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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00025
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Creation Date: December 11, 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00025

Full Text




Winter Park/ Maitland


Volume 20, No. 50
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY
A 'BANK

Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
SMember FDIC


Sensible gifts
Find low-cost holiday gift
alternatives with this guide.
Page A8


Cats shoot for third
The Winter Park basketball
team did welltn a tournament.
Page A2


Circa . ":
-A new Park Avenue restaurant
offers a taste of New York City.
Page A7





Community Bulletin..... .A4
Business Briefs............A5
CityTalks .... .......A6
Play On! ...............A12
Legals. ..... . .A13
Marketplace ........ A14
Games................A15


C


tro


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0


-0 9 4922 95 6 42 2


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF

It's difficult to catego-
rize the pizza at Mellow
Mushroom.
The Winter Park res-
taurant,: one of more
than 90 franchise loca-
tions throughout, the
South, serves up funky-
named pies that don't
resemble the thin, floury
dough made famous in
New York or the thick,
flaky variety out of Chi-
cago. - .
"It's Southern hippy
pizza," says Chuck Votey,
who opened the Aloma
Avenue franchise loca-
tion with his wife, Stac-
ey, about four years ago.


The whole-wheat piz-
za dough, which carries
a hint of sweetness, is
hand-tossed and topped
with a high-grade, low-
fat mozzarella cheese.
To further enhance nu-
tritional value, all meat
toppings are pre-cooked
so fat can drain off, Sta-
cey said.
"It's healthy food,"
said Mellow patron Silas
Ottman. "There's really
nothing else like this."
Aleesa Ponce, who
dines at Mellow twice a
month, said the Kosmic
Karma pizza, which fea-
tures spinach, pesto, feta
cheese, sun-dried toma-
toes and fresh tomatoes,
"rocks the house." "This
is the best pizza in town,"


she said.
Another favorite,
Chuck said, is the Magi-
cal Mystery Tour, which
features button.and por-
tobello mushrooms, ja-
lapenos, spinach, pesto
and feta cheese. They
also carry 21 micro-brew
beers on tap, including
locally brewed Orange
Blossom Pilsner. Sample
trays, with four 5-ounce
glasses, are available.
The atmosphere at
Mellow Mushroom is
much like its pizza se-
lection. The building, a
former Boston Market,
is covered with hand-
painted pictures of
mushrooms. A mural on

> turn to MUSHROOM on A2


50&+ tax
Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL


ky it.Cmy=


Standing in front of the
Winter Park City Commis-
sion, Phillip Downs became
818 voices at once. After
a month of exhaustive re-
search into just what makes
the people of Winter Park
tick, he laid out the results
in front of the city govern-
ment at Monday's City Com-
mission meeting.
The city commissioned
Downs' firm, Kerr and
Downs Research, to conduct
the 2008 Citizen Survey. The
results are available at Cit-
yofWinterPark.org.
Overall, reaction was
good to life in the city,
Downs said, but on specific
issues, there was far more
contention.
"The citizens are very
happy about living here, and
they're very happy about city
government," Downs said.
"But with specific services,
they were less positive."
The results of the sur-
vey surprised, pleased and
alarmed some elected offi-
cials.
"I was shocked that peo-
ple liked the Library as much
as they did," Commissioner
Beth Dillaha said.

> turn to CITY on page A3


PHUIU BY LAUHENEt SAMUELS - I M UuSBtMVti
Brandi Cook shows off one of.the Mellow Mushroom's
signature pizzas at their Winter Park location.


Joe McChesney, 5, waves
a balloon sword at simu-
lated snow Friday, Dec. 5, in
Winter Park's Central Park
at a festival culminating in
the annual holiday tree light-
ing ceremony. The tree was
donated to the city by news-
caster BobOpsahl 18 years
ago. Opsahl helped host the
event.

PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK
-THE OBSERVER


A mellow destination


--~-


cFI






g News II Ill




N ews


Cats take third


in tournament


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF


The Wildcats hung with
some of the best basketball
teams in the state, tearing
up the court at the Winter
Park Rotary Tip-off Clas-
sic Invitational last week-
end. But they fell short of
a hard-fought champion-
ship, finishing third over-
all.
With college scouts
watching from the stands,
teams battled for the high-
ly coveted tournament
title over three days, with
the Wildcats falling one
game short of a shot at the
championship.
They defeated Oak
Ridge in the consolation
final Saturday to cement
their third-place showing,
with the help of Austin
Rivers, who led the team
in scoring throughout the
tournament.
He would post up 25
points against eventual
champion Orlando Chris-
tian Prep and in front of a
sellout crowd. The Wildcats
would fall 66-51 in that
game, with Orlando Chris-


Orlando Christian defeated Winter
Springs to win the championship.

Winter Park's Wildcats took third
,place by defeating Oak Ridge.





tian Prep advancing to
the championship match
against Winter Springs.
That final game would
come down to a last-second
shocker. Both teams had
stayed knotted throughout
the game, but the Winter
Springs Bears pulled ahead
late by just a single basket
as the Warriors took out
the final ball.
As the clock ticked to
zero, OCP guard Tyshawn
Patterson let loose a ball
from the outside arc that
would put his team over
the top 52-51.


MUSHROOM I Happy owners say business is up
< continued from the front page


PHOTO BV LAURENCE SAMUELS - THE OBSERVER
Chuck and Stacey Votey opened their Mellow Mushroom pizza franchise about four
years ago. They said it's the "perfect job" for their personalities.


The Mellow Mushroom, at 2015 Aloma Ave., serves up eclectic pizza
pies and 21 types of micro-brew beers. The Winter Park restaurant is
open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 11 a.m. to
11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Takeout is available by calling 407-657-
7755. Visit MellowMushroom.comtto learn more.


the covered patio features
the members of The Beat-
les playing golf beneath a
star-filled sky. The stars even
twinkle at night. Chuck
said the inspiration was the
Beatles song "Lucy in the
Sky with Diamonds" with a
bit of Florida flavor.
Each Mellow Mushroom
has a different theme, he
said, although all locations
use the same menu. The
Voteys are set to open a
second location in the Wa-
terford Lakes area in mid-
January. That restaurant will
have a Key West theme.
Chuck and 'Stacey have
not been affected by the
economic downturn. In fact,
their numbers are still go-
ing up. "We're up 15 percent
from last year," Stacey said,
knocking on the wooden
table. "I knock every time I
say that."
Just four years ago, the
couple lived in Atlanta.
Chuck worked in computers
and Stacey was a children's
counselor. They were fre-
quent patrons of the Mellow
Mushroom there, and one
day Stacey came home and
said, 'We could own one of
these," Chuck 'recalled. Now
they're the happiest they've
ever been.
"This, for us and our per-
sonalities, is the perfect job,"
Stacey said.


iii k., ;'


Huge St. John and Escada sale!

Hurry in for best selection!


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Suond re,,e~A. Sound co.p. 6Soxnd mez .


407.539.2528

www.Jacobsons.com


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


aP e 2 Thursday Decem 8


p�'~~


~x~~

:111.
i, r
I~�


329 North Park Avenue
Suite 101
(next to Panera Bread)
Winter Park, FL 32789


New Store Hours
Monday - Saturday
10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday 12 p.m. - 5 p.m.


* Do you find yourself turning up
the volume on the tv?

* Do you frequently ask people to
repeat themselves?

Your journey away from hearing loss begins here!
Discover khat goA need to knovA(
www.OrlandoHears.com


1460 Lake Baldwin Lane
Baldwin Park
407-898-2220


II �


Dr. Melissa Riess


... .�...~- �. r�l.l~ � i. i' 1.1 ,.~. h.ll II i.. � i'. . .( ' '.'. -..1 t I� � '.L ' -� i. r 1* �)i Z \L)L'r bl.'r~ I
�'�' "' ."�',1,� ;�;�, i5iC1I�l


A good
conversation
should be
heard
and not
seen.




* Do people sound like they are
mumbling?







Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, December 11, 2008 Page 3


CITY I Residents favor more McMansions


< continued from the front page

"There were a couple of areas that sur-
prised me a little bit," Mayor David Strong
said. "And some contradictions that I
didn't expect."
That included some conflicts of inter-
est. Two out of three respondents wanted
to see increased funding for parks in the
city, while at the same time many wanted
reduced restrictions on the construction
of large houses, popularly called."McMan-
sions."
Few homeowners in the city would
be able to afford those large homes. De-
spite the city's upscale image, the poll
showed that the largest income group -
26 percent of residents - earned less than
$25,000 in their entire household in the
last year. Nearly half of all respondents
lived in a household earning less 'than
$50,000 last year.
On the other end of the economic scale,
26 percent of households earned $100,000
or more.
In a state famed for its retiree popula-
tion, Winter Park's age spectrum trended


strongly toward youth, with 43 percent of
respondents aged 18 to 39. Only 23 per-
cent were 60 or older. Only 31 percent of
all households had any children.
.When asked what services could go
on the chopping block during city bud-
get cuts, the golf course and tennis center
were the first to go, with 62 percent of re-
spondents saying they would cut back on
operating hours at those facilities.
Still receiving a majority of support, the
controversial issue of commuter rail'ser-
vice and the construction of a commuter
rail station in the city both received 48
percent "yes" votes from residents, with
about a third of respondents voting "no."
More than half of residents also wanted
to see Fairbanks Avenue beautified to the
tune of $1.4 million.
After hearing results of the survey,
Strong said he was pleased with the citi-
zens' praise of government, but that he'll
be changing some of his approach at City
Hall.
"I'll evaluate what we're doing and try
to adjust for what we got in the survey,"
he said.


Freshed

tower open

to fanfare

Winter Park Mayor David
Strong helps cut the ribbon
to re-open the refurbished
The Plymouth retirement
community on Thursday,
Dec. 4. The apartment build-
ing is at Gay Road and Ex-
ecutive Drive in Winter Park.


Topics will include:


* Current Interest Rates
SClosing costs associated with a reverse mortgage
Advantages and disadvantages


* When a reverse mortgage is NOT the answer
* What is a non-recourse loan?
*Safeguards designed to protect the Elderly








Literature and information will be available from the

Licensed expert in the industry.
Call Katy Krug to RSVP.and for additional information
407.695.9739


this Holiday with a season
subscription to the

S7J&WIuaf o Izo4II as
The World's Greatest Symphony Oriches .nw'

featuring the Boston Pops!
January o1 ~Dublin Philharmonic Orchestra
January 31 ~ Budapest Festival Orchestra
March 8 ~ The Boston Pops Orchestra
April 4 ~ National Philharmonic of Russia

Look for your brochure inserted in this paper
or visit us online at www.festivaloforchestras.org
To purchase tickets please call 407.539-0245


- ---~---- '~ll-i------~--~--~-


Thursday, December 11,2008 Page 3


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






r,4 d Dr


Greeting


the fans

A Winter Park firefighter says hel-
lo to young spectators at the- city's
annual holiday parade held Saturday
morning, Dec. 6, along Park Avenue.
Visitors stood shoulder-to-shoulder
for a view of the parade, which ran
PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER for more than an hour




Community u


Firefighters rescued two construction workers who
dangled perilously from the side of a seven-story build-
ing in Maitland Monday afternoon, Dec. 8. Maitland and
Orange County firefighters cooperated in the rescue.
A scaffold the workers were working from broke free
From the building at about 2 p.m., stranding two workers
five floors above the ground.
Maitland Fire Department personnel rescued the first
worker and were assisted by Orange County in reaching
the second man.
Winter Park-based First National Bank hosts a canned
food drive to help replenish the depleted shelves of the
Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida through
Thursday, Dec. 18 at each of its six offices.
In lieu of holiday cards to clients, the bank will direct


its resources to help Central Florida families in need by
making a contribution on behalf of its clients to the Second
Harvest Food Bank.
Visit www.believeinyourbank.com for more informa-
tion.
Blood donors at Florida's Blood Centers can either
keep a $10 Publix gift card they get for donating blood,
or they can give it back to the blood bank, which will
donate those cards to Second Harvest Food Bank of Cen-
tral Florida.
The campaign runs through the "Season of Giving,"
ending Dec. 31.
Call 1-888-936-6283 for blood bank locations. Visit
www.floridasbloodcenters.org for more information.


Brandywine Square

* Courtyard Shopping * Sidewalk Cafe *
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Muselum
Brandywine Deli Cida's of Winter Park Antiques
ci,.la s 1l Wiriil Pr. tepturing on the Avenue
ErIoy eaiin cutrl.e o, Tr i ,Orignal Ci,:,iiinmire IuaTy Arnique.
beautlul Park Avenue Butifl CIollltion I AnMni1 by Hiry HUd0On
c.ilerng speiatisl ,iae 1972 407-644 5635 407-657-2100

SFamily Comics & Cards Essence Luxe Linens
1oi1* ire e ~~os oru voV ITuonlr Salon & Day Spa ,Elegari essentials lur
oirnilm frO. yei t verJy ,i'. r.y lanr Mancures-Ped iures - Nl gracious Iying Fearurnng
,r i Ertensionrs-Facals-Wa.n~g beaubtul bed & ladle inens
Trailing rar lu every 13.1eT en _ _o. M .RAA.7n77


SPRINKLER SYSTEM REPAIRS

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*COVERAGE PROBLEMS
*LOCATEVALVES
*DRIP IRRIGATION
*LANDSCAPELIGHTING
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SERVICE IS OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1980



MEMBER
CEWIIALbLO.IQ


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"OUR QUALITY GROWS ON YOU"


*RAINSENSORS LICENSED-INSURED
Visitusontheweb@www.aquaturfinc.com m aI 407-365-3200


NEW DROP-OFF LOCATION
Please open your hearts to needy local
Orlando children this holiday season. Stop
by and drop off your new, unwrapped toy
(or monetary donation), andwe will
provide you with free coffee and sweets!
Leave donations at
Michelle Valentine Matchmaking
1540-B Lake Baldwin Lane
Orlando (Baldwin Park)
or coail 407-895-8222 for hours and directions


Fomren IMnaRoIM COhR* wwwREtoStu.o


Winter Park/ Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday, December 11,2008


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-628-8500, ext. 302
kyle@observemewspapers.com
EDITOR
Alex Babcock
407-628-8500, ext. 304
alexb@observemewspapers.com
DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-628-8500, ext. 306
. stephanie@observemewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-628-8500, ext. 311
jennya@observemewspapers.com
Isaac Babcock
407-902-8563
isaacb@observemewspapers.com
LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-628-8500, ext. 309
legal@observemewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observemewspapers.com
Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observemewspapers.com
COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us


ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-628-8500, ext. 303
tcraft@observemewspapers.com
BUSINESS MANAGER
Shelly Langston
407-628-8500, ext. 303
slangston@observemewspapers.com


Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-628-8500 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com


Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer@ 2008


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Volume 20, Issue Number 50


(4


~---~--' ---I~--~--I- -" I


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~L~--~---------~----------------~-~----~


--


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e gaP 4 Thursday December 11 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


:. :~::::~~.::I:~:::::::~





VV II/R PUIrl�K/M ICLu D2II0gIU Vtlnn h v ur


Business


Concern about the slumping economy has
taken a dramatic leap in Florida, according.
to a poll released Monday, Dec. 8.
Since Leadership Florida began asking
residents three years ago what they think is
the No. 1 issue facing the state, no topic has
dominated the survey the way the economy
does now.
In the 2007 survey, taxes and government
spending topped the list.
In the 2008 poll, 56 percent listed jobs and
the economy as the most important issue, up
sharply from 7 percent in 2007. Next on the
agenda of concerns, both polling at 8 percent,
were health care and taxes and government
spending.
When Floridians were asked what was the
single greatest stress on their household fi-
nances, personal debt was cited most often
- 23 percent, almost double from the 2007
survey.
A total of 1,200 Florida residents were in-
terviewed statewide by phone Nov. 17-23 by
Mason-Dixon Polling and Research.
Visit www.leadershipflorida.org for more in-
formation.
Greg Smith has joined the Oviedo-based
Citizens Bank of Florida as its senior vice
president. In his new position, Smith will serve
as chief financial officer and chief operating


officer of the bank. He suc-
ceeds Donald Drummer,
who has announced his re-
-. tirement, and who had held
these positions.
Smith is a graduate of
Seton Hall University and
received his master's degree
Smith in accounting from the Uni-
versity of Central Florida. He
has invested his career in financial services,
and is a certified public accountant.
CEO Nexus, a statewide program that en-
courages growth of entrepreneurial com-
panies, has appointed Larry Vershel Com-
munications as its public relations agency.
Beth Payan, chief operating officer of the
Winter Park public relations firm, said CEO
Nexus is funded by the'Florida High Tech Cor-
ridor.Council, the University of Central Florida's
office of Research and Commercialization, and
the Edward Lowe Foundation.
The Vershel group currently represents some
50 clients in six states and throughout Florida,
including the University of Central Florida Tech-
nology Incubator, Orlando Sanford International
Airport and a wide range of commercial and
community developers, home builder's archi-
tectural firms and support companies.


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GOOD iMORNIVHG ER PARK
The Issues - The Queptions - The Discussion * The People
..... . . ......... . .... ............................... ....... ... . It's the place to be!

Friday, December 12th
7:45AM --8:15AM: Networking/ 8:15 AM: Program
Complimentary Continental Breakfast
An update on the UCF College of Medicine
and community partnership discussion.
Featuring

SDean Deborah German
Come and hear the progress the UCF College of Medicine has made. Dean
Deborah German joins us to celebrate the completion of the fund-raising
efforts that the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce Members have
accomplished through the Chamber Cares Program in 2008.
Incoming Chair, Diane Pickett Culpepper, will also announce the selection of
the 2009 Chamber Cares fundraising efforts. You don't want to miss this!

Welcoming Winter Park Chamber members and our community
Winter Park Health Foundation Community Room
Winter Park Welcome Center I Chamber of Commerce
151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789
RSVP: 407-644-8281 or kmcdonald(a)winterpark.org
For information about upcoming Chamber events, please visit our website at www.winterpark.org.

60OD MORNM> WINTER PA

Sponsored By: Presented B: Media Sponsor:
Greenberg Obsr2
Traurig "
I . mm
: casitss- c


Thursday, December 11,2008 Page 5


Winter Park / Maitla r


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City Commission
meeting highlights
The City Commission met
on Dec. 8. Below are a few
meeting highlights:
The 2008 Resident Sur-
vey results were presented
to the City Commission and
can be found o'h the homep-
age of the city's Web site un-
der the heading "2008 Resi-
dent Survey Results."
The request for the Neigh-
borhood Council Matching
Grant recommendations
for the fall 2008 cycle was
approved.
The request of the Side-
walk Art Festival Commit-
tee to fly a banner across
'Park Avenue was amended
to change locations and
was approved by the City
Commission subject to the
approval by the Parks and
Recreation Commission.
The request of the inter-
local agreement with Lynx
to install and operate bus
shelters within Winter Park
and allow plaque advertis-


ing on the shelters and ame-
nities was approved.
Request for a temporary
motorized vehicle for-hire
permit to O-Cartz to start a
pilot "green" transportation
program in Winter Park was
approved.
The City Commission up-
held the Tree Preservation
Board's decision to deny
removal of a live oak tree lo-
cated at 1411 Via Tuscany.
The Business Recogni-
tion Award Program was ap-
proved.
-The City Commission ap-
proved the interlocal agree-
ment for Public School Fa-
cility Planning and Imple-
mentation of Concurrency,
subject to the addition of an
evergreen clause.
The prioritization for
federal funding requests
was accomplished, with
Fairbanks Avenue, traffic
signal improvements, the
Winter Park Community
Center and the bicycle pe-
destrian.plan as the top four


priorities.
The second reading of
the ordinance revising the
shoreline protection ordi-
nance was approved.
The first reading of the
ordinance authorizing and
regulating the use of red
light cameras in the city was
approved.
The first reading of the
ordinance related to char-
ter revisions for the March
2009 ballot was approved.
The resolution about
the adoption of the 2008
Evaluation and Appraisal
Report on the existing 1991
Comprehensive Plan of the
city of Winter Park was ap-
proved.
The emergency ordi-
nance amending the hours
of sale and consumption of
alcoholic beverages only for
Wednesday, Dec. 31, New
Year's Eve, was approved.
A full copy of the Dec.
8 City Commission min-
utes will be available on the
city's official Web site atCit-
yofWinterPark.org the week
ofJan. 12, pending approval
by the City Commission.

Holiday events lineup
Saturday, Dec. 13: Winter
Park's 13th Annual TubaCh-
.ristmas at the main stage in
Central Park starts at 1 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 14: Florida


Symphony Youth Orchestra
at the main stage in Central
Park beginning at 2:30 p.m.
Third week of Decem-
ber: Santa and Mrs. Claus
visit Winter Park neighbor-
hoods. Please call 407-599-
3334 for times.
Thursday, Dec. 18: City of
Winter Park and Enzian The-
ater present Popcorn Flicks
in Shady Park at Hannibal
Square featuring "Scrooged"
from 7 to 9 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 21: Chabad
of Greater Orlando presents
Hanukah in the Park from 5
to 8 p.m., in Central Park.

Dec. 15 City Commission
work session
There will be a City Commis-
sion work session at 4 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 15, in City Hall
Commission Chambers.
This work session is to dis-
cuss the business improve-
ment district.

Dec. 17 Webster
Avenue meeting
All interested parties are in-
vited to attend the Webster
Avenue Streetscape proj-
ect meeting at 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 17, at the
ity Hall Commission Cham-
bers. Call 407-599-3567 or
e-mail pmoore@cityofwin-
terpark.org for more infor-


nation.

New credit card fee
Because of increasingly sig-
nificant cost, the city will no
longer accept payments by
American Express and will
begin charging a credit card
convenience fee of $3 per
transaction for online and
over-the-phone credit card
and e-check payments. This
new fee is effective Jan. 1.

Officer gets crisis
intervention award
The Winter Park Police De-
partment is proud to an-
nounce that Officer Dick
Bosworth was . recently
awarded the Central Florida
Crisis Intervention Team
2008 Officer of the Year
award.

Fire-Rescue receives
live safety award
On Oct. 1, the Residential
Fire SafetyInstitute awarded
the Winter Park Fire-Rescue
Department with the 2007
Life Safety Achievement
Award. Out of 150 residen-
tial fires in Winter Park, the
department experienced
zero casualties.

Call City Hall at
407-599-3399 and visit us
at CityofWiinterPark.org


Maitland's Season of Light


The city of Maitland cel-
ebrated the holiday season
with another successful Sea-
son of Light put on by our
experienced and talented
Leisure Services team.
This past weekend's
event was certainly one of
the most successful and en-
joyable ever. Every member
of the family participated in
activities located through-
out Lake Lily Park.
Lake Lily Park was in-
credibly adorned with spec-
tacular lights throughout -
trees, entryways, the gazebo,
the garden club and much
more shone brilliantly with
the artful decorations and
twinkling lights.
The Maitland Middle
School Symphonic Band
and Wind Ensemble began
the evening and thrilled the
crowd with beautiful holi-
day music in anticipation


of the Holiday Tree Lighting
Ceremony.
After the arrival of our
special guest from the
North Pole, I assisted Santa
in the countdown to light-
ing the tree. Given the cur-
rent economy, the Sheraton
Orlando North helped fund
his trip to sunny Maitland.
And since Santa's travel
budget for associates was
limited only to Christmas
Eve, Santa's: helpers could
not attend. So we selected
honorary elves from the
crowd: Lauren, Jackson and
Sam. They did a magnificent
job at the switch!
Kids of every age enjoyed
the Season of Light. Bounce
houses and face painters
kept them entertained in
anticipation of the movie,
"Miracle on 34th Street,"
which was enjoyed by hun-
dreds of families.


The Maitland Middle
School Chorus provided
beautiful songs during the
.course of the evening. Al-
though every child sang
beautifully, I particularly
enjoyed the singing of one
of the singers - I believe her
name was Cassidy.
The crowd was mesmer-
ized by the reading of "The
Night Before Christmas"
by our esteemed Council-
man Jeff Flowers alongside
the Maitland Middle School
Chamber Orchestra.
The ever-popular Holly
Sisters; from Disney, ap-
peared on stage and sang
wonderfully energetic holi-
day tunes. Their funny and
engaging , performance
wowed the crowd through-
out the evening. Flowers re-
turned to the stage to join
the Holly Sisters with his
rousing rendition of "Mr.
Sandman."
Santa graciously do-
nated his time for photos
in his sleigh for any and all
families in attendance. But
he could not do this alone;
word has it that elves and
a particular reindeer with a
bright red nose were spot-
ted around the park, so San-
ta engaged them to assist
with the families.
As it turned out, the may-


or and Flowers were not the
only members of the Mait-
land City Council to partici-
pate in the fun. Upon closer
inspection, the elves and
reindeer helping Santa were
none ,other than our very
own Councilwoman Linda
Frosch, Councilman Phil
Bonus, and our esteemed
city clerk, Maria Waldrop.
Word has it that the suit
Councilman Bonus wore to
City Council Monday was
his costume.
Our community and cul-
tural partners were front
and center at the event also
with the Maitland Histori-
cal Society giving tours of
the museum, the Maitland
Art Center providing kids
crafts and luminaries for the
holidays, and the Maitland
Library sharing unique gifts
and pecans for all.
Many thanks go out to
all who provided.food for
the evening including the
Boy Scouts who provided
hot chocolate, the Maitland
Men's Club for once again
'cooking the burgers, Cathy
touting her hot dogs, and
Denise offering her pop-
corn.
The planning for this
event begins early in the
year. It takes eight months
to prepare with five days to-


Maitland Councilman Phil Bonus, City
Clerk Maria Waldrop, Mayor Doug Kinson
and Councilwoman Linda Frosch enjoyed
the annual "Season of Light" event.

tal just to put up the lights
in the park! Chuck Jor-
dan, Mari Smith and all in
Maitland Leisure Services
worked their wonders once
again and along the way
saved the taxpayers dollars
by investing in decorations
such as sculptures, trains, tin
soldiers, gingerbread men,
snowmen and elves, all of
which would have been
rented year after year.
Thanks to all who par-
ticipated and. attended
this year's event. We look
forward to other events
throughout the holiday sea-
son! Have a very happy and
enjoyable holiday and New
Year's!

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at ItsMyMaitland.com


FM 89.9 ORLANDO


Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


Relax and let us do the Cleaning!
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For your convenience we accept most major Credit Cards.


subscribe@
observernewspapers.com


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


e gaP 6 Thursday Decemb 8


.


4
--��.-2~-


- , '.






I


Fr rfTy rd f:rr FT r


WHITNEY HAMRICK
GUEST REPORTER

Music flows through the
chilled air down Park Av-
enue, beckoning enchanted
shoppers to dine at Circa
1926.
Those melodies flow from '
the fingers of Gary Quinn,
who plays live music for the
two-week-old Winter Park
restaurant every night and
on Sunday for brunch.
"One day I made a com-
ment that there should be a
place to play piano and they
found out I can play and .

said. "Every dayhas been get-
called me in without givinges as *- '
ting better since the first day.
It got pretty filled up Thurs- 7 -._. --.
day, Friday and Saturday be-
cause of all the activities in
the area including the tree
lighting and other events in
the park."
Circa not only has a gour-
met menu but also serves as
the only live piano bar on


OOrnuu oB LAURENCE iIAMUI
> turn to CIRCA on page A10 Circa, a Winter Park restaurant with live piano music and a dance floor, serves up a variety of delicacies such' as a dirty martini and smores pie, above.


S -- THE OBSERVER


FREE 1 day guest
pass for you and your
family at our Winter
Park Facility!

Come visit us for a personal tour
of our facility - see our new
equipment - get information on our
new group exercise classes - and
enjoy a day of exercising and fun,
courtesy of the YMCA.

The is simply a place where
people love to be!


r vq We're ringing in 2009 with
n _ n" ew equipment and classes! ,

* New Life Fitness Strength Equipment
* Free Weight Equipment cme hve your
* New Cardio Conditioning picture taken
* Teen Fitness with Santa
Sat. Dec. 13t
* Zumba from 9-11 a.m.
*Body Pump
*Cycling and more!

V . .
g. -


Frank and Gloria Houghton
know they made the right
decision to move to The
Mayflower. The couple's three
children also agree it was a wise
choice. "They've all visited us
here - and my daughter likes
it so much, she wants to move
in!" says Gloria. "This is the


nicest place I can think of to live,"
she adds. "It simply doesn't
get any better than this."
If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at The
Mayflower It's a good plan for
the future.
Call today to secure a spot on
our waiting list.

(407) 672-1620


' *X* L -


THE NL IAYFLO,\V'ER
.-A 'lan /,,r I.c, F ha -,
1620 Mayflower Coun
\inter Paik, Florida 32"92
wwwv.thema dflower.com


"It Simply Doesn't Get Any
Better Than This."


Thursday, December 11,2008 Page 7


Winter Park / Maitla r


Lifestyles


L110CMP QAMI








iyu ILI For Greater Orlans Ative Families



G. O . F am i, For Greater Orlando's Active Families


Family

Calendar


Coffee and Tea Company from
5-8 p.m. on Dec; 12, Dec. 13, Dec.
19 and Dec. 20, at 118 Park Ave.
in Winter Park. He'll be available
for pictures and to visit. Candy
canes and samples of.hot.choco-
late will be available. The cost for
photos is $10, which goes to the
Boys and Girls Clubs of Central
Florida Eatonville Branch.
Call 407-629-0042 for more
information.

Celebrate the arrival of the
holiday season at Seminole
County's annual St Lucia
Festival. This free event takes
place from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
13, at the Museum of Seminole
County History at 300 Bush Blvd.
in Sanford.
There -will be .performers,
Swedish Christmas music, and
replicas of a giant Dala Horse and
viking.,ship; as well as a Swedish
.smorgasbord Sampling for your
- eijoymert. Swedish gifts arikd
:tiooks will alf beon sale. - -;
- ;Thelf S - _ai ie stival is
.spOisored ,by: e Museum t ,of
.Seminoile Co iity History and
;thi Seminote County Histdrical
Soilety, 'Call if ti ause at 407-
665-2489 formode formationo.
n A tMrif. thmuah


pr'tD lBiiari iid


thur-ies";iht: r ^fi-at




" 'AIl- children:�-youhger.' than* 16
must wear ahielmet and flash-

Visit NewHopeForKids.otrg-r call
407-33fi3059, ext.-10 for more
information:
Harry R.Leu Ga idens and the
Orange County Library System.
present, Storytelling at Leu
arthldrens the third Monday of
eacth .month starting-at 10 a;m.
uChildren.will hear a stories and f
participate in songs ad r hymes.
Enjoy a favorite story or find a new
one. It'f4ree! xplorex te 50-acre
botanical gardens after story time
including the butterfly garden with
Snew chrysalis display.
Leu Gardens is at1920 N.
.Frest Aoe. in Orlando. Garden
mission is free every Monday
coming from 9 a a.m. until noon.
tiepearyte agiparking is limited.
bStory timeshare arsfollows:
-" 10-10:15 -a;m. for 18 months
and-:youinger; 10:20-10:35u a.m
:.t toddlers; 10:40-11 a-m, for 3-
new chrysalis display. -








to 5-year-oldd s
.Calf e u Gardens is at 10-246
220 or ist eintOrlando. Garden
morning from 9 a.m. unil noon.
Wive erIy asparkrng is i mited.


P'iT Bi-i ISAAC BABCOCK - THE r ibEPvE
A gingerbread man hangs around at the Partridge Tree Gift Shop in Winter Park. Tight economic times provide this season'sshoppers with incentive to get frugal and creative.


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF
PTiis the season to re-
connect with old
friends and share
good tidings. With constant
reminders of rough eco-
nomic times everywhere
we go, 2008 may be an op-
portunity for shoppers to
re-evaluate the presents
they give and perhaps focus
more on sentiment.
Americans typically
spend more than $400 bil-
lion a year on Christmas
with the spotlight on elec-
tronics and gadgets. Con-
sumers clamor for the "hot"
items, such as the latest iP-
hone or iPod, for example,
when last year's model will
really suffice, or yet another
Wii or X-Box game, when
there are probably plenty
not even touched in the
closet. It's time to think out-
side the box.
With only two weeks be-
fore Christmas, try to go
back to basics this year in
the gift-giving department.
Quite possibly, the more
sensible gifts will carry more
sentiment.

Goftof bad w
Start a tradition of giving
special ornaments to fam-
ily and friends and be re-
membered every Christmas
when the ornaments are
hung on the tree. Choose a
particular theme you know
the recipient enjoys, such
as traditional silver bells, or
select an ornament that re-
flects your friendship.
Jennifer Johnson, man-
ager at the Partridge Tree
Gift Shop in Winter Park,
said there has been an in-
crease in ornament, figu-
rine and angel sales this
year, which she attributes
to people trying to get more
creative and sentimental
this season. "Because of the


economy, people still want
to buy gifts that are less ex-
pensive, yet from the heart
- it's very important to
people," Johnson said,

Gift of food
Tough financial times cou-
pled with the challenges of
feeding holiday guests can
make the traditional food
basket an ultimate gift. Bas-
kets, filled with meats, spe-
cialty cheeses and holiday
goodies, can be enjoyed by
the entire family and pur-
chased pre-made at stores
such as Cavallari Gourmet
in Oviedo or Dominick's
Catering in Winter Springs.
Cavallari's Joan Harley
said gourmet f o o d
baskets make
ideal pres-
ents because
they offer
something
everyone
can enjoy.
Domin -
ick Com-
messo,
owner of
Dominick's Cater-
ing, said this year his cus-
tomers are also choosing to
purchase gift cards redeem-
able for one or more of his
freshly made meals. "One
woman came in and bought
two meals a day for 30 days
for her parents," he said.
It's a more economical gift,
Commesso said, than giving
yet another sweater or pair
of slippers. "The couple is
in their 80s and while they
like to go out every day, they.
wouldprefer to not cook. It's
a very sensible and thought-
ful gift because people have
to eat," Commesso added.
Another thoughtful yet
cost-effective gift is to make
pies or desserts in your
kitchen and include the
family recipe on a decora-
tive card. Not only are you
providing a meal or sweet


treat to a family during a
hectic time of year, but you
might also pass on a tradi-
tion.

Gift from the vine
-Pair a bottle of wine with
friends and dinner and trea-
sure some quiet holiday time
together. Roger Van Dusen,
owner of Roget's Fine Wine
and Beer in Oviedo, said,
"Wine is a very socially ac-
ceptable gift in most circles.
It ,has a certain connota-
tion of sophistication and is
great to pair with food and
include in dinner fare."
With at least 23,000 wines
available, Van Dusen is able
to select wines for his cus-
tomers that are both unique
and well-priced. With cus-
tomers being a
bit more
frugal
this sea-
son, Van
Dusen
said . he
has been
able to
help peo-
ple buy the
best quality
win e they can for
less. "There are great wines
in the 10 to 15 dollar range,"
Van Dusen said.
Another creative option
is to make your own custom
wine at Wine By Design or
D'Vine Wine, both located in
Winter Springs. With only a
few weeks until the holidays
and wine fermentation tak-
ing at least six weeks, select
,orie of their pre-bottled va-
rieties and create a person-
alized label for gift-giving.
Or make a promise to cre-
ate your own wine together
in the new year.

Gift of service
The gift of service could
make the entire year bright-
er for someone on your list,
Especially an elderly person.


Arrange for a lawn service
to take care of the property
or a monthly cleaning ser-
vice. If your monthly budget
is too tight, offer your own
services and enlist the help
of family members to get
the job done. Offer to bring
meals to an elderly neighbor
once a week and include a
quick visit - the rewards
may be everlasting.

Gift of entertainment
Sometimes in the frenzy
to buy material gifts, peo-
ple forget one of the most
valuable presents you can
give - the gift of your time.
Spend the afternoon at the
movies with a friend or an
afternoon at a local theater
performance. A day at the
beautiful Morse Museum in
Winter Park or the Orlando
Museum of Art will also give
you both a much-needed
break from the holiday hus-
tle and bustle.
Little ones will be thrilled
to spend the day playing
miniature golf or bowling
or even burning off energy
at an inflatable playground
such as Sliderz in Oviedo
or Monkey Joe's in Winter
Park. MonkeyJoe's Manager
Michelle Ciaz said the holi-
day break is an ideal time
for children to come jump,
slide and climb while par-
ents watch and take a quick
breather. Monkey Joe's now
offers gift cards that can be
purchased in any denomi-
nation and used toward
admission and food. "The
children get to play while
the parents save money. The
kids can get out of the house
and have lots of fun in a safe
environment," Ciaz said.
And for a no-cost gift, of-
fer to baby-sit for an after-
noon to give mom and dad
some quiet time, which can
prove priceless.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


aP e 8 Thursday Decembe 8






VV I I btr PFdr, f I Mdithndi UfLh'ZP" VICTusa, eebr1, 08 Pg


Cinema


'The Dav The Earth Stood Still' - Opens Friday


Winter Park Village
510 N. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park
407-628-0035
DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL
(PG-13) 11:50am, 12:30, 1:30,
2:30, 2:55, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 7:00,
7:30,8:00, 9:30,10:00,10:30,
midnight, 12:30am
DELGO (PG) 11:55am, 2:10,5:05,
7:55,10:40
NOTHING LIKE THE HOLIDAYS
(PG-13) 11:45am, 2:15,4:50,7:25,
9:50,12:20am
FROST/NIXON (R) 12:45, 3:35,
6:45,10:15
PUNISHER: WAR ZONE (R)
11:45am, 2:20,4:55,7:50,10:50
AUSTRALIA (PG-13) noon, 3:30,
6:55,10:25
TRANSPORTER 3 (PG-13) 1:50,
4:25, 7:05,9:35 12:25am
BOLT (PG) 11:40am; 2:05, 4:35,
7:10,9:45,12:10am
TWILIGHT (PG-13) 12:55, 3:55,
6:50, 9:40, 12:35am


FOUR CHRISTMASES (PG-13)
12:05,12:50,2:25,3:05,4:45,
5:15, 7:15, 7:45, 9:30, 10:05, 11:45,
12:15am
QUANTUM OF SOLACE (PG-13)
12:15, 2:50, 5:25, 8:05,10:45
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (R)
11:40am, 12:40, 2:35,4:15,5:20,
7:20,8:10,10:20,10:55
THE BOY IN THE STRIPED
PAJAMAS (PG-13) 12:20, 2:40,
5:10, 7:35, 9:55, 12:40am
MADAGASCAR 2 (PG) 1:25,3:45,
8:15,10:35,12:50am
ROLE MODELS (R) 1:05,3:40,
7:40,10:10, 12:45am
RACHEL GETTING MARRIED
(R) 12:10, 2:45, 5:40, 8:20, 10:55


Winter Park
-2155 Aloma Ave.
407-678-8214
FOUR CHRISTMASES (PG-13)
7:30, 9:20
DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL
(PG-13) 7:00, 9:30


giant robot counterpart travel across the


visit Earth and deliver a


Maitland
1300 S. Orlando Ave.
407-629-0054
MILK (R) 3:15, 6:30, 9:45
THE TIMES OF HARVEY MILK
(NR) Noon on Saturday, Dec. 13
Q&A with Director Rob Epstein
following the film


message to humans: a warning about nuclear war.

1 hour 50 minutes - PG-13

Also opening: 'Nothing Like The Holidays'
The Rodriguez children
gather at their parents' home
in Chicago for the holidays, and
tranquility quickly gets cast
away when family members ex-
change revelations, admissions
and secrets about their jobs,
love lives and dreams.


1 hour 39 minutes - PG-13


Calendar
Florida's cracker tenor Benjamin Dehart per- cooking demonstrations by local Call 321-303-1404 for more information. will begin at 11:30 a.m. and the program will
forms historical folk songs at 7 p.m. Thursday, to art exhibit, distribution of a free recipe . begin at noon. The Civic Center is at 1050 W.
Dec. 11, at Harry P. Leu Gardens at 1920 N. For- books, free reusable gro - sam- "Home For the Holidays," a musical revue, Morse Blvd. in Winter Park.
est Ave. in Orlando. The musical event is hosted pling and more. comes to the Winter Park Playhouse through Reservations are required and are non-re-
by the Central Florida Anthropological Society. The market is at 200 W. Ne gla Ave. in Dec. 20 on Fridays and Saturdays. Tickets are fundable.
Also participating will be retired judge and au- Winter Park. $32 for adults, $30 for seniors, $24 for matinee Individual reservations are $30 per person
thor Fred Hitt, introducing Dehart's newest song Visit FloridaTomatoArt.com r more orm $22 for students and industry pro- for Chamber members, $35 for non-members
"Timucuan Eyes." The event is free. tion. fessio s. and members paying at the door. Corporate
Call 407-699-9861 for more information. The heater is at 711-B Orange Ave. table sponsorships of eight seats are available
"Home for theJM ys' will be formed Cal 407-645-0145 for more information, at $240.
A mini-tomato festival, called the Florida To- by the Maitlaniymphon Orch tra .- E-mail Kimberly McDonald at kmcdonald@
mato Culinary Art Tour, comes to the Winter p.m. Sunday, Dec. 14, in th sa ry of th The ark Chamber of Commerce will winterpark.org, call 407-644-8281 or visit Win-
Park Farmer's Market from 7 a.m. to noon on First Presbyterian Church of Maitland at 341 host the An Il Orange County Commission terPark.org for more information.
Saturday, Dec. 13. N. Orlando Ave. The concert is free, supported on, Fri e 19, at the Rachel D.
The tour includes a tomato-wrapped vehicle, by Cultural Partner Performing Arts of Maitland. Murrah Civic Center ' inter Park. Registration > turn to CALENDAR on the next page


SAT prep for students seeking dramatic
score improvements.

Huntington
LEARNING CENTER'
Winer arkI 1997Alom Ave 1 407-875-230


PROGRESSVY Mj
"Openin-gW d bor) nWr


CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
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-. -, - *


Thursday, December 11,2008 Page 9


Winter Park / Maitla r


AHuntringrton . I i Io l

Huntington









CIRCA I Decor harkens to old NYC CALENDAR


< continued from page A7

Park Avenue. The restaurant is
managed by Zaheer Osman.
"Misty" by Erroll Garner;
"Satin Doll" by Duke Elling-
ton and "As Time Goes By"
complement the fine-dining
ambience. Prices range from
about $30 for lobster Thermi-
dor with pattypan squash to
$140 for beef and a bottle of
Chateaubriand
for two.
Quinn says
the .food is su-
perb, and he hes-
itated to pick a
favorite. "It looks
so good and so
Osman - fancy when it
comes out," he said. "I have
yet to try everything. I heard
them talking about macaro-
ni and cheese and I thought,
'Why's a place like this, have
macaroni and cheese?' It's re-
ally delicious.".
Owner Lester Lall designed
the interior of the restaurant.


Circa is at 358 N. Park Ave., where
SCanton Avenue intersects,
in downtown Winter Park.

Quinn said a customer re-
marked that Circa is as close
to New York City as Park Av-
enue can get.
The dining room decor in-
cludes an accent wall in bur-
gundy leather and stained
and polished concrete made
to look like brushed copper
in contrast with the gray, cold
tones next to the gold tones of
the full bar. Orange hibiscus
flowers adorn the off-white
and wrought-iron tables and
chairs.
Circa 1926 includes an up-
stairs dance floor and bar "all
done up with white candles"
as Quinn put it.
"[Lall's] intent is not to be
so elegant as to scare people
away," Quinn said. "He wants
a relaxing area."


< continued from the last page

The Orange County Legislative Delegation meets at
9 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 15, at the Orange County Com-
mission Chambers at 201 S. Rosalind Ave. in down-
town Orlando. This is the only meeting of the Orange
County State Legislators prior to the 2009 Legislative


ings at the First Congregational Church at 225 S. Inter-
lochen Ave. (at New.England Avenue) in Winter Park.
The group hosts a holiday party Dec. 13.
Reservations are required. E-mail gingersnap2@cfl.
rr.com or call 407-678-3013 or visit AAUWOrlando.org
for more information. A $15 charge includes breakfast
and the day's program.


session. .
* - i L. ia ofessional race car drivers face off against all-
Learn about services to which caregivers ad .-Csitar kart racers at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 11, at the Or-
dependents are entitled at the Orange CoupfV Rila- ange County Convention Center, where the 21stAnnual
tive Caregiver Orientation Seminar at 10 a.mWednes- PRI Trade Show is taking place. This event is free to
day, Dec. 17, at Kids Hope United located at.5402 Dip- watch. Visit PerformanceRacing.com and www.occc.
lomat Circle in Orlando. The event is free. net for more information.
Call Cheri Beck at 407-367-1213 or e-mail cbeck's'
fsmetroorlando.org for more information. -ArtFest, hosted by the University Club of Winter


Orlando-area animal lovers will gather at the 10th
annual Holiday Dinner for-the Animals at Garden,
Cafe in downtown Orlando at 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
13. Eatvegarfood, listen to animal-advocate speakers
and win door prizes.
The featured speaker is Melani Nardone with the
Greyhound Protection League. The Garden Cafe is at
810 W. Colonial Drive in Orlando.
The Cost is $25 in advance, $35 at the door, and
includes selections from eight vegan dishes. Call 407-
617-5572 to register.

The American Association of University Women
hosts educated women from a variety of profes-
sions for monthly meetings at 9 a.m. Saturday morn-


Park, comes to town from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Satur-
day, Jan. 10, at 841 N. Park Ave. The event features
-arts. and crafts, refreshments and entertainment, and
s free to attend. Call 407-644-61417 or e-mail Univer-
sityClubWinterPark.org for more information.

The Jewish Pavilion in Altamonte Springs sponsors
a Hanukkah concert for the residents of Horizon
Bay at 1 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 14, on Boston Avenue in
Altamonte. Howard Friedman will be featured on gui-
tar, accompanied by his daughter Ally Friedman, 9, on
piano. Both are residents of Maitland.
The pavilion sponsors Jewish musical programs
monthly at the facility, which is open to the entire com-
munity, including Jewish and non-Jewish people.


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Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


1e gaP 0 Thursday, December 11, 2008






Winter Park/ Maitland Observer Thursday, December 11,2008 Page 11


Opinion/


Perspectives

by..


The best of Winter Park


It's been too long since
my last "Best of Winter
Park" selections! Periodi-
cally I conduct an impartial
reader survey of the Best of
Winter Park. I will repeat
the methodology of the
last survey. All submissions
should be written on the
back of crisp $50 bills and
mailed to: Jepson c/o The
Winter Park-Maitland Ob-
server. I really must insist
on fresh 50s as old money
sometimes makes reading
the nominations difficult.
Please remember, one nom-
inationper $50 bill.
Here is my list of the Best
of Winter Park by category.
Some of these categories, I
grant you, are idiosyncratic
but they are all first-rate.

Best Radio Station
in America
This is a no-brainer. 89.9 FM
plays superb jazz. It is one
of the finest services UCF
provides our community.
Year in and year out, 89.9
provides the best in jazz.
Program your car radio to
this station and get with
the beat. Indispensable to
Central Florida living!

Best Esoteric Garden Art
Bocelli's at 836 Orange


Ave. I've purchased one-
of-a-kind garden art that
continues to inspire daily.
Constantly changing in-
ventory. The owner, Monte
Livermore, also consults on
garden creations. If you are
into quality yard art, Boce-
lli's provides.

Best Ceramic Art Tile
Specialty Tile at 838 Orange
Ave. A two-fer! Visit Boce-
lli's and walk mere feet and
look at superb, unique ce-
ramic tile for home or busi-
ness; Tile so good, it'll make
you drool.

Best Art on the Avenue,
Timothy's Gallery at 212 N.
Park Ave. With what I have
spent at Timothy's over
the years, well, I've even
purchased display cabinets
when they moved to their
new location. Ladies, if you
cannot walk into Timothy's
and find a gorgeous pair
of earrings, you are blind.
Great art jewelry and great
selection of objects d'art.
Wonderful, always friendly
staff.

Best Fabric and Furniture
Upholstery Store
Decorative Home Interiors
at 9205 S. Highway 17-92.


First-rate service. I've had
furniture repaired there.
Outstanding selections of
fabrics. A creative, warm
staff.

Best Antiques and Stuff
Elephant Walk Interiors
and Antiques at 1427 Al-
den Road. This is always an
evolving class - much sub-
jectivity. But I throw in fun,
too. In this cavernous col-
lection of rooms, I dare you
to not find something that
would complete a room
nicely. Or your back porch.

Best Barbecue
Pork Sandwich
Bubbalou's Bodacious Bar-
B-Q at 171 Lee Road. Get
the fries and coleslaw and
a side of beans, too. Consis-
tently first-rate.

Best Eggs Benedict and
Chocolate Malt Combo
Briarpatch Restaurant at
252 N. Park Ave. Yes, I do
order that. Mmmm-Mmmm
good. Great little eatery on
the Avenue

Best Blue Cheese
Burger at a Bar
Hannibal's on the Square
at 511 W. New England
Ave. Champagne and a
blue cheese burger. Who'd
a thunk! Great bar. Great
management. Lots of live
music (jazz). The place has
a presence.
Best Summer Rolls
and Vietnamese Food
Little Saigon Restaurant
at 1106 E. Colonial Drive.
I've eaten at this restaurant
more than any other in the
past 23 years. The summer
rolls are to die for. Consis-
tently excellent. Fresh food.


I recommend vermicelli
noodles and pork. Since
you're in the neighborhood,
walk around the corner to
Colonial Photo and Hobby
on Mills and look at their
great stuff (it's more of a
guy place).

Best Egg Salad
and Bean Soup
White Wolf Caf6 at 1829 N.
Orange Ave. Unique estab-
lishment. I love the.energy
of the place. I'm serious
about the egg salad (add
mustard). Owner Michael
Hennessey is a hands-on
proprietor; he's energetic
and smart, as is his place.
Do the antiques shops
nearby and then eat at.
White Wolf. Elephant Walk
is a couple of blocks away.
The area has a delightful as-
sortment of shops.

Best Pressed Turkey
Sandwich at a Bar
Dexter's of Winter Park at
558 W. New England Ave.
First-rate drinking estab-
lishment and restaurant.
Great history in Winter
Park. Owner Adrian Mann
runs a tight ship. He's a
wonderful presence. Great,
great vibe to the place.

Best Drinks Outside
Houston's Restaurant at
the intersection.of Morse
Boulevard and Highway 17-
92. This restaurant and bar
sits on Lake Killarney and is
the best place to sip a char-
donnay or a whiskey sour.
outsidefacing the lake. It's
Gorrrrgeous-George! Good
food inside. High marks all
the way around.

Best Day Spent
Winter Park, Florida. What


do you do with folks who
come to visit? The parks?
I don't think so. Here's a
whole day itinerary. Visit
the following museums all
within walking distance:
Albin Polasek Museum
and Sculpture Garden, The
Morse Museum of American
Art and the Cornell Fine
Arts Museum on the Rollins
College Campus. During the
day, take the Chain of Lakes
boat tour (end of Morse
Boulevard). Shop along
the avenue (see Timothy's
above) and eat.and drink
(several times) along the
way. If you have a car, add
the Orlando Museum of Art
and the Mennello Museum
of American Art (five min-
utes from Park Avenue).
This could easily and com-
fortably (and leisurely) en-
tertain you and your friends
for 8-10 hours. I highly rec-
ommend such a day.
Alas, that's about all
space allows. Kids, now
don't forget to submit your
nominations for the Best
of Winter Park. Remember,
it's crisp 50s that are the
approved entry form. Im-
portant: only one nomina-
tion-per $50 bill. Oh, please
don't forget to add your
name and phone number.
We had numerous entries
the last time that unfortu-
nately were ruled invalid
because of such omissions.
It was so sad. I had to go to
Timothy's with the voided
ballots. Sigh.



TA JEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letter to

You're invited and encouraged to up in Tallahassee, and we want to year for the economy and Florid- who attend Montverde Academy.
get involved in state legislation hear from you! The next day, Tues- ians, please rest assured knowing Mrs. Woodward previously worked
A few weeks ago, I informed the day, the first interim committee that as your state representative, I for nine years in the Pennsylvania
community about the upcoming week begins in Tallahassee, and will do my best to promote smart Senate and held various teaching
Orarige County legislative delega- House members will be assigned and sound policy, strong economic posts and community service posi-
tion and would like to update you our leadership posts and Council principles and ensure that your tions. You can reach Mrs. Wood-
on the time to attend. Instead of 3 and committee assignments. voice is heard in Tallahassee. ward at 407-880-4414.
p.m, the Orange County Legislative Then in January, the Legislature On another note, I'd like to also Feel free to contact my district
Delegation will convene promptly will convene for two more weeks introduce Mrs. Tresa Woodward to office at 407-880-4414. Tresa and
at 9 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 15, at of interim committee meetings, the District 38 office. Mrs. Woodward Maria are ready to assist you with
the Orange County Commission first week being Jan. 5-8, and Jan. joins Ms. Maria Pecoraro in the your state and state agencies is-
Chambers in downtown Orlando. 12-15. February is fully scheduled, district office as district executive sues and concerns. It is an honor to
This is the first event of many with three weeks of committees, secretary. Mrs. Woodward is a Penn- represent the fine people of State
that kicks off the weeks leading to followed by the last week working sylvania native who relocated to House District 38, and I look for-
the 2009 Legislative Session, and in our district before session kicks Florida in 1999 with her husband, ward to working for you these next
I once again encourage you to at- off on Tuesday, March 3. The 2009 Dennis, who works as the direc- few months prior to session.
tend if it is possible. Your Orange Legislative Session runs for 60 fol- tor of technology at a local private - Bryan Nelson, representative
County Legislative Delegation will lowing days, concluding the first . .school. Mrs. Woodward has two Florida State House District 38
be the voice of our county and area week in May. While it is a rough children, Mackenzie and Jackson,


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1a e2nM O


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
SDistinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

Miss Gray Matter

I had climbed up the
side of Mt. Rainier
about as far as I could
go.
I was now far above the
timberline.
The snow was deep
around me in every direc-
tion.
Iwas breathing hard and
my whole body suddenly
felt exhausted.
I had about had it, I
thought.
At any rate it seemed
foolhardy to push myself
any longer.
So I pulled the car over
and climbed out onto the
tarmac.
I strolled over to the big
Lodge at Sunrise.
The headline of a news-
paper on a rack outside the
door grabbed my attention.
It was the latest dope
from Atlantic City.
It seems that the "bath-
ing beauties" who started
it all may soon become as
vestigial as the dinosaur.
The good news is that


the bathing suit may be ver-
boten from now on at the
Miss America Pageant.
It's about time.
Oh, the shame of it
through all the long years!
I think of the lost
September of my early life.
The newspaper pictures
of those days, followed on
their heels by the weekly
newsreels at the Baby
Grand Theater, depicted
the "bevy of beautiful girls"
whose annual parade on
the Boardwalk.brought the
Atlantic City summer sea-
son to a close.
In scratchy black-wool
bathing suits that did noth-
ing to enhance nature,
the "girls" pranced up
and down, flashing their
Pepsodent smiles.
The prettiest of the lot
- according to the always-
unseen judges - was
named "Miss America" for
that year,
Amazingly, the "girls"
of those days were able to
contain their embarrass-
ment at exposing a bit of
their bodies in flagrant
betrayal of females every-
where.
Some of the contes-
tants in those photos may
have been able to play
"The Minute Waltz" or
"FOr Elise" on the piano, to
sing the "Habanera" from
"Carmen," to twirl batons,
or to clog dance.
No one will ever, ever
know.
That was not thepoint
of "Miss America" in.those
days so rife with then-timid
sexism.
"Miss America" was
a "beauty contest" pure
and simple. In those days,
what's now the "Pageant"
lived up to its modest
promise - and no more.
If you ask, "What's


wrong with that?", I'll tell
you.
Plenty - that's what!
Following the second
World War, the U.S. entered
a long period of scrupulous
self-examination.
Today, if you go with the
drift, you'll "Remember
Pearl Harbor" with a cul-
pable awareness that liber-
ates us from our former
misguided nationalism.
We World War II vet-
erans of the South Pacific
now understand that we
were the ones responsible
for Pearl Harbor and all the
rest.
We are deeply grateful
to well-financed Japanese
PACs in Washington for
having labored unselfishly
to enlighten us.
In the same vein, why try
to hide any longer the fact
that there was a time when
a young woman (a "girl"!)
could become an American
national idol only because
she was pretty?
Clara Bow did it. So
did Jean Harlow, Ava
Gardner, Lana Turner, Jayne
Mansfield, Marilyn Monroe,
and many others.
Those comely movie
stars never seemed
ashamed to become rich
and famous because people
liked to look at them.
Some of them even
became modestly adept at
"acting" before a camera.
But they knew darned
well that their "acting"
alone could not have
earned them the posh toys:
the mink coats, the big cars,
the beach houses at Malibu.
After many years, the
"pretty girl" who entered
beauty pageants found
that she would have to "do
something."
This requirement was
labeled "Talent."


Also she would have to
"open her mouth" (dan-
gerous!) in the form of an
"Interview."
In the interview she had
better be prepared to tell
the world that her looks -
were not really important
to her.
The thing that properly
concerned her most was to
be of "service" to the world.
She was now righteously
chafing at the bit to work
for "world peace," "interna-
tional understanding," "the
ecology," "underprivileged
children," "unspayed house
pets," and "the elderly."
Before long, we hope,
the Miss America contes-
tants' evening dresses will
follow their bathing suits
to "Pageant Heaven."
After all, the evening
dress has a tendency to
focus upon a contestant's
pulchritude - even her
grace of movement.
Let's be honest about it:
In an evening dress, a con-
testant's body is on display,
and nobody who is truly
aware could wish that to
happen in this age of anti-
sexist deliverance.
Liberating feminism
must stamp out the last
temptation for abused
women to accept rewards
for flaunting their physical
differences from males.
Our country needs an
unbiased and sexless Miss
America Pageant with level
playing fields, derrieres and
. bust lines.
Better that the young
women lot be seen by the
judges at all.
The showing off of the
young women's talent
must, in time, be elimi-
nated, as personal demon-
stration of talent cannot be
other than subjective.
Judges are likely to


be swayed by favoritism
for certain performance
media, musical selections,
etc.
In the name of fairness,
contestants' names should
be replaced by numbers
so that ethnic and nation-
alistic overtones of family
names play no part.
The young women's
high school SATs, and their
college grades, should
now be rated by a panel of
judges, half female and half
male - a panel selected by
nationwide search (Ph.D.s
preferred).
Contestants' interviews
should be recorded, and
delivered using a robotic
"computer voice," so that
no contestant's attractive-
ness as a communicatoruis
used unfairly to her advan-
tage.
Magnetic resonance
imaging of the contestant's
cerebrum will provide a
tool for determining capac-
ity for intelligence.
The above, revised for-
mat clearly obviates any
need for the physical pres-
ence of the contestants.
The enormous sum
of money saved through
making the Miss America
Pageant an electronic
undertaking could best be
expended on a worthwhile,
sensible cause: e.g., "The
Conversion of Las Vegas,
Nev., into a Home for the
Spotted Owl."
After all, if we are crassly
looking for physical beauty,
we can find it in an auto-
mobile or a dog - without
making fools of ourselves.
Who says we aren't mak-
ing important progress in
the U.S. as this century pro-
gresses?


FALLEN APPLES NOT FAR FROM MY TREE #78


Many people ask me what
Winter Park was like back
in the early 1930s. In those
years, we kids spent a great
deal of our lives in the
water - the lakes, that is,
particularly Lake Virginia
bordering the Rollins cam-
pus. Swimming was mostly
confined to the lakes,
which were also full of
black bass and bream, and
alligators that roamed free-
ly while bothering no one.
An occasional seaplane
landed on Lake Virginia,
and high-speed motorboats
were common.
Rollins was a very small
college then with some
500 students, and it domi-
nated the town. The college
had an air of being a big
family, and I knew many
of the Rollins students by
name. Rollins was possibly
the most important cul-
ttral center in all Central
Florida, with concerts,
theater, the Animated
Magazine, and lecture
series.
Florida state swimming
and diving championships
took place between the two


long docks that protruded
from the Rollins campus
into the lake. Rollins sport-
ed a very good single-pla-
toon football team every
year whose games were in
Tinker Field in Orlando.
Grapefruit League - big
league - baseball games
took place at Harper-
Shepard Field on Orange
Avenue, and we kids had
a rare chance to see top
big-league baseball stars in
action.
Today's Rollins has one
of the-most beautiful small-
college campuses in the
country. The biggest prob-
lem in Winter Park now
may be traffic, a problem
that confronts most small
towns that have grown
into small cities. Winter
Park has a superior police
department, for which we
can all be grateful.
When I returned to
this area in 1980, after
42 years, I found a huge
UCF campus abutting the
Econlockhatchee riverside
palmetto forest where we
used to overnight on Boy
Scout hikes. Driving in


Winter Park on streets that
were narrow and brick
when I rode there on my
bike brings back memories
of the early 1930s when a
car might pass every now
and then. As my father was
on the Rollins faculty, I
knew all the town bigwigs
from President Hamilton
Holt on down.
Winter Park was a good
place to grow up. We kids
were outdoors nearly all
the time we were not in
school. We rode our bikes
or walked when we went
to school - no cars were
allowed unless parents
were dropping kids off.
On the south end of Park
Avenue was a big drugstore
that opened out onto the
street. Some of us boys used
to convene there on our
bikes early evenings and
drink the biggest drinks we
could get for a nickel at the
drugstore soda fountain -
usually root beer.
Fall was particularly
exciting because it brought
Rollins students in their
new convertibles riding
down Park Avenue with


the tops down. I remem-
ber still how beautiful the
1936 Chevrolet was when
we first saw it. People who
kept those cars and took
good care of them now
own treasures.
An annual occasion was
the Rollins-sponsored big
picnic supper under the
"family tree" off Genius
Drive. That famous tree
was big enough to provide
shade for a sizable crowd.
The only house near there
was Dr. Martins' house on
the isthmus between Lakes
Virginia and Mizell..All else
along the dirt road was age-
old carpeted forest.
A few of us boys would
always bicycle down to the
railroad station in the park
to see the Northern winter-
visitors getting out of their
Pullman cars. Many chauf-
feurs waited in Cadillac,
Lincoln, Hispano-Suiza,
etc. convertible-sedans to
pick up part-year residents
and their luggage and take
them to their lakeside
homes. The time was the
deep Depression, but the
wealthy were still wealthy!


The Alabama and Seminole
hotels and the Virginia
Inn welcomed guests who
would stay for weeks, even
months. Often, European
nobility was said to be liv-
ing in our midst. We kids
knew what was going on,
but our lives were those of
kids, spent playing games,
going to movies at the Baby
Grand Theater on Park
Avenue, and enjoying the
lakes.
Once we 27 Winter
Park High School seniors
graduated, we scattered
onto college campuses all
over the U.S., and were far
from each other. Most of
us never knew where the
rest were when the war
came in December of '41.
We did not know who had
died in the war until years
later. Post World War II was
another life for us all...


TLK RONEY

Louis Roney's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at LRoney@cfl.rr.com.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


1e gaP 2 Thursday, December 11, 2008









Wi t r Park / Maitland r


Thursday, December 11,2008 Page 13


n THE .IR0.i r ni't uR T : l I E r nrTH 1.ui:inAL
lm'1i" T I m A :J .lnf Ti I 0Ilil- IIiA P.f ' fl ATI
DIVISION
CASE NO. 48-2008-CP-002722-0
IN RE: Estate of
ANN S. LUNDQUIST,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ANN
S. LUNDQUIST, deceased, whose date of
death was November 30, 2008, File Number
48-2008-CP-002722-0, Is pending in the Circuit
Court for Orange County; Forida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Room 340, Orlando, Florida 32801. The names
and addresses of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claim with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN-THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
December 11,2008.
Attorney for Personal Representatives:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and WIgle, P.A.
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801
Personal Representative:
SELIZABETH ANN DOYLE
650 South Lake Sybelia Drive
Maitland, FL 32751
Personal Representative:
.JAMES ANDREW DOYLE
460 Princeton Way, NE
Atlanta, GA 30307
12/11,12/18



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE
DIVISION
CASE NO. 48-2008-CP-002638-0
IN RE: Estate of
ROOSEVELT L. McKINNEY, SR.,
Deceased. ' ,
.NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ROOSEVELT
L. McKINNEY, SR., deceased, whose date of
death was September 9, 2008, File Number
48-2008-CP-002638-0, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida; Probate Division,
the address of which Is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Room 340, Orlando, Florida 32801. The names
and addresses of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
December 11,2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A.
. P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801,
Personal Representative:
GWENDOLYN McKINNEY
4057 Eagle Feather Drive
Orlando, Florida 32829
12/11,12/18



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,.
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 48-2008-CP-2398-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BemettaA. Moulton,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Bemetta A.
Moulton, deceased, whose date of death was Au-
gust 15, 2008, is pending In the Circuit Court for Or-
ange County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which Is 425 North Orange Avenue, Room 340,
Orlando, R'32801. The names and addresses of the
Co-Personal Representatives and the Co-Personal
Representatives attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, Including unmatuired, contingent or unliq-
uldated daims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
-THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having daims or demands against the
decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated daims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
12/11/08.
Vanessa J, DISimone
Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives
Florida Bar No. 0043713
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodmon, PA,
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor, PO, x Bo 80,
Winter Park, FL 32700
Telephone: (407) 423-4240
Co-Pernonvl ReptfosrlRntllve;
Jack E, Peleron
Lance A, Rgland
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd FBoBi
PO!Box bo
Winter Poar, FL 32709
12/1, 12/19


ill THF lii: 1.11i Cl.F Rt FRI.R nRAii t I.1.1J1.11 ,
fL'Ri:uA i fIROBj E Clvi:iijr
File No.: 48-2008-CP-002581-0
Division 1
IN RE: ESTATE OF
VADA RUTH RUBLE,
Deceased.
NOTICETO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Vada Ruth
Ruble, deceased, whose date of death was Sep-
tember 24, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Ave., Room 340,
Orlando, Florida 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice Is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this courtWITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE .TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is De-
cember 11,2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Shei Lund Kerney
Attorney for David Ross Ruble
Florida Bar No. 263028
1420 E. Concord St.
Orlando, FL 32803
Telephone: (407) 898-5526
Fax: (407) 898-5674
Personal Representative:
DAVID ROSS RUBLE
45 Whitehaven Dr.
Pinehurst, North Carolina 28374
12/11,12/18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2008-CP-002540-0
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WALTER EUGENE TABONY,
Deceased, '
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Walter Eu-
gene Tabony, deceased, whose date of death was
October 19, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
340, Orlando, FL 32801.The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHSAFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OFTHIS NOTICE:
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME 'PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
'IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is De-
cember 11,2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Chester Wheeler
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Chester Wheeler
2686 TuskaWilla Road
Oviedo, Florida 32765
the 1 - Noeb 12/11, 12/18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CA-10866
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
V.
EVON P. KNIGHT, and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as
unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Even P. Knight
YOULARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Lot 39, Waterford Lakes Tract N22, Phase 1,
according to the plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 36, Pages 25 and 26, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Matt G. Firestone, Esq, the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is POHL & SHORT, PA., 280 W.
Canton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box 3208,
Winter Park, Florida 32790, on or before December
24, 2008, and file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney
or Immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
DATED this 21 day of November, 2008.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: Corine Herry
Civil Court Seal
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. if hearing Impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
12/4,12/11

NOTICE OF PUBUC SALE
SALE BY CASH AUCTION
THE FOLLOWING UNITS
On December 30, 2008, at Assured Self-Storage,
Inc. to the highest bidder for cash, Items contained
In the following ounlt:
D2097 - Robert orman - Houslholdlltem
D213 - Allion Rivoer -- Hontouhold Itemo
01030 = Joqlollne BRrry -= Houlife lld Ito w
2004 - ehfltop0lrr Conter = Housold I teRe
D27i =- Ntllfy Keiafl - Household Ieomo
TO BI HELD AT
01 00JULABAVENUE
ALTAMON 9gP. IN6B, FL
ON BB66ftli6F 90,9088
AT I10 A M,
Asured il'f--8tfle In@ reserves the riglt to bid
(nd OF Flat ft tejit any 9l0t Oil BIBS,
1)O1,11/1B


In THE .i111. i .iii.11T n:|R r eufiI- 1..u nr
PL w'lJ I P Di viTL U iVillml.NI
File No.: 48-2uu8-sP-2iu2-u
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GRISELDA CASSAMAJOR,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
,The administration of the estate of GRISELDA
CASSAMAJOR, deceased, whose date of death was
July 2, 2007; File Number 48-2008-CP-2702-0, Is
pending in the Circuit Court for ORANGE County,
Florida, Probate. Division, the address of which is
425 NORTH ORANGE AVENUE, ORLANDO, FL 32801.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below. -
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBUCA-
TION OFTHIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTERTHE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: De-
cember 11,2008.
DONALD W. SCARLETT
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Florida Bar No. 112821
Donald W. Scariett, PA.
1003 East Concord Street
Orlando, FL 32803
Telephone: (407) 422-8189 -
CHARLOTTE CASSAMAJOR
Personal Representative
12388 ARLINGTON PARK LANE
ORLANDO, FL 32824
12/11,12/18


ill THE : IRC11iT ii.i. IOF THE EI:.HT"EPtjTH
II.II'I.IN I :I irni Id Ai r ,i' i iln Rdl l:ILI II:iurlT
FLOuliOA
CASE NO. 2008-CP-2100
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
DANIEL JOSEPH SHEEHAN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DANIEL JO-
SEPH SHEEHAN, deceased, whose date of death
was October 3, 2008, File No. 2008-CP-2100, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
is Post Office Drawer C, Sanford, FL 32772. The
names and addresses of the Personal Representa-
tive and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice has been served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LAST OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBUCATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedents
estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: De-
cember 4, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
JOHN D. MAHAFFEY, JR., ESQUIRE
FLORIDA BAR NUMBER: 098690
Mahaffey & Leitch
2461 West State Road 426, Suite 1001
Oviedo, FL 32765
(407) 894-2081
Personal Representative:
BONNIE KAYE RICH
1030 McKinnon Avenue
Oviedo, FL 32765
12/4,12/11


Ilf H (IM R.lI IIIt OJRT IJF THE rITllr JuLIOIIAL
I:Rlil:II iPO rAP&I LCIOFRAhfGE i: Il.irl r Li)I1'IA
fi RuBATE uivibiON
File No. 48-2008-CP-002492-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CORDIE E. WALKER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CORDIE E.
WALKER, deceased, whose date of death was Oc-
tober 7, 2008; File Number 48-2008-CP-Q02492-0,
is pending In the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which Is
425 N. Orange Avenue, Orando, Florida 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate mustfile their claims with this courtWITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBUCA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: De-
cember 4, 2008.
RICHARD A. LEIGH, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 119591
Swann & Hadley, PA
1031 W.Morse Blvd., Suite 350
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: 407-647-2777
Facsimile: 407-398-3114
KATHERINE W. WRIGHT
Personal Representative
924 W. 13th Street
Lakeland, Florida 33805
12/4,12/11


IN mHE IRis:uT1T n1.liTT FOR '-.MINrOLE CijINT
FLI)-I A I m RI)BATIE L IvrI�,I(
F&l. Nuimeur. 2u CFP2u1 768
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Annabelle Stafford a/k/a Ellen Annabelle Stafford
a/k/a Annabelle Brown Stafford,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of te estate af Annabelle
Stafford a/k/a Ellen Annabelle Stafford a/kda
Annabelle Brown Stafford, deceased, whose date
of death was September 9,2008, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is P.O. Box 8099,
Sanford, FL 32772-8099. The names and address-
es of the Personal Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uldated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their aims wi this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OFTHE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
tnis court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is 12/11/08.
Personal Representative:
Vicki L Catucci
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor
P.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
W. Graham White
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 0777544
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor, P.O. Box 880,
Winter Park, FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
12/11,12/18


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S TOP SHOP FR CENTRAL FLORIDA LEALS 6. CL PRACTICE D PROCURE ( 45-88
: Ie publishers pl the Winler Park-Maitland Observer orange County, FL) APTFR 0 LE GA 6. CIVIL PRACTD OFFIC AND PROEDME C
'- ftld OvlBdo-Wlnter Springs Voice (Seminole County, FLI we are your 1 stop CHAPER50 LEGAL AND OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENTS
'. D: central Florida legal nobce adverlising
, t cent on l l 50 031 Newspapers in which legal notices and process may be
published
-ji9pIRGOEOu CASE MANAGEMENT
S e ry "lock" qulcy Sed us your notice by Monday and we'll No notice or onrequre to be published in a newspaper
S .... . . . , . . . . . . . No notice or puiliaton requen to Ie ublshed uu a newspaper.-".'.


In Ine nature ol or in lieu of process ot any kind, nature, character
or descrptbon provided for under any law of the state, whether
heretofore or hereafter enacted, ana Whether pertaming to
constructive service or the Intiating, assuming, reviewing.
exercising or enforcing lurisd ctlon or power, by any court in this
state, or any notice of sale of propeny, real or personal for laves
stale, county or municipal, or shenff's, guardian's or admrnistralo's
or any sale made pursuant to any ji
any other publicahon or naoUti fSing to any aertars of tne state.
or any county, municine oroer political subdivision thereof
snail be deemed t ve been published in accordance with the
statutes prmviei' or such publication, unless the same dhall have
been publslll for tne prescribed period of time required for sucn
pubiiloIatnn a newspaper whic' ie tme of sucn publi;allon
snail nav a or 1 year aihall have been entered
nodicais matter al a post c the.-C
or In a suWnCprect 5ccessor of a newspaper
whein togOther nave been so published; provided, however, thai
nothing rierein contained snail apply where in any county mere shall
be no newspaper in existence wnich snall nave been Dpulisned
lor the length oI time abcve prescribed No legal publication of
any kind. nature or descnption. as neremn defined, snail be valid
or bindingg or nied to DO in compliance with the statUes providing
Ior such publnncaion unless the same.shall nave been pubihsnet
in occuida,:nce wir I (iacslni, oGllilj k cnon Proof if sucn
pullh'.lh''i tfI.Mill lfl nrilr.i Rnilornl .lflinlvC?"


STn ineay Ob uuserver Newspapes Implluves your IIdllmanagemeillll
Boiling out tre notarized affidavit Immediately following the ad run
e: ou file If With the court quicldy and avoid the costly delays many
ls" i.iposa by holding back the affidavil while waiting for Invoicing and


. , PRICE GUIDE
Pplllc Notlre/Puolic Sale 9/col mich
S. lotc to Creditore $42 50/week
Notice of Sale S55Areek
Dissolution of Marriage $125
i . elualpdcralmeiaerieauSrdnrinvoloes adaae nipr.nhuo
'iMW I mm ns sa mt sncadadW W al SB an a irni i

PLACE YOUR AD
No Accepting mai ubmitals Just e-mail us a
an i rm oce1 eP OlitOetJW I0


iext file of the nobce to De puolisned and we n no
the rest Upon complein l othie advertising Ne
immediately send you a notarted affidavit
E-MAIL- Legal@ooservemewspapers com
FAX. 407-628-4053
, * PHONE 407-628-8500
MAIL 1609 Eecutliv Dr.ve,
Willnr Park, FL 32789


The Wks e p.

The On*ep
penUMi00




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VVlIlF. ;l Ir II / IdlfU [.IU kl J V tJO - I �,1







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Pae 14 - Thursday, December 11,2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


T -Marketplace


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CAREGIVER WANTED
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at (407) 687-3524.





GARAGE SALE
Estate sale: Woodworking and shop tools,
household items,.fumiture. Saturday, Dec.
13, 8 a.m.to 4 p.m. 992 Palmetto Street in
Oviedo, 407-359-9069


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Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
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a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.



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Placed by adSource not affiliated w/USPS
who hires. Call (866)713-4492.

Health
Feeling Anxious About The Future? Buy and
read Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard. Price:
$20.00. Order Now. Free Shipping. www.
DianeticsTampa.org or Call (813)872-0722.

Help Wanted
Guaranteed Weekly SettlementCheck. Join
Wil-Trans Lease Operator Program. Get the
Benefits of Being a Lease Operator without
any of the Risk. (866)906-2982. Must be
23. '

Colonial Life seeks an' entrepreneurial
-professional with sales experience to
become a District Manager. A Life/Health
license is required. Substantial earnings
potential. Please contact: meredith.brewer@
coloniallife.com or call (904)424-5697.

DRIVERS: CALL TODAY! Sign-On Bonus 35-
41cpm Earn over $1000 weekly Excellent
Benefits Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR
(877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com

Driver- PTL Needs Company Drivers- CDL-A
earn up to 40 cpm. 1/2cpm increase every
60K miles. Average 2,800 miles/week.
www.ptl-inc.com Call (877)740-6262.

Homes For Rent
3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $11,000! Only $199/
Mo! 5% down 15 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4/
BR $259/Mo! For listings (800)366-9783
Ext 5798.

Never Rent Again! Buy, 4Br 2Ba $15,400!
Only $199/Mo! -3 Br $11,000! 5% down
15years 8%. HUD Homes Available! for
listings (800)366-9783 ext 5796.

Miscellaneous
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121, www.CenturaOnline.
com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified
- Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

NOW AVAILABLE! 2009 POST OFFICE
JOBS. $18-$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE, PAID
TRAINING, FED.BENEFITS, VACATIONS. CALL
(800)910-9941 TODAY! REF #FLO8.

Romance Home Parties. Earn big mohey
part-time. FREE training. Become a sales
agent or host a free party. Nationwide. www.
RomanceHomeParties.com.

Real Estate
TENNESSEE LAND RUSH! 1+acre to 2acre
homesites, wood, views. Starting at $59,900.
Tenn River & Nick-a-Jack view tracts now
available! Retirement guide rates this area
#2 in U.S. places to retire. Low cost of living,
no impact fee. (330)699-2741 or (866)550-
5263, Ask About Mini Vacation!

NC MOUNTAINS 2+ acres with great view,
very private, big trees, waterfalls & large
public lake nearby, $49,500 call now


(866)789-8535.

-MID TENN MTNS By Owner, 5 acres, perfect
mountaintop cabin-site w/woods. Small
stream in back of property. A must see!
$26,900. Owner Financing (931)445-3611.

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS-Handyman
special bordering U.S.FS. paved dr., well,
septic, singlewide with shop near Lake
Nantahala, borders paved road. Only
$49,000. http://valleytownrealty.com
(800)632-2212 valleytownrealty@verizon.
net.

Steel Buildings.
"BUILDING SALE!"..."ROCK BOTTOM
PRICES" BEAT NEXT INCREASE. 25X40
-$5,190. 30X50 $6,390. 35X60 $8,990.
40X60 $12,700. 60X100 $33,600. OTHERS!
Pioneer Steel Manufacturers. (800)668-
5422. Since 1980.







Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
cor where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search- thousands of additional openings,
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Dry Cleaning Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for managing
a laundry and dry cleaning establishment.
Coordinates activities of laundry personnel.
Plans and prepares daily schedules and
assigns duties. Prepares estimates on
proposed work such as cleaning draperies,
rugs, and 'fabrics. Handles customer
complaints. Prepares sales promotions and
advertising campaigns. Ensures compliance
with security, sales, and record keeping
procedures. Reconciles revenues and orders
merchandise. Interviews, hires, and trains
employees. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $995.00 per week
Job Order Number: 9372731

Regional Sales Manager -
Engines ard Generators
Job Description: Responsible for planning,
coordination, and executing various
functions to achieve maximum utilization
and efficiency of company resources and
products to meet company's quarterly goals
and objectives. Demonstrates in depth
knowledge of engines, generators, and parts.
Maintains a current customer base while
building new client relationships. Presents
immediate follow-through with leads
thorough delivery of product presentation
and closing sale techniques. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
plus commission
Job Order Number: 9358973

Computer Software Engineer
.Job Description: Responsible for creating
and maintaining the internal database
application. Prioritizes work, uses
programming best practices, and adhere
to coding standards. Creates and maintains
unit tests and documentation. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9373471

Cashier
Job Description: Responsible for running a
cash register and cleaning the food or stock
areas: Operates fryers and microwaves
and mans food preparation production line.
Assists in the kitchen area and maintains
Inventory. Cleans and stocks customer
eating areass, work stations, and equipment.
Greets customers and maintains knowledge
of available products and services. Transfers
supplies and equipment between storage
and work areas by hand or cart. Receives,
inventories, moves, and lifts food and
beverage products and supplies. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374530

Starbucks Barista
Job Description: Responsible for performing
a variety of food preparation duties other
than cooking. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374982

Cafe and Dessert Bar/
Food Service Manager
Job Description: Responsible for supervising,
training, and developing hourly employees.
Assists owner in developing new business
in the food service and catering arena.
Maintains cash controls and makes daily
,cash deposits. Executes food menu updates,
in store promotion programs, and local
marketing efforts while maintaining food
quality standards. Provides service to guests
at all times. Builds guest relationships
and continues to increase revenue. Work


1:00pm-10:00pm, days may vary.
Pay Rate: $25,000.00-$27,500.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9375160

Tax Preparer
Job Description: Responsible for conducting
in-depth interviewswith clients and obtaining
all information and materials required for
tax return preparation. Communicates the
procedures, paperwork, and time frames
applicable to the service being provided to
clients. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.50-$11.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9375139

Engineering Specialist
Job Description: Responsible for a broad
range of design assignments that including.
the generation of preliminary concepts
and layouts. Researches a wide variety
of technical information and historical
background data. Diagnoses troubled areas
and takes/recommends corrective actions.
Maintains records, data and other pertinent
information. Manages any personnel
assigned to perform various tasks relating
to project or program. Assists and directs
personnel when necessary. Work Monday-
Thursday, 7:00am-6:OOpm.-
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9344058

Billing Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for verifying
and posting accounts receivable
transactions to journals, ledgers, and other
records. Follows established procedures
for processing receipts and cash. Sorts
and files documents after posting. Prepares
bank deposits. Collect on past due accounts.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:30am-5:OOpm.
Pay Rate: $12.00-$13.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374907

Office Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for filing,
ordering, and maintaining office supply
inventory. Inputs and catalogs digital jobsite.
photographs. Orders plans and issues
transmittals. Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $30,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9375415

Leasing Agent
Job Description: Responsible for greeting
prospective residents, giving tours of the
community, qualifying resident applications,
working with current residents regarding
maintenance requests, and other duties as
needed. Work Monday-Saturday, 8:30am-
5:30pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9376568

Paralegal/Legal Secretary
Job Description: Responsible for handling a
wide range of legal support duties. Interacts
with clients, drafts/transcribes legal
correspondence and pleadings, schedules
depositions, , hearings and mediations,
organizes files, answers phones, and
performs other duties as assigned. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:OOpm.
Pay Rate: $25,000.00-$60,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9316801

Security Officer
Job Description: Responsible for patrolling
and performing security officer duties. Work
days-and hours mayvary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-per hour
Job Order Number: 9376755

Sales/Solutions Consultant
& Account Manager
Job Description: Responsible for promoting
and selling media, design and production
services through direct customer contact.
Acts as an ambassadorfor the organization's
policies, products and services. Identifies
prospective clients, schedules appointments
and keeps an accurate record of sales
activity. Provides support during on and
off-site events and other promotional
event opportunities. Prepares and presents
proposals that solve problems and speaks to
prospective client concerns. Work Monday-
Friday, 9:00am-6:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9376739


Civil Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for preparing
design for an assigned system including
analysis, calculations, research, selection,
and layout necessary to develop required
design documents. Prepares design
materials for basic design assignments.
Supervises drafters, designers, and
occasional subordinate engineers assigned
to the project including work assignments,
scheduling, and review. Coordinates design
efforts with other project personnel in the
same or other departments including space
control, schedule and layout optimization.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9376767

Senior Prevail
Technical Infrastructure Analyst
Job Description: Responsible for providing
technical assistance to computer system
users. Answers questions or resolves
computer problems, for clients in person,
via telephone or from a remote location.
Provides assistance concerning the use of
computer hardware and software including
printing, installation, word processing,
electronic mail, and operating systems.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $42,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9376533

Inventory Associate
Job Description: Responsible for performing
physical inventory tally of merchandise
at various customer retail sites. Counts
merchandise and uses portable data, a
calculator, and written documentation
regarding- completed inventory sections.
Tags, as necessary, as per the pre-inventory
meeting instructions. Maintains steady
work flow by moving between tags (touch
keying). Adheres to company dress code
and has necessary equipment to complete
task. Understands store instructions and
customer expectations. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9376627

Pharmacist
Job Description: Responsible for working
under the supervision of a Pharmacy
Coordinator and a. Shift Supervisor
performing all duties necessaryto provide for
the effective daily operation of all department
services and programs. Serves the needs of
neonatal, pediatric, adult, adolescent, and
geriatric patients. Participates in providing
outstanding customer service and accepts
responsibility in maintaining, relationships
that are equally respectful to all.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9375765

Door and Hardware Installer
Job Description: Responsible for distributing
and hanging commercial steel and wood
doors and door frames. Installs commercial
and institutional door hardware including
locks, hinges, door closer, panic devices,
thresholds; and weather stripping using
carpenter's hand tools and power tools.
Performs heavy lifting, distributes products
to openings, and maintains records. Work-
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.00-$1 600,per hour
Job Order Number: 9376478

Retail Salesperson
Job Description: Responsible for product
sales and customer relations. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $35,000.00-$75,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9377405

Chef/Head Cook
Job Description: Responsible for selecting
and developing Thai recipes. Applies
knowledge and experience in Thai cuisine
preparation. Devises special Thai dishes.
Reviews menu, analyzes- Thai recipes
and participates in modifying/planning
Thai menu. Holds primary responsibility
for creation and preparation of Thai
cuisine. Observes methods of Thai cuisine
preparation and cooking, sizes of portions,
and garnishing of dishes to ensure dishes
are prepared according to traditional Thai
style. Tests cooked foods by tasting and


smelling them. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $1,600.00 per month
Job Order Number: 9376752

Shop Manager
Job Description: Responsible for assisting
and supervising technicians including
inspection, review of work to assure quality
job performance, and recommends training.
Assists in the diagnosis and repairs of the
fleet, in the completion of all necessary
repair and work orders, and in the moving of
equipment in/out of the shop and around the
yard. Maintains a clean and safe work area.
Monitors job performance and troubleshoots
problems with equipment. Makes judgment
calls on solutions to specific problems. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $45,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9377703

Dispatcher/Client Services Manager
Job Description: Responsible for providing
daily supervision of Drivers and Operations
Coordinators. Enforces company policies,
procedures, and safety regulations.
Coordinates and schedules drivers and
buses to ensure efficiency of the operation.
Ensures that all runs are dispatched on
time. Submits reports and suggestions
for improvement to Operations Manager.
Coordinates and transports employees
for drug testing, suspension etc. Performs
time checks on drivers and investigates
accidents/incidents/injuries/complaints.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $28,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9377440

Physical Therapist
Job Description: Responsible for assessing,
planning, organizing, and participating
in rehabilitative programs that improve
mobility, relieve pain, increase strength, and
decrease or prevent deformity of patients
suffering from disease or injury. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $27.00-$30.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9377365

Home Health Aide
Job Description: Responsible for providing
routine, personal healthcare such as
bathing, dressing, or grooming to elderly,
convalescent, or disabled persons in the
home of patients or in a residential care
facility. Work days and hours may vary
Pay Rate: $8.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9377371


Seminole County
Log ontoWorkforceCentralFlorida.com where
you can enter the Job Title in the "Search For
Jobs" box to see more information on these
jobs and search thousands of additional
openings throughout Central Florida, at
NO COST. Apply by following the directions
listed. For further help visit the WORKFORCE
CENTRAL FLORIDA Seminole County Office
at 1097 Sand Pond Rd., Suite 1001, Lake
Mary, or call (407) 531-1225.

Senior Build Technician
Job Description: Responsible for collecting
field data and performing basic electrical
distribution design. Performs compliance
audits and makes ready design. Performs
utility field data collection, clearance analysis
and remediation. Practices company safety
policies and guidelines. Reviews quality
control. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $20.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9367148
How toApply: E-mail,fax, or mail resume after
registering atwww.WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com or in your local WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA OFFICE.

Victim Advocate
Job Description: Responsible for providing
crisis intervention, referral services, criminal
justice advocacy and support, and emotional
first aid to victims of sexual assault. Work
Monday-Friday, hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9372622
How to Apply: Mail resume after registering
at www.WorkforceCentralFlorida.com or in
your local WORKFORCE CENTRAL FLORIDA
OFFICE.


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WEATHER


680 740 740 540
6 a.m. I Noon 3 p.m. 16 a.m.
Friday


TODAY: Showers and
thunderstorms. Some
storms could produce
gusty winds and heavy
rain. High near 74.


g ~MORNING LOW 54�


S DAYTIME HIGH 650

Sunset 10% chance Wind
5:30 p.m. of rain NW 11 mph


a MORNING LOW 600


) DAYTIME HIGH 740

Sunset 10% chance Wind
5:30 p.m. of rain - NE 12 mph


S MORNING LOW 62�
DAYTIME HIGH 76*


Sunrise- Sunset 10% chance
7:10 a.m. 5:31 p.m. of rain


Wind
E 11 mph


pi,) I. j.. i . .i F YOUR NAME HERE, FROM YOUR CITY!
Want to see your picture in The Observer? Please e-mail it to editor@
observernewspapers.com. Files should be at least 1MB in size. Please
include as much information about the picture as possible, for example
where the image was taken, what time and who is in it.

NATIONAL


City
Seattle
Los Angeles
Houston


Friday . Sat.
34/42 38/29
50/71 45/60
42/62 56/71


City
Atlanta
Chicago
New York


Friday
30/50


Sat.
.33/54.


24/24 37/42
27/36 28/34


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time ' Low High
Saturday 1:19 a.m. 7:50 a.m.
Dec. 13 1:51 p.m. 7:75 p.m.
Sunday 2:12 a.m. ,8:41 a.m.
Dec. 14 2:45 p.m. 8:52 p.m.

FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.
Jacksonville 48/60 :,..54767
Miami 59/74 65/74
JTampa : - 1 49/67 ,-,5'7 -
Pensacola 39/58 47/64

INTERNATIONAL


City
London
Paris
Tokyo


Friday Sat.

'31/42 31/41
S 48/59 44/59


SKOLFIELD HOMES
REMO i)E. L.N. - RE\( \J'"'I ii -.'


. , . " . . ,. ' .. ' . ;: - 1 .
The Orchiii Speciz
- - Since 199i3
Providing a wide variety of orchid plants
SRetail * Custon -
* Wholesale Arrang e
* Rental '*
Boarding * CoiSr
Credit Cards Welco r
1605 Jeanette St. Apopka 407-889-3138 w.orchidspIaIIastcom


.3-.


" 118 \. Comstock Ave.
ij Winter Park FL 32789

Do you enjoy taking care of the small repairs around your home? Are endless
lists of Saturday projects relaxing therapy? If not, then turn to Skolfield Homes,
a name you can trust. We have a new division called Skolfield Services.
The growth in our primary business of major renovations, additions, kitchens
and baths has recently allowed us to add several more exceptional craftsmen to
our team. As we complement our main business with this new division, we are,
in a way, circling back to our 1979 roots and living our philosophy of "taking
care of the client."
Our service van is outfitted with supplies, tools, and most importantly an ex-
tremely talented craftsman, Bob Decker.
Our fee: $85 per hour plus materials; a relaxing stress-free Saturday: priceless!
To schedule an appointment call'407-647-7730


i Habitat for Hmanit

ReStore
Tmne Vto shO'
Te~ nw i'"


We carry quality new and used furniture,
appliances, building materials and more -
for 30-70% off retail prices.

Open Tuesday - Saturday, 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
2105 N. Orange Blossom Trail near Princeton St.
Call today: (407) 426-7192.


100 ofproits9suppor


3
Moderate


Sunrise
7:09 a.m.


THE VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS


Sunrise
S 7:10a.m.


I -


~11;1111~r113B~
II:


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 16 Thursday, December 11,2008


I PEAKTIO


11 "