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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00024
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Creation Date: December 4, 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00024

Full Text



Winter Park/ Maitland


Volume 20, No. 49
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY

*WABANK
Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
A b, ,o Member FDIC


Red Fox nights
Get a look at Winter Park's
famed archetypal lounge act.
Page A7

j..z. . recession
Budget cuts to local schools
have educators worried.
Page A3


Ways to give back
Read about
local chari-
ties worth
your gener-
osity in this"
season of
giving.

Page A8




Business Briefs......... A5
Community Bulletin........A5
City Talks...............A6
Play On!..............A12
Legals ............. A13
Marketplace............A14
Games................A15


g B
0


0
t-4


0 94922 95642 2


Thursday, December 4,2008

SeniorObserver

A local playwright
gets 15 minutes
in Maitland.


> SECTION B


504+ tax


[


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE (
Construction workers are adding finishing touches to Winter Park Village's new Publix, slated to open,8 a.m. Dec,.3..


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

Signs popped up at the
new Publix at the Winter
Park Village this week,
advertising 8 a.m. Satur-
day, Dec. 13 as the grand
opening hour for the
store,where construction
crews are working on fi-
nal details. Pood is already
appearing on shelves.
A nearby Publix store
on South Orlando Avenue
in Winter Park may not be
turning into a Greenwise
store, at least yet. Pub-
lix spokesman Dwaine


Stevens said that's still
under discussion, as the
company makes chang-
es to 49 stores it bought
statewide from competi-
tor Albertson's.
The Greenwise brand,
which offers healthy and
organic foods, has been
used to theme entire
stores in other parts of
the state.
The company has
slowly converted other
Publix stores into full-
blown Greenwise stores.
Included on the list of fu-
ture Greenwise locations
is one in Orlando.


Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL


BANK & TRUST
On the corer of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
407-622-8181 * www.CNBT-FL.com
C it io i


Rail stop

proposed

for 17-92

ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

In yet another twist to the
meandering story of Cen-
tral Florida Commuter Rail,
Winter Park developer Dan
Bellows officially suggested
changing the location of a
rail stop - but not quite in
the way the Commission had
expected.
The move - which Bel-
lows had alluded to in a let-
ter last week - would put
a commuter rail station in
Bellows' proposed neigh-
borhood near the northwest
corner of Lee Road and High-
way 17-92 in Winter Park.
That had the Commission
listenifig. But what Commis-
sioner Beth Dillaha said she
didn't expect was that Bel-
lows' presentation before
the Commission on Monday
wouldn't involve eliminat-
ing the commuter rail stop
at Central Park.
"We thought he would
suggest moving the loca-
tion, but he wanted to build
a second station in addition
to the one in Central Park,"
Dillaha said.
The talks resulted in little
movement in the city's plans,
> turn to RAIL on page A2


, lianna Girovslogo and is packed - d
.withb feshilyicked irhite grape- hlp f4
fruit, temple oranges and tange- urt an AHnda to rq
losvshipped from Maitland. It is --compan y.
one of thousands of boxes of fruit Kurt, whoacts as growS -
that will be shipped throughout their nearly 20,000 cltius trees,
the country duringFlorida's citrus jokes he has been working.in the
seasonbythelocalbusiness. family business since he was '6
A visit to Hollieanna Groves, o-yes olThey used take me
.-,o.Y. ....:yarsd o d. "r used osh to take me'
.cated bn Si th:Orlaiilb.Avende;. t o scholto .helpi wa The
thesc.nt f itrus: w omes .ade. . -k W
.customers as-theysid roto%,�^i iisc
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News


Rocking the sandwich


WHITNEY HAMRICK
OBSERVER STAFF

Rock music and a resounding
"Welcome to Jimmy John's!"
from the staff hints at the un-
usual offerings of this new Win-
ter Park sandwich shop on Or-
ange Avenue.
Rock music isn't just white
noise - it's part of a theme, said
co-owner Ashton "Buck" Pop-
lin. "Jimmy John's was estab-
lished in 1983, and Mr. Jimmy
wants us to play rock 'n' roll,"
Poplin said. "Our employees are
rock stars, and we want to rock
out the business; we want to
rock out the people that come
in here."
Owned with wife Colleen M.
Gangwisch and son Brad Gang-
wisch, the shop has been open
for business for four months
and makes more than 100 sand-
wiches a day, Poplin said.
"We have awesome bread;
we're freaking fast and that's
including in-shop as well as our
delivery service. And everything
is consistent throughout all
our 750-some-odd franchises,"
Poplin said.
Playful signs carry that lively
tone, adorning the walls in a
rainbow of bright colors. "If you
think you have a reservation,
you're in the wrong place," one
reads. Another states boldly,
"We'd love to see you naked but


state requires shoes and shirt."
The Dead Kennedys, The
Who and other classic rock and
punk favorites blare from the
speakers as the crew turns out
sandwiches within seconds of
them being ordered, despite
each being custom-made.
CherylWebb, a first-time cus-
tomer, said she was out holiday
shopping when she decided to
stop by. "It was great," she said.
"Everyone was friendly and the
food was great.".
The JimmyJohn's restaurant
chain is unusual for its variety of
order options - by fax, delivery
within a mile and a half of the
store, as well as online through
jimmyjohns.com.
"This is an awesome spot - I
mean because this is very stra-
tegically spaced," Poplin said
of the Orange Avenue location.
"Needless to say, I deliver right
to Rollins and [as far as] the
hospital medical community at


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
Co-owner Buck Poplin shows off one of his
raisons d'etre - an 8-inch sub sandwich.
Florida Hospital."
Sandwiches named the Tur-
key Tom, Pepe, Beach Club, To-
tally Tuna, Tuna Club and The
J.J. Gargantuan - which has
just about everything on it -
are some of the bestsellers.
"The bread is all freshly made
every day," Poplin said. "All the
meats, all cheeses, all the let-
tuce, tomatoes and cucumbers,
every thing is sliced every single
day, right here."
Jimmy John's also sells its
day-old bread for 50 cents.
Sandwich prices range from
$3.99 for Plain Slims to the $7.99
J.J. Gargantuan.


RAIL I New deal sought
< continued from the front page

which are on hold while the city waits for de-
cisions from the county and from state gov-
ernments in other parts of the country also
grappling with commuter rail issues.
Recently the Commission sent official let-
ters to the Orange County government in an
attempt to renegotiate an interldcal fund-
ing agreement for the commuter rail system,
which is estimated to cost $650 million.
The agreement, which the Commission
voted 4-1 to renegotiate, would put the city
on the hook-for maintenance and operat-
ing costs, shared with other governments in-
volved in the system.
In the letters, the city asked to have an opt-
out clause to prevent it from being locked
into a 99-year financial contract.
The letter to the Orange County Commis-
sion has a deadline of Jan. 15 for a response.
In the meantime, the Florida Department
of Transportation has amended the agree-
ments between local governments to extend
the deadline to solidify a deal until Decem-
ber 2009. Currently the deal deadline is set at
Dec. 31, 2008.
In February, a study by the U.S. Govern-
ment Accountability Office will conclude
with a recommendation about liability pro-
visions in deals with railroad companies and
passenger rail companies.
Currently the deal between the Florida
Department of Transportation and CSX
would absolve CSX of financial liability for
accidents along the tracks carrying the com-
muter rail line, even if CSX is at fault.
In a similar situation with a commuter
rail deal in Massachusetts, Lt. Gov. Timothy P.
Murray wrote that such a clause would be a
deal breaker.
"Frankly it undermines the foundation
of our justice system, which is based on the
idea that people and companies should be
responsible for their own actions," he wrote.


Huge St. John and Escada sale!

Hurry in for best selection!


New Store Hours
Monday- Saturday
10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday 12 p.m. - 5 p.m.


329 North Park Avenue
Suite 101
(next to Panera Bread)
Winter Park, FL 32789


407.539.2528

www.Jacobsons.com


FOver 600 articles available on a variety ot'spii moral, moral, andsocial tofi
l - ' :*.._ *


Sunday Worship - 10:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Bible Classes - 9:00 a m. Sunday & 7:15 Wednesday,


www.spiritualperspectives.org
www.whybaptism.org
5410 Lake Howell Road Gary W. Summers, preacher-
Winter Park 407-657-0657



Brandywine Square

* Courtyard Shopping * Sidewalk Cafe *
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum


Brandywine Deli
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Family Comics & Cards
T ,,Ill Ii1 jr : u ii ,v'iuru r I r-i
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Cida's of Winter Park Antiques
r.,, oi ,yni w -ar P ir iur.n on the Avenue
Tri Or, fiail i,n.i, nrm enil uujii Allj]ue
Cielion rIj ,rv d Xiv Har,]y HUd.o;rO
407-644-5635 407-657-2100
Essence Luxe Linens
Salon & Day Spa EIP ,-, ii ,;:en,3i1 i,
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7 .-. -"- 4. .- .. . . . AY
Winter Park Hair Studio Park Avenue Jeweler
H' Uti ^ H.i' 4,I,, ' .31 r .. li,3rr ,roT c -rn ,I.-.
40i .; 62',:;lr. Goia & Silpr . le*elry
| .M 114.: T , ,'1 u Orn iOc n
..., ." --I RF.cj.;r-% tcinp n nip,:ii


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 2 Thursday, December 4, 2008


i -





Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Tough time


KRISTY VICKERY
OBSERVER STAFF

As steep budget cuts take a
toll on Florida school dis-
tricts, the cost of a quality
education is getting harder
to afford.
"We did a $700 million
cut this year," said Joie Ca-
dle, Orange County School
Board chairwoman. "There's
not much more to cut. We
are down to the bone mar-
row."
With more budget cuts
projected for next year, the
financial outlook for public
education is not promising,
and the hope for improving
the quality of education is
dwindling.
S"The quality of education
will certainly be challenged
if we aren't smart with our
budget cuts," School Board.
member Daryl Flynn said.
"We have to keep the cuts
from affecting the class-
room."
Although school districts
are doing what they can
to cut back outside of the
classroom, students are still
feeling the affects inside the
classroom, Flynn said.
"Adequate funding allows
schools to put different pro-
grams in place that help stu-
dents academically," Flynn
said. "For instance, comput-
er and science labs, reading
and math coaches, (and) in-


class paraprofessionals are
all examples of programs
and positions that add to
the overall success of a stu-
dent. More often than not,
these are the services and
positions that are cut first."
Mike Cahill, president of
Orange County Classroom
Teachers Association, said
the lack of programs in
schools directly impacts a
student's well-being. With
more emphasis on prepar-
ing for tests, such as the
FCAT or SAT, teachers are
losing the creativity they
once had in the classrooms.
Despite the amount of
time and money spent pre-
paring students for tests,
teachers in Orange County
are still not seeing scores
improve.
Throughout the last 10
years, Orange County Public
Schools has spent more per-
student than neighboring
Seminole County, but have
continuously had signifi-
cantly lower SAT scores than
Seminole County, below
even the state and national
averages. The average criti-
cal reading score for Orange
County this year was 488 -
26 points lower than Semi-
nole County. That's eight
points lower than the state
average and 14 points-lower
than the national average.
Writing and math scores
in Orange County were also
lower. The average writing


s squeeze
score was 469, 23 points
lower than Seminole Coun-
ty, while math in Orange
County averaged 32 points
lower.
With the demographic
disparity, though, Cadle cau-
tions against side-by-side
comparison.
"Comparing Seminole
County public schools to Or-
ange County public schools
is like comparing apples to
oranges," Cadle said. "Semi-
nole does not have the same
makeup as Orange County.
We are an urban school dis-
trict. Our poverty levels are
different."
Although there are sig-
nificant differences be-
tween Orange and Seminole
county schools, both school
district officials agree more
funding would help im-
prove the quality of educa-
tion.
Orange County School
Board member Rick Roach
said the county is spend- Educators worry that
ing all it can, but he wor-
ries that's not enough. He
would like -to see at least a Seminole Cot
10-20 percent increase per have always d(
student, a lower level o
"I think Orange Coun- funding, it is g
ty schools just don't have and harder.
enough [funding] to give "You can (
kids all they need," he said. low-hanging
Seminole County School Morris said.
Board member Jeanne Mor- As 2009
ris said she is also concerned school district
about the quality of educa- anxious abou
tion. She said even though $3.5 billion pr


schools


ARCHIVE PHOTO COURTESY OF JULIE FLETCHER
t school funding isn't enough to meet basic needs of students.


unty schools
one well with
f per-student
getting harder

only cut the
fruit once,"

approaches,
:s grow more
t the state's
projected bud-


get cut,-although they say
they continue to do the best
they can with what they've
got.
"We have the best edu-
cational ,system, they're
just not funding it," Orange
County's Cahill said. "It's like
giving a mechanic a ham-
mer and screwdriver and
telling him to go fix a car."


4>,y <.,r,. dTrI V l�,~IIt�tW~4VV,*,. .%S*V . . . . . .. -- . * .- ., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Presented by:


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December 6th * 9:00 a.m.

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Over 100 parade units including marching bands, local elected officials,
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O bs WinParkai
b s e 'r' V" me 'r"�M


Thursday, December 4, 2008 Page 3


II


iunrun�1 sri,* rlrrar~ab*�u


)o ROLLINS Col I






Page 4 Thursday, December 4, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Winter Park


Burglary/theft
Someone entered an apartment on
Margaret Square through an unlocked
rear sliding door on Nov. 25 and stole a
Compaq laptop computer.
Someone entered a residence on Mar-
garet Square through a glass sliding door
on Nov. 24. but nothing appeared to have
been stolen.
A white four-door 2002 Ford Escort
was stolen from Oak Grove Road on Nov.
22. The vehicle was possibly stolen with
the keys that were lost on Nov. 18.
Someone broke the rear driver's side
window of a vehicle on North Lakemont
Avenue and stole a purse containing an
Ann Taylor wallet, a Sony digital camera,
Starbucks GC, a Motorola Razor cell phone
and Gucci sunglasses on Nov. 22.
A thief broke the front driver's side
window of a car on North Lakemont Av-
enue and stole a Garmin Nuvi 9901 GPS
unit and an iPod car charger on Nov. 23.
A black male robbed a business on
North Orlando Avenue with a silver hand-
gun on Nov. 24, The thief wore a bandana
on his face, a white baseball hat, a white
T-shirt and blue jeans.
On Nov. 24, someone removed a bed-
room window screen on the north side
of a residence on Oak Block Road, but fled


Nov. 22 to Nov. 25
after the alarm activated. Nothing was re-
ported stolen.
Auto theft/burglary
A stolen white 2007 Nissan Pathfinder
was found in a parking lot on South Harp-
er Street on Nov. 24.
Criminal mischief
A loud party drew a noise complaint
Nov. 22 on Harmon Ave.
Someone unsuccessfully attempted to
pry open the rear door of a residence
on Mayfield Avenue after cutting a hole
in the rear screen to access the porch on
Nov. 25.
Loud music from a residence on Palmer
Avenue drew a complaint Nov. 22.
Someone pried open the rear French
doors of a residence on Summerfield
Road Nov. 23, but nothing was stolen.
A loud party on Osceola Avenue drew a
noise complaint on Nov. 22.
Drugs
A minor was arrested on Nov. 26 for
possession of alcohol and of a fake driv-
er's license on Shoreview Avenue.
For possession of marijuana and drug
paraphernalia, a suspect was arrested
Nov. 23 on North Orlando Avenue.


GROVE I Gift could make you more loved


< continued from the front page

Fourteen varieties of citrus are
produced on nearly 200 acres of
groves located in the Indian River
district, Fort Pierce and Ochecho-
bee and on land between Sanford
and Geneva, Jason said.
"We focus on specialty varieties,
as opposed to juice oranges that go
toward the juice industry," Alinda
said. The fruit is tree-ripened and
never placed in cold storage.
Derr said it's this guarantee of
freshness that has kept him as a cus-
tomer for close to 30 years. "I have
been ruined by them. I don't even
buy fruit locally because it is not as
good as what I get from them. Their
grapefruit is phenomenal. I send it
to people in New York and they just
rave about it because they have nev-
er had anything like it," Derr said.
"If you send people a half bushel
of their white grapefruit I guarantee
they will love you more than they do
already," Derr said with a laugh.
The Hollieanna Groves candy col-
lection is also ideal for gift-giving,
especially the basket shaped like
the state of Florida filled with Pecan
Log Roll Slices, Creamy Nougat, Pe-
can Orangettes, Citrus Candies and
a White Chocolate Alligator. "We've
used the same candy supplier for
more for 50 years," Glenn proudly
stated.


Hollieanna Groves, a citrus packing retailer,
is at 540 S. Orlando Ave. (Highway 17-92)
in Maitland. Call 407-644-8803 or visit Hol-
lieanna.com for more information.

Jason said the most gratifying
aspect of working at Hollieanna
Groves is being able to see the same
people come back year after year,
including multiple generations.
"I get a lot of satisfaction growing
it, bringing it in here and seeing it
packed and shipped off and having
happy customers at the other end,"
Jason said.
Alinda added, "I'm proud of the
Lingle name and that we have been
in business for 55 years. I'm proud
to be part of something that is sec-
ond generation - and possibly third
generation," she said.
For Glenn, he said it makes him
happy to see his children work to-
gether and follow in his footsteps.
"We are in better shape than most
people. Not many people can stay
in business for more than 50 years
without changing the product line,"
he said with a laugh.
"I'm proud that they are still here
in the area," Glenn said as he smiled
at his adult children. "I hope this
continues with the grandchildren."


WU CF9 NO


FM 89.9 ONDO


NEW DROP-OFF LOCATION
Please open your hearts to needy local
Orlando children this holiday season. Stop
by and drop off your new, unwrapped toy
(or monetary donation), and we will
provide you with free coffee and sweets!
Leave donations at:
Mlchelle Valentine Matchmaking
1540-B Lake Baldwin Lane- -
Orlando (Baldwin Park) LS. MADU CCI


-.tf a I


(Winter Park/ Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday. December 4.2008


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-628-8500, ext. 302
kyle@observernewspapers.com

EDITOR
Alex Babcock
407-628-8500, ext. 304
alexb@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-628-8500, ext. 306
stephanie@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-628-8500, ext. 311
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-902-8563
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-628-8500, ext. 309
legal@observernewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observemewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us


ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-628-8500, ext. 303
tcraft@observemewspapers.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Shelly Langston
407-628-8500, ext. 303
slangston@observemewspapers.com


Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ N 164 1
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-628-8500 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
� Winter Park / Maitland Observer@ 2008 A


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Volume 20, Issue Number 49


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-r-_--__-_-_~__�________________________


___________________________~


or call 407-82 or_ ors ht and dircins


I


Page 4 Thursday, December 4, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






VVWIIIr P1N IVQI M Ind b r rhsy e m r,0Pg


Business


Insight Financial Credit Union announced Nov. 25 that
it has hired two new employees for its Orlando-based
operation. Heather Bumgardner has been hired as mar-
keting executive and Carlos Herrera as public relations
executive.


PHOTO COURTESY OF FLORIDA HOSPITAL
Florida Hospital lit up its newest building- with fireworks and
also by writing "100" using the lights in specific rooms at night.
Florida Hospital kicked off its year-long Centennial
Celebration with a community event Nov. 24. People lined
the streets for the 100th birthday party of Florida Hospital
Orlando. Jeb Bush also joined the guests to share his sup-
port for the organization.
The event was sponsored by the Florida Hospital Foun-
dation and Brasfield and Gorriea and introduced its-newest
addition - the Ginsburg Tower, opening Dec. 11.
This 15-story, 675,000-square-foot tower will house
440 new patient rooms, as well as one of the largest
emergency departments and one of the largest cardiac
catheterization labs in the country.


AGIS, a full-service insurance agency
with an office in Winter Park, an-
nounced Monday, Dec. 1, that they will
donate money to two local charities that
would normally be spent on gifts for cli-
ents.
Both the Second Harvest Food Bank of
Central Florida and the Healthcare Cen-
ter for the Homeless will receive contri-
butions. This is he second year AGIS has
donated these funds and has inspired
four other AGIS offices in three states to
donate.
AGIS will also forgo the company's an-
nual holiday party this year, and will in-
stead take its employees to the 12th an-
nual Arts Alive in Seminole, a fundraiser
for the Foundation for Seminole County
Public Schools in Sanford. All proceeds
raised from the event and auction will go


Herrera






Bumgardne
Bumgardner


to support the arts in the public school district. The event
will be held on Dec. 6 at the University of Central Florida's
Pegasus Ballroom.


Community


The Winter Park Police Depart-
ment's Officer Dick Bosworth was
recently awarded the Central Florida
Crisis Intervention Team 2008 Offi-
cer of the Year award. He received
the award after demonstrating char-
acteristics that provide a positive
role model for fellow Central Florida
police officers. Officer Bosworth has
executed the focus of the Team pro-
gram, effectively intervening in situ-
ations dealing with mentally ill indi-
viduals and has continued to serve
as a positive role model within the
field. He is an active participant in
the program, and frequently volun-
teers to assist with SWAT Team and
Hostage Team training programs.
Officer Bosworth has been serving
Winter Park residents and visitors
for almost 10 years and is currently
assigned to the Special Operations
Division as a traffic officer.
AAA Auto Club South and Bud-
weiser will be protecting drivers
during the holiday season with "Tow
to Go" - a program that provides
a confidential ride home and tow,


free of charge, to anyone who may
have had too much to drink simply
by calling 1-800-AAA-HELP.
"Tow to Go" will be available
through Jan. 1.
Winter Park is expanding its en-
vironmental initiatives through a
$10,000 grant presented .to Keep
Winter Park Beautiful by Waste Man-
agement Inc. of Florida. Waste Man-
agement has established a partner-
ship with Keep America Beautiful,
Keep Winter Park Beautiful's parent
organization, and pledged $150,000
in grants to 15 chapters nationwide
to support the group's mission to
protect local ecosystems. Winter
Park is one of only two Florida chap-
ters to receive a grant.
Work is underway to replace sec-
tions of lighting and ceiling on the
Winter Park Public Library's first
floor. The end result will be a more
energy-efficient Library that takes
less city staff time to maintain, but it
will cause some inconveniences for
patrons in the Library Dec. 1-22.


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My Future. My Place.


AUTO ACCIDENTS
MARK LANG & ASSOCIATES
Attorneys
In Beautiful Dou 'ntoln Winter Park
222 'est Comnstock Avenue, Suite 21
Winter Park, Florida 32-89-2615
Telephone: (40U7 59Q-4433
wWv.langlaw.net
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision and should.not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience."


Relax and let us do the Cleaning.
Professional Home & Office Cleaning


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Licensed, Bonded, Insured
and Background Checks


(407) 265-MAID (6243)
www.MaidSolutions.com
For your convenience we accept most major Credit Cards.


r775.17


Thursday, December 4, 2008 Page 5


Winter Park / Maitla r


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Paae- 6 Thrdy eebr4 08WntrPr atadOsre


Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


Tony Leffin -
"And the Lifetime Achieve-
ment Award, the Maitland
Chamber of Commerce's
highest award, goes to...
Tony Leffin!" This award was
presented to. Tony in Feb-
ruary. A week later, he was
diagnosed with a serious ill-
ness.
On Thanksgiving eve-
ning, I learned that Tony
had passed quietly, after see-
ing family and friends one
last time.
Tony died just as he had
lived: quietly. Not being one
to covet honors, awards or
recognition, Tony shunned
the spotlight. Tony Leffin
was a man who lived for one
purpose and one purpose
only - to serve others.
Tony was a native of She-
boygan, Wis. He loved every-
thing about Wisconsin, from
the University of Wisconsin
Badgers to bratwurst; he
was dedicated to the town
and state he grew up in.
His roots are indicative of
the type of person he was,
kind and respectful of ev-
ery human being. Even in
the most challenging times
in the months prior to his
death, he always wanted
those around him to feel he
was going to be OK and that
they should not worry.


-A true leader.
A few weeks ago, after
having lost a bet to Mark
Blinderman on the Badgers
beating the Nittany Lions
two years in a row, we de-
cided to surprise Tony with
a genuine Wisconsin feast:
bratwurst, sauerkraut and
potato salad - without the
beer. Tony was in good spir-
its, as usual, and although
weakened by therapy, was
the same Tony inside we
all knew and loved. I thank
God I took the time that af-
ternoon, for that day made
me realize how short life
truly is, and gave me a new
outlook on those I love.
I have known Tony for
many, many years. But few
know that Tony Leffin was
a confidant and mentor of
mine throughout time. It
was my association with
Tony through the city of
Maitland, the Maitland Area
Chamber of Commerce, and
through Rotary that made
me realize how great a man
he truly was.
In his professional life,
Tony was the best of the
best. For the city, he headed
up public works, a job that
few talk about over the din-
ner table, but every one of us
depends on. He approached
his work diligently and was.


I


genuinely dedicated to serv-
ing each and every resident
of the city of Maitland. He
received numerous local,
state and national honors
for his service, including the
Florida Chapter Meritorious
award, the American Public
Works Association Member
of the Year award, and the
dedicated service award,
and in 2003, Tony received
the National APWA Public
Works Leader of the Year
award. Tony's leadership as
president of the local APWA
chapter in 2001 set the bar
for others to follow, and
they did.
Tony continued his lead-
ership role with the Mai-
tland Area Chamber of
Commerce. The Lifetime
Achievement Award was
just the pinnacle of all that
Tony had accomplished. He
was past president in 1991;
he received the President's
award in 2000; he chaired
the Chamber's golf tourna-
ment for three years, and
served as the Chamber's
Spring Festival of the Arts
chairman for 14 years.
For me, I learned a lot
about Tony just by watching
how he handled the most
difficult situations. I learned
through him that no mat-
ter how difficult a situation,
there is always a solution, al-
though it may not be readily
evident. Work hard to create
a win-win for those around
you, and you cannot go
wrong. His leadership and
dedication to a community
became a model for others
to follow, including me.
SMy association with Tony
however did not begin with
the city or the Chamber.


It began with Rotary. As in
every other organization
he was a part of, Tony was
a leader in every way. He
received the .Outstanding
Leadership Award in 1992,
was president of the Rotary
Club of Maitland in 1993,
and received one of Rotary's
highest honors, the Rotarian
of the Year award in 1996.
STony worked hard in Ro-
tary, and eventually became
the top leader in all of Rota-
ry in Central Florida, district
governor. This is a role that
few ever have the opportu-
nity to serve in as it requires
a dedication of nearly two
years of your life, and the
time impacts on your family
and job are -tremendous. I
remember fondly the meet-
ings where he presented his
goals with his wife, Sue, at
his side, and his son Matt
as photographer. For many
years, Tony guided the youth
of Rotary through the Rota-
ry Youth Leadership Awards
program. As district gov-
ernor, Tony had a unique
ability to relate to anybody
whose lives he touched, no
matter his or her age or situ-
ation. My commitment to


Rotary grew through Tony's
leadership and guidance.
And it was through my
association with Tony that
I realized through a dedica-
tion, commitmentand pas-
sion to help others, one can
reach new plateaus in their
life, just in the desire to help
those around you. Through
my association with Tony, I
reached new levels in Rota-
ry. Through my association
with Tony, I reached new
levels in serving my commu-
nity. But most importantly,
it was through my associa-
tion with Tony Leffin that I
became a better person.
Thank you Tony for be-
ing a mentor to us all, for
always being respectful, for
always having a sense of hu-
mor, for always being kind
and considerate of others,
and for all of the difference
you have made in our lives.
Thank you Tony for being
our friend.
Although we will miss
you, you will forever be in
our hearts.

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at ItsMyMaitland.com


Nov. 24 City Commission.
meeting highlights
The City Commiission met
on Nov. 24 at 3:30 p.m.
in City Hall C6mmission
Chambers. Beloware a few
highlights from that meet-
ing:
';:.The request o. purchase
traffic signal maintenance
services from Cstrol Spe-
ciilists Co. for 'fiscal year
2009, piggybackig-the City
of Maitland contract, was
approved.
The request to approve
the amended interlocal
agreement for Public School
Facility Planning and Imple-
mentation of Concurrency
was tabled until the Mon-
day, Dec. 8, City Commis-
sion meeting.
The request to allow the
city manager to execute and
the fire-rescue chief to inan-
age the agreement with the
state of Florida to house and
operate the Mutual Aid Ra-
dio Cache (MARC) unit for
Region 5 was approved.
The request to consid-
er the Fire Rescue Staffing


Overtime Reduction Action
was approved.
The request to approve
the Business Recognition
Award Program was tabled
until the Monday, Dec. 8,
City Commission meeting.
The request to approve
the fee waiver policy as rec-
ommended by the Parks
and Recreation Commis-
sion was sent back to the
Parks and Recreation Com-
mission for further review
and will be brought back to
a future meeting in January.
City staff was directed by
the Commission to "clean
up" the administrative sec-
tions of the charter at this
point and the portions of
the charter that required
deliberations to be ad-
dressed as part of the fiscal
year 2010 strategic plan.
The request to approve
the memorandum to be sent
to the Orange Coihty- Com-
mission regarding ctommut-
er rail was approved with a
few minor revisions to in-
clude a timeframe for Or-
ange County to respond.


The second reading of the
ordinance annexing 1802
and 1812 Stonehurst Road,
528 E. Lake Sue Ave. and 441
E. Kings Way was approved.
The first reading of the
ordinance revising the
shoreline protection ordi-
nance was approved.
The request of Strollo's
Market and Caf6 at 200 W.
Fairbanks Ave. to amend the
previous Conditional Use
approval to extend hours
of operation - from 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m. to 9 a.m. to mid-
night - to include on-site
consumption was approved
to stay open until 10 p.m. to
serve beer and wine only.
The first reading of the
ordinance adopting a new
definition of bed and break-
fast inns and establishing
standards and criteria for
bed and breakfast inns was
tabled and sent back to the
Planning and Zoning Com-
mission for further review.
The Conditional Use re-
quest of Eucalyptus Prop-
erties for a vertical zoning
special exception/condi-
tional use for up to 25 per-
cent of the interior non-
Park Avenue frontage floor
space within the building at
212-218 N. Park Ave. was ap-
proved, permitting real es-
tate offices on the first floor
but not on the frontage on
Park Avenue.
'A full copy of the Nov.


24 City Commission min-
utes will be available on the
city's official Web site at Cit-
yofWinterPark.org the week
of Dec. 8, pending approval
by the City Commission.

CoffeeTalk with
Karen Diebel
Come join Commissioner
Karen Diebel for coffee on
Friday, Dec. 5, at the Winter
Park Country Club, located
at 761 Old England Ave.,
from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
This is our last CoffeeTalk
of the season so please make
plans to attend this casual
gathering to ask questions
about your specific area of
interest and get to know
your city leaders.
For inquiries regarding
CoffeeTalk, please call 407-
599-3428.

Dec. 8 City Commission
meeting topics
There will be a City Commis-
sion meeting held Monday,
Dec. 8, at 3:30 p.m., in City
Hall Commission Cham-
bers. Below are a few topics
of interest:
Request to approve the
budget adjustment rolling
over $9,959,478 in capital
project budget balances
from fiscal year 2008 to fis-
cal year 2009.
Request to approve the
Interlocal Agreement with


Lynx to install and operate
bus shelters within Winter
Park and allow plaque ad-
vertising on the shelters and
amenities.
Request to approve a
temporary motorized ve-
hicle for-hire permit to O-
Cartz to start a pilot "green"
transportation program in
Winter Park.
Appeal to remove a Live
Oak tree located at 1411 Via
Tuscany.
First reading of the ordi-
nance authorizing and reg-
ulating the use of red light
cameras in the city.
First reading of the or-
dinance related to charter
revisions for March 2009
ballot.
Emergency Ordinance-
Amending the hours of sale
and consumption of alco-
holic beverages only for
Dec. 31, New Year's Eve.
Commuter rail follow-
up discussion of the Dec. 1
work session.
You can find the Com-
mission's full agenda and
more detailed information
on specific agenda items by
logging on to the city's offi-
cial Web site at CityofWin-
terPark.org and clicking
on Government then City
Commission.

Call City Hall at
407-599-3399 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF MAITLAND
Tony Leffin, show here holding a University of Wisconsin Badgers jersey with local
officials, died last week after battling a serious illness. He was a leader in the Chamber
of Commerce and a well-known figure at public events.


---------i-------------------~- ~ -"--I ----"I~-


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 6 Thursday, December 4, 2008





Thursday, December 4, 2008 Page 7


Lounge act lives on in Winter Park

JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Mark Wayne's fingers tum-
bled fluidly across the key-
board as his wife, Lorna
Lambry, arm outstretched,
belted out the chorus to Nat
King Cole's "Unforgettable."
Guests sipping cock-
tails in the low-lit Red Fox
Lounge snapped their fin-
gers and slapped their legs
to the beat, seemingly en-
chanted by the duo. :
At the table nearest to the '
husband-wife act, Winter ..,. .
Park resident Curt Stanton,
90, swayed back and forth.
He's been following Mark
since 1968 and comes to the
lounge weekly, he said.
"This is the place," he said.
"My second home." .
Mark andLornahavebeen
playing the cozy lounge at
the Mt. Vernon Inn in Win-
which Mark said he suspects
is a national record. They
play from 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday to
PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK --THE 01
> turn to LOUNGE on page Al Singing duo Mark Wayne, on keyboard, and Lorna Lambry, on mic, have been entertaining the night life at the Red Fox Lounge in Winter Park for almost 18 years.


SKOLFIELD HOMES


Tir e

'^


Skolfield Homes, LLC
118W. Comstock Ave.
Winter Park FL 32789

Do you enjoy taking care of the small repairs around your home? Are endless
lists of Saturday projects relaxing therapy? If not, then turn to Skolfield Homes,
a name you can trust. We have a new division called Skolfield Services.
The growth in our primary business of major renovations, additions, kitchens
and baths has recently allowed us to add several more exceptional craftsmen to
our team. As we complement our main business with this new division, we are,
in a way, circling back to our 1979 roots and living our philosophy of "taking
care of the client."
Our service van is outfitted with supplies, tools, and most importantly an ex-
tremely talented craftsman, Bob Decker.
Our fee: $85 per hour plus materials; a relaxing stress-free Saturday: priceless!
To schedule an appointment call 407-647-7730


December is
Amnesty Month!
ATTENTION: FORMER MEMBERS
(or those who know a former member)

NO JOINERS FEE!
(Savings up to $150 with this ad)
Redeem this ad at the Winter Park YMCA


The is simply a place where
people love to be!


Come have your
picture taken
with Santa
Sat. Dec. 131h
from 9-11 a.m.


ii


PrY C F ilyICenter
Alaenn~e.o4764109oCnrlFlrdYCr


--






Page 8 Thursday, December 4, 2008


G .O. Fam zi For Greater Orlando's Act._


Family

Calendar


Signup for Pre-K session
starting Jan. 15. The Orange
CountyVoluntary Pre-kindergarten
Program offers six hours daily
of developmentally appropriate
learning experiences with a
strong emphasis on language
development. The program begins
Thursday, Jan. 15 and ends on
June 3.
Enrollment space may still be
open at these Orange County
elementary schools: Aloma,
Apopka, Avalon, Bonneville,
Camelot, Castle Creek, Chickasaw,
Frangus, Hiawassee, Lake Gem,
MeadowWoods, Oak Hill, Oakshire,
Ocoee, Palmetto, Pershing, Pinar,
Riverside, Union Park, Ventura,
Vista Lakes, Whispering Oak,
Spring Lake, Windermere and
Winegard.
To enroll, please do the
following:
Call the school to find out if
there are any vacancies.
If so, provide the school with
your child's full name and birth
date.
The school will provide this
information to the Early Childhood
Team who will contact 4-C to
determine the child's eligibility.
Visit www.VPKFlorida.org or
www.earlychildhood.ocps.net for
more information.

The Orlando Roadhouse hosts
a family-friendly rummage sale
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 6. Each family gets a free
booth the size of a parking spot,
though wares must be family-
friendly. Business booths are $50.
Bring your own tables, chairs, et
cetera. A non-profit organization
will accept unsold items at the
end of the event.
The Roadhouse is at 1870 State
Road 436 in Winter Park
E-mail julie@mykidsplate.com
or call 407-568-1228 to reserve
a spot.

Harry P. -Leu Gardens and
Orange County Library System
present Storytelling at Leu
Gardens the third Monday of
each month starting at 10 a.m.
Children will hear stories and
participate in songs and rhymes.
Enjoy a favorite story or find a new
one. It's free! Explore the 50-acre
botanical gardens after story time
including the butterfly garden with
new chrysalis display.
Leu Gardens is at 1920 N.
Forest Ave. in Orlando. Garden
admission is free every Monday
morning from 9 a.m. until noon.
Arrive early, as parking is limited.
Story times are as follows:
10-10:15 a.m. for 18 months
and younger
10:20-10:35 a.m. for toddlers
10:40-11 a.m. for 3- to 5-year-
olds
Call Leu Gardens at 407-246-
2620 or visit www.leugardens,org
for more information.


Helping neighbors in need


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF


December is a time of celebration
and giving. It's the time when chil-
dren wait with bated breath for a visit
from jolly ol' Santa, while others look
forward to the nights of Hanukkah
and the honor of lighting the meno-
rah. The holidays often give people a
chance to reconnect with family and
friends, share homemade dinners and
exchange gifts.
But not everyone will be that fortu-
nate this season.
With job layoffs and a sluggish
economy, many local families have
had to make tough choices this sea-
son, from not traveling to see loved
ones to choosing to provide food and
shelter as an alternative to gifts. For
some, there may be very little at all.
While budgets are predicted to be
tight, remember true joy may be found
by making the holidays brighter for
others. Ask members of your church
or synagogue how you can help. Talk
to local schools; they often facilitate
requests from families for the basics,
such as underwear and socks, or a
jacket for cooler weather. Coordinate
a mailing to service personnel serving
our country abroad. Spend time with
an older neighbor or friend, who may
be alone and missing family. Any gift,
whether large or small, will make a
world of difference in the life of some-
one in need.

Girls and Boys Town
of Central Florida
Girls and Boys Town of Central Florida
Executive Director Greg Zbylut invites
all families to join them in their Christ-
mas Tree Lighting and Open House at
6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 9, at Oklahoma
Street and State Road 426 in Oviedo.
People are asked to bring unwrapped
gifts or gift cards to contribute to the
children in the program.
The organization provides abused,
abandoned and neglected children
with a safe and caring environment.
Last year, the Girls and Boys Town of
Central Florida and its Oviedo Dem-
etree campus helped more than 800
children and families.
"This is a great opportunity to cel-
ebrate with our kids and really an op-
portunity to teach them about tradi-
tions and the holidays," Zbylut said.
The executive director said he hopes
children will recognize that




4.




3,


m~i~Aj r:


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
Christine Wright, a volunteer at Sonshine Community Thrift Store and the HOPE Foundation, stocks food cans to be
distributed to needy families. The foundation has helped to feed more than 1,000 families per month in Oviedo.


the holiday's true meaning centers on
creating friendships and traditions
rather than receiving an abundance of
presents.
On Dec. 18, Santa Claus will be vis-
iting Boys Town, escorted by law en-
forcement motorcycles from agencies
across Seminole County. This year's
event is co-hosted by Winter Springs
and Oviedo Police and members of the
Oviedo Optimist Club, who are com-
munity partners with both Oviedo Po-
lice and Boys Town Central Florida.
Requests: New, unwrapped gifts for
teenagers, pre-teens, children, tod-
dlers and infants. Gift cards or cash
donations are also accepted.
Drop-off locations:
Oviedo Police Department, 300 Al-
exandria Blvd. in Oviedo
Seminole County Sheriffs Office
Main Headquarters, 100 Bush Blvd. in
Sanford
Donations can also be dropped off
at police stations in Winter Springs,
Altamonte Springs, Casselberry, Lake
Mary, Longwood and Sanford; Semi-
nole County Sheriffs Office substa-
tions, the Altamonte Springs Police
C.O.P.S. Center in the Altamonte Mall
and the Oviedo Police C.O.P.S. Center
at Oviedo Marketplace (by Dillard's).
Deadline: Friday, Dec. 12
Contact: 407-366-3667

HOPE Foundation, The Sonshine
Community Thrift and Food Pantry
Margorie Hoffman, Sonshine Food
Pantry coordinator, said the local
need for donated food has doubled
since the pantry opened behind the
Sonshine Community Thrift shop on
East Broadway in Oviedo a little more
than a year ago.
"We are feeding over 1,000 families
a month right, now," Hoffman said.
"With the economy tanking and peo-
ple having a hard time meeting their
basics in life, being able to get their
food here may mean they can pay their
light bill or their rent."
In light of economic hardships, the
Oviedo City Council and Oviedo Fire
Rescue are conducting a canned food
drive, to benefit local families. Dona-
tions may be made at the site or at one
of four holiday drop-off locations.
"This community is really special
because there are a lot of food pantries
that are suffering that do not have
enough to give," Hoffman said. "The
generosity of this community is very,


very touching."
Need: non-perishable food
Oviedo drop-off locations
Fire Station 44 - 42 South Central
Avenue 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Fire Station 46 - 300 Alexandria
Blvd. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Gymnasium and Aquatic Facility
- 148 Oviedo Blvd. Sat-Sun 8 a.m. -10
p.m.
Riverside Park - 1600 Lockwood.
Blvd. Mon-Friday 8 a.m. - 10 p.m., Sat 8
a.m. - 7 p.m., Sun 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Deadline: Sunday, Dec. 21
Contact: 407-366-3422-

Share Your Christmas
Winter Park is partnering with Second
Harvest Food Bank and WESH TV to
collect food to benefit Central Florida
families in need. Decorated Share Your
Christmas barrels can be found at the
Winter Park City Hall, Public Library
and the Public Safety Facility. Winter
Park Mayor David C. Strong and mem-
bers of the city staff will deliver the
collected items to WESH TV.
"The holiday season is a very special
time in Winter Park and we are thrilled
to host an abundance of events that
have become a part of family tradi-
tions for several generations," Strong
said in a prepared statement. "The spir-
it of giving is evident at each of these
events by watching family, friends and
loved ones spend time together to en-
joy all that Winter Park has to offer."
"The city of Winter Park staff works
hard every day to provide 6ur resi-
dents with excellent services," added
City Manager Randy Knight, also in
a prepared statement. "In that same
spirit, we look forward each year to
supporting the Share Your Christmas
food drive. We are very proud of the
amount of donations we contribute
each year and very happy to have the
opportunity to help so many people in
Central Florida."
Need: Canned, non-perishable
food, baby supplies and personal care
necessities
Drop off locations
Winter Park City Hall, 401 S. Park
Ave. '
Winter Park Public Library, 460 E.
New England Ave.
Winter Park Public Safety Facility,
500 N. Virginia Ave.
Deadline: Wednesday, Dec. 10
Contact: 407-599-3506
> turn to CHARITY on the next page






Thursday, December 4, 2008 Page 9


Winter Park Village
510 N. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park
407-628-0035
NOBEL SON (R) 12:55, 3:55,6:50,
9:40,12:30am

PUNISHER: WAR ZONE (R)
11:45am, 2:20,4:55, 7:35,10:05,
12:45am

AUSTRALIA (PG-13) noon, 1:00,
3:30, 4:30, 7:00, 8:00, 10:30,11:30

FOUR CHRISTMASES (PG-13)
12:05,12:50,1:30,2:30,3:05,3:45,
4:45,5:15,7:15,7:45,8:15,9:30,
10:00, 10:35,11:45,12:15am,
12:50

TRANSPORTER 3 (PG-13)
11:50am, 2:15,4:50,7:25,9:50,
12:20anj

BOLT (PG) 11:40am, 12:20, 2:05,
2:40, 4:35, 5:05, 7:10, 7:50,9:45,
10:15, 12:10am, 12:35

TWILIGHT (PG-13) 11:40am,
12:30, 2:35, 4:15, 5:20, 7:20, 8:10,
10:20,10:55

QUANTUM OF SOLACE (PG-13)
12:15,1:50,2:50, 425,5:25,7:05,
,


8:05,9:35, 10:45, 12:25am

THE BOY IN THE STRIPED
PAJAMAS (PG-13) 12:35, 2:55, -
5:10,7:35,9:55, 12:40am

MADAGASCAR 2 (PG) 11:55am,
2:25, 5:00,7:55,10:40

ROLE MODELS (R) 1:05,3:40,
7:40,10:10, 12:50am

CHANGELING (R) 3:20,10:50

SYNECDOCHE, NEW YORK (R)
12:45, 3:35,6:45,10:25

THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES
(PG-13) 12:25, 7:30

RACHEL GETTING MARRIED
(R) 12:10,2:45,5:40, 8:20,10:55


Winter Park
2155 Aloma Ave.
Winter Park
407-678-8214
FOUR CHRISTMASES (PG-13)
7:00, 9:10

TWILIGHT (PG-13) 7:15, 9:40


'Punisher: War Zone' - Opens Friday


Vigilante Frank Castle assaults a party full of mobsters, in the process
disfiguring one of them and killing an undercover FBI agent. Now he's
forced to face off against the feds and the vengeful scarred mobster.

1 hour 47 minutes - R


: 'Nobel Son'
When a Ph.D. student is
kidnapped, the kidnapper asks
for ransom from the student's
chemist father, who just won
the Nobel Prize and the money
that comes with it. His father
refuses to pay, setting into mo-
tion a tale of revenge, lust and
betrayal.


1 hour 50 minutes - R


CHARITY I Kiwanis Club stuffs stockings for underprivileged children


< continued from the previous page

Kiwanis Stocking Project 2008
For 10 years, the Kiwanis Club of
Oviedo and Winter Springs has
been making Christmas brighter
for local underprivileged children
in Seminole County by providing
filled Christmas stockings. This year,
they anticipate needing about 300
12-inch stockings (no glitter) and
goodies to fill them. Members of the
Kiwanis Builders and Key Clubs will
fill the stockings on Sunday, Dec.
14 at the C.O.P.S. Center located in


Oviedo Marketplace. Volunteers are
welcome to come that day and as-
sist at 2 p.m. and may also drop off
donations. The stockings will be
donated to the Oviedo and Winter
Springs police departments, Salva-
tion Army, shelters and other local
churches.
Volunteer Kathy McDonald, who
is coordinating the 2008 effort, said
it's touching to see the partnership
between local groups such as key
clubs, Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts, sew-
ing groups and seniors.
"The whole community comes


together on this project," McDon-
ald said. "It's wonderful to see these
kids working together." The chil-
dren who receive the stockings
would not have any Christmas with-
out their special delivery, McDonald
explained.
S"These kids are doing something.
for other children [whom] they do
not know and [whom] they will
not get a thank you from and that's
OK," she said. "This is what it means
to serve others; you don't do some-
thing for a reward, you do it because
it is the right this to do. Everyone


pitches in a little bit and at the end
there is a smile."
Need: Small toys, toys from kid's
meals, small toothbrushes, small
toothpaste, small soaps, coloring
books, crayons to fit in stocking
Drop-off locations:
Oviedo Vision Center, 875 Clark
St., Oviedo, 407-366-7655 for direc-
tions
Lockwood Self Storage, 1700 E.
Broadway St., Oviedo
Deadline: Friday, Dec. 12
Contact: 407-349-0757


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S -






Page 10 Thursday, December 4, 2008


LOUNGE I Singers interact with audience


< continued from page A7

a mostly standing-room-only crowd,
ranging in age from 21 to 90. "It's very
eclectic," Lorna said of the audience.
Another regular, Jo Ann Bentti,
sang along as they played a myriad of
tunes ranging from the 40s to the 70s,
with holiday songs thrown in:
"This is a lost thing here," she said of
lounge acts. "I don't know where else
you can find this kind of live music."
Lorna agreed that lounge acts have
become unusual, citing that there used
to be. places where you could learn
how to perform in front of a large au-
dience. "Show business has really re-
ally changed," she said. "There was no
TV when this started."
"You don't get personal interac-
tion," Mark said of watching TV and
movies. "That's what you get here."
The Red. Fox Lounge opened in
1961. In 1991, hotel general man-
ager Rick Frazee discovered the two
performers. He had gone through a
boatload of entertainers before they
came along. "Entertainers are usually
a pain," he said with a laugh. "But I've
never had a problem with them."
The spouses definitely don't seem
like they're working, as they laugh
and interact with the crowd and each
other, Lorna tapping a tambourine
against her blue sequin cocktail dress.


Their act is rumored to have in-
spired a Saturday Night Live skit, "The
Gulp Family Musical Performances,"
starring Will Ferrell and Ana Gastey-
er.-SNL denies the rumor, but Mark
and Lorna say the skit's writer, Paula
Pell, was a regular at the lounge when
she lived in Orlando, and that SNL is
scared the duo will take legal action
because the show did not get permis-
sion to use their personas.
"We wouldn't sue; that would be sil-
ly," Lorna said. "I'm flattered she was
inspired to do that and I knew she en-
joyed us because she came a lot."
"In show business, everything is
good," Mark added. '


Calendar


Comma Studio south of Winter Park
hosts an artist reception from 6:30-9
p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 9 for Ken Austin and
other artists. Comma is at 813 Virginia
Drive in Orlando. Visit www.commagallery.
com or call 407-894-4505 for more infor-
mation.

Tina McElroy Ansa talks about her lat-
est book, "Taking After Mudear" from
6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 4 at the
Winter Park Public Library. She'll sign cop-
ies of her books. Call 407-623-3279 to
register or visit www.wppl.org for more
information.

Manage retirement investments better
with information from Frank Dasse at
7:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 4 at the Universi-
ty Club of Winter Park at Park and Webster
avenues. The cost is $6, which includes
breakfast. Call 407-629-2125 to register.

See "Langston Hughes," a Chautauqua
performance by Bob Devin Jones, and
learn about Hughes' Florida connection
from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Monday, Dec. 8 at
the Winter Park Public Library. Call 407-
623-3279 to register or visit www.wppl.
org for more information.

The Jewish Pavilion in Altamonte
Springs sponsors a Hanukkah concert
for the residents of Horizon Bay at 1 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 14 on Boston Avenue in Alta-
monte. Howard Friedman will be featured


on guitar, accompai,.
Ally Friedman, 9, on piai .
dents of Maitland.
The pavilion sponsors Jewish
programs monthly at the facility, w .
open to the entire community, including
Jewish and non-Jewish people.

A limited number of seats in the or-
chestra for Avenue Q will be made
available for $25 at every performance at
the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre. The
tickets will be available two hours prior to
the show and are cash onjy, with a limit of
two tickets per person.
In keeping with thematic issues in the
show such as living in New York with big
dreams and a tiny bank account, the pro-
ducers of the show are committed to of-
fering these special priced seats in each
city the show will play.
Avenue Q makes its Orlando premiere at
the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre Dec.
2-7. The Arts Centre is at 401 W. Livings-
ton St. in Orlando. Call 407-841-4675 for
more information.

Business women are invited to "Wom-
anWorks!" at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 8
at Strollo's Italian Deli and Eatery at 800
W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park.
The evening event is a networking so-
cial, held on the second Monday of each
month. The event is free.
Register with Ms. Charlie Wilson at 321-
279-1089.


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, December 4, 2008 Page 11



Opinion/


A man and his wife went to
the chemist to pick up his
prescription for Viagra. See-
ing the $10 per-pill price,
the man was astonished
- but his.wife had a differ-
ent opinion, "Oh, $40 a year
ain't too bad." - unattrib-
uted Internet joke
I am not a prude. Bahl-
eeeeeve me, I am not! But is
anyone else out there tired,
oh, so tired of all the Viagra
and Cialis advertisements
on television? C'mon, you
know you are. You're sitting
there, perhaps with a book
on your lap, intermittently
watching a "Scrubs" re-run
and a foot-ta-ball game and
up pops (pun intended) yet
another shot of the ubiq-
uitous tub's couple, hold-
Sing hands, waiting for the
"right" moment when Mr.
Johnson will show up for
duty.
You weren't even think-
ing about sex and wham-
bam-thank you-ma'am,
you're drawn into the trag-
edy, the heartbreak of LNS
(Limp Noodle Syndrome).
What's a man to do? Drugs
anyone?
Men sometimes get the
rap from women, "Is that
all you think about?" No, of
course not. I think about


straightening up the garage.
I wonder about Tebow's
chances on repeating. I'm
miffed that one of my aza-
leas is dying for no appar-
ent reason. Should assault
weapons be sold at Wal-
Mart? A Pink song courses
through the back mind
ground. I don't care wheth-
er the president is black or
white, I want all American
troops out of Muslim land.
Now. I warm to a memory
of sharing a Coke with my
grandson at the movie,
"Bolt." I think about writ-
ing this column on Mon-
day and what's of interest
this moment. Sometimes,
my mind just shifts into a
stream of consciousness
montage and then focis
returns. I chop wood, carry
water. I do.
Every man I know
thinks similar yet different
thoughts. The emphasis
is different because each
man is unique. But then you
read or hear (urban myth?)
that every 45 seconds some
sexual fantasy flashes on a
man's gray matter andper-
haps ever so briefly, a man's
thoughts turn to...
Forty-five seconds. Can
that be? Every 45 seconds
your average guy's Mr.


Perspectives

by...







The long and short of it


Johnson moves ahead of
the crowd, to the front
and center of what your
conscious mind might con-
sider.
That seems biologically
unfair to sustained study.
So I am dubious of the re-
search that would make
such a 45 second claim.
Hmmm? But it does beg the
question, "Well then, how
often does a man have a
sexual thought?"
Actually that would
make a good book, "The
'Unexpurgated' Chronicles
of A Sexual Thought Coun-
ter." Underwritten by the
Ford Foundation, no doubt.
Throughout the years
I've seen that number
dance around. Every 60 sec-
onds. Every seven minutes
(that seems a bit long), to
unbelievable lapses of time
(An hour! The longest time
every recorded by the cel-
ebrated, celibate Trappist
monk of the renowned Our
Lady of Guadalupe Mon-
astery). And then you have
to take into consideration
we are the same guy we
were 25,000 years ago. Unk,
our distant, distant cousin,
these are his numbers, too.
Without all the added stim-
.ulation provided by our
21st century culture.
American men are sur-
rounded by images of sexu-
ality. That is our condition.
It is a byproduct, an obser-
vation, a transition (?), a
comment on our culture
today. That can change.
Our television and print
advertising is a cornucopia
of fertility, of provocatively
clad maidens in every imag-
inable environment. In the
car. On the sidelines. Under
the stairs. Laughing at the


Letters to


Auto bailout a no-go
for small business
As Congress wrestles with what do
to about the problems with De-
troit's automakers, they should re-
member one thing. Small business
owners are adamant: Don't ask us
to send our tax dollars to Detroit to
pay for their mistakes without sig-
nificant restructuring and effective
independent oversight.
Proposals to.provide as much
as $50 billion to the "big three"
auto companies are a misguided
attempt to bail out companies
that did not get into this situation
because of the current credit crisis,
but because of a long series of deci-
sions that have led these corpora-
tions to where they are today.
While Detroit has been shed-
ding American jobs, small busi-
nesses have been creating them. It's
unfair to these entrepreneurs and
small-business owners to ask them
to help pay for gold-plated health
care plans, generous pensions and
platinum-level retirement benefits
they don't have and can't afford.
The cost of health care benefits
alone is staggering. For example,
in 2005, Ford spent a record $11


billion on health care benefits.
That same year, GM estimated that
health care costs added more than
$1,500 to the cost of every new ve-
hicle the company built. Even un-
der the restructured union agree-
ment that goes into effect in 2010,
the companies will still pay $15 bil-
lion for these benefits.
The costs for workers is higher
than average as well. The Big
Three's workers' average cost is
$73.20 per hour, while Toyota's
workers average cost is $48 an hour.
The average for all American wbrk-
ers is $28.48. -
In the meantime, other auto-
makers are thriving. This year,
Honda will open a new manufac-
turing facility in Indiana, while Kia
and Toyota will open plants next
year in Georgia and Mississippi, re-
spectively. These will be followed in
2010 by a new Volkswagen plant in
Tennessee.
A strong domestic auto industry
is important to the U.S. economy
and many small businesses. But any
taxpayer dollars provided to the
companies must come with spe-
cific conditions, starting with top-
to-bottom scrutiny of everything


from the effectiveness of current
management to the nature of their
union and supplier contracts.
The Big Three and the auto-
workers unions must make serious
changes if they want to survive.
Once these costs are reduced, the
price of domestic cars will come
down as well, and U.S. auto dealers
will be more competitive.
We should learn a lesson from
the success of the federal Air Trans-
portation Stabilization Board,
which helped to support a restruc-
turing of the airline industry after
Sept. 11. Any public assistance to
the Big Three must come with the
same type of rigorous oversight
to ensure that taxpayers' interests
are protected. And that protection
should be Job One in any debate
over this issue.
- Todd Stottlemyer
President of the National Federation of
Independent Business
Washington, D.C.

Remember the importance
of drug labels
Americans today have access to
more cutting-edge pharmaceuti-
cals than ever before. But medi-


cines carry risks. Failing to pay at-
tention to a drug's label can lead to
serious side effects.
Only the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration has the authority to
approve drug labels, but that may
soon change. The Supreme Court
is about to decide a landmark case
about drug labels. The question
before the Court is whether expert
scientists at the FDA or local juries
should have the final say regarding
what's written on a prescription
drug's warning label. *
If the Court rules against drug
maker Wyeth in a Vermont lawsuit,
drugs could bl required to have
different labels in each state. And
labels might end up reading like
complex legal disclaimers.
Regardless of what the Supreme
Court decides,.this case should
remind all of us about the impor-
tance of carefully reading and fol-
lowing the instructions on drug
labels. There's no better- time than
the holidays to make sure your
loved ones are doing just that.
- Peter Pitts
President of the Center for Medicine in the
Public Interest
Former FDA associate commissioner


bistro. Powerfully strutting
bras and panties for Victo-
ria Secret. Drinking beer,
fer sure. Always with alco-
hol. Always associated with
good times. And success.
If the good life in Amer-
ica doesn't have at its core
a message of sexuality, well,
please consider me out-of-
step. How does a car rental
company rent its cars? By
having the smiling, radiant
pleasure-promising tempt-
ress offer her man a choice
of black or red nighties and
off they go. The scene clos-
ing with passionate kisses
and a fade to hot embraces
with his hand deftly slip-
ping the "Do Not Disturb"
card through the tighten-
ing door. Oh, my. I hope the
Overdrive kicks in tonight.
So if we are not think-
ing about sex enough
already, every 45 seconds
(Hmmm?), another ad to
get men to directly think
about Mr. Johnson pops
up. Even if you're not in the
market for Viagra or Cialis,
who knows when Mr. John-
son might take, you know,
a vacation. Or, you've read
that, "Hey, take it anyway,
it, uh, magnifies the expe-
rience." Ha! Better living
through chemistry!
That's right. The heart-
break of LNS is a medical
condition of gigantic pro-
portions. But there's a pill
for "it!" Oh, gawd, have the
Nobel Prizes for medicine
been announced yet?
Aside: If it's true that
insurance companies will
cover LNS and the prescrip-
tions, they damn well better
be providing birth control
for women, no questions
asked.
I was at a party Satur-


day night, actually riding
on a pontoon boat on the
St. John's, and I asked my
assembled boat mates if
they weren't just out and
out sick of Viagra ads. To a
person we were, and then
one of the women said, "We
were recently watching a
TV ad on Viagra and it was
going on about, 'If you have
an erection lasting...'"
And a young man less
than 20 sitting with us said,
"Lasting longer than four
hours? I get four in an hour,
what's with longer than...?"
Sigh. Youth. That's a
true story. Yet, Mr.Johnson
shows up for four hours
and you're going to call a
medic? Well, there you have
it. When Ripley's should be
called, we're calling 911?
Go figure. I jest. I imagine
there are worse things that
can happen to Mr. Johnson
than not showing up?
I could write another
1,000 words on this subject
but enough already. And fer
cryin' out loud, can Cialis
please put the couple in a
tub together. And why are
the gals in these ads always
so much hotter than the
men? Is that just my imagi-
nation? Oh, I see, it ain't the
women. It's all about the in-
scrutable Mr.Johnson! It's
getting Boooorrring!
I close with another
unattributed quote: "What
do you get when you mix
chocolate and Viagra?"
"Oh, Henry!"



T JEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


""I~-"~---~-~~---I-~"'-"'~~~~-----~







I age I, IIrMrIVOJ, fLVP*Im 4W P M -,r- W r


Play On!




2'~'\~ I


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved Wife Joy Roney

Len's hocus-pocus

(Fiction)
L a Scala, on 54th
Street, between Sixth
and Seventh, was
a New York restaurant
I hardly ever went into
without seeing someone to
speak to, or to wave at.
Of course, Joe Dimaggio
was there at his table
almost every night. Luciano
Pavarotti was often at a
round table in a corner,
sometimes with Sophia
Loren. Luciano, Sophia and
I lived close to each other
on Central Park South, five
blocks away.
One day a few years ago
I was looking down at a
newly arrived plate of La
Scala's sinfully delicious
saltimbocca a la Romana
when I heard a resonant
bass voice say my name.
I looked up quickly, and
there stood Len Thomas, a
singer I had known well in
Germany.
Len, who was 10 years
my senior, was born in
Wales, and, from age 10,
raised in South Africa. He
was singing Wagner operas
in Germany when World


War II broke out. He had
been married a long time
to a German soprano. They
had a couple of bilingual
daughters whom I got to
know when their father
and I sang together in
Frankfurt, where they lived.
How Len was able to
remain in Germany and
sing opera in all the impor-
tant theaters during the
Hitler era was a mystery.
'He was a citizen of a
British Empire nation that
was at war with Germany.
Most foreigners who tried
such a.stunt would have
ended up in a.concentra-
tion camp.
Of course, Len had spo-
ken Afrikaans all his life,
and his fluent German
sounded like German in
some kind of bucolic dia-
lect.
The fact that he had
been married to a German
for many years probably
shielded him from harm.
He once intimated to
me that he had spied for
England during the War. I
was never sure if that was
true. It's the kind of story
any American, Frenchman
or Englishman might have
made up after the War as
an excuse for having been
singing for the Fiihrer all
through the Nazi years.
When Len sat down at
my table in La Scala that
day, we had a lot of catch-
ing up to do about the
years since we last sang
together, which was in the
Hamburgische Staatsoper.
Len had read that I was
still singing actively in
North America, France and
Italy. When I asked him
about his career, he said
he was looking for jobs in
American opera compa-
nies.
It was tough going,
he said. You see, Len had
always sung everything in
German, and had confined


his career to Germany,
Austria and Switzerland.
He had never sung in
France or Italy as I had, and
therefore knew nothing in
Italian or French, which are
the languages most sung
in the big American opera
companies. I finally got
around to asking him why
he wasn't still singing in
Germany.
"That's an ugly little
story, my friend," he said,
taking a swallow of San
Pietro Chianti.
"How's that?" I asked.
"You remember a
conductor named Horst
Radzo?"
"Yeah," I said. "And I
always thought he was a
third-rate little Nazi runt.
Unpleasant to be around.
Even worse to sing with."
"You said it! Well, I'm
a tall guy, and he always
seemed to have it in for me.
Unluckily, I often had to
do the big Wagner operas
with the little bastard -
'Meistersinger,' 'Lohengrin,'
'Parsifal,' 'Hollinder,'
'Tristan,' 'Tannhaiuser,' 'The
Ring' - the whole kit and
caboodle."
"And?" I asked.
"Well, Radzo had a
suspicion I had spied for
England during the War.
You know he was in the S.S.,
don't you?"
"I heard that," I said.
"I was ready to call it
quits and go somewhere
where I could buy a little
land and become a gentle-
man farmer."
"Like?"
"Like South Africa, or
perhaps out west here in
the States."
"What stopped you,
Len?"
"It was Radzo. The
little bastard finagled a
way to get the Deutsche
Biihnengenossenschaft
to tie up my retirement
money. Everything I had


put away in my union
account all through the
years. I can't lay my hands
on a Pfennig."
"How'd he do it?" I
asked.
"The union is run by a
board, a Verwaltung, as you
know," he said. "The people
on it are fairly powerful
bureaucrats who may or
may not have been Nazis.
The fact is, they balk when
it comes to paying out pen-
sion money to any foreign-.
er they think was against
the Vaterland during the
War."
"Len, were you a spy, or
not?" I asked.
"It doesn't really matter
anymore," was all he want-
ed to say.
"Where's your wife
now?"
"Hannah - she's
in Germany. In the'
Schwarzwald ... Freiburg.
She's still a German citi-
zen."
"That Radzo was some
Schwein!" I said.
"Well, I must say, I hated
the little Kraut. The way
he'd slink into the Kantine,
wearing his greasy little
reddish toupee, and take
his coffee all the way back
to his studio, away from us
all.
"Rehearsals with him
used to disgust me. He
would get into screaming
rages. I've heard that comes
from insecurity. Anyway,
he always had to be right
about everything. One
thing: He could never ever
look me in the eye. Anyone
who knows men knows
what that means. He knew
that the whole Frankfurt
Opera was on to him, and
hated his guts."
Len sucked in another
Schluck of Chianti. "There's
more ..." he went on.
"Oh?"
"Last year I had to go
back to Capetown ... my


mother died."
"I'm sorry."
"Yes. Well, she was over
90. In Africa I stayed with
the very dear old fam-
ily retainer who raised
me from a little lad - an
ancient and spooky black
lady who does fortunes and
voodoo and that sort of
thing."
We called the waiter and
ordered espressos.
"What about her?"
"Well, she told me that
she had once killed a white
man who raped her daugh-
ter."
"Did she get caught?"
"No. According to her,
she killed him simply by
saying some magic words
and aiming them his way.
The guy up and died the
next day."
"Coincidence maybe," I
said.
"Perhaps. We'll find out
soon enough."
"How?"
"Simple. I aimed her
words at Radzo last night
in bed. I'll write them down
on this slip of paper for
you. Keep it. You never
know..."
Next morning, The New
York Times reported that
conductor Horst Radzo had
collapsed and died while
rehearsing 'Walkiire' in the
Berlin Stdidtische Oper.
Did that fact make Len
a murderer? How could
it? He had only repeated
meaningless syllables of
gibberish.
Yesterday I found Len's
slip of paper in my wallet.
On it, nine strange sounds
are printed out phoneti-
cally.
Now I'm in a quandary...
You see, there's someone
I detest - and with good
reason.
Up to now I could never
do anything about it -
legally, that is.


FALLEN APPLES NOT FAR FROM MY TREE #78


The beautiful Second
Annual Peacock Ball of
the Winter Park Historical
Association, Phil Eschbach,
president, enthralled a
sold-out Murrah Civic
Center on Friday night,
Nov. 21. A delicious dinner
at tables for eight amid a
great many varied hap-
penings guaranteed not
a wasted moment. Tables
were festooned with vases
of peacock feathers. Slides
depicting women who
have served Winter Park
nobly were accompanied
by praise from Master of
Ceremonies Thad Seymour.
Women honored were:
Rose Bynum, Eleanor
Fisher, Eula Pearl Jenkins
and Peggy Strong. Mayor
David Strong presented
the ladies with plaques
and Keys to the City.
Soprano Ahna Eschbach
sang "O mio babbino caro"
from Puccini's "Gianni
Schicchi" with a fine, full
natural voice and affect-
ing emotion. The excellent
Buzzcatz band was on hand


for dancing. A live auc-
tion conducted by Michael"
Nutter included: a Casa
Feliz party for 50, a " Ride
to school on a fire engine,"
ballroom dancing lessons,
and a Don Sondag Jr. paint-
ing plus scenic boat tour. A
net intake of $45,000 more
than doubled last year's
proceeds. Co-chairs for
this highly successful eve-
ning were Twila Williams
and Linda Kulmann. Twila
opened the evening by giv-
ing well-deserved thanks
to the committee whose
members had contributed
much generous work. I was
pleased to be sitting with
Mrs. James Gavin, widow of
the late, great, Eisenhower
stalwart and ambassador
to France, General James
Gavin. Remember: Save
Nov. 20, 2009, for the Third
Annual Peacock Ball!

"Bankruptcy" is a helpful,
productive concept, and
doesn't get the government
involved in solving the
problems of private busi-


ness organizations. A bank-
rupt business has the time
and possibility to work out
its own salvation.

This year's Festival of Trees
at the Orlando Art Museum
was an occasion not to
be missed. Different local
firms and groups provided
beautifully decorated
Christmas trees for display,
and for sale. The museum
benefited financially.

Daytona Beaches
International Festival pres-
ents some of Florida's finest
world-class classical music.
At the end of April through
the first week of May,
the magnificent London
Symphony Orchestra will
be playing a variety of pro-
grams including the Mahler
First Symphony (The
Titan) and a Spanish night.
(Tickets: 386-257-7790)

My b.w., coming from Ohio,
likes this cold weather -
this old Winter Parker can't
wait 'tilit warms up!


A neighbor tells me, "It's
tough to sell a house in
Winter Park, now." If that's
true, it's the first time I
can ever remember. Aren't
there always people wait-
ing on the sidelines to buy
a Winter Park home when
prices ease a bit?

Einstein's definition of an
insane person: "Somebody
who keeps doing the same
thing over and over while
expecting different results
each time."
Michael Ledeen writes,
"Only a madman can
believe that negotiating
with the Iranians will pro-
duce some result different
from what we've had now
for 30 years, including very
recently under our current
'administration. But many
continue to believe it."

In analyses of causes lead-
ing to the recent mort-
gage foreclosures fiasco,
three political names are
often mentioned as hav-
ing helped to push this ill-


fated project along: Barney
Frank, Maxine Waters and
Christopher Dodd. A great
many people were aided
in buying homes whose
mortgage requirements
were too much for them.
Bankers seemed happy
with the arrangements, as
were realty salesmen, and
owners - but it was a short,
happy trip. At the end, who
was a winner?

The question of Hillary
Clinton's appropriateness
as Secretary of State surely
involves Bill's doings. He
has reportedly received
money from various Middle
Eastern countries. Can
Hillary successfully mrrain-
tain simultaneous privacy
and objectivity both with
Bill and the countries
involved?


>TK RO NEY
Louis Roney's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at LRoney@cfl.rr.com.


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


P 12 Thursday Decemb 8







Winter Park / Maitla r


Thursday, December 4, 2008 Page 13


i- ln Notices


ill THE Il ,il .li C l i .'i: ' THI 'y1f ' Iri, iiiisIll.1 IA L
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CA-10866
WATERFORO LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
EVON P.KNIGHT, and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as
unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Evon P. Knight
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Lot 39, Waterford Lakes Tract N22, Phase 1,
according to the plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 36, Pages 25 and 26, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is POHL & SHORT, PA., 280 W.
Canton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box 3208,
Winter Park, Florida 32790, on or before December
24, 2008, and file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
DATED this 21 day of November, 2008.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: Corine Herry
Civil Court Seal
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance.with the.Americans With Disabllities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
12/4,12/11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2008-CP-1865
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
DANIEL LEE BRANSON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DANIEL LEE
BRANSON, deceased, whose date of death was May
10, 2008, File # 2008-CP-1865, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is Post Office Drawer
C, Sanford, FL 32772. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the Personal Rep-
resentative's attomey are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice has been served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LAST OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OFTHE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OFTHIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: No-
vember 27, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
JOHN D. MAHAFFEY, JR., ESQUIRE
FLORIDA BAR NUMBER: 098690
Mahaffey & Leitch
2461 West State Road 426, Suite 1001
Oviedo, FL 32765
(407) 894-2081
Personal Representative:
DAVID EUGENE BRANSON
5079 loblolly Bay Lane
Orlando, FL 32829
11/27,12/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2008-CP-2380-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARILYN F. DIANA,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Marilyn F.
Diana, deceased, File Number 2008-CP-2380-0,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom-a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the de-
cedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF.THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice Is
November27, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative
Suellen D. Fagin, Esquire
FBN 561789
1016 Delaney Park Drive
Orlando, Florida 32806
(407) 898-1018
Personal Representative
Karen Belig
5508 Banwell Place
Raleigh, NC 27613
919-847-1357
11/27,12/4










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iI THE 1I:lk'lIr S1 III T IUF TiF jHE I!riH .ii " II: . 1
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2008-CP-002492-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CORDIE E. WALKER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CORDIE E.
WALKER, deceased, whose date of death was Oc-
tober 7, 2008; File Number 48-2008-CP-002492-0,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which Is
425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this courtWITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: De-
cember 4,2008.
RICHARD A. LEIGH, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 119591
Swann & Hadley, PA
1031 W. Morse Blvd.; Suite 350
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: 407-647-2777
Facsimile: 407-398-3114
KATHERINE W. WRIGHT
Personal Representative
924 W. 13th Street
Lakeland, Florida 33805
12/4,12/11
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Pursuant to Ch 713.585(6) FS. United American Lien
& Recovery as agent with power of attorney will sell
thefollowing vehicles) to the highest bidder subject
to any liens; net proceeds deposited with the clerk
of court; owner/lienholder has right to hearing and
post bond; owner may redeem vehicle for cash sum
of lien; all auctions held in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lienor facility; cash or ca-
shier check; 15% buyer prem; any person inter-
ested ph (954) 563-1999
Sale date December 26 2008 @10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
19844 1962 Volkswagon vin#: 4529602 lienor auto
pro of Orlando 5204 edgewater dr Orlando If 407-
522-5532 lien amt $2558.52
19845 1998 Lincoln vin#: 1LNFM82W1WY736059
Ilenor gilbert auto repair 9615 s orange ave Or-
lando fl 407-857-2060 lien amt $3125.48
19846 1991 Ford vin#: 1FOKF37H5MKA22764
lienor: jarett consulting svcs inc commercial vehicle
svcs 1325 w Anderson st Orlando fl 407-843-1811
lien amt $7567.88
19847 1986 Ford vin#: 1FDKF37H8GNB22831
lienor: jarett consulting svcs inc commercial vehicle
svcs 1325 w Anderson st Orlando fl 407-843-1811
lien amt$ 5037.74
19848 1985 Ford vin#: 1FDJF37Y1FNA67939
lienor:jarett consulting svcs inc commercial vehicle
svcs 1325 w Anderson st Orlando fl 407-843-1811
lien amt $1875.50
19849 1989 Ford vin#: 2FDKF37H3KCA38480
lienor: jarett consulting svcs inc commercial vehicle
svcs 1325 w Anderson st Orlando fl 407-843-1811
lien amt $1902.45
19850 1985 Ford vin#: 1FDJF37Y4FNA70401
lienor: jarett consulting svcs inc commercial vehicle
svcs 1325 w Anderson st Orlando fl 407-843-1811
lien amt $1902.45.
19851 1984 Ford vin#: 1FDJF37Y7ENA54529
lienor: jarett consulting svcs inc commercial vehicle
svcs 1325 w Anderson st Orlando fl 407-843-1811
lien amt $1902.45
sale date January 2, 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
19864 1997 Ford vin#: 1FBJS31S7VHA79616
lienor: central florida auto repair 1779f s obt Apopka
tl 407-880-8221 lien amt 45289.90
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
& 1911
12/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2008-CP-2100
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
DANIEL JOSEPH SHEEHAN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DANIEL JO-
SEPH SHEEHAN, deceased, whose date of death
was October 3, 2008, File No. 2008-CP-2100, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
is Post Office Drawer C, Sanford, FL 32772. The
names and addresses of the Personal Representa-
tive and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice has been served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LAST OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice Is: De-
cember 4,2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
JOHN 0. MAHAFFEY, JR., ESQUIRE
FLORIDA BAR NUMBER: 098690
Mahaffey & Leitch
2461 West State Road 426, Suite 1001
Oviedo, FL 32765
(407) 894-2081
Personal Representative:
BONNIE KAYE RICH
1030 McKinnon Avenue
Oviedo, FL 32765
12/4,12/11


in THi i i. I'I T i. 1 IIIHIT , n I :fi Ivi jie inJi.i rj
S: iillll'- a . I3 I tit J E v I iirfj
File No: 2008-CP-2607-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BRUCE M. WIGLE, II,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of BRUCE M.
WIGLE, II, deceased, whose date of death was
November 2, 2008, and whose Social Security
Number is XXX-XX-0941, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Room 340, Orlando, Florida 32801. The names
and addresses of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice Is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
November 27, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
BRUCE M. WIGLE, III
Florida Bar No. 0293954
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, PA.
PO. Box 1328
Winter Park, FL 32790-1328
(407) 644-9801
Personal Representative:
BRUCE M. WIGLE, III
1422 Cumbie Street -
Orlando, FL 32804


STOP LEG CRAMPS Legraw


BEFORE THEY STOP YOU. COlcet



Calcet's triple calcium formula isj UrPvni

designed to help stop low calcium leg
cramps. Just ask your pharmacist. Triple Calcium
plu3 Vitarni D



s s a a . . a : n . . . ..


11/27,12/4


.-.


Copyrighted Matealo



^ Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers

,I 1
4111111h �0 -rI T I & , i-


, '.. " i "




: O observer meets all statutory requirements
. n .


ONE STOP SHOP FOR CENTRAL FLORIDA LEGALS
.As Ite publishers of ie Winter Pan -Mallana ODserver ((range County. FL)
and the Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice iSemlnole County. FLI we are your 1 stop
shop tor central Florida legal notice aoaerlising.

IMPROVED CASE MANAGEMENT
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*PRICE GUIDE
Public NollcePublic Sale $9coi1 incn
Notice to Credilors $42 50'weeK
Notice of Sale $55'week.
Dissolution of Mariage 125
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-, "fj.n~ae ...... I,...
PLACE YOUR AD
Now Accepling emaild uoumtltal Ju-l emaill us a
fetr fle Ot inie nnolr I, Ue pEbli .l1rd and We'il du
S Ene rest Upon completion ot the avertisingl we
immirialeily send pyou a nioradied alid-i,l
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* .,'


TITLE 6. CIVIL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (Chs. 45-88)
CHAPTER 50 LEGAL AND OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENTS

� 50 031 rJewsrpaprs in wnii.n legal nutices and process may oe
published

No notice or publlcallon reaurred lo be published in a newspaper
In the nature of or in lieu ul process oa any Kind. nature character
or descriptlor provided lor under any law ri tne Stale. wheTherI
hermiloure or nereaher enabled and tiptn[rr pertaining lo
conrtriuCtre service or tie inieiaing, assuming, revi6ewng,
exerwiinng or enlorcirig uri-dincion or Dower by any court in tns
Stale. or any nollce of sale or property re31 or personal for taees,
sate, county or municipal or uneritt's, guralarn 5 adr driniltrator s
or any sale .ldae puruant Io any lUa r t
rny otner publication or nIl.e dining lo any aurias 01 the slal.
or any counT munl ,ci un Oer political suBo dliiion thereot
inill be idleeinerlt d a ee pu0l n ed in acc 1oance w itUi me
I p-eY& Der rui s ri ua e r
eI stue" proVi gtor suc h putliLation, unless tre jame snall nave
ear. lut fo' r tme pres':nnea pera ol lime rEquirea for iuchr
puiblica3ll,, a newsoapeI vnich 31 Mpe lime ol sucn publication
'hall rn.in .-n .j rIr i 3ye. r ~n l naie Deen Enlererl
fa rirj al' mian i at i a iii l i l ll Ojr ine 3 niewtp 'i sij'ceuifor ol nawa5Dper
n,:h ligetner nave Dben 5-io puoDliried irovidad r,;wever' tjal
n.ining Nh.,.en :ontnaind ha311l apply whefi. n any ,Couni mnere Sn311
oe no n ispaper in eP-P'ence whricn Erianl have Dten publshed
fjr Ine lenlgin uil lo me bovP pre5':ri.ed N.I lg'31 piblibcaOlln of
;any Vin , nature or aef:r plion r I, nerer n ?linn a 'inall D- vl3id
or r.,ilin wo nhel, O( Ce ,n i ,iplani: . w,ln ine stalurii. prov,iln,
i,ji iui-, ,uoiI3ati(.r, urioie in. ;im .nrip rrn ire D OT-en pu hibirir,
n aC',:, an, . r va i ne A ire, , l ww u : N P or ol ;muri
put l.i slra n Cnai31 Le ,Ta.! y , Ij,'1 ,T liiT v


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Pace 14 Thursday, December 4, 2008


. Marketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds- of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

CAREGIVER WANTED
CAREGIVER/Housekeeper wanted for my
100 year old mother at her lovely home -
Lake Sue, Winter Park. Various times day &
night. Call 317 545-5540 after 10 a.m. or
email to rosemail@comcast.net

EXPERIENCED DRIVERS
Experienced Drivers W/Class A CDL, Home
weekends, East Coast Runs, Fruit and
Foliage up and refrigerated back. Call MCT
@ 877-564-6628







WATERBRIDGE TOWNHOUSE 32789
On cul-de-sac near Tennis Courts. Walk to
middle and high school, bus, W.P. hospital,
dog park. $299,900 (was $340,000). Winter
Park Land Co. Realty 407-644-2900



SENIOR APARTMENTS
Winter Park - The Plymouth Apartments:
Studio/1BR Senior Apts, All Utilities Incl.,
Newly Renovated. Rents start at $591. Call
407-644-4551


MIlXl flf
FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.





GARAGE SALE
Garage sale 12/5 and 12/6 8am-12:00.
1017 California Creek Drive off Seminole
Creek near Seminole Comm. College
(Lockwood campus). Furniture, household
itenis, bikes.

GARAGE SALE
Garage sale, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday,
Saturday, Sunday, Dec. 5, 6 and 7. 2310
Sierra Lane, Maitland. 407-718-0820.
Household items, women's clothes, shoes,
furniture, Christmas items, and much more.


HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural herbal patches, overnight
detoxification, pain relief: knees, back, foot,
gout, sciatic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer
treatment. Attach to foot - great night's
sleep. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.org
(407) 970-1483





Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.





A * ; ; gl~:(r sg


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you doh't
have time to do - yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or Interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call-Scott at 321-460-3905.

KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
Repair and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets,
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensed/insured/
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0061

CARPENTER
Robert A. Paige. Specializing in finished
carpentry to termite and wood-rot damage.
Interior and exterior. Call me and ask if I can
do your job. References available. 352-552-
6157

NEED HELP WITH
CLEANING, ERRANDS?
Senior citizen seeking part-time house
cleaning, we'll also run errands, grocery
shopping, and doctor's office, etc. 407-838-
8075 or 407-756-2361




Adoption
Pregnant? Considering adoption? 'A
successful educated woman seeks to adopt,
and needs your help! Will be a loving full-
time mom. Financial security. Expenses
paid. Call Lisa. (800) 900-2980, pin 00. FL
Bar# 0150789.

Announcements
Run your ad STATEWIDE! Run your classified
ad in over 100 Florida newspapers reaching
over 4 MILLION readers for $475. Call this
newspaper or (866)742-1373 for more
details or visit: www.florida-classifieds.
com.

Auctions
AUCTIONS! Saturday December 6th 10:00
A.M. 211 Acres� Highway 142, Selmer,
Tennessee. 1:00 P.M. 85 Acres- Harris
Road, Crump, Tennessee. FREE BROCHURE:
(877)914-7653. Garner Auctions, Inc.
Ken Garner TN FIRM 4293. www.
garnerauctionsinc.com.

Auto Donations
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON UNITED BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION Free Mammograms, Breast
Cancer Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing,
Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted,
(888)468-5964.

Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800
in a day? 30 Local Machines and Candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033. CALL
US: We will not be undersold!

Be Empowered! Realize Financial Fulfillment
with a Proven System! Six-figure Potential.
Returning 2 min-phone calls. Not MLM. Full
Training & Support. References Available.
Serious Call (800)940-6301, www.
cashresultstoday.com

Create your own prosperity and personal
freedom with your own financial bailout
plan. Go to: www.financialfreedom2008.net
or call (888)848-4777.

Cars for Sale
Police Impounds! 95 Honda Civic $700! 94
Acura Integra $700! 93 Honda Accord $650!
for listings call (800)366-9813 Ext 9275.

Employment Services
Post Office Now Hiring! Avg Pay $20/hr or
$57K/yr Including Federal Benefits and OT.
Placed by adSource not affiliated w/USPS
who hires. Call (866)713-4492.

Learn to Operate a Crane or Bull Dozer Heavy
Equipment Training. National Certification.
Financial & Placement Assistance. Georgia
School of Construction. www.Heavy5.com
Use code "FLCNH" or call (866)218-2763.

Health
Feeling Anxious About The Future? Buy and
read Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard. Price:
$20.00. Order Now. Free Shipping. www.
DianeticsTampa.org or Call (813)872-0722.

Help Wanted
No Truck Driver Experience-No Problem.
Wil-Trans Trucking Will Teach You How to
Drive. Company Sponsored CDL Training. Be
OTR in Three Weeks. (888)368-1205. Must
be 23.

DRIVERS: CALL TODAY! Sign-On Bonus 35-
41cpm Earn over $1000 weekly Excellent
Benefits Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR
(877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Driver- PTL Needs Company Drivers- CDL-A
earn up to 40 cpm. 1/2cpm increase every
60K miles. Average 2,800 miles/week.
www.ptl-inc.com Call (877)740-6262.

Driver-BYNUM TRANSPORT- needs qualified
drivers for Central Florida- Local & National
OTR positions. Food grade tanker, no hazmat,
no pumps, great benefits, competitive pay &
new equipment. (866)GO-BYNUM. Need 2
years experience.

Homes For Rent
3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $11,000! Only $199/
Mo! 5% down 15 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4/
BR $259/Mo! For listings (800)366-9783
Ext 5798.

Never Rent Again! Buy, 4Br 2Ba $15,400!
Only $199/Mo! 3 Br $11,000! 5% down
15years 8%. HUD Homes Available! for
listings (800)366-9783 ext 5796.

Miscellaneous
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical,*Business,*Paralegal,*Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121, www.CenturaOnline.
com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified
- Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

NOW AVAILABLE! 2008 POST OFFICE
JOBS. $18-$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE, PAID
TRAINING, FED BENEFITS, VACATIONS. CALL
(800)910-9941 TODAY! REF #FL08..

Real Estate
-NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS-Handyman
special bordering U.S.F.S. paved dr., well,
septic, singlewide with shop near Lake
Nantahala, borders paved road. Only
$49,000. http://valleytownrealty.com
(800)632-2212 valleytownrealty@verizon.
net.

VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS 2 acres on mountain
top near New River State Park, great fishing,
view, private. $29,500 must sell, call owner
(866)789-8535.

TENNESSEE.LAND RUSH! 1+acre to 2acre
homesites, wood, views. Starting at $59,900.
Tenn River & Nick-a-Jack view tracts now
available! Retirement guide rates' this area
#2 in U.S. places to retire. Low cost of living,
no impact fee. (330)699-2741 or (866)550-
5263, Ask About Mini Vacation!

MID TENN MTNS By Owner, 5 acres, perfect
mountaintop cabin-site w/woods. Small
stream in back of property. A must see!
$26,900. Owner Financing (931)445-3611.

South Carolina low country Hunting/
Recreation Tracts for sale. Close to 1-95 in
Bamberg CO. Peaceful/secluded and loaded
with deer, turkey, hogs and timber value too.
42ac-85ac-120ac-235ac-500ac-730ac- all
on the Little Salkahatchie river. Roads, game
plots, stands new Ready to hunt. Priced
below market!! Call Now (803)826-6033
(Brokers Protected).

Skilled Trades/Crafts
JOB CRAFTERS, INC. NOW HIRING!!!!! FIRST
CLASS SHIPYARD CRAFTS LONG TERM
WORK FL, AL, MS OVER TIME & PER DIEM
PHONE: (800)371-7504 OR (251)433-1270
FAX: (251)433-0018 EOE www.jobcrafters.
net.







Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central' Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Landscaping and
Grounds Keeping Worker
Job Description: Responsible for performing
general landscaping maintenance to
maintain an attractive and appealing
landscaped facility according to established
standards. Performs planting, transplanting,
irrigating, detecting plant, annual, tree or
shrub diseases or insect infestation, cutting
and laying sod, mowing, hedge trimming,
and helping to keep campus free of debris.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $11.44 per hour
Job Order Number: 9361500

Engineer II
Job Description: Responsible for working in
a general hospitality environment providing
maintenance services. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9361819


Body Shop Technician
Job Description: Responsible for all phases
of crash repair from light to heavy. Applies
undercoating, gravel guard, seam sealer and
lubricants as needed. Re-assembles parts
after painting. Accountable for parts, upkeep
of area, and tools (personal and shop). Work
Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $16.00 per hour
.Job Order Number: 9375443

Account Executive
Job Description: Responsible for soliciting
new business through prospecting and cold
calling, managing and growing existing
assigned accounts/budgets, identifying
clients' advertising needs and developing
and presenting customized solutions to
meet those needs. Achieves-sales budgets
and collects on the accounts. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:30am-5:30pm.
Pay Rate: $10.38-$17.31 per hour
Job Order Number: 9371546

Power Generation Service Technician
Job Description: Responsible for servicing
and repairing generators and industrial
engines. Operates machinery and performs
routine maintenance calls. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9358327

Mechanical Drafter/Designer
Job Description: Responsible for
creating, designing and maintaining
drawings, assemblies, and 3-D models
using a computer aided drafting system
in a mechanical, electrical; and optical
environment. Works with and manipulates
AutoCAD legacy files. Edits and creates
documents; makes copies, scans, files
documents, and completes standards in
engineering department. Converts AutoCAD
files to models, assemblies, and drawings.
Creates operation manuals and product
test procedures. Writes incorporating and
distributing engineering change orders.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $21.63-$24.04 per hour
Job Order Number: 9367888

Database Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for consulting
with management and clients to review
project proposals and to determine goals,
time frame, funding limitations, hardware
and software needs, procedures for
accomplishing project,staffing requirements,
and allotment of resources. Establishes
standards and procedures for the initial build
out and delivery of both remote and hosted
database services delivery including change
management for delivery processes and
systems. Formulates and defines systems
architectures and direction to align with
strategic business initiatives. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $90,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9371970

Production Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for greeting
customers. Takes and processes customer.
Picks up and delivers orders. Cleans office
and performs other duties as assigned.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374497

Kitchen Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for total food
production in the kitchen. Services the main
dining room and banquet operations. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $14.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374944

Driver
Job Description: Responsible for driving,
loading, and unloading truck. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.69 per hour
Job Order Number: 9375264

Office Manager
Job Description: Responsible for bookkeeping
and reconciling bank statements. Prepares
invoices and statements for membership
dues, magazine subscriptions, and items
for sale. Processes and prints checks.
Maintains the member database. Sets


up annual meeting events. Develops and
creates new membership benefits. Assists
with office operations and personnel
management. Analyzes regional activity
and makes recommendations. Assists in
the preparation of agendas and meeting
materials, takes minutes and follows up on
action items as necessary. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $30,000.00-$45,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9374974

Screen Print of Metals
and Plastics Person
Job Description: Responsible for burning silk
screens on light table using inks. Tracks and
keeps artwork organized.Washes and cleans
out silk screens. Reclaims and screens print.
Rounds corners, punches holes, and packs/
ships. Cuts metal and performs screen
printing of metals and plastics. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $600.00 per week
Job Order Number: 9375492

Clinical Product Specialist
Job Description: Responsible for providing
clinical information to assist-in the product
design. Implements, researches, designs,
tests and documents rules supporting
clinical guidelines. Performs research of
published clinical literature to support
product or clinical guideline development.
Provides customer support from a clinical
perspective on identifying and managing
individuals for care management activities.
Performs clinical and statistical quality
assurance of products and predictive model
results. Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-
6:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9375878

Medical Data Analyst
Job Description: Responsible for supporting
data processing and client implementation.
Analyzes and evaluates medical claims data
to support company's predictive modeling
tool targeted at health plans and performs
production functions as required to process
client data. Analyzes, audits, and processes
data. Tests, tracks, and monitors data
for quality, integrity, and trend analysis.
Conducts research as needed. Works with
clients on data specification requirements
and data issued identified. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:00am-6:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9375885

Product Manager
Job Description: Responsible for the
Overall product life cycle management of
the company's product lines. Develops
Business cases for new products, plans,
Sand implements product launch and
manages the marketing mix post-launch.
Manages incoming customer and market
requirements, evaluates their feasibility
with development, determines their costs,
and translates them into an overall product
road map. Supervises the daily activities for
each product line. Collects customer/market
requirements from internal and external
sources. Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-
6:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9375901

Outside Sales Person
Job Description: Responsible for making
outside sales calls, presentations and
attending local events to promote
organization to potential clients. Achieves
established revenue goals and generates
and closes major accounts. Ensures
adherence to all company safety policies
and procedures. Maintains accurate reports,
files, and client lists. Performs other duties
as directed by the Sales Manager. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $30,000.00 per year plus
commission
Job Order Number: 9374935

Aerospace Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for engineering,
electronic packaging, and supporting the
design and fabrication of various equipment
for missile related hardware. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $40.00-$50.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9375462


Office Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for filing,
ordering, and maintaining office supply
inventory. Inputs and catalogs digital jobsite
photographs. Orders plans and issues
transmittals. Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $30,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9375415

Medical Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for working
in a busy physician practice assisting the
doctors with patient care. Provides patient
care consistently. Services the needs of
all guests in a quick and efficient manner
upholding guest satisfaction. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9375395

Medical Receptionist/Front Office Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for
scheduling patient appointments and
answering telephones: Obtains new patient
insurance information and verifies patient
demographics. Obtains updated insurance
on established patients and acts as first
point of contact. Registers new patients
and updates existing patient information
in computer system. Checks patients in
and out. Files medical records'and prepares
charts for visits. Work Monday-Friday,
8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour plus tips
Job Order Number: 9375396

Quality Control Liaison
Job Description: Responsible for
carrying gut activities that promote the
overall clinical and billing quality of field
documentation. Coordinates with the
administrator to complete tasks related
to documentation quality assurance.
Reconciles initial audit of all patient care
reports for completeness, accuracy, and
quality of billing documentation. Facilitates
the timely submission of patient care report
requests. Coordinates review meetings with
field personnel to provide timely feedback
regarding documentation quality. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $6.79-$7.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9377055

Optical Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for the
alignment process of the integrated
detector cooler assembly targeting system.
Responsibilities include test requirement
specification and interpretation and system
level requirement analysis. Determines the
alignment specifications from mechanical
interface drawings, and the design of
mechanical and electrical interfaces.
Performs first system mechanical alignment
utilizing a prototype design. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $50.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9376885

Call Center/Customer Service
Representative Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for all duties
and responsibilities associated with the
title of Supervisor for Customer Service
Representatives in a call center environment.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9376561

Senior Operations Manager - Call Center
Job Description: Responsible for planning,
directing, or coordinating the operations of
the organization. Performs other duties as
assigned. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $35,000.00 per year
Job.Order Number: 9376555

Front Desk Receptionist
Job Description: Responsible for greeting
inbound clients. Assists clients with filling
out survey forms. Enters information
into database or manifest. Performs
administrative duties including organizing
files and.mailing out deals. Makes welcome
or followup calls and verifies contracts.
Assists with ordering and maintaining
office supplies. Greets guests and conducts
business. Work 4pm-1Opm, days may vary.
Pay Rate: $271.60-$300.00 per week plus
commission
Job Order Number: 9375765


WE BUY


HOUSES!
Sell Your Home
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-Is" with NO Repairs!

Call Now:

407-297-8749


Copyrighted Material


SSyndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers



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Thursday, December 4, 2008 Page 15


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^ MORNING LOW 540
DAYTIME HIGH 760
Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
7:04 a.m. 5:29 p.m. of rain ENE 5 mph


S MORNING LOW 51 0
DAYTIME HIGH 750
Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
7:05 a.m. 5:29 p.m. of rain NW 8 mph


MORNING LOW 46�
* DAYTIME HIGH 690

Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
7:06 a.m. 5:29 p.m. of rain NW 9 mph


NATIONAL
City F
Seattle 4
Los Angeles 4
Houston 3


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4/53
9/73
7/57


750
3 p.m. I


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a high near 75. Calm wind
54 becoming south southeast
around 5 mph.
6 a.m.
Friday


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Sat.
45/51
50/73
41/67


City
Atlanta
Chicago
New York


Friday
28/50
20/25
26/36


Sat.
29/53
15/31
30/37


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High
Saturday 7:21 a.m. 1:11 a.m.
Dec. 6 7:55 p.m. 1:26 p.m.
Sunday 8:24 a.m. 2:13 a.m.
Dec. 7 8:51 p.m. 2:21 p.m.

FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.
Jacksonville 50/67 46/64
Miami 63/76 60/77
Tampa 55/71 53/75
Pensacola 42/59 39/56


Sat.
37/43
38/44
42/51


INTERNATIONAL
City Friday
London 39/44
Paris , 40/47
Tokyo 44/63


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December 5th

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Presented by:




THE MAYFLOWER


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KELLY PRICE TOIE
# 'K L COFFEE COMPANY


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Central Park & Park Avenue
,A will be transformed into a Winter Wonderland at
The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce's
S Holiday Stroll. Bring the entire family for
- '- a night of cheer to this FREE event: V

Visit Santa Claus - Live Music
Clown . Lighting of the Tree
S7pm Movie ~ The Gremlins T
Fresh-Made Snow * Cookies for the Kids
Holiday Cards Winners Announced
Winning Designs Now Greeting Cards - Available for Purchase
1 .., + O t .S


THE VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS


; ,T..A, _ ,, YOUR NAME HERE, FROM YOUR CITY!
Want to see your picture in The Observer? Then e-mail it to editor@
observernewspapers.com. Files should be at least 1MB in size. Please
include as much information about the picture as possible, for example
where the image was taken, what time and who is in it.


B~l~e~Y......!"i.-J.';'i:J' '-**.. �*.~i~i~S-fe~:I.* *L*T.*'. �� "'iai 704. yk*", l.S'ii


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


aP e 16 Thursday Dece 8


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Volume 18. No. 12


SeniorObserver


F.t 19q9n


UtU


WHITNEY HAMRICK
GUEST REPORTER

Honing a lifelong pas-
sion for songs and lyr-
ics, a 75-year-old Winter
Springs resident conveys her life
experience of music apprecia-
tion and Jewish culture in "Oy
Vay - the Musical," which opens
in Maitland in January.
Elinor Brownstein, the play-
wright, said a performance at
the Schenectady Philharmonic
Symphony when she was just 5
years old lit the fire that's burned
in her for 70 years.
"I was absolutely enthralled
with the magic of the music and
the magic of all the instruments,"
Brownstein said. "And I kept say-
ing, 'Someday I'm going to play
an instrument.' I kept pulling
my father's arm, 'Can't we get
a piano? Can't we get a piano?'
Finally, he acquiesced and got
me a piano. I was just 7 then and
it was wonderful."
Never in her wildest dreams
had Brownstein thought her
musical would be performed
outside her living room until she
met Sandi Lacey, director of "Oy
Vay."
Brownstein hired Lacey to
transcribe her music from tape
to sheet music. Lacey found
herself humming the score
and encouraged Brownstein
to put on a production. Since
September, Brownstein .and
Lacey have taken turns hosting
rehearsals of the four-act play in


their homes.
"It's a surreal experience,"
Brownstein said. "As they're
rehearsing I am laughing because
what they are doing with and
what they are ad-libbing, I am
hysterical with how they are
developing their characters and
with their ad-lib, and I'm saying
to myself, 'Who really wrote this
play?'"
Two of the songs featured in
"OyVay"camefromBrownstein's
first musical, "Miracles," which
has yet to be performed.
The song "Discipline" details
the trials of a mother's resolve
to love her children. The refrain,
similar to a mantra, allows the
mother to remain calm in the
face of the irritation that can
come with raising children.
"Discipline your children with
lots of love," the song goes.
In a classic upbeat melody,
"Just Disserts" charms the crav-
ing for sweets: forget-dinner.
"Coconut custard, strawberry
shortcake, give me a lemon pie.
Pour on the fudge and scoop out
the whipped cream, and oy vay, I
could die. Forget the meats and
omit the corn and don't serve
me black-eyed peas. Spinach's a
waste and beans have not taste
and I'll have my chocolates
please."
Other songs play with keeping
kosher around the father-in-law,
arguments over a heated game
of mah-jongg, and observations

see PLAYWRIGHT on page B3


POU I U IY ISAAC BABUUUK - SNIUN UOStMVt
When she was 5 years old, Elinor Brownstein, above, saw an orchestral performance, and ever since she
has been enthralled with the magic of music. "Oy Vay - the Musical," a four-act play written by Brownstein,
premieres to the public in Maitland this January and features commentary on life and Jewish culture.


The ABCs of Medicare



Find out which plan fits your needs


It's as simple as ABC: If you or
someone you care for is a se-
nior citizen, it may pay to learn
the Medicare alphabet. Know-
ing how the different parts of
the program work could mean
more money saved and possibly
even better care.
Medicare Parts A and B have
been around since the begin-
ning of Medicare in the 1960s.
Part A covers hospital visits,
skilled nursing facilities and
some home health care. Part
B covers doctor visits, outpa-
tient visits and durable medical
equipment.Together, PartsAand


B are referred to as "traditional"
fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare,
or sometimes as "Original Medi-
care." It is estimated that FFS
Medicare only covers about 50
percent of the health care costs
incurred by beneficiaries. That
is why some people who choose
FFS Medicare also obtain a Medi-
care Supplemental plan. This
type of health insurance is also
known as Medigap coverage.
Medigap plans do just that -
cover the "gaps" that FFS Medi-
care does not cover. However,
Medigap plans can be extremely
costly. As a result, many seniors


are attracted to the broader cov-
erage and more predictable costs
of Medicare Part C, commonly
called Medicare Advantage.

Extra benefits
Medicare Advantage plans may
offer extra benefits such as vi-
sion and hearing coverage, an-
nual physical and worldwide
emergency coverage, and many
also include coverage for medi-
cations. These plans help with
your coordination ofcare across
the provider spectrum.

see MEDICARE on page B7


0 ~
407 -1 :-4,35


----~ I--------------






Lire r


SenrObserver

NEWS SENIORS CAN USE, SINCE 1990

Kyle P.Taylor
Publisher
kyle@observernewspapers.com


Alex Babcock
Editor
alexb@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
SReporter
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock-
Reporter
isaacb@observernewspapers.com


Amy K.D. Tobikl
Reporter
amykdtobik@bellsouth.net


609 Executive Drive, Winter Park, FL 32789

Observer Newspapers is a member of:
*Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
*Maitland Chamber of Commerce
eThe Florida Press Association
*Central Florida Press Club


Stephanie Erickson
Designer
stephanie@observernewspapers.com

Jonathan Gallagher
Copy Editor
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Tracy Craft
Advertising Sales
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


Pat Lovaglio
Advertising Sales
plovaglio@observernewspapers.com


I 407-628-8500 I WPMObserver.com

Published monthly by Observer Newspapers,
publishers of the:
*Winter Park/Maitland Observer
*Oviedo/Winter Springs Voice


Ihe l , .; r irit r e , i r r i ,:, er~ r;e -lr d :i :j'3v : i rl. r ,) r I~l ii; ii , :,i
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Beardall Senior Center
800 S. Delaney Ave.
Orlando
407-246-2637


St. Cloud Senior Center
Indiana Ave. & 8th St.
St. Cloud
407-892-2533


Marks Street Senior Center Osceola Senior Center
99 E. Marks St. 1099 Shady Lane
Orlando Kissimmee
407-245-0921 407-846-8532

Maitland Senior Center Sanford Senior Center
345 S. Maitland Ave. 401 E. Seminole Blvd.
Maitland Sanford
407-539-6251 407-302-1010

RSVP Senior Volunteers Senior Resource Alliance
407-422-1535 407-228-1800


Alzheimer Resource Center Seminole County
407-843-1910 Better Living for Seniors
407-228-1800


We provide a loving home where each member

of our community is honored and valued.

Our family environment provides a true "home"

feel with an attentive and caring staff


1340 Oxford Road Maitland, F1 32751 407-339-0389


407-247-8937


www.EnglishEstatesALF.com
License # AL10968


- .- - Copyrighted Material .. -

-_ "_ Syndicated Content. ".

Available from Commercial News Providers


GET LOCAL NEWS FROM A LOCAL SOURCE!
SUBSCRIBE TO THE SENIOR OBSERVER FOR THE LATEST "NEWS SENIORS CAN USE!"
SU BSCR IB E@� @ [0WR N NEWSPAPER S0o@@


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December 2008


SeniorObserver


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How to stock a pet first-aid kit


You can protect pets in times of emer-
gency - if you prepare. Pet care experts
h Shore Animal League America,
world's largest no-kill animal res-
e and adoption organization, recom-
mend having a pet first-aid kit that's
handy if an animal emergency occurs.
You can buy pre-assembled kits or
make your own. Keep them in differ-
ent locations - for instance, one kit at
home, one in the car, a vacation home,
wherever the pet spends time. If mak-
ing your own kit, use a container that's
sturdy, waterproof and easy to spot
when you need it. Here is what every
basic first-aid kit should contain:
Phone number and addresses: veteri-
narian, emergency vet, animal poison
control
A basic pet first-aid book
Photocopies of your pet's paperwork:
medical records, vaccinations, etc.


Medical gloves: to protect hands and
prevent contamination
Scissors to cut gauze or hair
Bottled water
A mild antibacterial soap to clean
skin
Paper towels
Gauze pads: for cleaning and pad-
ding wounds
Gauze rolls: to wrap wounds and can
also be used as a-temporary muzzle
Alcohol prep pads: to sterilize equip-
ment - not for use on wounds'
Self-adhesive bandages: Flexible ban-
dage used to wrap and stabilize injuries
(do not wrap too tightly)
A large cloth towel: to wrap animal in
Hydrogen peroxide to clean minor
wounds
Eyewash: to gently but thoroughly
flush out wounds and eyes
Antibiotic ointment: For cuts and


abrasions (never for
eyes)
Cotton applicator
swabs
Twee-
zers:
to re-
move
foreign
objects from skin
and paws and for
proper removal s .Ad1
of ticks.
Always read directions
and warnings before applying med-
ications, either prescribed or over the
counter, to your pet. In an emergency,
contact your veterinarian.
For more information on pets, in-
cluding how to adopt and care for
them, visit www.AnimalLeague.org.


Courtesy of NAPSA


PLAYWRIGHT I Musical opensJan. 9


I - " -..









"Oy Vay - the Musical," described by Director Si
its four acts to illustrate nuances of Jewish life throi

< continued from the front page
oji how technology influences
/ children.
"I like that sort of Mel Brooks
quality about it," Lacey said.
"It's funny but it's down-to-
earth. It's a reflection of her
life that mirrors so many lives,
especially women."
"Oy Vay - the Musical" will
be performed at the Maitland


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - SENIOR OBSERVER
andi Lacey as possessing a "Mel Brooks quality," uses
ugh songs and scenarios.
Civic Center from Jan. 9 to 11,
at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday,
and at 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets
will be $10 at the door.
- "It's a surreal experience but
I am so excited and I hope the
community will be as excited as
I am when they see the perfor-
mance," Brownstein said. "It's
thrilling. It's my dream come
true."


OFFICIAL MEDICARE ANNOUNCEMENT





"Reviewing my current

prescription drug plan

really opened my eyes."


"My drug plan's monthly
premium changed.
So I compared other
plans and found
similar coverage at
a better price."


Plans Change. You Change. Take the time
to see if your plan still works for you.
Four Ways to Review and Compare Plans - Get the help you need:


* Call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). Call us
anytime for help by a trained Medicare representative.
* Visit www.medicare.gov. Compare costs, y i
coverage and more. Get an estimate of your
out-of-pocket costs for the year.
* See the listing of plans in your
2009 Medicare & You handbook
and information sent to you by.your plan.
* Talk with local Medicare experts
at your. Serving Health Insurance
Needs of Elders program (SHINE).
Call 850-414-2060 or 800-963-5337.
1-8
Review your plan and act early to avoid any (1-
inconvenience at the pharmacy counter in January. TTY 1


Health.
fy Medicare.


w.medicare.gov
00-MEDICARE
800-633 4227)
1-877-486-2048


Advertise your business in the Senior Observer!

Call us today at 407-628-8500 and ask for Tracy or Pat.


SeniorObserver


December 2008


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2069 Aloma Ave.


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* Your Diabetes
Headquarters
* Adult Diaper Home
Delivery Program
* Bath Safety
Equipment
* Power Scooters
* Wheelchairs
* Lift Chairs
* Hospital Beds
* And So Much More!


1RNGTIS I N FOR


I :


GET LOCAL NEWS FROMIV A LOCAL SOURCE!
SUBSCRIBE TO THE SENIOR OBSERVER FOR THE
LATEST "INEWVS SENIORS CAIN USE!"
SUB SCRIBE @ CBEEi N E W S PA PER S ��~~~]


--- -- --


SeniorObserver


December 2008


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Elderly care deserves careful decisions


More than 1.7 million Florid-
riu--e for frail, older loved
, nearly one in 10
..ans are caregivers. Yet
millions of other Floridians
have either yet to focus on
the need for long-term care
for loved ones, or
are having trou-
ble finding high-
quality services
for those they
love.
One critical is-
THAMES sue is where your
loved one receives
care. People of all ages who
are frail, ill or disabled and
need help with regular daily
activities, such as dressing,
bathing, preparing meals or
eating, may need long-term
care, but only 3 percent of
Floridians age.35 and above
want to receive long-term
care in nursing home set-
tings. Some 77 percent want
to receive care at home.
Yet Florida spends 91 per-
cent of Medicaid long-term
.care dollars on nursing home


care, far more than the na-
tional average of 75 percent.
In 2006, the budget for Med-
icaid in Florida was $15 bil-
lion, and two-thirds of this
amount was spent on nurs-
ing homes. Florida ranks 41st
in the nation in achieving
a good balance of
care between com- "
munity-based and lved
loved o
nursing-home care.
Boomer children require
are worried about there
the care of their ways for
older parents, but back to
unfortunately fewer munity..
than half of adult
children are making
specific plans for that care.
.The key to creating a specific
plan of care for your loved
ones is talking to them and
strategizing in case of emer-
gency.
According to AARP re-
search, people often underes-
timate the costs of long-term
care and often think they are
covered by Medicare, when
generally Medicare offers full


coverage for only 20 days of
skilled nursing home care.
In 2006, the average cost of
a nursing home was about
$75,000 per year, while pri-
vate in-home care was about
$20 an hour.
"There is no substitute for


your older
nes don't
assistance,
are many
you to give
your com-
."


careful advance
planning," said Lori
Parham, AARP's
Florida 'state direc-
tor. "Now is the time
for boomers and
other adult chil-
dren to have candid
conversations with
their older loved
ones to help them


protect their ability to choose
how and where they receive
care."
Even if your older loved
ones don't require assistance,
there are many ways for you
to give back to your commu-
nity by assisting older Flo-
ridians who need assistance.
Caregiving provides ways for
individuals to give back to
their community and make a


difference in peoples' lives.
At a recent Tampa event
honoring caregivers, one fea-
tured speaker was Paul Chap-
delaine, caregiver for the late
"Golden Girls" television star
Estelle Getty.
"I feel like my ever-chang-
ing life will always lead me
to be exactly where I am sup-
posed to be," Chapdelaine
said.
"I know for a fact that I have
so much more to learn. I have
life's experiences, and my
Creator, to thank for all that
I am today. It's with courage
and love and laughter that
I plod along, knowing that
I am actively using my gifts
and talents to make a contri-
bution on this planet."

-Judy Thames
Florida's AARP state president

Statistics were taken from a 2006 AARP-
commissioned survey titled -"Let us Choose:
A Survey of Floridians Age 35+ on Long-Term
Care Choices."


Topics will
*Current Interest Rates
Closing costs associated with a reverse mortgage
SAdvantages and disadvantages


include:
* When a reverse mortgage is NOT the answer
SWhat is a non-recourse loan?
SSafeguards designed to protect the Elderly








LITeiaRtl e alid ir-iorm tion Will be dvailalF Irnl Ill
Nabonal Council on Agying and annous Seinor
S Orgaiaiialoon; Tm pproqrair will nD presernte of 3
iceiseao ekpen in int InOUs r
S Call Kalty Krug to RSVP ano tor additional intoiimahon
d'" ,!'';. d .' , "fi" ,


Make Faith House Your.

Our Amenities Include:


* Warm Home Cooked Meals
* Housekeeping/ Laundry


* Monitored & Secured
Environment


Services * 24-Hour Staffing
* Assistance with Medication * Private & Semiprivate
and Personal Care Needs Accommodations
* Scheduled Transportation * Scheduled Day Trips
Services * Daily Activity Program

!: " Faith House is committed to providing excellent
iB service in a loving home-like environment.
' U~ur warm and inviting 13 bed assisted living facility is located_
S on Lake Catherine off County Road 419 in Chuluota.
At Faith House you can be sure your loved one will receive tender,"
lo\ ing care by our experienced, carng and supportive staff. -
Faith House is owned and operated by a registered nurse whose
S purpose and passion is to provide the elderly with the best quality
', .care. loe adrespect. : . , :-
"L~ ~ ~ = e- "- ' ' c ,-.7. ',l -


407-366-9961
Chuluota/Oviedo


321-947-1888
Winter Springs (Opening Soon)


Advertise your business in the Senior Observer!

Call us today at 407-628-8500 and ask for Tracy or Pat.


www.wpmobserver.com


mmmmmummmma


SeniorObserver


eceD mber2008





Db


Getting more from
Medicare doesn't have
to cost you extra.
The right health plan could really
help you save.




AARP� MedicareComplete�


Mont
health
plan
premium


from SecureHorizons may include:

* Monthly health plan premiums starting at $0.
* Predictable costs for doctor visits and medical services.
* Predictable costs and coverage for almost 1,200 brand name and generic prescription drugs.
* 60,000-plus network pharmacies that accept our Medicare drug plans.

Call SecureHorizons now to reserve a seat at a community meeting or
schedule an in-home appointment. The deadline to enroll is December 31.

1-877-562-7106, TTY: 711
8 a.m. to 8 p.m. local time, 7 days a week.


www.AARPMedicareComplete.com


A'ARP IMedicareComplete
from SecureHorizons


E TO A FREE INFORMATIVE COMMUNITY MEETING


12/8 @ 2:30 PM
Panera Bread
696 E. Altamonte Dr.
Alt. Springs, FL

12/4 @ 3:00 PM
Perkins
6425 University Blvd
Winter Park, 32792

12/17 @ 10:00 AM
Clarion Hotel
230 W. State Rd. 436
Alt. Springs, FL


12/3 @ 2:00PM
Best Western - Mt. V
110 S. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park

12/16 @ 10:00AM
Holiday Inn Select
5750 T.G. Lee Blvd.
Orlando, 32822

12/17 @ 10:00 AM
Crown Plaza Orlando
304 W. Colonial Dr
Orlando, 32801


12/17 @ 10:00AM
Best Western
110 S. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park

12/9 @ 3:00 PM
Perkins
6425 University Blvd
Winter Park, 32792

12/11 @ 9:30 AM
Perkins (Rosemont)
5320 N. Org. Blsm. Tr.
Orlando, FL


12/17 @ 2:00PM
Best Western - Mt. V
110 S. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park

12/18 @ 3:00 PM
Perkins
6425 University Blvd
Winter Park, 32792


12/22 @ 2:30 PM
Panera Bread
696-E. Altamonte Dr.
Alt. Springs, FL


A UnitedHealthcare� Medicare Solution


A sales representative will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of
persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-877-562-7106, TTY: 711.8 a.m. to 8 p.m. local
time, 7 days a week.
AARP does not make health plan recommendations for individuals. You are strongly encouraged to evaluate your
needs before choosing a health plan. The AARP" MedicareComplete" plans are SecureHorizons' Medicare Advantage
plans insured or covered by an affiliate of UnitedHealthcare, an MA organization with a Medicare contract. AARP is
not an insurer. UnitedHealthcare pays a fee to AARP and its affiliate for use of the AARP trademark and other services.
Amounts paid are used for the general purposes of AARP and its members. The AARP" MedicareComplete" plans are
available to all eligible Medicare beneficiaries, including both members and non-members of AARP.
AARP and its affiliates are not insurance agencies or carriers and do not employ or endorse individual agents.
Limitations, copayments and coinsurance may apply. Benefits may vary by county and plan.


December 2008


SeniorObserver


OVEXO9MP3131602_000


^^


210573


M0011_080925_101632










Form a budget on needs, not wants


Following a few easy steps can
help keep your head above
water during tough financial
times.
Even though we can't con-
trol when the economy goes
into recession,
dipping home
prices, or increas-
es in gas prices,
we can decide
how we spend,
save and invest
WESTON our money. It's
more . important
now than ever to make the
right financial moves, so that
regardless of what's going
on with the economy, you're
able to stay on top of your fi-
nancial situation. MSN Mon-
ey personal finance editor
Liz Pulliam Weston offers the
following advice to help you


stay afloat during these tough
economic times:
Don't confuse your needs
and wants. We have fewer
needs (shelter, food, clothes,
etc.) than wants (endless).
Figuring out what we really
need and how to get it for less
can really help get finances
in check. If you find yourself
saying "I need a (whatever),"
stop for a second and consid-
er whether you really do. You
probably don't have to live
without it forever, but wait
until you're in a comfortable
enough financial situation
before purchasing.
Get the big stuff right. If
your mortgage or rent pay-
ment eat up much more than
30 percent of your gross in-
come, or your vehicle costs
you more than 10 percent


(including financing, repairs
and gas), you're probably
overspending on the "big
stuff' in your life. Try using
the Home Affordability Cal-
culator on MSN Money to get
a realistic look at what's truly
manageable.
Get out of debt. Whether
you meant to do it or not,
there's no excuse for carrying
credit card debt. It costs you a
ton of money in interest and
puts you at the mercy of the
credit card companies. If you
can't pay your bill in.full, it's
time to put that card away.
Pay over the minimum and
plan to pay it off entirely be-
fore using any of your credit
cards again.
Track your spending. It's
not the most fun, but keep
track of every nickel you


spend for at least two weeks.
You'll learn why and how
your money is disappearing.
Once you can see where your
money is going, you can find
ways to keep more of it in
your pocket.
Set up an emergency fund.
A $500 cushion is something
that just about everyone can
come up with and it can really
be a lifesaver. You never know
what can happen tomorrow;
and having some savings set
aside will help keep you from
going further into credit card
debt or searching for high-
interest alternatives such as
payday loans.
For more helpful financial
tips and tricks from Liz Pull-
iam Weston, visit money.msn.
com.
. Courtesy of NAPSA


Save energy while going digital


For 50 years, entertainment has been deliv-
ered to your television as an analog signal.
Now everything is going digital. Beginning
Feb. 17, the U.S. will shift to digital-only tele-
vision broadcasts. As of that date, analog TVs
that use antennae will need a digital-to-ana-
log (DTA) converter box to continue receiv-
-----in,-baradca&ts_3BychoosijnganEnergy Star-
qualified DTA converter box, you can save
energy, save money and help fight global
warming.
Most home energy comes from power
plants burning fossil fuels, which in turn cre-
ates greenhouse gas emissions that add to
global warming. If all DTA converter boxes


sold in the United States were Energy Star-
qualified, Americans would reduce green-
house gases equal to the emissions from 1
million cars.
Look for the Energy Star label when you're
in the market for other electronic products,
including .TVs, DVD players, computers,
printers and copiers. These products meet
strict energy-efficiency guidelines set by the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and
come with the same features and functions
that standard products offer.
For more information, visit www.Ener-
gyStar.gov/products.
Courtesy of NAPSA


PHOTO COURTESY OF NAPSA
Families in the United States will be watching digital over-the-air
broadcasts instead of analog broadcasts starting Feb. 17.


MEDICARE I You're eligible to join Medicare on the month in which you turn 65


< continued from the front page
Explains Scott R. Kelly, chief
government programs officer,
Health Net Inc., "With the wide
array of Medicare options, you
have the ability to customize
your coverage to really meet
your needs." He offers another
alphabetical aid, saying, "In re-
viewing your options, the most
important factors are often the
4 Cs - Cost, Customer Service,


Convenience and Coverage."
Part D is prescription drug
coverage, which started in early
2006 and has turned out to be
more popular than expected.
Both Part D and MedicareAdvan-
tage plans are offered through
private health care companies,
either as separate options or to-
gether in one plan. Some of the
plans do not have premiums
while others do have monthly


fees. Those plans can vary de-
pending on where you live and
the services covered.

Dates to keep in mind
In addition to the Medicare al-
phabet, there are some numbers
you should keep in mind as well.
You are eligible to join Medicare
on the first day of the month in
which you turn'65.
Once you are on Medicare,


you can change your Medicare
Advantage or prescription drug
plan each year during the Annu-
al Election Period, which runs
from Nov. 15 to Dec. 31. During
this period, you can pick any
plan that is offered in your area.
Most beneficiaries can choose
between dozens of plans. For
more information, please go to
Medicare.gov.
Courtesy of NAPSA


oBulletin


The Belles and Beaus Dance
Club hosts its annual Christmas
Dance from, 7:30-10 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 17, at the Marks
Street Recreation Complex at
99 E. Marks St. in Orlando. Soft
Touch will perform as guests
enjoy refreshments. Singles and
couples are welcome. The cost
is $5.
Call 407-277-7008 for more
information.


The Maitland Senior Center
presents Alice Friedman and
the Poetry Ensemble of Orlando
at 11:30 a.m. Dec. 9.
At 11:30 a.mT"Dec. 16 author
and lecturer Eva Marie Everson
hosts a presentation about the
Holy Land titled "How I Realized
My Dream."
The Senior Center is at 345 S.
Maitland Ave. Call 407-539-6251
-for more information.


The AARP Winter Park Chapter
1047 hosts a Christmas lun-
cheon at noon on Dec. 16 at the
Clarion Hotel, 230 W. State Road
436 in Altamonte Springs. Call
407-295-9120 for more informa-
tion.

VITAS Innovative Hospice Care
of Central Florida needs volun-
teers who can befriend termi-
nally ill patients, provide relief


for weary caregivers, accompany
their pet on Paw Pals visits, visit
with veterans and more.
Call 407-691-4541 or e-mail
central.floridavolunteers@vitas.
com for more information.

The Renaissance Senior Center
hosts a Sock Hop and Holiday
Bash from 7-10 p.m. Friday, Dec.
5, at 3800 Econlockhatchee Trail
in Orlando.


Dress up in your 1950s-era
clothes and compete in contests
for men and women. Ladies, pick
out your '50s-era dress for the
best-dress contest. Men compete
in a best-socks contest.
The cost of admission is a cov-
ered dish and one canned good
to be donated to the for Pathways
Drop-In Center in support of the
mentally ill.


SeniorObserver


December 2008






SeniorObserver December 2008


Be your


own


boss


Ik Ill l it%'%i


*






Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


1 "0


Available from Commercial News Providers


"u W O
^^L


* - .'


Frank and Gloria Houghton
know they made the right
decision to move to The
Mayflower. The couple's three
children also agree it was a wise
-choice. "They've all visited us
here - and my daughter likes
it so much, she wants to move
in!" says Gloria. "This is the


nicest place I can think of to live,"
she adds. "It simply doesn't
get any better than this."
If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at The
Mayflower. It's a good plan for
the future.
Call today to secure a spot on
our waiting list.

(407)672-1620


THE MAYFLOWER
A Plan b r the Future
1620 Mayflower Court
Winter Park, Florida 32792
www.themayflower.com


A good
conversation
should be
heard
and not
seen.


* Do people sound like they are
mumbling?


* Do you find yourself turning up
the volume on the tv?

* Do you frequently ask people to
repeat themselves?

Your journey away from hearing loss begins here!
DOicover awht yo need to know(
www.OrlandoHears.com


ASSOCIATES'
oP CK*4PR04I. FVtORIQA


1460 Lake Baldwin Lane
Baldwin Park
407-898-2220


"It Simply Doesn't Get Any
Better Than This."


Or~IfftI


mI


SeniorObserver


December 2008


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