sell-
ers in which the company pays for
the cameras, but receives a portion
of the fines generated.
"We're not looking to make
money or to lose money," Strong
said. "We're just looking to improve
safety."


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Thursday, December 18, 2008 Page 5


Winter Park / Maitla r


irk ,'-' ..
'* w . . -






Paa 6~- Thrsay Deebr1,20 itrPr atadOsre


As every resident in our
community knows, our
firefighters work hard for
us every hour of every day.
Words cannot express how
thankful I am for how dedi-
cated our team is to each
of our families. It's the least
I can do to continue my
commitment to make sure
our Maitland Fire Depart-
ment and EMS team gets
a new home - and soon!
Many thanks go out to Bat-
talion Chief Chris Phelps
for his contributions to this
week's City Talk article.
-Mayor Doug Kinson

On Monday, Dec. 8, Mait-
land Fire Rescue units re-
sponded to a reported con-
struction accident with two
workers said to be trapped
some 40 to 60 feet in the
air. Recognizing the highly
technical nature of per-
forming such a rescue, mu-
tual aid assistance was im-
mediately requested from
Orange County and Winter
Park fire departments.


Crews arrived to find
a seven-story building
under construction with
one worker still trapped
atop a partially collapsed
concrete platform. The
6,500-pound concrete-and-
steel platform came away
from the building causing
it to buckle and almost fall.
Coworkers using a forklift
rescued one worker, who
was slightly injured when
the platform gave way. The
other worker stood patient-
ly atop the now-collapsed
platform hanging onto the
chains that were prevent-
ing the concrete and steel
from plummeting to the
ground. This was a very
dangerous situation as any
movement of the platform
could cause it to completely
tear away from the building
and possibly break the only
lifeline that was holding
the worker suspended 60
feet in the air.
A coordinated incident
action plan was established
as a cooperative effort be-


tween firefighters from the
cities of Maitland and Win-
ter Park as well as special-
ized rescue teams from Or-
ange and Seminole Coun-
ties. Under the command of
Maitland's battalion chief,
a rescue group was estab-
lished consisting of tech-
nical rescue experts from
Orange County's Squad
3 and Seminole County's
Tower 12. A battalion chief
from Orange County as-
sumed the responsibility
for responder and incident
safety. The Winter Park Fire
SDepartment's.training of-
ficer also assisted with pre-
paring the rope rescue plan.
With the assistance of
another crane that was
originally working at an-
other location on the con-
struction site, crews were
able to hoist a rescuer up
to make contact with the
trapped worker. Rescuers
performed what is known
as a "pick-off" by care-
fully attaching the trapped
worker to the rescuer and
then disconnecting him
from the platform. The
worker was then lowered
safely to the ground.
This rescue effort dem-
onstrates the effectiveness
and efficiencies realized by
the fire rescue mutual-aid
agreements between Mait-
land, Winter Park, Orange
and Seminole counties.
Over the years, calls for
specialized rescue services


as well as hazardous mate-
rials incidents have greatly
diminished. It was not too
long ago that each fire
department had its own
specialized rescue team as.
well as hazardous materials
team and dive rescue team.
The costs to properly staff,
equip and train these teams
became very expensive.
For many of these same
reasons, fire departments
in Central Florida have
banded together to take a
more regional approach
to respond to these highly
specialized and technical-
type emergencies. Central
Floridians have greatly
benefited from sharing of
resources in terms of re-
sponder knowledge and ex-
pertise as well as the finan-
cial savings represented by
the reduction of specialty
response teams.
SUtilizing this same con-
cept, fire departments re-
spond across jurisdictional
boundaries to help each
other with structural fires.
Responses to structural fires
are predicated on national-
ly recommended standards
. that dictate the tasks to be
carried out and the num-
ber of response person-
nel needed to safely affect
a positive outcome. Few
agencies can meet these
recommended national
standards without eliciting
the aid of their neighboring
fire departments. Central


Floridians enjoy one of the
most effective and efficient
fire and rescue response
systems where emergen-
cies are answered by the
closest unit regardless of
jurisdictional boundaries,
and agencies have the abil-
ity to easily communicate
on shared response radio
channels. Residents can
rest assured that where effi-
ciencies are to be gained by
cooperating or combining
services, their fire depart-
ment administrators are ac-
tively taking advantage of
these opportunities. They
do this because your lives
may depend on it.
-Chris Phelps, battalion chief

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at ItsMyMaitland.com


City Hall closed
City Hall will be closed be-
ginning at noon'on Wednes-
day, Dec. 24, through Thurs-
day, Dec. 25, in observance
of the Christmas holiday.
City Hall will be open for,
regular business on Friday,
Dec. 26.

No Waste Management
service on Christmas
There will be no Waste Man-
agement service on Christ-
mas Day. The makeup day
for regular household trash
pickup will be the following
Saturday, Dec. 27.

Holiday events still
ahead in Winter Park
Below are more holiday
events the city has planned
for all ages to enjoy. Gather
with friends, family and
loved ones to experience
Winter Park's holiday tradi-
tions.
Chabad of Greater Or-
lando presents Hanukah
in the Park on Sunday, Dec.
21, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.,
in Central Park. This festive
celebration featuring the
lighting of a giant menorah
will also include live en-
tertainment and Hanukah
treats for all to enjoy.
The city of Winter Park
will proudly host the second


annual Champs Sports Bowl
Parade of Bands on Friday,
Dec. 26, at 2 p.m. Read on
for more details regarding
the parade.
For complete details on
these and other city of Win-
ter Park events, please visit
our official Web site at Cit-
yofWinterPark.org.

Bowl Parade featuring
Florida State
The city of Winter Park will
proudly host the second an-
nual Champs Sports Bowl
Parade of Bands featuring
school bands from Florida
State University and the
University of Wisconsin on
Friday, Dec. 26, at 2 p.m.
The parade starts at 2
p.m. at the intersection of
Park and Lyman avenues.
Florida State and Wiscon-
sin bands and team mascots
will march north along Park
Avenue through downtown
Winter Park. After turning
west on Garfield Avenue,
they will proceed to the
West Meadow of' Central
Park where they will per-
form.
SIn order to minimize
disruption to traffic flow,
street closures will occur in
a rolling fashion along the
parade route. Side street en-
trances onto Park Avenue


will be closed as the parade
approaches each intersec-
tion. Street closures will re-
open immediately after the
parade has safely passed.

New convenience fee
beginning Jan. 1
Since the city began accept-
ing payments by credit card,
the associated merchant
fees have become an in-
creasingly significant cost.
In an effort to defray these
costs, the city is taking two
steps. ,
First, the city will no
longer accept payments by
American Express due to
the high merchant fees.
Second, the city will be-
gin charging a convenience
fee of $3 per transaction for,
online and over-the-phone
credit card (credit and deb-
it) and e-check payments.
This includes all payments
made via the city's online
Click2Gov payment service
offered on the city's Web
site.
This convenience fee of
$3 does not apply to any
online banking (payments
made directly through your
bank), bank drafts, and does
not include payments made
face-to-face, or at the kiosk
located in City Hall.
This new convenience fee
is effective-Thursday, Jan. 1.

KWPB receives
$10,000 grant
,The city of Winter Park's
local Keep America Beau-
tiful affiliate, Keep Winter
Park Beautiful (KWPB), has
recently been awarded a
$10,000 grant from Waste


Management to support the
preservation of our local
ecosystem and to further
KWPB's mission to preserve
Winter Park's environmen-
tal legacy.
This generous dona-
tion will primarily be used
to help fund a phone book
recycling drive, which will
in turn help create recy-
cling education materials
for Winter Park elementary
and middle schools. The al-
location will also be used to
fund several tree plantings
throughout the city. To date,
Waste Management has al-
located a total of $150,000
in grants through its part-
nership with 15 Keep Amer-
ica Beautiful affiliates.
It is the mission of Keep
Winter Park Beautiful to
educate, motivate and assist
individuals and groups to
take greater responsibility
for their community envi-
ronment. For more informa-
tion regarding Keep Winter
Park Beautiful, and to learn
more about how you can
get involved, please visit the
city's official Web site at Cit-
yofWinterPark.org.

City receives FMEA Com-
munity Service Award
The Florida Municipal Elec-
tric Association (FMEA)
recently honored the com-
munity service efforts of
Winter Park Electric Utility
by recognizing it with the
2008 Community Service
Award. The FMEA represents
the unified interests of 34
public power communities
across the state that provide
electricity to more than 2
million residential and busi-


ness consumers.
Honored during a cere-
mony at FMEA's annual En-
ergy Connections Confer-
ence and Trade Show in Or-
lando, Winter Park received
the prestigious award for
its commitment to enhanc-
ing customers' quality of
life through recent initia-
tives such as the Emergency
Home Energy Assistance for
the Elderly Program, Emer-
gency Utility Assistance Pro-
gram, Low Income Home
Energy Assistance Program,
Online Energy Audit and
residential Surge Protection
and HomeWIRE services.
In addition to these re-
cent community-service
initiatives, Winter Park Elec-
tric Utility is in the process
of undergrounding city-
owned power lines, which
will contribute to the over-
all mission of improving
electric reliability. Although
the entire project may take
up to 30 years to complete,
residents now have the op-
portunity to accelerate this
process through the city's
newly introduced Putting
Lines Under Ground In
Neighborhoods (PLUG IN)
program.
For more information
regarding the city of Winter
Park's Electric Utility Ser-
vice and the PLUG IN pro-
gram, please visit the city's
official Web site at Cityof-
WinterPark.org or call 407-
599-3233.

Call City Hall at
407-599-3399 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org


Firefighters to the rescue


I- -- n~-- -- - 1


Paae 6 Thursday, December 18, 2008


I


Winter Park / Maitland Observer












Lifestyles




New spot for women's novelty shop
AMY K.D. TOBIK -


slogan is: I'm in the want
business, not the need
business," she said with a
laugh. "You don't need a
single thing in here, you
want it!"
Only a month since
It's a Chick Thing! moved
from its Winter Springs
location, the 900-square-
foot shop has become the
ideal Winter Park spot
to find those hip nov-
elty gifts for friends, new
moms and bachelorette
parties, as well as senti-
mental mother-daughter
gifts.
From attractive pre-
monogrammed travel
mugs to traditional mono-
grammed silver necklaces.
there is something charm-
ing for every woman.
The stylish La-Tee-Da
home fragrance lamps
and candles make fan-
tastic ' houLsewarming
gifts and the handmade

> turn to CHICK on page A10


As the glass door slowly
opens signaling the chime,
customers peek in for a
quick look, intrigued by
the brown logo with hot
pink lips on the window.
"Welcome to It's a Chick
Thing!" cheery owner Ker-
rie Stumpf calls out.
It's easy to be drawn in
by the jazzy holiday mu-
sic and a large collection
of unique treasures artis-
tically displayed among
stylish decorations.
The new business, lo-
cated on Aloma Avenue
just east of Lakemont Av-
enue, alongside Outback
Steakhouse, Tijuana Flats
and Einstein Bagels, gets a
constant flow of lingering
pedestrians. "This plaza
has such a.nice feel to it
- there are always people
around, they congregate,"
Stumpf said.
Stumpfoftenjokeswith
customers as they com-
ment about the interest-
ing collection of gifts. "My
�*


1 i IV I u i u bY I.,IM mu.bA.jUi -- I IHtUbbi.nvrit
It's A Chick Thing owner Kerrie Stumpf, left, and employee Doris Coleman, right, arrange a display shelf at the novelty gift business' new
Winter Park location. The shop offers women-focused gifts for $30 and less, and brings with it a loyal following from Winter Springs.


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, December 18, 2008 Page 7






Page 8 Thursday, December 18, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer





G . For Greater Orlando's


Relishing what leaves you 'ravished'


Family

Calendar


Santa Claus comes to Bamie's
Coffee and Tea Company from
5-8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 19 and
Saturday, Dec. 20, at 118 Park
Ave. in Winter Park. He'll be
available for pictures and to visit.
Candy canes and samples of hot
chocolate will be available. The
cost for photos is $10, which goes
to the Boys and Girls Clubs of
Central Florida Eatonville Branch.
Call 407-629-0042 for more
information.

Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus will
ride in a sleigh through Winter
Park neighborhoods through
Monday, Dec. 22.They head along
Blueridge and Virginia avenues at
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 18 and
through Margaret Square at 7:30
p.m. Monday, Dec. 22. This is part
of an annual tradition in Winter
Park. The famous pair already
have visited some areas of the
city.
Visit CityofWinterPark.org for
more information.

The number of homeless
families continues to grow
everyday in Central Florida, so
Dommerich Elementary School
wants to do its part to help those
in need..
Students will host a holiday
party from 1:30-2:30 p.m:
Thursday, Dec. 18 to help needy
families through the Coalition
for the Homeless. The students
will prepare care packages to
send to homeless children. A
representative from the Coalition
for the Homeless will be on hand
to speak with the students about
the needs of homeless people in
our area and how their gifts will
make a difference.
This year the fifth-grade
students themed the annual
event, "Warm, Inside and Out."
Call Rebekah Dooley, a
Dommerich teacher, at 407-623-
1407, extension 4271, for more
information.

The Orange County Voluntary
Pre-kindergartenProgramoffers
six hours daily of developmentally
appropriate learning experiences
with a strong emphasis on
language development. The
program begins Thursday, Jan.
15, and ends on June 3.
Enrollment space may still be
open at some Orange County
elementary schools.
To enroll, please do the
following:
Call the school to find out if
there are any vacancies.
If so, provide the school with
your child's full name and birth
date.
The school will provide this
information to the Early Childhood
Team who will contact 4-C to
determine the child's eligibility.
Visit VPKFlorida.org or
EarlyChildhood.ocps.net for more
information.


GINA DiPAOLO
CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST
There's a sensual passage in the Song
of Songs. Are you familiar with the
Song of Songs? I wasn't until recently.
That tiny book in the Old Testament
is an absolute treasure trove of poetic
beauty. In only eight small chapters, I
found more interesting and colloquial
expressions of love than I've ever at-
tributed to the best Danielle Steele
novel. I admit, I read those in college;
I'm much more highbrow now, I've
moved onto Candace Bushnell.
This verse is the kind that just
makes me stop and appreciate the
beauty of language and an author's
ability to reveal such brilliance with
the simple combination of words.
Amazing how words can bring forth
such an outpouring of emiOtiop,
thought and image. Th t's wha in-
trigues me so about language. Trust
me, these words are not ones to live by.
They offer no substantive advice. They
are just exciting. Theysound inviting.
They are descriptive and a bit person-
al. And hey, they make me daydream.
A young woman and her lover ban-
ter-back and forth throughout the
chapters, and as they do, their words-
betray their feelings for each other;
they are clearly enthralled with one
another. They cannot heap enough
praise and admiration, and they long.
to be together. True, they are young
and crazy in love. There is a lot of flow-
ery language and metaphors that are
not bona fide in today's vernacular,
but all in all, it's a stir ulating read.
"You have ravished rly heart with
one glance of your eyes," says the
young woman to her lover midway
through chapter five, and that's when
I stop and smile. Irresistible. I let my
mind wander over the words - rav-
ished, ravished, ravished. It's interest-


ing that such a powerful word was
juxtaposed with such a gentle word
as glance later in the sentence. The
author knows his speaker is full of/
passion but also lacks experienceand
self-confidence. I repeat the words,
committing them to memory. I'll 'ant
to treasure them over my lifetime, %ot
just for their obvious beauty but also
for how they play with my mind.
I linger and as I do, thosewords
take me back. I remember en my
husbandJav lSed-me ... within eyes.
He di~l,1 swear. I can rearemer the
feeliAg of being consumed by a look
from him. A sweet sensation would
fli6d my body, and it was hard to re-
sist the urge to leave PG-13 territory.
N matter where we were. Yes, ma'am,
the'ge of innocence. The birth of a
relationsip. It's hard to return to that
place tha4 allowed such raw emotion
and such uninhibited childlike re-
sponses to something new and excit-
irig. We could call it utter authenticity
- the kind of authenticity that comes
from lack of wisdom. don't think
I have theenergy required to ravish
anyone these days, nor do I want to re-
turn to that stage. I enjoy remember-
ing and appreciating. Remember the
birth of your own relationship? Did
you lavish anyone with one glance of
vour eyes? Did anyone set you on fire?
I like where I am now. It's a little
'calmer and warmer. These days, my
husband ravishes me with one glarice
of his eyes - it's a look that says, "Get
a loadof the baby standing on a chair
in herdiaper singing into a micro-
phone with chocolate on her face." I
-smile back, and while I don't feel the
urgeright then to rip his clothes off, I
get this warm feeling knowing we are
sharing something that only we can
with a simple glance.
I look ahead and my future is com-
ing over the horizon: clean, quiet


-" $221
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L includes
S -. Kds WelcomeExam,
C IL A 1Appointment Cleanina


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house. Late dinners. Grandbabies. And
I suspect a return to the two of us rav-
ishing each other with one glance. I
am hopeful.
You should be hopeful, too. Statis-
tics say that couples who read that big
book and welcome the spiritual into
their lives have about an 80 percent
chance of staying together. The pjun-
dits push the 40-50 percent divorce
rate in the United States, but remem-
ber there is always a bright tangent to
every hideous statistic.
The next time I'm looking for inspi-
ration, I'm not going to lament over
where to find it. I'm going to head
straight to the horse's mouth. Wow,
that Bible really is a good read. It's rav-
ishing.


=-~C-,j -B


& X-Rays!


$78 Welcome Appointment for Children Ages 12 and Under!



A-
,, �- ;,- .^ '- -'-'


' " - - ' " ,, , ". - , - , , .. . " *-:�- " * - -
� ' " , '. ' -.:-' - - , ' .. 2. .'= ,- ' o. '- ''


I


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. . . . . .


The big 'Ohb"






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, December 18, 2008 Page 9


This week's art comes from art students
at Brookshire Elementary in Winter Park.


Cat

Marker on paper


Illustrated by
Elena Scivally
int 2nd grade
aint


Illustrated by
Alyssa Stewart
5th grade


The World Illustrated by
.............. ..............Janie C arlson
Marker on paper 5th grade


A good
conversation
should be
heard
and not
seen.




* Do people sound like they are
, mumbling?

* Do you find yourself turning up
the volume on the tv?

* Do you frequently ask people to
repeat themselves?

Your journey away from hearing loss begins here!
Discover what gOl need to kneom
www.OrlandoHears.com


1460 Lake Baldwin Lane
Baldwin Park
407-898-2220


Dr. Melissa Riess


* Your Diabetes
Headquarters
* Power Sooters
* Wheekhairs
* Lift hairs
Masectbmy
Supplies


* Adult Diaper Home
Delivery Program
* Bath Safety
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* Oxygen Supplies
* Hospital Beds
* And So Much More!


B G IO NFO

Wg


NEW DROP-OFF LOCATION
Please open your hearts to needy local
Orlando children this holiday season. Stop
by and drop off your new, unwrapped toy
(or monetary donation), and we will
provide you with free coffee and sweets!
Leave donations at.
Michelle Valentine Matchmaking
1540-B Lake Baldwin Lane
Orlando (Baldwin Park)


Shy
Seahorses

Tempera p-


mR -.- -n-l h .l I -& ; o


--- ------------ L------- --I'-


SO~u*-p~ 7-~e9L~7end. ~rUl~cl CAIYe. ~oum(~-~Ssr~e~.


Thursday, December 18, 2008 Page 9


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


BSSO@liK
Qr CL*rTI)I)L FLQO!PX.


get
....noticed



Advertise
S.*. here











contact tracy
407-628-8500
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


1915



P)

F~I







gd i u. I I ,hm. 18 2008 Wne Par / MatadOsre


Cinema


Area ovietime forFri6y, Dc. 1


'Seven Pounds' - Opens Friday


Winter Park Village
510 N. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park
407-628-0035
SEVEN POUNDS (PG-13)
11:40am, 12:45, 2:35, 4:15,5:20,
7:10, 8:10,10:20,10:55

THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX (G)
12:30, 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30,11:45

YES MAN (PG-13) 11:45am,
12:15,1:15, 2:25, 2:55, 4:30, 5:05,
5:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:40, 10:10,
10:40,12:10am, 12:40

DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL
(PG-13) 11:50am, 1:30, 2:15, 4:25,
4:55,7:00,7:25,8:05,9:30,10:00,
10:30, midnight, 12:30am

NOTHING LIKE THE HOLIDAYS
(PG-13) 11:45am, 2:10,4:50,7:55,
10:50

FROST/NIXON (R) 12:35, 3:35,
6:45,10:15

AUSTRALIA (PG-13) noon, 3:30,
6:55,10:25

BOLT (PG) 11:40am, 2:05, 4:35,
7:05, 9:45, 12:05am
^______"*"""" """ .............. "


FOUR CHRISTMASES (PG-13)
12:05,12:50, 2:20, 3:05, 4:45,
5:15, 7:20, 7:45, 9:35, 10:05, 11:50,
12:15am

TWILIGHT (PG-13) 12:55, 3:55,
6:50, 9:50, 12:35am

QUANTUM OF SOLACE (PG-13)
12:10, 2:50, 5:25, 8:15,10:45

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (R)
12:40, 4:10, 7:50,10:35

MADAGASCAR 2 (PG) 12:25,
3:10, 5:35

ROLE MODELS (R) 1:05, 3:40,
7:40,10:55

VICKY CRISTINA BARCELONA
(PG-13)12:20, 2:40, 5:10, 7:35,
9:55,12:25am




Maitland
1300 S. Orlando Ave.
407-629-0054
MILK (R) 3:15, 6:30, 9:45
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .


PhnoI no urt-e ) I Crlumbia Pil lures o . di
Ben Thomas is racked with guilt by a terrible secret. Looking to redeem


THE D
STILL
9:30


himself, he goes on a quest to change the lives of seven strangers.

1 hour 58 minutes - PG-13

I Also opening Friday: 'Yes Man'
Winter Park Carl is a negative guy whose
life is stuck in a rut. Seeking a
2155 Aloma Ave.~ - way out, he signs up for a self-
407-678-8214 help program that requires him
)AY THE EARTH STOOD- to say "Yes" to every opportu-
(PG-13) 1:30, 4:00, 7:00, nity that comes his way. This
(P-13) 130, 400, 7:00, new outlook begins to change
his life in dramatic and comical
ways.


RFUOF CHRISTMASES (PG-13)
2:15, 4:15, 7:30, 9:20


1 hour 44 minutes - PG-13


Calendar


Enzian Theater hosts a "Popcorn
Flicks" presentation of the movie
"Scrooged" at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec.
18, in Shady Park at 721 W. New Eng-
land Ave.
The next Popcorn Flicks event will
be at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 8, in Cen-
tral Park - a showing of "The Hus-
tler."

Winter Park hosts the second an-
nual Champs Sports Bowl Parade
of Bands featuring school bands
frofi Florida State -University and
the University of Wisconsin at 2 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 26. As a prelude to the
Champs Sports Bowl game Dec. 27 at
the Florida Citrus Bowl, school bands
from the Atlantic Coast Conference
and Big Ten. championship teams
will march through downtown Winter
Park and perform a "Bandtastic Game
Day Preview" in Central Park's West
Meadow.
The parade starts at the intersec-
tion of Park and Lyman avenues.
Florida State and Wisconsin bands


and team mascots will march nbrth,
along Park Avenue through down-
town Winter Park. After turning west
on Garfield Avenue, they will proceed
to the West Meadow of Central Park
where they will perform.

"Home for the Holidays," a musical
revue, comes to the Winter Park
Playhouse through Dec. 20 on Fridays
and Saturdays. Tickets are $32 for
adults, $30 for seniors, $24 for mati-
nee times, and $22 for students and
industry professionals.
The theater is at 711-B Orange
Ave.
Call 407-645-0145 for more infor-
mation.

The Winter Park Chamber of Com-
merce will host the Annual Orange
County Commission Luncheon, Fri-
day, Dec. 19. at the Racnel D. Murrah
Civic Center of Winter Park. Registra-
tion will begin at 11:30 a.m. and the
program will begin at noon. The Civic
Center is at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. in


Winter Park.
Reservations are required and are
non-refundable.
Individual reservations are $30 per
person for Chamber members, $35
for non-members and members pay-
ing at the door. Corporate table spon-
sorships of eight seats are available
at $240.
E-mail Kimberly McDonald at km-
cdonald@winterpark.org, call 407-
644-8281 or visit WinterPark.org for
more information.

The Mid-Florida Milers Walking
Club promotes recreational walk-
ing for fun and fitness and will host
a walk in Winter Park on Saturday
evening, Dec. 20. Participants can
register at Winter Pines Golf Course
at 950 S. Ranger Blvd. in Winter Park
from 5:30-6 p.m Groups will leave at
6 p.m.
This Mid-Florinaa Milers' annual
guided holiday walk will go through
parts of Winter Park adorned with
Christmas decorations. -Bring flash-


lights and reflective items. Wheel-4
chairs and strollers are medium, toI
hard difficulty and pets are not'a h.
lowed.
The cost is $3 for AVA Credit.: fJh-
credit walkers can walk for free. The
distance'is 10 kilometers (6 miles),
and a shorter 5-kilometer (3 miles)
trail will be available.
Visit MidFloridaMilers.org, call
407-304-6394 or e-mail mlanpher@
cfl.rr.com for more information.

The Park Plaza Gardens Restaurant
and Cafe in downtown Winter Park
will offer a "prix fixe" dinner menu
- with multiple selections from dif-
ferent courses for the same price -
along with party hats and Iavors to
ring in the New Year on New Year's
Eve. Brad and Company will play jazz-
music from 9 p.m. to closing.
An a la carte menu will be available
in the caf6.
The restaurant is at 319 S. Park
Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407-645-
2475 for more information.


The Retired Officers Wives Club
of Central Florida meets the third
.tifsday of every month, September
p4.ough May, for lunch and mutual in-
Ster'sts at the Elks Club #1079 at 12
N Primrose'Drive in Orlando.
Call membership chairwoman
Margie Simmons at 407-977-0516
for more information.

The Gramercy Theatre Company
of Orlando, in partnership with
the historic Plaza Theatre, will be
presenting a live stage production
of "A Christmas Story," adapted by
Philip Grecian, based on the motion
picture. through Dec. 28.
The Plaza Theatre is at 435 N.
Bumby Ave. in Orlando. Show times
are 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Fridays,
2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday,
and 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday.
There is an additional performance
at 2:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 26. Tickets
are $23-$33.
Call 407-228-1220 or visit ThePla-
zaTheatre.com for more information.


CHICK I Lighthearted and downright silly gift ideas fill 'Chick Thins


< continued from page A7


sterling silver fossil, min-
eral and gemstone jewelry
makes a sophisticated pres-
ent. The extensive selection
of Pandora beads and brace-
lets has become their No. 1
seller, Stumpf said.
Customers are immedi-
ately drawn to the exten-
sive collection of UCF, Ga-
tor and FSU collegiate gifts,
from decorated wine glass-
es to photo frames and food
trays, all hand-painted by a
local artist.


First-time visitors can't
help but laugh when they
spot the high-heeled cake
server or the drink holders
*with hot-pink feathered
rims. The hand-painted
martini and wine glasses
decorated with tennis mo-
tifs or dice from a bunco
game, and silly T-shirts with
' comical sayings about choc-
olate or wine, also earn a
giggle.
"People who want to
spend between 20 and 30
dollars on a gift can come in
here and pick up one or two


Women's novelty shop "It's a
Chick Thing!" just moved from
Winter Springs to Winter Park,
at 1961 Aloma Ave. It's open 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through
Saturday, and noon to 5 p.m.
Sunday.
Call 407-388-1400 for more
information.


things. It's fun and different
and they didn't break The


bank to do it," Stumpfsaid.
Customer Patty D'Angelo
of Winter Springs said she
appreciates having a gift
shop nearby that offers
monogramming so she can
personalize her gifts. "They
have unique things you
can't find at other stores -
it's like a craft fair in here,"
D'Angelo said as she made
her selection.
Amber Tyler, once a dedi-
cated customer at the Win-
ter Springs location, trav-
eled from Chuluota to the
new shop to do her holiday


shopping. "You can find
unique gifts here, nothing
that you absolutely need
but is really cool and you
just.want it," she said with a
laugh. "Where else can you
find 'Future Trophy Wife'
key chains?" she asked as
she laid down her purchases
on the counter for a newly
engaged best friend.
"I think it's fun to have
the sassy items," Stumpfsaid
with a smile. "People are so
serious all the time."


'Winter Park / Maitland Observer


aP e 1 0 Thursday Dece 8






I


Letter to


Is Obama the new FDR?


I received a sincere message via e-mail
from a supporter of the president-
elect congratulating me on a sup-
posed strategy of mine. Evidently this
follower thinks that I recommended
that it would be a good strategic idea
to spend as much money as possible
during the waning weeks of the Bush
administration. This excessive spend-
ing would ensure that there will be
nothing left for President Obama to
waste money on when he takes office
Inauguration Day, Jan. 20.
First of all, the economic strategy
that I have in fact always supported
for my country has always been to
live within its means. For example, I
deplore all of these "bailouts" which
have been advocated by the current
administration and passed by Con-
gress. But the person who wrote me
does have a point. The president-elect
has made substantial promises to all
sorts of groups.
He has said that he will provide a
middle-class tax cut for 95 percent
of the tax-paying public. In addition,
lower-income individuals will not
have to pay federal-income tax, but
they will receive economic "stimulus"
checks. And they won't have to pay ei-
ther Social Security or Medicare taxes.
He is going to help those who have
bad mortgages and would not oth-
erwise be able to stay in their homes.
He is going to see to it that everyone
will get to go to college. He is going
to increase funds for early education.
He intends to increase foreign aid. He


wants to help out on Main Street now
that Wall Street has been taken care
of. He is going to take care of all of
those 401(K)s that have lost so much
money. He is going to bring back
high-paying manufacturing jobs. He
will offer tax credits to businesses
that will bring back jobs from abroad.
He intends to see to it that the United
States has universal health care. I
could go on and on.
The problem is that he simply
doesn't have enough money for all of
it. He can borrow only so much. How
much of the American gross domestic
product does he want the Chinese
to own? If he just has the Federal Re-
serve System print more money.the
country will suffer massive inflation.
There is little question that he will
have to disappoint perhaps a large
number of interest groups. How will
these groups then react to President
Obama? Will they understand that
the money was just not there and
forgive him? Or will they run out of
patience and begin to take out their
anger on him. Time will tell.
The problem for the Republicans is
that they will have to rely on the pres-
ident's supporters to become angry
with him. Obama is often compared
with President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Recall, FDR's supporters elected him
to the presidency four times.
-Paul M. Weyrich
Chairman of Free Congress Foundation


EdriorlnM


Copyrighted Material A
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


LI.U.


dftI


Thursday, December 18, 2008 Page 11


Wi t P k / Maitland Obs r


Opinion/ i
mor, my bile, into timeless leavings? And, of course, the rilous and corrupt Republi-
prose, answer was a resounding, cans, he not only could not
Perspectives And Sanjay Darjeel- "Yes!" We've determined afford to do my column,
ing did all the heavy lift- what you are, the old joke he offered me a 2-cents-a-
by ing, all the hours over the goes, now let's decide the word (that's right, 2 cents
word processor typing out price. Oh, my shame. a word) writing job (doing
drafts, sweating the transi- But, I couldn't accept "Visit Sunny Orlando" bro-
tions, worrying about verb that I had become such a chures, no less) but I had
agreement and such, and cheap, tawdry little shill for only a week to decide. After
for what? I am profoundly the "published" word. But a week it would be a penny
ashamed to tell you. For the Roman goddess Fortu- a word. Sigh..Such is mod-
$1.25. na smiled on her reprobate ern capitalism. America is
If the shno fits M . B h That's right. One dollar of a writer son and deliv- now the outsourced.
II L 1lUU iLO I l. u and twenty-five cents. The ered one Sanjay Darjeeling. I leave you now. This is
disgrace - on my part. But I was on the cutting edge of my fond farewell, my swan
I felt compelled to be hon- Party. But that was rare. I to my credit, he did support "outsourcing" years before song of a final column. So,
est. "You don't really write don't know why I told the his family of seven (and his it became mainstream. Per- dear, faithful, loyal read-
the column for The Ob- truth last Saturday night, one-legged mother-in-law, chance, one casual conver- ers, you will now be left
server, do you?" asked the but once it's out, it cannot too) with my remittances. station led to another and with onlyJepson's pedes-
diminutive, sparkling-eyed be rebottled. Sanjay was always grateful. the next thing you knew trian devices (he insisted I
brunette. Standing before I do not personally write But for my largesse, as he so I was in communication write this last column), his
the hors d'oeuvres table, this column. it is written generously put it, he did not with an aspiring Indian lad shameless, manipulative
party drink in hand, I was by Sanjay Darjeeling, an have to intentionally maim who would work (write) writing tricks to amuse and
momentarily flummoxed. Indian writer who lives on or blind any of his children for "peanuts." challenge you. I wish you
And then the truth just the outskirts of Mumbai, to make them better beg- You know the sordid the best. I do.
poured out like a knocked- India. Each week, I forward, gars. Unlike his "untouch- $1.25 details. A thousand- Regardless of what your
over drink, via e-mail, an idea or two able" neighbors. plus columns later and I American press is now
"Actually, I don't," I said. to Sanjay, as I have come And how did such a simply could no longer suggesting, when abroad,
She nodded knowingly. to call him, and he creates reprehensible, despicable accept the accolades, the continue to claim to be
For more than 20 years, the essays that have been arrangement come about glory, the fame. I came Canadian and if you're ever
I've been living a false- an Observer mainstay since in the first place? Pride. clean over a canape of fresh in Mumbai, do look me up.
hood. It's a small thing, 1988. Hubris. Arrogance. When salmon and cantaloupe. Wear a flak jacket, however.
for some, to embrace the An example of the type I first started with The Such is the purity-of some Yours in a word. If not,
harmless lie. And it always of prompt I would provide Observer, the then-owner- moments. In one accidental deed.
made me inwardly laugh. Sanjay would be the re- publisher offered me such confession I cleansed my - SanjayDarjeeling
"If you only knew," was my cent incident of President low compensation I was Dorian Gray soul of its 20-
secret thought. Occasion- Bush deftly ducking a shoe taken aback by the effron- year shadow of hypocrisy
ally, someone would slap thrown at him while doing tery of it. How did this man and dishonesty. And the sun
me around, metaphorically last week's press confer- know I could be "had" for did, indeed, shine brighter
speaking, for being unmer- ence in Iraq. I would have so little? Was I that needy? the next morn. TALK JEPSON
cifully harsh to "W" and his come up with some utterly Was I so apparently shame- That and Sanjay now
thoughtless brotherhood of tasteless lead, such as "If less, so without pride that I owns his own company Chris Jepson's opinions are made
reactionaries, better known the shoe fits ..." and Sanjay would write for proverbial and while he loved every independently of the newspaper.
as the Florida Republican would spin my acidic hu- "peanuts"? The dregs? The week ripping into the scur- Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


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Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

Promises

S But I have promises
to keep, And miles to
go before I sleep," says
Robert Frost in his thought-
ful poem, "Stopping by
Woods on a Snowy Eve-
ning."
When I was 19 or 20, I
joined other students for
an occasional lunch with
Robert Frost in the Eliot,
House dining room at
Harvard. I wondered what
promises he had made, and
whether'he was able to
keep them all.
Frost was a troubled
man in those years. His
daughter's recent suicide
weighed heavily upon him.
His happy young "birch
swinging" days were lost in
the distant past. Still, Frost
kept faith with the tenets
that ruled his life and art.
Today, not everybody
I know concerns himself
with keeping promises
he has made, perhaps too
lightly. The attitude seems
to be, "I'll promise now, and
later on, maybe I'll figure


how to get out of it."
Among some seasoned
prevaricators one meets,
Ananias would have to
strain his imagination to
make the second team.
When Jimmy Carter
asked on TV, "Would I lie
to you?" what was the
American public's unani-
mous reply? Richard Nixon,
referring to his truthful-
ness about Watergate and
the "cover-up," said to the
nation on TV, "Your presi-
dent is not a crook." Did
that statement itself com-
pound a lie?
The old creed of a good
upbringing, "Your word is
your bond," is viewed as
mawkish corn by lots of
people today.
For years I worked as an
opera singer in Germany.
There, a verbal "Zusage"
(binder) on the telephone
is as valid as a signed con-
tract. Woe to the artist who
fails to live up to a "Zus-
age." He will be quietly
"blackballed" by the The-
ater Directors Association,
and will never again be
employed by anyone in the
German theater system.
The Germans are prob-
ably no more moral in this
respect than anyone else.
But they have learned that
it's not practical to run an
enormous system of opera
and playhouses if everyone
involved doesn't keep his
word fastidiously.
Corruption has become
a chosen way of life at
almost every economic and
educational level, if one
believes our newspapers
and broadcast media.
We read that cheating
on exams has become a
national phenomenon -
even in such institutions as
Annapolis and West Point.
"Truth in advertising"


- are you kidding?! What
kind of nafare you?
As someone commented
to me the other day, "Who
can you trust nowadays?"
No matter what else of
value a friend, or colleague,
or mate has, if you cannot
count on him or her, what
have you got? ... sand that
runs through your fingers.
In recentyears, highly
visible religionists (e.g.:
Bakker, Swaggart, et al)
have raised the public's
eyebrows with allegations
of financial dishonesties or
other more bizarre immo-
ralities. Were their lives flat-
out lies against the Chris-
tian Ethic they espoused?
If "the truth shall set you
free," voluntary bondage
seems the state of mind of a
large percentage of people
one knows.
Lying has well-nigh
become a popular national
sport. A lie is so easy to get
away with - and usually,
one hears, "It won't hurt
anybody." However, most
people who damage other
people's lives have prob-
ably lied to them some-
where along the way.
George Washington's "I
cannot tell a lie" must bring
a derisive snort from some
of our present leaders.
Bill Clinton would seem-
ingly rather lie than tell the
truth. If this is to be the Age
of the Lie in the U.S., in Bill
we had the right guy in the
White House to serve as our
role model.
Clinton preached a
patently false NAFTA "Gos-
pel" - that this treaty
would "create millions of
jobs in the United States."
Anyone stupid enough
to believe Slick Willie's
sleight-of-hand brand of
salesmanship deserved to
be taken to the cleaners.


A while back, TV news
told us that our biggest
auto manufacturer, General
Motors, had received a con-
tract from the Japanese to
produce engines for forklift
trucks.
The details given were
exactly what NAFTA oppo-
nents predicted: i.e., GM
built a factory in Mexico,
and Mexican workers got
the jobs.
"All men are liars," states
Psalm 116,v. 10. (Nota
bene, liars: the Bible doesn't
say you have to be one.)
"Liars ought to have
good memories," wrote
Algernon Sydney. Right on,
Algernon!
Did Bill Clinton handily
forget that, under the rules
of GATT (another bill-of-
goods he pawned off on
us), no GATT member can
unilaterally impose a puni-
tive tariff on the goods of
another member? Or did
he know full-well that his
threat to slap, all by his
lonesome, a 100 percent
tariff on a dozen models of
high-priced Japanese cars.
was bunk - a gold-plated
lie?
Even now, do we have
the promised secure border
between us and Mexico?
"He (God) will not leave
his promises unfulfilled,"
Samuel Johnson wrote.
But in the meantime, we
earthlings must deal with
the promises of our fellow
human beings!
"A promise made is a
debt unpaid," we learned
by reading aloud Robert W.
Service's "The Cremation
of Sam McGee," around our
Boy Scout campfire.
"It is easier not to speak
a word at all than to speak
more words than we
should," wrote Thomas A
Kempis in the 15th century.


Yes, Tom, but maybe not so
profitable.
"Seldom is-heard a dis-
couraging word," sings the
cowboy in the folk song,
"Home on the Range."
What is a more "discourag-
ing" word than a lie?
These days, Demos-
thenes' vain "search for an
honest man" takes on a
new dimension of futility.
Shakespeare wrote,
"Above all, to thine own self
be true, And it must follow
as the night the day, Thou
canst not then be false to
any man." - "Hamlet."
The worst sin is "to
violate the sanctity of the
human heart," i.e., to lie to
one who believes in you,
said Nathaniel Hawthorne
in "The Scarlet Letter."
When those look-you-
straight-in-the-eye liars,
who rationalize their way
through life lie by lie, break
a promise to you, they usu-
ally replace it with a bigger
one. If there is a Hell, I am
sure it is loaded with ratio-
nalizers wearing surprised
looks on their faces..
We all know people of
whom we could say, "He's
as good as his word - but
his word is no good!"
Bobby Burns, the great
Scottish poet, warned
about lying to ourselves
about ourselves, "O would
some power the giftie gie
us, to see ourselves as oth-
ers see us."
Galahad, whose
"strength was as the
strength of ten, because his
heart was pure," is still a
valid hero for the young.
Those friends and col-
leagues I know who have
that strength have received
the greatest inheritance
that one generation can
pass on to another.


FALLEN APPLES NOT FAR FROM MY TREE #80


In 1644, philosopher
Ren6 Descartes penned a
three-word sentence that
simultaneously describes
humankind's potential and
its concomitant limita-
tions: Cogito ergo sum - I
think, therefore I am.
Descartes argues that
Sman's very existence
depends upon his con-
sciousness of himself, i.e.,
the ability of his brain to
think.
This little statement
is the basis of "idealism,"
implying that man exists
only in his own imagina-
tion, i.e., his innate mental
concept of himself and the
-world around him.
The enormous poten-
tial of man's intellect lives
only within his own head,
and is limited only when
he bumps his head in
approaching infinity.,
In a sense, man "thinks
himself up" again every
morning as he awakes from
the torpor of sleep.
In Western civilization,
idealism is the philosophy
which insists that the ulti-
mate nature of reality is
Ideal, or based upon our


ideas, values and essences.
The "real world," says
Descartes, is inseparable
from consciousness; per-
ception, mind, intellect and
reason in the sense of true
science.
Idealism; as we most
often use. the word, applies
to the concept that says
things are in an ideal form,
or as they ought to be,
rather than as they usually
are, in the realms of ethics,
morality, aesthetics and
values.
If I say "I have an ideal
wife," I am implying that in
my mind she measures up
to everything I wish for in a
wife. (And incidentally, she
does!)
She is, of course, not per-
fect - but, after 30 years; I
have not yet located in her
anything that needs to be
changed:
Making one's whole life's
value is an ongoing, never-
ending matter indeed.
Every deed one does
must first be conceived in
detail before it is done.
After it is done, one
immediately sizes up the
fruit of his imagination,


and assesses the accuracy
of how he fulfilled some-
thing which was, a moment
earlier, only an amorphous
wish.
The mundane impor-
tance of our own self-con-
cept can vary depending
upon whether our feet are
solidly on the ground.
Too high a concept is a
symptom of swell-headed-
ness.
Too low a concept indi-
cates an inferiority com-
plex.
In the words of the old
Quaker song, '"Tis the gift
to be simple..." When you
come down where you
ought to be, "'Twill be just
right."

Is there pleasure in being
wrong?
When I recently started
an article by asking, "Where
are we going? What are
we doing?" I was hop-
ing against hope that my
instincts were wrong.
Well, my countrymen
went ahead and voted the
guy into the White House
and I think a big surprise
may be in store.


The incoming presi-
dent does not have a track
record of being in com-
mand of anything impor-
tant before we ceded him
the top executive spot in
our land.
We should never forget
that, regardless of whatever
switcharoos Obama serves
up in the meantime, he will
have the last laugh with his
Supreme Court appoint-
ments - which will be lib-
eral.
There were a lot of
Socialistic hints in what he
told us about his own phi-
losophy, but we chose to
see him as a nice guy who
surely wouldn't do us harm.
Socialism is something
most of us detest, and yet at
year's end, we find our fed-
eral government owning
big shares of the mortgage
business and banks.
Now the U.S. govern-
ment is on the verge of
sponsoring the manufac-
ture of American automo-
biles. All these dire things
have happened under the
aegis of George W. Bush.
If this is "conservatism,"
what is it going to look


like when the more radi-
cal Obama takes over in
January?
The public's tires are
slick and the road will be
icy.
With a Democrat House
and Senate, how can we
put on the brakes when we
need them?

"Government'S view of the
economy could be summed
up in a few short phrases:
If it moves, tax it. If it keeps
moving, regulate it. And if it
stops moving, subsidize it."
- formerPresident
Ronald Reagan

"If you don't read the news-
paper you are uninformed;
if you do read the newspa-
per you are misinformed."
- Mark 7Tlain


TALK RONEY
Louis Roney's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at LRoney@cfl.rr.com.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


aP e 1 2 Thursday Dece 8




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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, December 18, 2008 Page 13


I(( Notices


2L&-4--


inj THIE IHr: iL r . Fl"il 1W :! iHE rr i ,- .11.1101:.1(ia
IIIr.IFI Il.IT I: fll Jl l :l: .irjlit hLI: I.lI: I iAill Ai
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CASE NO. 48-2008-CP-002722-0
IN RE: Estate of
ANN S. LUNDQUIST,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ANN
S. LUNDQUIST, deceased, whose date of
death was November 30, 2008, File Number
48-2008-CP-002722-0, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Room 340, Orlando, Florida 32801. The names
and addresses of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'SDATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
December 11, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representatives:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A.
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801
Personal Representative:
ELIZABETH ANN DOYLE
650 South Lake Sybelia Drive
Maitland, FL 32751
Personal Representative:
JAMES ANDREW DOYLE
460 Princeton Way, NE
Atlanta, GA 30307
12/11,12/18


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE
DIVISION
CASE NO. 48-2008-CP-002638-0
IN RE: Estate of
ROOSEVELT L. McKINNEY, SR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ROOSEVELT
L. McKINNEY, SR., deceased, whose date of
death was September 9, 2008, File Number
48-2008-CP-002638-0, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 North Orange.Avenue,
Room 340, Orlando, Florida 32801. The names
-and addresses of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
esnate-on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
December 11, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A.
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801
Personal Represertative:
GWENDOLYN McKINNEY
4057 Eagle Feather Drive
Orlando, Florida 32829
12/11,12/18


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 48-2007-CP-001701-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELSIE G. BURDEN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered In the
estate of Elsie G. Burden, deceased, ile Number
48-2007-CP-001701-0, by the Circuit Court for
Orange -County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando,
FL 32801; that the decedent's date of death was,
April 15, 2007; that the total value of the estate
Is $5000.00/approxlmate and that the names and
addresses of those to whom At has been assigned
by such order are:
Name/Address
Kathleen J. Dubecky / 37055 Sue Street,
Geismar, Louisiana 70734
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
December 18, 2008.
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'lVliiiu lli
CASE NO. 48.2008-CP-002764-0
IN RE: Estate of
ANTOINETTE R. CLARK,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate -of
ANTOINETTE R. CLARK, deceased, whose date
of death was November 18, 2008, File Number
48-2008-CP-002764-0, is pending In the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Room 340, Orlando, Florida 32801. The names
and addresses of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is
December 18, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A.
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801
Personal Representative:
BARBARA C. McCUE
1901 Legion Drive
Winter Park, Florida 32789
12/18,12/25




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 48-2008-CP-2398-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Bernetta A. Moulton,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Bernetta A.
Moulton, deceased, whose date of death was Au-
gust 15, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for Or-
ange County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Room 340,
Orlando, Fl 32801. The names and addresses of the
Co-Personal Representatives and the Co-Personal
Representatives attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
dedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWIT-TANOING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO(2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
12/11/08.
Vanessa J. DiSimone
Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives
Florida Bar No. 0043713
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward &Woodman, P.A.
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor, P.O. Box 880,
Winter Park, FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
Co-Personal Representatives:
Jack E. Peterson
Lance A. Ragland
329 ParkAvenue North, 2nd Floor -
P.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
12/11,12/18





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2008-CP-2178
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Annabelle Stafford a/k/a Ellen Annabelle Stafford
a/k/a Annabelle Brown Stafford,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Annabelle
Stafford a/k/a Ellen Annabelle Stafford a/k/a
Annabelle Brown Stafford, deceased, whose date
of death was September 9, 2008, s pending in the
Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which Is P.O. Box 8099,
Sanford, FL 32772-8099. The names and address-
es of the Personal Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and. other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of'the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD 'SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
18 12/11/08,
Personal Representative:
Vicki L, Catuccl
32 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor
RO, Box 880
WInior Patr, FL 32790
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I i fll i I 11llT I'll T lr : I: l li Il 'll) I ." I : I :.l :1
ii1 I lA)u I f AalI; il" Li l IItrI
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GRISELDA CASSAMAJOR,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of GRISELDA
CASSAMAJOR, deceased, whose date of death was
July 2, 2007; File Number 48-2008-CP-2702-0, Is
pending in the Circuit Court for ORANGE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 NORTH ORANGE AVENUE, ORLANDO, FL 32801.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedents
estate must file their claims with this courtWITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBUCA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED..
The date of first publication of this notice is: De-
cember 11,2008.
DONALD W. SCARLETT
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Florida Bar No. 112821
Donald W. Scarlett, PA.
1003 East Concord Street
Orlando, FL 32803
Telephone: (407) 422-8189
CHARLOTTE CASSAMAJOR
Personal Representative
12388 ARLINGTON PARK LANE
ORLANDO, FL 32824
- 12/11, 12/18


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 48-2008-CP-1556-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PROSPERO F. MENDOZA,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of PROSPERO
F MENDOZA, deceased, whose date of death was
June 23, 2008; File Number 48-2008-CP-1556-0,
is pending in the Circuit Court for ORANGE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 NORTH ORANGE AVENUE, ORLANDO, FL 32801.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims wi this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-.
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: De-
cember 18, 2008.
DONALD W. SCARLETT
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Florida Bar No. 112821
Donald W. Scarlett, P.A.
1003 East Concord Street
Orlando, FL 32803
Telephone: (407) 422-8189
AURORA B. MENDOZA
Personal Representative
5836 GAMBLE DRIVE
ORLANDO, FL 32808
12/18.12/25


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i: 'i I sN irj arr 'I' ah nlltdl I' u i:lllilj i FLI:IlIsI4
ai: i uiE l . I Ii1i rJ
FILE NO.: 48-2008-CP-002611-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JIMMIE DUFFY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of JIMMIE
DUFFY, deceased, whose date of death was Septem,
ber 23, 2008, File Number 48-2008-CP-002611 -0,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is:
Clerk of the Court, Probate Division, 425 N. Orange
Avenue, Suite 340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names
and addresses'of the Personal Representative and
the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the Decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against Decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is served, must
file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OFTHE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE, OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.-.
All other creditors of the Decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against Decedent's
estate, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is: De-
cember 18, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
FREDERICK W. JONES, ESQUIRE
Florida Bar No. 181520
Graham, Builder, Jones, Pratt & Marks, LLP
Post Office Drawer 1690
369 N. New YorkAvenue
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-4455
Personal Representative:
JAMES DUFFY
14903 Prairie Road Ct.
Orlando, Florida 32824
12/18,12/25




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 48-2008-CP-002581-0
Division 1
IN RE: ESTATE OF
VADA RUTH RUBLE,
-Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Vada Ruth
Ruble, deceased, whose date of death was Sep-
tember 24, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Ave., Room 340,
Orlando, Florida 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims wih this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this courtWITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is De-
cember 11,2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Shedri Lund Kemrney
Attorney for David Ross Ruble
Florida Bar No. 263028
1420 E. Concord St.
Orlando, FL 32803
Telephone: (407) 898-5526
Fax: (407) 898-5674
Personal Representative:
DAVID ROSS RUBLE
45 Whitehaven Dr.
Pinehurst, North Carolina 28374
12/11,12/18


ONE STOP SHOP FOR CENTRAL FLORIDA LEGALS
As the puBliners ol the Winiter Park -.Maliand ODservr (Orange Corunry FLI
and the Oivedo-Winler Springs voive iSiierno'le County FLI we arc your i ..lj
shop toi [enlRal Florirla lEgil nulioe .dverniinA

IMPROVED CASE MANAGEMENT
Start the stalu 'or CiIrlk' ouiclv Send us your police by Monday aria e II
pubtlisn It on Thursday Obsrver Iew.iDipers imDrovbc your case managemari;
by sending out the nolanzed a3ildavdl immedlalely following mea 3d run
This lets you file it withe coun quickly and avoid the costly delays many
publlsherE Impose by holding Back the ffidavit while waiting for invoicing and
payment processing


'- .







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*PRICE GUIDE
Public Nolr.e/Publlc Sale $9/rol mnrl
Notice to Creditors $42 50tweek
Nolice of Sale 155/weekr
Dissoluton of Marriage 125
-Ar 0u l 01 iit] 1' I ", &Itr., j a. 11 u re n rrn
r.t N r' . iA B S' rco 'sm. int1,

PLACE YOUR AD
Naw Accepting e-mail subminals Jusl email us a
te'l file ol Ine notice o be published and we II oa
S the resr Upon completion of the adarlising we
. immeandlaily send you a notarized afidavil
S E-MAIL Legal'o0serverneawpaperas om
- FA< t407-628-4053
PIHONEE 40;-6:'R2 500
MAIL 60il Eeculive Drive.
S Winter Park. FL 32789


i11 THI I:l: ill.r I Illlki : FliR ,i:dirjii F ei n i ri l
L,:IlHlA P'.II:I A _ rUlvr:.llt'
Fil, ri.:. i i. i.,s :1 , lI. I . .'ll
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WALTER EUGENE TABONY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Waiter Eu-
gene Tabony, deceased, whose date of death was
October 19, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
340, Orlando, FL32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whoma copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OFTHIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is De-
cember 11,2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Chester Wheeler
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Chester Wheeler
2686 Tuskawilla Road
Oviedo, Florida 32765
12/11,12/18


TITLE 6. CIVIL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (Chs. 45-88)
CHAPTER 50. LEGAL AND OFFICIAL ADvERTIlEMENTS

S i1) j NEl:Jsrppetis in wnC lh egli injulir, li.ina] injieii m-y be
[.utl ihe,'

ti') noti:e or pubiialian equirted 13 be putrii',lel n d newspaper
in me nature ot or in iiu o prc-cs i or any ,ino nature cnaracler
or descnpllon provided lir under any law of the stale. rietner
neraltiare or nerealtir enaclEd. and whether pertraining o
conS4ructive service, or lth e nbIng. a3umrnng., reviwing,
eiercising or enlorcing jurlnsaicion or pier by any coun irn Trl
stale. or any notice oi sale or property real or personal mrr taes
slare, county or municipal, or shend s guardian's Of saministralors
or any sale made pursuant io any juli
any olner publicanon or lnotic Sning to any affair of me state.
or any county, municnlld r olthepr Dolhical su bdoision trereof,
shall be deemne ave been Dlsn'einD nd n accordance aith the
alulules provig lor suc publication unless the sam shall have
w1en publish for tripe prescnbed period of lime required lor such
punlicallor n a neiwsaper which the me o such pubilcairu'j
snail nia ia I year an aall have bee entered
nodicalsmatter atalpa l the, n M* - j,| li
i.r in a newsar sucesor of a newspaper
wni;n lIgelheI nave been so DuBollned. provided however Ihar
rlnrining npiein conLtined shall appry were in any county there shall
De no newspaper in esi-tnce which shall nave bDein Ouilll'ned
fInr Ine l.ngin of lime atove prescried No legal puillaTi or 01
any kind nature or descrntiun as nele-i detined. shall De v3lid
or binling or hFeld to be in compliance Arn m th sltJleS DrOvcidrin0
for such publication unless the samr shall nhav been published
In arcora.,nf a wilh the Diuprn & efmiclion Prioo of *ui.h
oublicalion shall be maqfby unilorm affidav!


lp:TIC:F If :ilFLt.: ':. LE
,ALiE B - 4L in ' .H A iil: r
rTHMF- iLLi)J1141 ING I"T .
On December 30, 2008, at Assured Selt-Storage,
Inc. to the highest bidder for cash, items contained
in the following units: -
02097 - Robert German - Household Items
02153 -Alleen Rivera - Household Items
01038 - Jacqueline Berry - Household Items
C2004 - Christopher Conter - Household Items
02078 - Nancy Kucaba - Household Items
TO BE HELD AT
510 DOUGLAS AVENUE
SALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL
ON December 30, 2008
AT 10:00 A.M.
ASSURED SELF-STORAGE, INC.
Assured Self-Storage, Inc. reserves the fightlo bid
and to refuse or reject any and all bids.
12/11,12/18













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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


SMarketplace


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your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
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NEED ADDITIONAL INCOME?
Need Additional Income For The Holidays?
Are you tired of struggling to pay off debts?
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SENIOR APARTMENTS
Winter Park - The Plymouth Apartments:
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FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.




HOW TO DETOX FOR
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Natural herbal patches, overnight
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Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
.school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hailon for more
information, 407-365-7585.






HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do - yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),-
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
Repair, and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets,
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensed/insured/
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0061

CARPENTER
Robert A. Paige. Specializing in finished
carpentry.to termite and wood-rot damage.
Interior and exterior. Call me and ask if I can
do your job. References available. 352-552-
6157

HOUSE CLEANING
Licensed and insured; references available,
weekly, bi-weekly and monthly. Call
Stephanie 407-953-2454.




Adoption
Pregnant? Considering adoption? A
successful educated woman seeks to adopt,
and needs your help! Will be a loving full-
time mom. Financial security. Expenses
paid. Call Lisa. (800) 900-2980, pin 00. FL
Bar# 0150789.

Announcements
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Autos For Sale
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Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.


Estimator- Orlando
Job Description: Responsible for performing
work with plans and specs to develop
estimates. Performs take offs of plans as
provided. Reads, interprets, and applies
specifications to anticipated project
costs. Inputs information into computer
spreadsheets. Researches and applies
material costs as needed. Researches and
applies labor costs as needed. Develops
final estimate and proposal letters. Keeps
bid filed and plans in proper order and file.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $25,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9360512

Vacation Consultant
Job Description: Responsible for conducting
simple vacation surveys with potential
clients and explaining the basics of
vacation memberships. Assists clients with
paperwork and shows resorts on company's
website. Work Tuesday-Saturday, 4:00pm-
10:00pm.
Pay Rate: $7.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9359130

Industrial Engine and Generator
Distributor Service Representative
Job Description; Responsible for planning,
coordinating, and executing various
functions to achieve maximum utilization
and efficiency of company resources and
products to meet company's quarterly
goals and objectives. Handles customer
calls, accounts, orders, and daily inquires.
Demonstrates in depth .knowledge of
engines, generators, and parts. Maintains a
current customer base while building new
client relationships. Presents immediate
follow-through with leads thorough delivery
of product presentation and closing sale
techniques. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $13.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9358345

Account Manager
Job Description: Responsible for the
sale of anatomic pathology services and
the maintenance and development of
established accounts in the following
markets: physician offices, clinics, surgery
centers, and hospitals within the assigned
territory. Performs cold calling, follows up
and develops accounts, and plans territory
and sales forecasting. Attains, continuously
develops, and presents the clinical and
technical applications of the organizations
services. Work Monday-Friday, hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $40,000.00-$60,000.00 per year
plus commission
Job Order Number: 9377335-

Manager
Job Description: Responsible for traveling
to colleges and universities across the
country to implement colleges' best
-practices methodologies for the overall
user services organization including help
desk, desktop support, lab management,
and customer service. Provides training for
teams of technical support representatives
for advanced computer desktop support,
advanced help desk support, lab
management, and other user services
organizations. Work days and hours may
vary..
Pay Rate: $55,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9372252

Irrigation Foreperson
Job Description: Responsible for installing
systems and ensuring functionality, repairing
and maintaining valves, tracing electrical
.components, installing, and initializing
clocks and timers, locating existing zones
and valves and performing pump repairs.
Adheres to company's safety policy,
watches over crew, and ensures customer's
satisfaction through communication,
relationship building and site visits. Work
Monday-Friday,.7:OOam-3:00pm.
Pay Rate: $12.00-$20.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9375475

Regional Sales Executive
Job Description: Responsible for increasing
sales of company's products to customers.
Provides on-site product demonstrations,
generates sales, and identifies additional
sales opportunities supported by an
expanding lead generation initiative and
an existing customer referral base. Work
Monday-Friday, hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9376512

Chef/Head Cook
Job Description: Responsible for developing
recipes and menus, estimating cost,
and pricing food. Manages the kitchen
purchases and inspects work area and food
quality and quantity to ensure standards
are met. Hires, supervises, and trains cooks
and other kitchen personnel. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9376791

Office Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for assisting
with the enrollment process and answering
telephones. Records student attendance,
record requests, payments, and performs


other duties as assigned. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9376310

Security Officer
Job Description: Responsible for patrolling
and performing security officer duties. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9376755

Paralegal/Legal Secretary
Job Description: Responsible for handling a
wide range of legal support duties. Interacts
with clients, drafts/transcribes legal
correspondence and pleadings, schedules
depositions, hearings and mediations,
organizes files, answers phones, and
performs other duties as assigned. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $25,000.00-$60,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9378537

Sales Worker
Job Description: Responsible for developing,
deploying and enabling the key processes
within Sales and Marketing. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $50,000.00-$70,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9378448

Senior Manager of
Project Planning and Implementation
Job Description: Responsible for performing
system conversions, integration, project
management and coordination. Performs
other duties as assigned. Work Bays and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9378370

Outpatient Substance Counselor
Job Description: Responsible for counseling
individuals on substance abuse. Completes
and maintains accurate records of-cases
on file. Work Monday-Saturday, hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$11.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9377836

Homemaker/Companion
Job Description: Responsible for preparing
light meals, performing light housekeeping,
and providing companionship and
transportation. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00-$9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9378445

Personal Computer Technician
Job Description: Responsible for maintaining,
analyzing, troubleshooting, and repairing
computer systems, hardware, and computer
peripherals.Answers user inquires regarding
computer software or hardware operation
to solve problems. Sets up equipment for
employee use and performs basic desktop
telecommunication maintenance. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $28,340.00-$32,938.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9378092

Retail Salesperson
Job Description: Responsible for product
sales and customer relations. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $35,000.00-$75,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9377405

Construction Laborer
Job Description: Responsible for performing
tasks involving physical labor at building
and heavy construction projects, tunnel
and shaft excavations, and demolition sites.
Operates hand and power tools of all types
and assists other craft workers. Cleans and
prepares sites, digs trenches, sets braces
to support the sides of excavations, erects
scaffolding, cleans up rubble and debris,
and removes asbestos, lead, and other
hazardous waste materials. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9378862

Material Handler
Job Description: Responsible for manually
moving freight, stock, or other materials or
performing other unskilled general labor.
Work Monday-Friday, 2:00pm-11:00pm.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour


Job Order Number: 9378532

Food Server
Job Description: Responsible for serving
food and/or beverages to guests. Performs
other job related duties as assigned. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.75 per hour
Job Order Number: 9378739

Marketing Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for providing
customer service and closing sales. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9377921

Medical Technician I
Job Description: Responsible for prepping
specimens' and tracking and entering
data.-Runs samples with some analysis
of samples. Troubleshoots equipment and
precisely and accurately performs a variety
of routine and special technical procedures
in Flow Cytometry and Hematology. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9377930

Computer Systems Analysts III
Job Description: Responsible for recognizing
a potential security violation, taking
appropriate action to report the incident
as required by regulation, and mitigating
any adverse impact. Applies instructions
and pre-established guidelines. Provides
end user support for all operating systems,
peripherals, and applications. Supports,
monitors, tests, and troubleshoots hardware
and software problems. Applies specific
program requirements to identify areas of
weakness and access controls. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $28.31 per hour
Job Order Number: 9377863

Septic/Sewer Construction/
Project Manager
Job Description: Responsiblefor running
crews in the installation of septic systems,
lift stations, grease traps, sewer systems,'
and storm water systems. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $62,400.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9378547

Demonstrator/Product Promoter
Job Description: Responsible for
demonstrating merchandise and answering
questions for the purpose of creating public
interest in buying products. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $25,000.00-$60,000.00'per year
Job Order Number: 9377858


Seminole County
Log ontoWorkforceCentralFlorida.comwhere
you can enter the Job Title in the "Search For
Jobs" box to see more information on these
jobs and search thousands of additional
openings throughout Central Florida, at
NO COST. Apply by following the directions
listed. For further help visit the WORKFORCE
CENTRAL FLORIDA Seminole County Office
at 1097 Sand Pond Rd., Suite 1001, Lake
Mary, or call (407) 531-1225.

Senior Bookkeeper
Job Description: Responsible for the day-
to-day financial functions. Reconciles bank
statements and credit card statements,
Processes accounts payable and accounts
receivable. Establishes budgets and
forecasts for procurement, statements of
cash flow and profit and loss, quarterly/
annual tax filings, payroll for 25+ employees,
sales tax payable, balance sheet analysis,
general ledger maintenance, cash flow,
sales tax, purchase orders, sales orders,
implements accounting internal controls,
and inventory management. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate:.$40,000.00-$45,000.00 per year-
Job Order Number: 9374736

Optometric Technician/Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for patient
work up and data entry. Work Monday-
Friday, hours.may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience


Job Order Number: 9375456

Payroll Specialist
Job Description: Responsible for processing
a multi-state payroll for over 800
employees. Enters new hire information,
files. Assists in any capacity needed within
the payroll department including data-entry,
researching discrepancies and running'
reports. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9376339

Child Care Worker
Job Description: Responsible for performing
child care worker and teacher duties. Work
Monday-Friday, hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.50-$10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9376695

Executive Secretary
Job Description: Responsible for providing
administrative support for a variety of
departments. Answers . phones, sorts/
distributes mail, maintains equipment,
orders supplies, works with vendors, drafts
correspondence, maintains logs and costs,
organizes, and files. Provides administrative
assistance to office and coordinates logistical
support for program training events and/or
meetings. Answers and directs all incoming
telephone calls. Maintains current staff
directories and emergency staff lists. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $22,300.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9378686

Wood Finisher
Job Description: Responsible for shaping,
finishing, and refinishing damaged, worn, or
used furniture or new high-grade furniture
to specified color or finish. Work Monday-
Friday, 7:00am-3:45pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$13.00 per hour .
Job Order Number: 9378769

Executive Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for performing -
administrative duties for executive
management. Screens calls, makes travel
and meeting arrangements, prepares reports
and financial data, trains and supervises
other support staff, and performs customer
relations. Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9378346

Data Analyst
Job Description: Responsible for client
database preparation for professional
services consulting and modeling projects.
Develops, edit s, and maintains client
modeling project databases. Applies market
research concepts to create cartographic
maps using complex mapping tools. Uses
market research database programs to
extract data for analysis projects. Works
with consultants to determine project
specifications, 'adjusts timelines, and
obtains critical information prior to analysis.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9378183

Coordinator
Job Description: Responsible for
coordinating work load in backroom, cash
office, customer service, and merchandise.
Communicates with management and store
associates. Trains associates. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00-$9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9378112

Patient Care Coordinator
Job Description: Responsible for answering
all calls that come into our customer service
call center. Accesses calls quickly and
triages to appropriate department within
10 seconds. Enters patient information data
into computer system and manages difficult
customers. Responds promptly to customer
needs and solicits customer feedback.
Responds to requests for service and
assistance. Contributes to building a team
spirit and follows policies and procedures.
Completes administrative tasks correctly
and on time. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $10.75 per hour
Job Order Number: 9377949




S I


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WEATHER
THRSAY DEC 18,080 AI CHNEIWN:E5MH71 .532pm


600 760 810
6 a.m. I Noon 3 p.m. I


4Moate
EU JModerate


540
6 a.m.
Friday


TODAY: Areas of fog
before 8 a.m. Otherwise,
sunny, with a high near 80.
Calm wind becoming east
around 5 mph.


48 eeiasol 1:3pm
ii os
A' * s I. *. I


MORNING LOW 540
DAYTIME HIGH 80*
Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
7:13 a.m. 5:33 p.m. of rain SE 6 mph



MORNING LOW 630
DAYTIME HIGH 80�

Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
7:14 a.m. 5:33 p.m. of rain SW 6 mph



MORNING LOW 600
DAYTIME HIGH 80�

Sunrise .Sunset 10% chance Wind
7:14 a.m. 5:34 p.m. of rain SSW 10 mph


NATIONAL
City Friday Sat.
Seattle 17/28 25/31
Los Angeles 40/51 41/58
Houston 62/75 52/76


City
Atlanta
Chicago
New York


Friday Sat.


53/68
22/38
32/41


53/66
25/31
18/33


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High
Saturday 8:04 a.m. 1:46 a.m.
Dec. 20- 8:31 p.m. 1:57 p.m.
Sunday 9:02 a.m. 2:47 a.m.
Dec. 21 9:25 p.m. 2:53 p.m.

FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.
Jacksonville 57/76 57/76
Miami 66/77 67/78


Tampa
Pensacola


58/78 78/60
59/73 58/73


INTERNATIONAL
City Friday


London
Paris
Tokyo


41/50
41/48
42/51


Sat.
47/53
39/48
43/56


SKOLFIELD HOMES
REMO[)I:. 1Nf, - R \.. A " .... --. _ \I ,- .


Do you enjoy taking care of the small repairs around your home? Are endless
lists of Saturday projects relaxing therapy? If not, then turn to Skolfield Homes,
a name you can trust. We have a new division called Skolfield Services.
The growth in our primary business of major renovations, additions, kitchens
and baths has recently allowed us to add several more exceptional craftsmen to
our team. As we complement out main business with this new division, we are,
in a way, circling back to our 1979 roots and living our philosophy of "taking
care of the client."
Our service van is outfitted with supplies, tools, and most importantly an ex-
tremely talented craftsman, Bob Decker.
Our fee: $85 per hour plus materials; a relaxing stress-free Saturday: priceless!
To schedule an appointment call 407-647-7730


BEAT THE HOLIDAY RUSH!


Give the gift of health!

Come by and see us for
special pricing on Personal
Training packages!

If you want to be healthier, feel
better and look better - then get
involved at the Y! We care about
your fitness success!

The is simply a place where
people love to be!


We're ringing in 2009 with
new equipment and classes!


* New Life Fitness Strength Equipment
* Free Weight Equipment
* New Cardio Conditioning
* Teen Fitness
" Zumba
*Body Pump
*Cycling and more!


e'.


THE VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS








. --3.7 -
S'-HTri I n: I:i TF',I F YOUR NAME HERE, FROM YOUR CITY!
Want to see your picture in The Observer? Please e-mail it to editor@
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include as much information about the picture as possible, for example
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IMOR[ NIN; G 11= tEJIt


Page 16 Thursday, December 18, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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THIS WEEK
IN HISTORY
On Dec. 18,1988 warm
weather prevailed in '
U.S. ';;" i
.,.�,ie cool
..%,eather s.oreac across 'the
eastern states. Snieridan **
�,Vyo.. hac . a rlecoldl NVI
of 68 degrees, 7 degrees
v�arnier than Ke;.., �,Vest. Fla.
The National Weather
L Summar,


pp- Visit Our Health Fair
air
Sat., Dec. 27 9-11 a.m.
Nutritional Counseling
Blood Pressure Checks
9 Flu Shots
Recommended Fitness
n-- ams