Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00023
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Publication Date: November 27, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

Full Text




Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 20, No. 48
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY

*.BANK
Your Real Hometown Bank


Thursday, November 27,2008

Locally owned.

Locally produced.

Widely read.

www.WPMObserver.com


50N+ tax


lHrT


Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL


BANK & TRUST
On the corner of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
407-622-8181 www.CNBT-FL.com
C uy I i ',


Children give back
Youngsters sent soldiers letters
and collected pet food.
Page A10


Season finales
Trinity Prep and Winter Park fall
out of the football playoffs.
Page A3


Food on the tables
Maitland's Farmers Market
offers a fresh Sunday diversion.
Page A2




Business Briefs...... A5
Community Bulletin ...... A5
City Talks.. ............. A7
PlayOn! .............. .A16
Legals .. ........... A17
Marketplace........ A18
Games ......... Al.... 9


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Village

Publix

opens in

two weeks
ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

The Winter Park Village
will finally have a gro-
cery store again, starting
Saturday, Dec. 13. That's
when the new Publix will
open its doors for the first
time since converting the
store from an Albertsons,
said company spokesman
Dwaine Stevens.
Publix agreed to buy
49 Albertsons stores
statewide in June, and has
gradually been convert-
ing them to Publix stores.
The Winter Park store,
which will be the second
in the city, was expected
to open by the end of the
year, but will be opening
early.
The store will also
include a liquor store
across West Canton Av-
enue, which was also part
of the old Albertsons.


City fixes up West Side homes


MARY-ELIZABETH HITTEL
GUEST WRITER
Between Park Avenue and
the Winter Park Village sits
Winter Park's historical
West Side neighborhood.
The area teems with life
from its many churches,
which host bake sales, ba-
zaars and social events.
Neighbors talk to each oth-
er on porches and on the
sidewalks. About half of the
original owners still live in
these homes.
The neighborhood's
spirit is starkly contrasted
by its architecture. It's a
cluster of buildings aged
and weathered by econom-
ic reality, one where upkeep


frequently is optional when.
pressing bills take priority.
Last month, Seretha
Carter found she needed
$18,000 in repairs to her
50-year-old house a hefty
sum, but it's now all been
made a reality. She has a
new roof, new central heat
and air, and a new toilet.
Also fixed were a concrete
pathway, her bathtub and
the electrical meter, which
was replaced to accommo-
date the new AC system.
These renovations, would
not have been possible
without the Housing Reha-
bilitation Program run by
the Community Redevelop-
> turn to HOUSING on page A4


Hnu I U BY IIAAnU unBAUOK I In UtBitnvE
Winter Park is offering residents financial help to spruce up their homes both inside
and out. The program is aimed at keeping longtime residents living in the city.


On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland


Member FDIC


S 124E Morse Blivd
7-. WnterPark407-951-8039
www.gurtzberry.com


.2 Weight Watchers Points (per4oz .serving) -Over 30 toppings Non-Fat & Low Calorie
Kosher-Dairy certified -Only 80 calories (per4oz..serving) No preservatives & Gluten free
(1 rperperon) offerndudesonesmall frozenyogurt, toppingsateadditional Mustpresentadattimeofpurchase. Cannot behcombinedwithanyotheroffer 0ferexpires 12/10/08
IVtl Eoqi]l,,lt[ tH:,[ C f /;'' i


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News



Shops support Maitland market


KAROLINE KNIEL
GUEST WRITER
As the long, hot days of summer have given
way to crisp, clear mornings and mild after-
noons, outdoor fun again seems bearable, if
not a delight. Weekend mornings are spent
riding a bike, walking, and enjoying the lo-
cal farmers markets, a favorite pastime of
both Winter Park and Maitland residents.
Maitland has its very own farmers mar-
ket. Located off Maitland Avenue between
Packwood and Ventris avenues, the Mait-
land Farmers Market offers an experience
all its own. "The Maitland Farmers Market is
a great place for the whole family, including
the dogs," says Diane Bennett of DOGgone
Gourmet Treats. "It is a perfect place to
meet on Sunday, to pick up your fresh fruits
and veggies, flowers and plants, homemade
breads, and have a fresh-squeezed lemon-
ade."
DOGgone Gourmet Treats has been sup-
plying dogs with healthy treats, fun toys
and even canine apparel since 1997. It's
important to support local businesses, Ben-
nett adds, an act which the market vendors
not only welcome, but have also come to
relyupon.
Launched in January of this year, the
Maitland Farmers Market is slowly evolv-
ing, with room to grow. Situated in the lush
Quinn Strong Park, the location is perfect
for attracting families, couples or singles
looking for a relaxing, lovely way to spend
a Sunday morning.
Jean Vasicek, master beekeeper at Winter
Park Honey, has been a vendor at the mar-
ket since its inauguration and says of the
setting, "The trees offer a bit of relief from
the Florida sun and the live music is just


The Mailland Farmers Market is open every
Sunday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., allowing plenty of
time for a quick trip for the bare necessities, or
a relaxing stroll through just one of Maitland's
many parks, and the city's one and only Farmers
Market.

great!" Vasicek started Winter Park Honey
three years ago and has been enjoying its
success ever since.
Selling her products at the Winter Park
Farmers Market, and now at the Maitland
Farmers Market, has allowed Winter Park
Honey a chance to expand, or, as Jean puts
it, become the "one-stop honey shop."
The Maitland Farmers Market boasts
many of the same products and vendors as
the Winter Park market, and the quality of
the goods continues to be a contributing
factor in the market's growing popularity.
Peggy Paytoft, a local resident, buys all of
her fruits and vegetables at the Maitland
market. "The produce is really good, and I
was told it all came from local growers, so I
liked that, too," Payton said.
Regardless of patrons' continued satis-
faction, some vendors are worried about
the market's future success. "It was not at
all crowded when I was there," Payton said,
"and I had a chance to talk with the same
produce vendor that is at the Winter Park
Farmers Market. He was encouraging every-
one to tell their friends about the new Mait-
land market sb they could stay open."


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Kleber Sanchez of Liliana's Catering serves a steak empanada at the Maitland Farm-
er's Market, which is open every Sunday at Quinn Strong Park.


Restaurant Owners...


Right Now Consumers In Your Area


Are Thinking About


Where To Dine Out.


Don't you wish they had

your ad In their hands?


Advertise today!
Call 407-628-8500


L


JA--e


age 2 Thursday, November 27, 2008


Winter Park /Maitland Observer


40~'


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Saints and Cats bow out early


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

Winter Park's long-fought return
to the playoffs was cut short Friday
night, as it fell to East Ridge 23-7 in
the first round of regional play.
The numbers didn't look promis-
ing for the Wildcats from the start.
East Ridge was riding a nine-game
win streak into the playoffs, with a
hard-to-stop offense propelled by
running back Jeremy Wright.
The Wildcats, though they'd man-
aged to improve on offense later in
the season, had difficulty amassing
the kinds of scores the Knights had
managed regularly. Their only hope
would be to hold the Knights back.
The Wildcats' defense easily got
its hands on Wright, but the slippery
running back broke free again and
again, racing for three unanswered
touchdowns in the first half.
Wright's first quarter alone was
enough to take down the Wildcats,
who failed to cross the goal line un-
til the fourth quarter.
That score came largely from the
help of Zee Ware, who had come
on strong late in the season to help
propel his team to the playoffs, but
couldn't outrun the Knights.
A Sam Richardson 13-yard sneak
put six points on the board, but the
Knights could only manage an ex-
tra point before the clock ran out.
The Wildcats end their season
6-4, not counting the playoff loss.
That's a dramatic improvement
over the 2006-07 season, in which
the Cats only managed a 4-6 record,
winning all but one of their games


by a touchdown or less.

Trinity Preparatory School
For the Trinity Prep Saints, a 34-6
loss to Frostproof quickly ended
their first playoff run since 2002.
With a 6-3 overall record and a 2-2
record in the district, the Saints im-
proved dramatically over last sea-
son
With a recent trouncing of Pine
Castle Christian 41-14 to end the
season on a high note, the Saints had
shocked the district by emerging
from a three-team playoff to make
it to the regionals. But Frostproof
was on an 8-1 tear leading into the
game, and ended the Saints' hopes
quickly.
The Saints' biggest numbers on
the field this season came from Aus-
tin Barton, who played three ways,
generating impressive numbers on
offense, defense and special teams.
He raced for 1,098 yards on the
ground, averaging more than 13
yards per carry en route to 12 touch-
downs.
His bulldozer running style
didn't just pay off on the ground.
In just two kickoff-return attempts
he outran opposing defenses for 81
total yards, including a return for a
touchdown.
On defense, he was the thorn in
the sides of many strong offenses
this year, amassing 85 total tack-
les 12 per game including one
sack.
That was both good and bad
news for the Saints, for whom Bar-
ton is playing his final season.


PHOTO BY LAURENCE SAMUELS THE OBSERVER
A Wildcats player sheds a tear as the result of the game became certain on Friday with East Ridge taking
an easy victory in the first round of regional postseason play, 23-7.


"Pe A9be Nometo1nQ\


Presented by:


bright house
NETWORKS


December 6h 9:00 a.m.

Park Avenue, Winter Park

Over 100 parade units including marching bands, local elected officials,
police and fire departments, church groups, girl scouts and boy scouts,
Walt Disney World, antique automobiles and even Santa Claus!


Leadership Winter Park Pancake Breakfast
7:00-10:30 a.m. Central Park Stage
: $5 Adults / $3 Children
Proceeds benefit Winter Park Area Elementary Schools
For tickets or more information, please call 407-644-8281



,,, [ Observer ,IN


I


. Thursday, November 27, 2008 Pg


Winter Park / Maitland Observer













FWintpr Park November 15 to November 19


Burglary/theft
Someone broke through the rear glass door of a business
on Morse Boulevard and stole a 46-inch Samsung LCD TV on
Nov. 15.
On Nov. 18, on Dunraven Drive, someone used a bar from a
chain-link fence to break a bedroom window then stole an
Apple MacBook computer, a Wii game console, three bottles of
liquor and 60 to 80 pieces of jewelry.
Someone entered a residence on East Fawsett Road and
stole $26,000 in fine jewelry on Nov. 18. The point of entry, a
bedroom door, was left unlocked.
Someone cut the lock to a fence surrounding a property on
Dalmen Avenue and stole a Coleman 5500-watt generator
from the back of a trailer on Nov. 18.
The main door of a business on Orange Avenue was bro-
ken out on Nov. 18 in an apparent attempted robbery, but the
unknown perpetrator seemed to have fled the scene when the


alarm went off.


Auto theft/burglary
Someone broke the driver-side front window and stole a
Garmin GPS unit on Holt Avenue on Nov. 18.


Criminal mischief
A black male threw a brick through a window after the vic-
tim refused to open the door for the suspect on South Orlando
Avenue on Nov. 19.
For carrying a concealed weapon, someone was arrested
on North Orlando Avenue and Morse Boulevard on Nov. 16.
Someone cut a bike lock and rearranged four bikes on the
back patio of an address on Margaret Square on Nov. 16.
On Early Avenue, on Nov. 16, someone threw brick pavers


at the windows of three vehicles parked at a residence.


Drugs
On Nov. 17, someone was arrested on Holt Avenue on vari-
ous drug charges. These included possession of cocaine with
intent to sell, possession of alprazolam, and possession of
MDMA (ecstacy).
An arrest was made on Holt Avenue, Nov. 17, for possession
of amphetamines, possession of marijuana, and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
For possession of psilocybin mushrooms, someone was ar-
rested on East Lake Sue Avenue and Highland Road on Nov.
15.
Someone was arrested for driving under the influence on
Fairbanks Avenue on Nov. 15.


HOUSING I Rehab program saves homes on the brink of condemnation


< continued from the front page

ment Agency of Winter Park.
"My husband and I built this
house in 1958," Carter said. "They
made my home comfortable
again."
For six years the Housing Reha-
bilitation Program has been reno-
vating and improving houses in the
West Side neighborhood. Founded
in 2002 by Don Martin and Alber-
to Vargas of Winter Park Planning
and Community Development, the
program helps homeowners make
the necessary repairs to keep their
homes safe, all the while helping to
beautify the neighborhood and im-
prove its property value.
This Community Redevelopment
Area, a geographic district more of-
ten called a "CRA," was created in
1994, aimed to help revitalize the
area's homes, keeping them from
sliding into disrepair and eventual
condemnation.
People in the CRA can apply for
a grant, up to $20,000. Peter Moore,
assistant manager of the CRA, said
its goal is to keep people in their
homes.
"In order to qualify, the single-
family home has to be owner-occu-
pied, with an income of 120 percent
of the area median income or lower,


as defined by Orange County, live in
the CRA area, and be current on all
taxes," Moore said. "Right now we
have 20 people on the waiting list."
During the six years the program
has been in existence, $1.6 million
has been spent on repairing and
renovating the neighborhood's
homes.
"The money for renovations
comes from taxes from the CRA
area," Moore said. "We (the Agency)
get 95 percent of the tax-
es that would normally "Everyone
go to the City of Winter better ab
Park or Orange County.
This year we can do more neighborhc
andpreserve more of this all deeply a
neighborhood. Thanks what's beir
to a $250,000 grant from
Orange County, we have -_
$375,000 in the budget
for this fiscal year."
With a grant from Or-
ange County, the CRA will be taking
the program citywide for disabled
and senior residents, with similar
guidelines to the original program.
Changes include a focus on more
need-based construction, changes
to the bidding process, and the addi-
tion of a pre-selected, pre-screened
contractor list.
The biggest change in the pro-
gram is the focus on doing more


need-based work. "Before, we would
do a lot of landscaping and add cab-
inets," Moore said. "Things like that
are costly and with landscaping es-
pecially, the owner doesn't always
have the means to maintain it. We
want to make it so that the people
who really need improvements
made to their homes for their own
safety get priority."
The bidding process has been
changed. Before any contract is
signed, the homeowner,
feels contractor, and a CRA
iout the staff member will walk
)out the through the house and
od. We assess what needs to be
appreciate done.
ng done," The pre-selected, pre-
screened contractor
eretha Carte list is another change.
resident "Before any work be-
gins, contractors bid
on the job," Moore said.
"We wanted to eliminate instances
where a contractor will have the
lowest bid and then go in and add
jobs, eventually increasing the
amount needed to get the job done.
We currently have 28 pre-selected
contractors, some of which have
been with the. program from the
start."
On this list is local contractor
Sean Woodard of Woodard Con-


struction. The company renovated
the first house in October 2002. "I
still remember that house," Woo-
dard said. "The woman had asthma
so we ripped up the carpet in the
living room, dinning room and her
bedroom, and replaced it with tile.
We also painted the outside and up-
graded her electrical. We still do the
program because of all of the grate-
ful, nice people you meet in that
neighborhood."
CRA Manager Sherry Gutch said
that Winter Park is looking forward
to the expansion of the program.
"We have a waiting list now and be-
lieve the [citywide] program will be
as big of a success," Gutch said. -
Moore added he would like to do
an in-depth study of what the pro-
gram has done for the neighbor-
hood. "The area used to be crime-
ridden," Moore said. "This program
is so popular among the residents
of the neighborhood and it visually
looks better."
And the residents feel that way
too. "The neighborhood is enthused
about it," Cater said. "Everyone feels
better about the neighborhood. We
all deeply appreciate what's being
done."


SWinter Park/ Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday, November 27, 2008


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-628-8500, ext. 302
kyle@observemewspapers.com

EDITOR
Alex Babcock
407-628-8500, ext. 304
alexb@observemewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-628-8500, ext. 306
stephanie@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-628-8500, ext. 311
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-902-8563
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-628-8500, ext. 309
legal@observernewspapers.com


Volume 20, Issue Number 48


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observernewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us

Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


ADVERTISING SALES "
Tracy Craft
407-628-8500, ext. 303
tcraft@observernewspapers.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Shelly Langston
407-628-8500, ext. 303
slangston@observernewspapers.com


Member of P.O. Box.2426 609 Executive Drive
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-628-8500 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland ObserverO 2008


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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Business


Larry Vershel Communications, Inc. has
uncovered an emerging technology boom that
promises to make up for some of the losses
the company has experienced as a result of
the housing slowdown.
Larry Vershel, who along with vice president
Beth Payan, launched Larry Vershel Com-'
munications in 1992, said the agency added
more than 10 technology companies in 2008
and plans to seek more technology business
in 2009.
As the housing industry declined over the
past three years technology companies be-
gan to play a larger role in the agency's plans,
Vershel said.

The Morgan Group, Inc. is pleased to an-
nounce the appointment of Bruce Halverson
to the position of Project Manager for the na-
tional developer's Eastern
Region.
In this role,' Halverson
will coordinate construc-
tion activity for The Village
at Lake Lily, a mixed-use
-development in Maitland.
The project will feature
about 450 apartment units
Halverson and 40,000 square feet. of
retail, office, and restaurant
space.
Halverson has worked in the real estate and
construction industry for more than 20 years
with companies such as Broadstreet Partners,
Contravest and Trammell Crow Residential.
Halverson currently resides in Apopka.


The Central Florida Employment Council is
Celebrating 15 years of hosting Central Flori-
da Job Fairs in 2009. Their six annual job fairs
will be Jan. 28, March 25, May 20, July 15,
Sept. 9, and Nov. 4 of 2009. All job fairs will
be located at the Central Florida Fair Exposi-
tion Park, 4603 W. Colonial Drive in Orlando
with more than 70 employers offering open-
ings in all types of Central Florida Industries.
Free admission and parking is available to all
Central Florida Job Seekers. Visit www.CFEC.
org anytime for more information or call their
main office Christian HELP at 407-834-4022.

Tire Kingdom and Uniroyal Tire have raised
donations of more than $600 in both funds
and equipment for Association of Christian
Youth Sports, headquartered in Altamonte
Springs. This is thanks to the Uniroyal Soccer
Program, a grassroots initiative that annually
supports youth soccer all over the country.
Soccer families can also enter Uniroyal
Tire's "Soccer To Go" sweepstakes at www.
uniroyal.com/sweeps. The grand prize in-
cludes a "soccer taxi" makeover with a
Gameboy Advance dockable car entertain-
ment system, an entertainment gift card, a
free set of Uniroyal tires, and a gas card.

Barry Weiss of Air Flow Designs Central,
LLC of Cassdlberry was among a select
group of professionals who passed the NA-
DCA examination and were awarded the
distinguished title of "Air System Cleaning
Specialist" (ASCS). The ASCS designation
recognizes comprehensive knowledge in the
field of ventilation system cleaning and is a
distinctive accomplishment.


Community


The Maitland Woman's Club held its fall
membership coffee at the home of Marianne
Link on Nov. 20. The gathering began the
club's fall drive for the Second Harvest Food
Bank. This food drive continues at the club's
annual Christmas party in December.
Call 407-647-2838 or visit www.Maitland-
WomensClub.org for more information.

Winter Park is partnering with Second
Harvest Food Bank and WESH TV for Share
Your Christmas, an annual food drive to ben-
efit Central Florida families in need. Residents
are encouraged to participate by donating
canned, non-perishable food, baby supplies
and personal care necessities.
Donations will be accepted through
Wednesday, Dec. 10. Please look for the dec-
orated Share Your Christmas barrels at the
following locations:
City Hall 401 Park Ave. South, Public
Safety Facility 500 North Virginia Ave.,
Winter Park Public Library 460 East New
England Ave.
Items recommended for donation include
bar soap, diapers, hand sanitizer, shampoo,
toilet tissue, nutritional drinks, diapers, pasta,
baby food, dry beans, peanut butter, canned
fruit, rice, canned meats, canned vegetables
and oatmeal.
On Friday, Dec. 12, Winter Park Mayor David
Strong and members of city staff will person-
ally deliver all donated items to the drop-off
site at WESH TV.
Call 407-599-3506 for more information.

The Winter Park Health Foundation recently
approved a $5,000 grant to the City of Winter
Park Fire-Rescue Department to cover the
cost of analyzing reports of falls in the city.
This is the first step in developing an effective
fall prevention program for area older adults.
Each year, the Fire Department averages
360 calls on "short falls" (falls from less than
one story) the most frequent type of call
it receives. The grant will enable the depart-
ment to analyze report details such as fall
location, cause, suspected injuries and ages
of individuals.
Visit www.wphf.org for more information
about the Health Foundation.

The Residential Fire Safety Institute (RFSI)
awarded the Winter Park Fire-Rescue
Department with the 2007 Life Safety


Members gather at the Maitland Woman's Club
Membership Party on Nov. 20.
Achievement Award last month in recogni-
tion of its hard work and dedication toward
keeping the community free of residential
fire-related casualties during the past year.
Out of 150 residential fires in Winter Park, the
department experienced zero casualties.
Visit www.cityofwinterpark.org for more in-
formation about the Winter Park Fire Depart-
ment.

Throughout the year, Jewish Family Ser-
vices devotes its time to granting wishes
to those faced with hard times and hard reali-
ties. When a client broke his leg and couldn't
work for six weeks, Jewish Family Services
helped with his rent payment.
There are a few items on JFS' wish list that
may be in your ability to provide, or perhaps
you know someone who can fulfill a wish.
They need someone to make a video of the
group's services, and also need a heavy-duty
two-level grocery cart, a laser color printer,
adoption books, and bus passes for birth
mothers of potential adoptable children.
Call Es Cohen at 407-644-7593 to grant a
wish.

The Florida Municipal Electric Association
(FMEA) recently honored the community
service efforts of Winter Park Electric Util-
ity by recognizing them with the 2008 Com-
munity Service Award. The FMEA represents
the unified interests of 34 public power com-
munities across the state which provide elec-
tricity to more than two million residential and
business consumers.
In addition to these recent community-
service initiatives, Winter Park Electric Utility
is in the process of burying city-owned power
lines, which will contribute to the overall mis-
sion of improving electric reliability.


IJ


Visit Downtown

Mount Dora

Where it is A

Wonderful Life
No%. 14-D-c. ". [Mount Dura Thlatre Compan I'Presentn : 'It*. A % \ondr-rful Life
D ciJil. :u .[ E),, [ -ti re >c, .:...- '. -- *'. . ... eit.-n, arre 0...
No%. I' Feb. 16. Greal Holida% Gift Show
I(, A .' : P M r.1, ,S_ Fir, i .all ,i i -if i r, .hi-c *-* ,. ci er pIl, Jr n -I r :resa i,
J d b r .,J l'. iL -r l E ) l, M .-i i .r l .. C 'r i .-r f: ,r I h e l h-' *'r1 [ I


Nov. 29, 28th Annual Light Up Mount Dora 4:30-9PM
Join as in lighting Donnelly Park and dont.otn Mount Dora with close to
2 million sparkling lights' wonderfull Holiday Season Entertainment and
festit ties including the Commumr, Chou. Ballet. Soloist and Santa'
Details. Mouan Dora Area Chamber of Commerce 352-383-2165. FREE

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Thursday, November 27, 2008 Pg_


Winter Park/i Maitland Observer


).






rage D I nuouay, IwVeGIIUGI tVuu


SHOP I 'Black Friday' origin uncertain


< continued from the front page
years."
Snaith, director of the Institute
for Economic Competitiveness at
UCF, said the economy is in bad
shape and is only getting worse.
Unemployment is on the rise and
Americans have lost trillions of
dollars in the stock market and
home equity. "Consumers are un-
der siege and they're going to bat-
ten down the hatches," he said.
The day after Thanksgiving is
called Black Friday, Snaith said, be-
cause it's the kickoff of the holiday
season, a period where retailers go
from being "in the red" using red
ink in their accounting records to
indicate unprofitable times to
being "in the black" turning a
profit.
But there are several accounts
on how the term originated.
A popular theory says it was
dubbed Black Friday by the Phila-
delphia Police Department around
1960 because of the crowds it
brought. A column written in Jan-
uary 1966 by Philadelphia retailer
Martin L. Apfelbaum in The Ameri-
can Philatelist explained the term.
"'Black Friday' officially opens
the Christmas shopping season in
center city," he wrote, "and it usu-


ally brings massive traffic jams
and over-crowded sidewalks as
the downtown stores are mobbed
from opening to closing."
Research by the American Dia-
lect Society suggests that the red-
to-black ink usage didn't occur in
print until 1981.
Despite its origins, it was not a
term that was used or liked -
by retailers until more recently.
"Black Friday is not an accepted
term in the retail industry and as
far as retailers are concerned, it
is understood to mean the Friday
the stock market crashed in 1929,"
the National Retail Merchants As-
sociation said in a statement that
appeared in the Philadelphia In-
quirer in 1985.
Today the day is even more hec-
tic with stores advertising "door
busters," or sales, sometimes be-
ginning before the sun comes up,
meant to lure in shoppers.
The big box stores can set the
lowest prices and thus attract-more
shoppers, but they're not immune
to the economic woes. "I suspect
the pain will be fairly evenly dis-
tributed" between large and small
businesses this year, Snaith said.
"Size isn't necessarily going to
shield you."


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Winter Park /Maitland, Observer


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Wite Pak. Matan Obere ThrdyNvmer2,208 Pg


Families from different
cultures came together in
the early 1600s for a day
of thanks. No matter how
difficult one's situation be-
comes, there will always be
opportunity to be thankful.
First and foremost, I am
thankful for all who work
for our city in the many
departments and for staff,
who, in times of budget
cuts, work harder than ever.
I pray that their families are
taken care of during the up-
coming holiday season.
I am also thankful that,
as a community, we enjoy
a safe, civil environment,
within which we can ex-
ecute government for the


sake of all citizens in our
community.
I am thankful that our
community has been given,
an opportunityto voice their
opinions and express their
convictions on many issues
affecting Maitland such that
we continue to make real
progress and move forward.
With this opportunity of in-
volvement and input, our
leaders have been in a much
better position, to make
more informed decisions
about matters that impact
each of us.
I am. appreciative and
thankful for the opportu-
nity to serve my community
in ways I never dreamed


Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


A time to be thankful


possible. Specifically, I am
blessed with the opportu-
nity to touch the lives of our
school children by present-
ing awards for Rotary's Four-
Way Test, speaking at DARE
graduation ceremonies, and
working with our school
principals and educators
to assure our children the
best education in the future.
This week I had the pleasure
of presiding over the induc-
tion ceremony of the Mait-
land Middle School Student
Council. This was especially
meaningful as my daugh-
ter Cassidy was installed as
president. I am so fortunate
and blessed for having a
healthy, loving, happy fam-
ily who cares for each other
and supports each other in
every way.
I am also thankful for and
pray for all of our veterans
and soldiers who have giv-
en so much of themselves
so that' we are able to enjoy
the freedoms we have today.
During this upcoming day
of thanks, let's all keep our
veterans and soldiers in our
thoughts and prayers.


Here's wishing you and
your family the very best
during the upcoming holi-
days. Have a healthy, happy,
enjoyable and safe Thanks-
giving.

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at ItsMyMaitland.com


Nov. 24 City Commission
meeting highlights
There was a City Commis-
sion meeting held on Nov.
24 at 3:30 p.m. -in City Hall
CommissionChambers. Due
to the early deadline associ-
ated with the Thanksgiving
holiday, the highlights from
that meeting will be pub-
lished in next week's col-
umn.

No Waste Management
pickup for the holiday
In observance oftheThanks-
giving holiday, City Hall will
be closed on Thursday, Nov.
27, and Friday, Nov. 28.
There will be no Waste
Management pickup on
Thanksgiving Day, Thurs-
day, Nov. 27. The makeup
day will be Saturday, Nov.
29.

Winter Park Welcome
Center open weekends
The Winter Park Welcome
Center is now open on the
weekends beginning Satur-
day, Nov. 22, until the end of
the year. Hours of operation
will be Saturdays from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sundays
from noon to 3 p.m., includ-
ing Friday, Nov. 28.
The Winter Park Wel-
come Center, located at 151
W. Lyman Ave., is the result
of a partnership between
the city of Winter Park and
the Winter Park Chamber
of Commerce. The build-
ing and land is owned by
the city and the Chamber
occupies and manages the
facility. Additional financial
supporters of the Welcome


Center include the Winter
Park Health Foundation,
Winter Park Memorial Hos-
pital, Embarq, Fannie Hill-
man and Associates, and
Workscapes.
The Winter Park Cham-
ber of Commerce executive
offices occupy the second
floor of the Welcome Cen-
ter. The first floor has a dis-
tinctive lobby with 11 video
monitors, three laptops and
an abundance of informa-
tion about Winter Park. The
first floor also houses pub-
lic restrooms, the J.K and
Sarah Galloway Foundation
Community Gallery, and the
Winter Park Health Founda-
tion Community Room. The
Galloway Gallery features,
on a rotating basis, local
non-profits and education-
al institutions. The Winter
Park Health Foundation
Community Room is a pub-
lic room available to rent for
meetings,. luncheons and
social functions.
For more information
regarding the Winter Park
Welcome Center, please call
407-644-8281.

CRA Agency
work session
The City Commission will
hold a Work Session on
Monday, Dec. 1, at 3:30 p.m.,
in City Hall Commission
Chambers, located at 401
Park Ave.-S., to discuss the
community center.
Immediately following
this work session, the City
Commission will convene
for a work session to discuss
a proposal from a developer
for a potential alternate lo-


cation for the commuter
rail stop.

Planning and Zoning
Commission meeting
A public hearing will be held
by the Planning and Zoning
Commission on Tuesday,
Dec. 2, at 7 p.m., in City Hall
Commission Chambers lo-
cated at 401 Park Ave. S. to
consider the following pub-
lic hearings:
Request of The Charles
Hosmer Morse Museum
of American Art to con-
struct a 12,222-square-foot
addition to the existing
28,629-square-foot. muse-
um building at 445 N. Park
Ave. This addition is com-
posed of museumr-space on
the first floor and office or
administrative space on the
second floor that will face
Canton Avenue, and it will
be two stories, 38.9 feet in
height.
Request of Fields Motor
Cars of Florida to construct
a parking lot for car sales in-
ventory display and to con-
struct a car wash building as
part of their car service fa-
cilities on the 2.6-acre prop-
erty at 951 N. Wymore Road
(former Park Inn motel).

Fire-Rescue Department
gets safety award
On Oct. 1, 2008, the Resi-
dential Fire Safety Institute.
(RFSI) awarded the Winter
Park Fire-Rescue Depart-
ment with the 2007 Life
Safety Achievement Award
in recognition of its hard
work and dedication toward
keeping the community
free of residential fire-relat-
. ed casualties during the past
year. Out of 150 residential
fires in Winter Park, the de-
partment experienced zero -
casualties.
According to the RFSI
director, Roy L. Marshall,
"Experience tells us that
fire prevention activity and


public education can sig-
nificantly reduce life and
property loss from residen-
tial fires. The Life Safety
Achievement Award recog-
nizes fire departments for
their fire-prevention efforts
and encourages them to
continually improve those
efforts." Although residen-
tial fires in the United States
account for only 20 percent
of all fires, they result in 80
percent of all fire deaths.
The RFSI is a public in-
terest group whose mission
is to reduce residential fire
deaths and injuries by ad-
vocating the use of residen-
tial fire sprinklers, smoke
alarms and carbon monox-
ide detectors, and teaching
people fire-safe behavior.
Their membership includes
the United States Fire Ad-
ministration, the National
Association of State Fire
Marshals, and private indus-
try associations with an in-
terest in and commitment
to fire safety.

CoffeeTalk with
Commissioner Diebel
Come join Commissioner
Karen Diebel for coffee on
Friday, Dec. 5, at the Winter
Park Country Club, located
at 761 Old England Ave.,
from 8;30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
This is our last CoffeeTalk
of the season so please make
plans to attend this casual
gathering to ask questions
about your specific area of
interest and to get to know
your city leaders.
For inquiries regarding
CoffeeTalk, please call 407-
599-3428.

Annual holiday
events lineup
Thursday, Dec. 4: 30th an-
nual Christmas in the Park
Celebration in Central Park
at 6 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 5: Annual
Tree Lighting Ceremony


and Holiday Stroll'in Cen-
tral Park at 5 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 5: City of Win-
ter Park and Enzian The-
ater present Popcorn Flicks
in Central Park featuring
"Gremlins" from 7 p.m. to 9
p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 6: 56th an-
nual Winter Park Christmas
Parade along Park Avenue
at 9 a.m. Before, during and
after the Christmas Parade,
the Winter Park Chamber
of Commerce will host the
10th annual Leadership
Winter Park Pancake Break-
fast at the Central Park main
stage from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 13: Winter
Park's 13th annual Merry
Tuba Christmas at the main
stage in Central Park begin-
ning at 1 p.m.
Sunday,'Dec. 14: Florida
Symphony Youth Orchestra
at the main stage in Central
Park beginning at 2:30 p.m.
Third week of December:
Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus
visit Winter Park Neighbor-
hoods. Please call 407-599-
3334 for times.
Thursday, Dec. 18: City of
Winter Park and Enzian The-
ater present Popcorn Flicks
in Shady Park in Hannibal
Square featuring "Scrooged"
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 21: Chabad
of Greater Orlando presents
Hanukkah in the Park from
5 p.m. to 8 p.m., in Central
Park.
Friday, Dec. 26: Second
annual Champs Sports Bowl
Parade of Bands marches
through downtown Winter
Park at 2 p.m. and ends with
a battle of the bands in Cen-
tral Park.
For complete details on
these and other city of Win-
ter Park events, please visit
our official Web site at Cit-
yofWinterPark.org.

Call City Hall at
407-599-3399 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF MAITLAND
In lieu of a Thanksgiving luncheon this year, the Maitland city government gave tur-
keys to all city employees. Pictured are Mayor Kinson and Cynthia Cooper, Community
Development administration assistant.


Winter Park City Talk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER


I am honored and privi-
leged to be in a position to
set an example of involve-
ment, communication,-and
dedication to professional-
ism and optimism that sets
an example for others to
follow. I will always be hum-
bled by what this opportu-
nity to serve has brought to
my family and me.


Thursday, November 27, 2008 Pg


Winter Park./ Maitland Observer


I











Police budget weathers cuts


MARY-ELIZABETH HITTEL
GUEST WRITER

A rise in Winter Park's crime
rate of 18.5 percent could
easily be chalked up to a
budget cut to the city's po-
lice force if only that were
the case. The overall budget
for the police department
increased by .56 percent or
$66,476, despite pressure
from the state to see city
budgets trimmed.
Winter Park did in fact
cut its overall city budget -
by .4 percent, but the Police
Department was spared.
"Everyone is suffering
cuts right now," said Deputy
Chief Bill McEachnie. "But it
was important to the police
department, the city of Win-
ter Park and the residents to
maintain the level of service
done by the Winter Park
police. Our main objective
was to not cut anything that
would affect our ability to
serve the residents of Win-
ter Park."
One. aspect of the budget
that did not suffer cuts was
the salary budget. Since the
officers are paid out of the
salary budget, that was the
last thing they wanted to
cut, McEachnie said. "The
number of officers patrol-
ling Winter Park streets is at
89 and has been for about
the past five years. And if
Winter Park annexes any-
thing more, we will make
the provisions necessary to
add more officers."
The other area of the
budget that was increased
indeterminately was the
fuel budget, the chief said.
"Since fuel costs are shift-
ing so much, we left the fuel
budget open-ended to com-r
bat costs," McEachnie said.
"But because fuel has gone
down, we don't need as
much of that money now."


Though the overall bud-
get increased, the operat-
ing budget was cut due to
reduced tax revenue, and
state and federal funding.
It suffered a decrease of
$70,969, or 4 percent. Of the
cuts made, only two were to
staffed positions; the police
department was able to save
costs by eliminating unnec-
essary administration posi-
tions, said Clarissa Howard,
the city's spokeswoman.
Other cuts include: the
elimination of one police
dog and its K-9 car, a reduc-
tion in the uniform supply
available to officers, the re-
Iduction of minor mainte-
nance of cruisers, and the
retirement of a few older
cruisers.
Another reduction of the
department's budget comes
from the elimination of the
budget that covers "capi-
tal outlays" purchases of
equipment that costs more
than $1,000.
"We have not made any
cuts that the community
would notice or anything
that would compromise
safety," McEachnie said. "We
always try to operate very
lean at the police -depart-
ment 'and this time around
we've trimmed the fat as
much as we can."
The only cuts that direct-
ly impacted Winter Park res-
idents were small cuts made
to the Neighborhood Watch
Program. "We were unable
to conduct our National
Night Out program this past
August," said Sergeant Pam
Marcum. "And for this next
budget year, we are no lon-
ger printing our quarterly
Neighborhood Watch News
Letter and will be making
them available online."
But the police depart-
ment has not slacked on
service. If anything, officers


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK- THE OBSERVER
Despite citywide budget cuts, Winter Park's Police Department will maintain a high number of officers on patrol: 89.


are working harder to keep
Winter Park safe.
"Detectives understand
that crime has increased
which results in an in-
creased number of arrests,"
said Sergeant Ronald L.
Johnson, supervisor for the
Criminal Investigation Di-
vision. "Detectives under-
stand that with increased
crime there are going to be
an aQditiogal number of
cases to investigate and ar-
rests to be effected. Rather
than complain, detectives
have learned to adapt and
prioritize their caseloads."
Over the past year, crime
has increased in Winter
Park by 18.5 percent. "We
were concerned about what
budget cuts might do to our
ability to combat the rise
in crime," McEachnie said.
"That's always our No. 1 pri-
ority."


"I would guess that the
economy has definitely had
an. effect," McEachnie said.
"We've seen a rise in burglar-
ies and larcenies more than
anything else and had sta-
tioned more patrols in ar-
eas that seem to experience
those types of crime and
they're mostly commercial,
like shopping centers."
However, the police de-
partment has not received
any complaints from resi-.
dents about service or the
increase in crime.
Winter Park residents Ed-
ward and Giliane Meyer said
that the department is do-
ing a great job of protecting
the community.
"I'm generally quite im-
pressed by Winter Park po-
lice," Edward Meyer said.
"The bike patrol program is
wonderful, and I do believe
they are diligent with traf-


fic violations. I believe the
police have done a good job
controlling the crime rate."
The increased crime rate
has not directly affected
their family, and they feel
safe in their neighborhood,
Giliane Meyer said. "I've not
really noticed an increase in
major crime, but I have no-
ticed the increase on petty
crime like defacing private
property, more graffiti," she
said.
Luckily, the department
does not expect any bud-
get cuts in the future. "We'll
deal with those if they hap-
pen," McEachnie said. "As
always, our main objective
is keeping Winter Park safe.
We want and will be as re-
sponsive to our residents as
possible."


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Winter Park Presbyterian Church


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Ceremony of Carols
Thursday, Dec. 4, 7:30 p.m.
UCF & Univ. HS Women's Choirs
Service of the Longest Night
Thursday, Dec. 18, 7:30 p.m.
For those dealing with loss and
life's transitions.
Living Nativity
Dec. 19-21, 7:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.
Service of Lessons and Carols
Sunday, Dec. 21, 11:00 a.m.
Christmas Eve Services, Dec. 24,
5:30 p.m. Family & Children
7:30 p.m. Candlelight
11:00 p.m. Communion/Candlelight


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400 South Lakemont Ave.
Winter Park, FL 32792
Phone: 407.647.1467
www.winppc.org


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contact tracy
407-628-8500
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


Winter Par k /Maitland Observer


Paqe 8 ThrdyNoebr2,08


%-


I'm "










Lifestyles



Desperate retailers sweeten deals
AMY K.D. TOBIK 7
OBSERVER STAFF
The special assignment begins prompt-.......
ly at 3 a.m. when two women dressed in .
matching gear quietly slip out the door and
into their cars. Equipped with backpacks
crammed with lists, bottled water, snacks,
cell phones and walkie-talkies, they know
their mission won't end for at least 21
hours.
It's Black Friday and these friends are
more than prepared to do their holiday
shopping.
Devoted Black Friday shopper Becky Pi-i
ety of Oviedo said she anticipates this sea-
son's shopping will be challenging.
"This year it is going to be even more
crowded due to a tough economy," Pi-
ety said. "More people will be. looking for
deals."
Her, advice to first-time Black Friday
shoppers: "Start early; the early bird gets
the worm. Leave your kids at home. Black
Friday shopping craziness is no place for
kids."
The holiday 'shopping season tradi-
tionally goes into full swing the day after
Thanksgiving, when the majority of retail-
ers offer enormous discounts and extend-
ed hours to lure more shoppers. The term ....,
"Black Friday" may refer to a promising B L -
PHOTO BY LAURENCE SAMUELS -THE OBSERVER
> turn to SALES on page All Retailers facing tough times collide with holiday shoppers eager for "Black Friday" bargains on the day after Thanksgiving, this Friday, Nov. 28.


December 5th Presentedby:

5:00pm r

THE MAYFLOWER
Supported by:


SKELLY PRICE
^~~~(7' 0 '*QBr'jf' M P AN Y:


Central Park & Park Avenue


TORYVILLE
COFFEE COMPANY


will be transformed into a Winter Wonderland at
The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce's
p Holiday Stroll. Bring the entire family for
1-, ,, a night of cheer to this FREE event: *
Visit Santa Claus Live Music,
Clown Lighting of the Tree
7pm Movie The Gremlins it II
Fresh-Made Snow Cookies for the Kids
Holiday Cards Winners Announced
Winning Designs Now Greeting Cards Available for Purchase
"c-2


, __


2008 olida Strll


NB


ThurdayNoveber 7, 208 age 9


Winter Park / Maitland Observer







IG For Greater Orlando's Active FamiliesUU




G OO^j JLCFlCC C For Greater'Orla'ndo's Active Families


Family

Calendar


Show off your creative side
and join Seminole County
4-H for their kids' holiday crafts
workshop. This opportunity will
give youth ages 5 through 14 the
opportunity to make a variety of
simple holiday crafts and gifts.
The workshop will be held in the
Cooperative Extension Auditorium
at 250 W. County Home Road in
Sanford from 10 a.m. to noon on
Saturday, Dec. 13.
The cost is $4 per person. Pre-
registration is required. Call the
4-H office at 407-665-5560 by
Thursday, Dec. 11 to register.
Signup for Pre-K session
starting Jan. 15.
The Orange County Voluntary
Pre-kindergarten Program offers
six hours daily of developmentally
appropriate learning experiences
with a strong emphasis on
language development. The
program begins Thursday, Jan. 15
and ends on June 3.
Enrollment space may still be
open at these Orange County
elementary schools: Aloma,
Apopka, Avalon, Bonneville,
Camelot, Castle Creek, Chickasaw,
Frangus, Hiawassee, Lake Gem,
MeadowWoods, Oak Hill, Oakshire,
Ocoee, Palmetto, Pershing, Pinar,
Riverside, Union Park, Ventura,
Vista Lakes, Whispering Oak,
Spring Lake, Windermere and
Winegard.
To enroll, please do the
following:
Call the school to find out if
there are any vacancies.
If so, provide the school with
your child's full name and birth
date.
The school will provide this
information to the Early Childhood
Team who will contact 4-C to
determine the child's eligibility.
Visit www.VPKFIorida.org or
www.earlychildhood.ocps.net for
more information.
The Orlando Roadhouse hosts
a family-friendly rummage sale
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 6. Each family gets a free
booth the size of a parking spot,
though wares must be family-
friendly. Business booths are $50.
Bring your own tables, chairs, et
cetera. A non-profit organization
will accept unsold items at the
end of the event.
The Roadhouse is at 1870 State
Road 436 in Winter Park
E-mail julie@mykidsplate.com
or call 407-568-1228 to reserve
a spot.
The Orange County Library
System present Storytelling at
Leu Gardens the third Monday
of each month starting at 10 a.m.
Children will hear stories and
participate in songs and rhymes.
Enjoy a favorite story or find a
newone. ft's free!
Gall Leu Gardens at 407-246-
2620 or visit www.leugardens.org
fr. more information.


Good deeds for the holidays


----^^^~I ^^^^^lf


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -THE OBSERVER
Oviedo children took up two causes this month to help bring joy to the world during the holiday season: collecting pet food for needy families, and writing cards to soldiers.


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF
very time a child walks
into the Oviedo City
Hall with pet food or
homemade cards in hand,
it warms Linda DeBonis"
heart.
The records specialist in
the City Clerk's Office has
watched the collection of
donated canned and dry
pet food increase every day,
along with a growing stack
of Thanksgiving cards dec-
orated with hand-drawn


turkeys and cornucopias,
intended for American sol-
diers stationed in Iraq.
These two special proj-
ects were set in motion at
the first Children in Action
Forum hosted in early No-
vember by the Oviedo City
Council. The attendees, who
ranged in age from elemen-
tary to middle school stu-
dents, discussed local issues
and concerns, and were en-
couraged to express their
community project ideas to
Oviedo Mayor Mary Lou An-
drews through secret ballot.
Project suggestions var-


ied, from planting trees on
city property to cleaning up
litter and recycling. Nearly
half of the respondents,
however, voted to collect
pet food for an Oviedo food
pantry. The children theo-'
rized that people who need
to visit food banks to pro-
vide for their families must
also need animal food to
feed the family pet. Resi-
dents were asked to contrib-
ute in order to help prevent
people from having to give
up a pet because of the cost,
or being tempted to share
their "people food." The


children collected enough
animal food for several
Oviedo pets.
The enthusiasm for help-
ing local animals did not
surprise Andrews.
"Most children can eas-
ily sympathize with pets
because they are perceived
as innocent and dependent
upon a human's care," An-
drews said. "Although adults
may be in need, I believe it is
harder for children to em-
pathize with adults because
children view adults as ca-
> turn to ACTION on next page


Featured art


This week's art comes from art students i -
at Carillon Elementary School in Oviedo. '


Scarecrow


Crayon on Paper


Thanksgiving

Chalk on paper


Illustrated by
Eric Hunter
2nd grade


Fall


Crayon on paper


Illustrated by
Mila Gaarder.
2nd grade


Illustrated by
Samantha Grande
2nd grade


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


pDn i hrsa. oebe 7,20






Winter Park / Maitand Observer Thursday, November 27, 2008 Page 11


SALES I Electronics on the hot list


< continued from page A9
shift in profit due to the sudden
influx of sales and dates back to
when accounting records were
kept by hand using red ink to
represent unprofitable periods,
to black ink for profit.
Newspapers are typically
packed with early bird circu-
lars offering unusual discounts
on electronics and toys. More
than 100 Black Friday adver-
tisements from large retailers
can also be found online weeks
in advance, offering hot deals
and coupons to entice consum-
ers. Some large discount stores
keep their hours secret up until
the last minute, hoping to beat
out the competition.
This year, Piety anticipates
people will be searching for the
best prices on "hot" items such
as plasma and LCD TVs, Blu-ray
disc players, video games, Nerf
N-Strike Vulcan Blaster and ac-
tion figures such as Bakugan
Battle Brawlers.
While economic times may
seem challenging this year,
Chris Molho, assistant general
manager of Oviedo Market-
place and Altamonte Mall, said
he remains optimistic.
"The traffic has been phe-


nomenal at both Altamonte
and Oviedo the past two week-
ends, despite what people have
been saying about it being a
slow season," Molho said. "Ev-
eryone will be looking for a
deal with the credit crunch."
The Altamonte Mall will kick
off the holiday season at one
minute past midnight with the
"Rockiri' Shoppin' Eve" celebra-
tion. In addition to store dis-
counts, the mall will be giving
away a $1,000 shopping spree
and gift cards on Black Friday.
Oviedo Marketplace will host
"Get Your Gift On" and open
at 6 a.m. on Friday. Prizes, such
as a big, flat screen television,
a laptop computer and special
gift bags will be given away at
the event.
"I can't wait," Molho said.
"I'll be there bright and early."
Oviedo Borders bookstore
manager Jeff Fike said the Win-
ter Park Village store will open
an hour earlier than normal on
Black Friday, at 8 a.m., hoping to
increase book sales. "The whole
sales year has been light," Fike
said. "A 'big day' (in sales) is so
subjective now; it has been no-
where near our expectations."
"I think everyone in retail is
so far out of the black this year,"


BACKFIA


*' -'. ; 4 07-~ .1 0:- :.,
Hours:- .1.a:m. to 9i.m.
Waterford Lakes town Center
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Hours: 7 a.m..to 9a30 p:m.
The Florida Mall
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Hours:m ^O.To0m

Fike said, adding, "We need a
Black December and every pa-
triot out there to support their
country."


ACTION IA time to give
< continued from the previous page

pable and 'in charge.'
"I believe that children have a hard time
wrapping their emotions around the concept
that an adult can also be dependent and in
need of care."
The children were also asked at the forum
to select a Thanksgiving project. The mayor
received earnest suggestions ranging from
collecting books for the homeless to making
cards for the elderly. Fifteen out of 26 children
voted for a Thanksgiving card project to raise
the spirits of military personnel stationed at
Camp Victory in Iraq. Andrews said she thinks
the card project was so popular with the chil-
dren because the military is a high-visibility
entity that children have seen in newspapers
and on television.
Deputy City Clerk Sue Andrews, who helped
coordinatetheeffort,saidshewasoverwhelmed
by the response. "These are children who really
know what is happening in our world, which
is both tragic and amazing to me," she said. "I
grew up in a small town in Kentucky and had
no idea what the issues were, let alone have an
opinion or a solution. I truly believe that these
are the children who will one day be our city,
county and state leaders."
Debonis added, glancing at the growing pile
of contributions, "It makes me feel wonder-
ful that children are interested in wanting to
participate ... the more we involve children in
actual events the stronger our community will
be.
"And the earlier we start, the better."


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Friday, December 5 from 10:00 A M 6:00 PM
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_ _I__ ~U-5T- liC ~I


Thursday, November 27, 2008 Pae1


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer










Calendar


So Social hosts a networking happy
hour from 5:30-8 30 p.m. Wednes-
day, Dec. 3 at Circa Restaurant and
Lounge in Winter Park.
For $10 get happy-hour drink pric-
es, free hors d'oeuvres, doors prizes
and entry in a raffle.
Circa is at 358 N. Park Ave., where
Park crosses Canton Avenue.
Don't forget to bring business
cards, brochures and other marketing
materials.
Visit SoSocial.com or call Scott
Bender at 407-260-5200 or e-mail
scott@sosocial.com for more infor- .
mation.

"Home For the Holidays," a musi-
cal revue, comes to the Winter Park
Playhouse from Friday, Dec. 5 through
Dec. 20 on Fridays and Saturdays.
Tickets are $32 for adults, $30 for
seniors, $24 for matinee times, and
$22 for students and industry profes-
sionals.
The Winter Park Playhouse theater
is at 711-B Orange Ave. in Winter
Park.
Call 407-645-0145 for more infor-
mation.

The 75th Christmas Vespers will be
held on Friday, Dec. 5 and Saturday,
Dec. 6 in the Knowles Memorial Cha-
pel at Rollins College in Winter Park.
Doors open at
5:45 p.m. and music begins at 6
p.m. Admission is $5.

Florida's cracker tenor Benjamin
Dehart performs historical folk songs
at. 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 11 at Harry
P. Leu Gardens at 1920 N. Forest Ave.
in Orlando.
The musical event is hosted by the
Central Florida Anthropological Soci-
ety. Also participating will be retired
judge and author Fred Hltt, introduc-
ing Dehart's newest song "Timucuan


Eyes." The event is free.
Call 407-699-9861 for more infor-
mation.

"Home for the Holidays" will be
performed by the Maitland Sym-
phony Orchestra at 7:30 p.m.-Sun-
day, Dec. 14 in the sanctuary of the
First Presbyterian Church of Maitland
at 341 N. Orlando Ave.
The concert is free, supported
by Cultural Partner Performing Arts
of Maitland. Call 321-303-1404 for
more information

The Winter Park Chamber of Com-
merce will host the Annual Orange
County Commission Luncheon, Fri-
day, Dec. 19 at the Rachel D. Murrah
Civic Center of Winter Park. Registra-
tion will begin at 11:30 a.m. and the
program will begin at noon. The Civic
Center is at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. in
Winter Park.
This luncheon offers Winter Park
Chamber members and guests an
opportunity to receive an .update on
county issues and activities affecting
residents and businesses, by Orange
County Mayor Richard Crotty:
Commissioners Theresa Jacobs, Fred
Brummer, Mildred Fernandez, Linda
Stewart, Bill Segal, and Tiffany Moore
Russel, have also been invited to par-
ticipate in this event. Reservations are
required and are non-refundable.
Individual reservations are $30
per person for Chamber Members,
$35 for non-members and members
paying at the door. Corporate tables
sponsorships of eight seats are avail-
able at $240.
E-mail Kimberly McDonald at km-
cdonalda'winterpark org, call 407-
644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.
org for more information.

The Mid-Florida Milers Walking
Club promotes recreational walk-


ing for fun and fitness and will host
a walk in Winter Park on Saturday
evening, Dec. 20 Participants can
register at Winter Pines Golf Course
at 950 S. Ranger Blvd. in Winter Park
from 5:30-6 p.m. Groups will leave at
6 p.m.
This Mid-Florida Milers' annual
guided holiday walk will go inrough
parts of Winter Park adorned with
Christmas decorations. Bring flash-
lights and reflective items. Wheel-
chairs and strollers are medium to
hard difficulty and pets are not al-
lowed.
The cost is $3 for AVA Credit. Non-
credit walkers can walk for free. The
distance is 10 kilometers (6 miles);
and a shorter 5 kilometer (3 miles)
trail will be available.
Visit www.midfloridamilers.org, call
407-304-6394 or e-mail mlanpher@
cfl.rr.com for more information.

ArtFest, hosted by the University
Club of Winter Park, comes to town
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan.
10 at 841 N. Park Ave. The event fea-
tures arts and crafts, refreshments
and entertainment, and is free to at-
tend. Call 407-644-6147 or e-mail
www.UniversityClubWinterPark.org
for more information.

DePaul University Assistant Profes-
sor Gagik Aroutiunian will exhibit
his sculptures and installations from
a wide range of traditional and non-
traditional materials at the Crealde
School of Art in Winter Park.
These are subjected to a complex
fabrication process which alters their
original identity both in materials and
process. The resulting constructions
function as metaphors of displace-
ment, the passage of time, and the
vulnerability of memory.
A lecture and opening reception will
be held at 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 16 in the


Alice and William Jenkins Gallery at
600 St. Andrews Blvd., just north of
Aloma Avenue.
The Jewish Community Center of
Greater Orlando will host busi-
nesses from all over the Orlando
area from 4:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 22 to network and market their
services to each other and attendees.
Participating businesses and attend-


ees can also experience educational
seminars to help grow as businesses
and individuals.
Attendance is free. Tables are $90
for Jewish Community Center mem-
bers and $125 for non-members. The
event is at 851 N. Maitland Ave. in
Maitland.


Holiday Events Guide

Sunday, Nov. 30
A Holiday Pops concert performed by the Orlando
Philharmonic Orchestra at 6 p.m. in Winter Park's Central
Park. The concert is free. Call 407-896-6700 for more
information.

Thursday, Dec. 4
The 30th Annual Christmas in the Park Celebration. The
Bach Festival Choir performs from the main stage in
Winter Park's Central Park. The program begins at 6
p.m. Call 407-645-5311 for more information.

Friday, Dec. 5
The annual Tree Lighting Ceremony and Holiday Stroll
beginning at 5 p.m. in Winter Park's Central Park. Call
407-644-8281 for more information.

Friday, Dec. 5
Popcorn Flicks in Winter Park's Central Park. "Gremlins"
will be shown at 7 p.m. Call 407-644-8281 for more
information.


Saturday, Dec. 6
The 56th Annual Winter Park Christmas Parade on Park
Avenue, starting at 9 a.m. Call, 407-644-8281 for more
information.


r: A good
T conversation
should be
I t heard
, _, and not
Seen.


&. Do people sound like they are
@k- mumbling?

Do you find yourself turning up
the volume on the tv?

Do you frequently ask people to
repeat themselves?

Your journey away from hearing loss begins here!
ODicover oot Ia eeO&& io kov(
www.OrlandoHears.com


1460 Lake Baldwin Lane
5~/7 Baldwin Park
ASSOC ATES 407-898-2220 Dr. Melissa Riess

,Sound 7e-ameneitZ. Sca C re. 6on CpW-/.e -e.


SKOLFIILD HOtMES
,R)^ o l r N '1"*(" '1 ,-\y s *


wllr~u
aV(.~5.


,sl3_aI I\ 'lll 1 i IIL I ,L I, L.
118 \\. Comlstoclk A\vc.
Winter Park FL 32"89

Do you enjoy taking care of the small repairs around your home? Are endless
lists of Saturday projects relaxing therapy? If not, then turn to Skolfield Homes,
a name you can trust. We have a new division called Skolfield Services.
The growth in our primary business of major renovations, additions, kitchens
and baths has recently allowed us to add several more exceptional craftsmen to
our team. As we complement our main business with this new division, we are,
in a way, circling back to our 1979 roots and living our philosophy of "taking
care of the client."
Our service van is outfitted with supplies, tools, and most importantly an ex-
tremely talented craftsman, Bob Decker.
Our fee: $85 per hour plus materials; a relaxing stress-free Saturday: priceless!
To schedule an appointment call 407-647-7730


BJIRICaP' -~~i~ramaaa


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


P~qnp 12 hrdv oebr2,20


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, November 27, 2008 Page 13


Cinema


AreaUIi~li ~ mo ie imeU s for Wedn 1*i'esday, Nov. 264i
Tiesma b vli fr haksivng6n. ohe6 dys- cal to*e*sue.-


Winter Park Village
510 N. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park
407-628-0035
AUSTRALIA (PG-13) noon, 1:00,
3:30, 4:30, 7:00, 8:00,10:30
FOUR CHRISTMASES (PG-1i3)
12:05,12:50,1:30,2:30, 3:05, 3:45,
4:45, 5:15, 7:15,7:45,8:15,9:30,
10:00,10:35
TRANSPORTER 3 (PG-13)
11:50am, 2:15, 4:50, 7:25,9:50
BOLT (PG) 11:40am, 12:20,2:05,
2:40, 4:35, 5:05,7:10,7:50, 9:45,
10:15
TWILIGHT (PG-13) 11:40am,
12:30,12:55, 2:35, 3:55, 4:15, 5:20,
6:50, 7:20, 8:10, 9:40,10:20,10:55
QUANTUM OF SOLACE (PG-13)
11:45am, 12:15,1:50, 2:20, 2:50,
4:25, 4:55, 5:25, 7:05, 7:35, 8:05,
9:35,10:05,10:45
THE BOY IN THE STRIPED
PAJAMAS (PG-13) 12:35, 2:55,
5:10,7:35,9:55
ROLE MODELS (R) 1:05,3:40,
7:40,10:10


MADAGASCAR 2 (PG) 11:55am,
12:25, 2:25, 3:10, 5:00, 5:30, 7:55,
10:40
CHANGELING (R) 7:30,10:50
SYNECDOCHE, NEW YORK (R)
12:45, 3:35, 6:45,10:25
RACHEL GETTING MARRIED
(R) 12:10, 2:45, 5:40, 8:20,10:55



Maitland
1300 S.Orlando2Ave.,Maitland
407-629-0054
HAPPY-GO-LUCKY (R) 6:30,
9:30




Winter Park
2155 Aloma Ave.
Winter Park
407-678-8214
FOUR CHRISTMASES (PG-13)
7:00,9:10
QUANTUM OF SOLACE (PG-13)
7:30, 9:45


'Australia' Opens Wednesday


When her husband dies, an English aristocrat inherits his Australian
ranch. Soon, however, cattle barons plot to take over the land, and she
must unite with a rough drover to herd her cattle across the wilderness.

2 hours 45 minutes PG-13


Wednesday: 'Four Christmases'
2 Married couple Kate and Brad
successfully avoided visiting
. their parents during the past
few Christmases. But when
Weather interrupts their holiday
plans, they're forced to visit all
four of their parents in one day.


1 hour 22 minutes PG- 13


Opening next week


'Punisher: War Zone'

1 hour 47 minutes R


NEW DROP-OFF LOCATION
Please open your hearts to needy local
Orlando children this holiday season. Stop
by and drop off your new, unwrapped toy
(or monetary donation), and we will
provide you with free coffee and sweets!
Leave donations at:
Michelle Valentine Matchmaking
1540-B Lake Baldwin Lane -
Orlando (Baldwin Park) ULS. MAR E Cow
..--1. A- .... h..- .. Fod -nn.o.ti onvwit


RPS RESERVII
n-n-. v5nf Un-U


Brandywine Square

* Courtyard Shopping Sidewalk Cafe *
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum
Brandywine Deli Cida's of Winter Park Antiques
il., 1 iCi r i ,a.i r P u,,ing q on the Avenue
Enijy ,3ai,r,. OuLnr ,'r, ill I'ri na1 an[,1 n Ou iIty Arlii,,u
r,3u1lll P3rh Avvt. ,Je BMIH C o(IlI, rn O rtEd ly Hrdly H djI ,=
e,r3.. pn ii. ,,,:. l'.- 4017-644-5635 407.657.2100

Family Comics & Cards Essence Luxe Linens
.i, inr, ..... :, ,.:. ..... Salon & Day Spa El s ,I .: :e 1,i 1, I..
i,, ii,, ,-iHlr i ] i ]i Hi urI.F l i:u[ ..- i II I i3( ,u: IUi nql F., I uriin,
T t, f r y 1 '. ] 'n, 1 h ), ] E ^ r o w n : ,F ,I : : [i i ii l t u l r i- .? '. i ,) 1 -, i l i.-l -i'r: .
1 l "r "' 407-629-2588 7.-*4. 67

Barbara Coffee Winter Park Hair Studio Park Avenue Jewelers
LMFT, LHMC vi.. .i oryi, ii uT,,n, ,T,I,,,-.
" I. .. nl l.."r J" 'lv
I,,, f ,,:,,r f l. ii ', r .. .. .. r.v. .. ,' w l, -

Thimble Works Grace Clinic
AAileral,,!,n, ior al ,, vO In o ci
407-657-5555 or Wiriler oPar. ..I.I... :i ....... ,,.,-V
4l07-dR7-539Q7 407-629-7699


Huge St. John and Escada sale!

Hurry in for best selection!


New Store Hours
Monday Saturday
10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Sunday 12 p.m. 5 p.m.


329 North Park Avenue
Suite 101
(next to Panera Bread)
Winter Park, FL 32789


407.539.2528

www.Jacobsons.com


-14


or call 407-895-8222 for hours and dirednons


Thursday, November 27, 2008 Pae1


Winter Park / Maitland Obser~ver










Cultivate your own butterfly bush


A member of the legume
family and native to Brazil
and other countries in South
America, the butterfly bush
produces a brilliant display
of yellow blossoms in the
fall that resemble golden
butterflies. This plant is also
known as climbing cas-
sia, Christmas senna, win-
ter cassia or simply cassia
shrub. This plant is the food
and nectar source of various
yellow butterflies.

The plant
This sprawling, semi-ever-
green shrub reaches a height
of 8 to 10 feet with an equal
spread. Leaves are alternate
with ovate leaflets less than
2 inches long. When partial-
ly folded, the leaf creates a
"lobster-tail."
The flowers are yellow,
very showy, about 1.5 inch-
es across and in three to


12 flowered racemes that
grow near the stem tips.
Each flower has prominent,
curved, filamentous sta-
mens, which are character-
istic of this plant. The fruit
is a brown, slender cylindri-
cal pod, about 3 to 6 inches
long.

The butterflies
Cloudless sulphur, sleepy or-
ange and orange-barred sul-
phur are three of the most
prominent butterflies that
feed on this plant. Sulphur
butterflies often migrate
across the state in large
numbers, going south dur-
ing the months of Septem-
ber through November, and
a smaller migration occurs
in a northward direction in
the spring.
The cloudless sulphur
butterfly is one of the most
common butterflies in Flor-


+ Florida

Gardening
BY AL FERRER
-SEMINOLE COUNTY URBAN
HORTICULTURIST


ida. Males are easily recog-
nized because of their pure
yellow color without any
markings on the upper side
of their wings. The females
have small black spots and
markings along the edges of
the fore wings. Both sexes
have very small silver spots,
rimmed in pink, on the un-
derside of the hind wings.
The sulphur butterflies
are so named because of
their bright yellow color-
ation, resembling the color
of the element sulfur. Actu-
ally, their colors vary from
lemony ,yellow to bright
orange and pastel green to
faded white. Some of the
females have a yellow and a
white form.

Ecological notes
Commonly cultivated for
ornament in Florida at least
since the 1940s is known to
escape cultivation displac-
ing native vegetation in
disturbed and undisturbed
areas of Florida's tropical
hammocks, coastal strands
and canal banks. It has be-
come naturalized in South
Florida, considered some-
what weedy in the Bahamas
and disturbed areas in South
America.


Culture
The 'butterfly bush grows
well in partial shade but
needs full sun for best
growth and flowering. It
tolerates a wide range of
well-drained types of soil
and becomes moderately
drought-tolerant after be-
coming established.
This plant will benefit
from frequent pinching of
the young shoot tips during
the growing season up to
the beginning of September;
this encourages branching
and increases the number
of flowers. Blooming occurs
in late fall or early winter,
producing numerous seeds
in each pod. Appropriate
training can produce a very
small specimen tree that
looks nice growing in a low
ground cover.
Trees often fall over and
will require staking to hold
them upright. For this rea-
son, it is easiest to place it in
a shrub border among other
shrubs that will help hold it
erect. Cut off at ground lev-
el as soon as the frost kills
back the stems during se-
vere winters.

Uses
Container or above-ground


*I




SCopyrighted Materia

: Syndicated Content



'Available from Commercia New





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planter. It is recommend-
ed for buffer strips around
parking lots or for median
strip plantings in the high-
way. Plant it near a deck or
patio or use as specimen.
Use in the. back of a border
to hide its straggly, leafless
lower stems.
Leaves are used as a pur-
gative, but large amounts
may be harmful. The nectar
is said to be toxic to bees.
Propagation is by seed or
cuttings.

Pests and diseases
In the fall, the foliage and
flower buds of this plant
are often eaten by caterpil-
lars. These caterpillars can
be easily picked off by hand.
You carn control the damage
of the caterpillars by spray-
ing biological insecticides
such as Dipel or Thuricide.
If you are a butterfly lov-
er, you can leave some cat-
erpillars alive so they can
reach the adult stage while
you watch their life cycle
unfold in front of your eyes.
Damaged or stressed plants
can be infested with trunk
borers. There are no serious
disease problems that affect
cassia plants.


f


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CONTESTED DIVORCE CHILDREN'S ISSUES
MARK LANG & ASSOCIATES
Attorneys
In Beautifidl Doiutoiun Winter Park
222 West Comstock Avenue. Suite 210
Winter Park. Florida 32-89-2b15
Telephone- t 40) 50. 4.-433
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Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, November 27, 2008 Page 15



Opinion/ i


"Oh, my gawd, he's making
a pass at me," was my reac-
tion in 1978 to a comment
made by my luncheon
guest. What was an Iowa
rube to do? My response is
forthcoming, but let's jump
30 years later to 2008.
I want to offer to all my
gay and lesbian friends the
happiest of Thanksgivings
this year and to not despair
over the continued "g6ofi-
ness" of the American elec-
torate, particularly with the
recent marriage amend-
ment votes in Florida and
California. As "they" say,
"This, too, shall pass."
It's only a matter of time
before America grows up
and no longer fixates on
what goes on behind closed
doors between consent-
ing adults. I mean, c'mon
kids, we can't forever be in
junior high school, can we,
all atwitter over who does
what to whom and how?
Hmmm, maybe we can.
Sigh.
I want to briefly explore
the Marriage Amend-
ment effort and why such
initiatives are ultimately
doomed. If you examine the
history of marriage and,
oh, my goodness, marriage
actually predates the writ-


ing of the Old Testament -
it has been an institution of
evolutionary change. If you
do not subscribe that mar-
riage is a gift/law/require-
ment of God, and I do not,
you realize it is a human
contrivance that was in its
implementation an issue
of property and progeny
- historically one and the
same in many cultures.
Oh, I will grant you that
marriage was originally a
union between a man and
a woman but I find that
limitation no more valid
than I would the marriage
restrictions that defined a
woman as a man's piece of
property. So, logically, if you
are going to argue for those
old-time values, you are ad-
vocating for all intents and
purposes that women are
chattel and, as such, have
no rights. Consistency re-.
quires it. Don't-cha see."
But those Biblically in-
spired and Biblically sure
counter with the claim
of the inerrancy of their
"Word," and how can you
possibly argue with what
God intended? A lesser man
would heartily guffaw at
such claims. I'll just say, "In-
teresting, but wrong."
The Old Testament was


Perspectives

by...







Have a gay Thanksgiving


one people's attempt at
managing life. It, like a pho-
to, captured what "they"
felt was important, relevant
and true thousands and
thousands of years ago.
We all know there is ab-
solutely nothing larger in
the known universe than
man's ego, hence, our God
is jealous, parochial and
male. Rules were set down,
codified, and a priestly class
established to forever inter-
pret the inscrutable mind
of God and apply it to his
"children." And, marriage
-was just one of those con-
siderations.
But, the faithful argue,
the sanctity of marriage is
explicitly described and
sanctified in the Bible and,
as everyone knows, it is un-
deniably true. The Book is
not wrong. Hmmm? Please,
if the Bible is not subject to
change, interpretation and
the influence of modernity,
explain slavery in the Bible.
Explain all the codified
lunacy of how the Bible
once considered women,
children and slaves that
we no longer believe: I'll go
chapter and verse with any-
one who wants to debate
the literalness of the Bible.
Actually, I won't. It is an
intellectual waste of time.
Amusing sometimes, I'll
grant you that.
Save your letters to the
editor of how intolerant
I am. I simply do not sub-
scribe to what I believe is
an incredibly limited view
of humanity.
Thankfully, we are not
living in a theocracy, no
matter how hard America's
religious right would like us
to. The religiously certain
would impose their views


Letters to


Support voters' agenda on rail
In response to recent letters in
the Sentinel regarding commuter
rail in Winter Park, I respectfully
offer another point of view. The
role of the City Commission in the
commuter rail project should be to
support the vote of the residents of
the city. In addition to looking at
the cost side of the equation, they
need to work with their partners
- Orange County, Metro Orlando,
the state of Florida, and the federal
government on constructive
revenue solutions to pay for com-
muter rail. For me, and many other
residents, there is no question but
that we need commuter rail and
other solutions that will make us
more energy independent. The
timing couldn't be better than now
for the Commission to play a lead-
ership role in making sure com-
muter rail succeeds. They need to
embrace and promote commuter
rail as an integral part of an overall
city and regional plan for a sustain-
able development future based on
mass transit.
As for the lingering argument
about the commuter rail's "threat-
ening" of Central Park, we need
to put that to rest. Winter Park is


what it is today because the city's
early founders had the foresight
to get the tracks to come through
the center of town. This city's his-
tory is intrinsically connected to
railroads. It needs to make its fu-
ture connected to rail as well. The
time has come for the Commission
to put aside personal agendas and
support the voter agenda on com-
muter rail.
-Jeffrey Blydenburgh

Who said the following?
"We've all overspent. We all had
it so good we just kept going for-
ward without saying, 'What if it
goes bad?'"
Was it the president? Was it our
governor? Was it our senators?
Was it Orlando's mayor? Was it
the county chairman? Was it our
school superintendent? Was it our
county commissioners? Was it Bar-
ney Frank or Chris Dodd? Was it
the "Big Three" automakers? Was
it university presidents? Was it the
teachers' unions? Was it anybody
"big" by society standards? No, it
was "only" Richard Petty, as he is
quoted in the Nov. 18 edition of the
Orlando Sentinel.
The seven-time NASCAR cham-
I


pion is the only voice I have heard
publicly facing the truth. While
his concern is about a private or-
ganization and its past abuse of
responsibility, his words are ap-
propriate for public matters, espe-
cially in the adherence to sound
financial policies. All of our current
money problems have brought on
employment problems and social
problems because our people and
our leadership have ignored the
rules of income/spending and have
fallen victim to the philosophy that
government can be all things to all
people.
No wonder no one (compara-
tively speaking) is eating out. No
wonder restaurants, including
chains, are closing. No wonder
holiday spending is expected to be
"down." No wonder the Dow Jones
industrial average is imitating a yo-
yo. No wonder investors have lost
the last 10 years of their gains (ac-
cording to investment expert Steve
Forbes).
Richard Petty hit the nail on the
head. And I would bet that he has
been warning NASCAR in the past
about trouble ahead, but no one
wanted to listen. Money and "high
times" have a way of luring a lot of


us away from reality. And the reality
is that there @@are@@ people phil-
osophically at fault nationwide.
-Ted Haberkorn
Winter Park


on a secular nation, and
this includes marriage.
Whether or not gays are
born as such or "just" se-
lect that life is something
I've explored in previous
columns. It is not germane
to me in the argument for
marriage.
Our gay and lesbian citi-
zens are human beings first.
They fall in love and want
to commit to their lover.
It is no more complicated
(to me) than that. Our cul-
ture has determined that
marriage is the sincerest
expression of love (com-
mitment). Hence, it should
come as no surprise that
gays and lesbians want
what "all" of us desire.
The question becomes:
Is marriage only between
heterosexuals or not? I have
argued that marriage is a
historically changing con-
vention, that its Biblical re-
strictions are intellectually
untenable and, as a culture
changes, so too its defini-
tions and institutions.
I laugh out loud when I
hear someone argue that
gay marriage will under-
mine the institution. That
is too funny. Step back and
review modem marriage.
Then-have a good rip-
roaring laugh. To the degree
marriage means anything
at all is up to the participat-
ing individuals.
Basically, it's an old
person's issue. I'll be 60 in
March and sadly it's old
fogies my age and older
who get their undies all in
a bundled knot over gay
marriage, that the world
will end, yada, yada, yada.
The younger generations
don't give two twits about
it. I predict that within 60


months this issue will be
resolved for America, that
enough people will, say, "My
gawd, can we be anymore
juvenile? Let's grow up. Let's
move on. Let's all just mind
our own business." And
wish everyone well if mar-
riage is what they require as
fulfillment in life.
I did not have an openly
gay friend until 1978.1 I met
this man over lunch. He
was a prominent Midwest
disc jockey that I was at-
tempting to recruit to chair
a fundraising event for the
organization I was run-
ning at the time. No sooner
had we sat down and ex-
changed handshakes when
he said something to the
effect of, "I find you attrac-
tive," and my mind went
haywire.
No one had ever made a
pass at me, let alone a man,
and what was I going to do?
He rambled on about such
things and I'm thinking,
"What am I going to do?" I
can't be offended; I wanted
him to chair my event. @@
Argh!@@ I'm screwed!
And then it occurred
out of nowhere and I said,
"Dave, you know I'm im-
mensely flattered but I
don't swing that way."
He smiled and said,
"Well, I just had to ask." I
do get that. A good hunting
dog sniffs at every bush.
We laughed. We moved
on.
It is past time for Ameri-
ca to move on.


T KJEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.






I UI ThI imdv November, 27.vl 8W r k a O e


Play On!
1


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

Happiness

6 Your love of liberty,
your respect for the
laws, your habits of
industry, and your practice
of the moral and religious
obligations, are the stron-
gest claims to national and
individual happiness" said
the father of our country.
"Happiness," in the most
literal sense, is based on
"hap," referring to good
luck or fortune not
brought on by oneself -
e.g. "happenstance."
However, in ordinary
usage, happiness carries
no reference as to origin,
whether something hap-
pens by one's own inten-
tion or by pure chance.
In my own case, a happy
home provides the ingredi-
ents that make the climate
of my life a consistently
loving one.
In the fourth cen-
tury B.C., Aristotle said,
"Happiness depends upon
ourselves."
The old saying,


"Happiness is where you
find it," implies, if nothing
else, that one should avoid
unhappy influences and
circumstances.
One can often create a
setting in which happiness
is prone to "happen."
Sardonic malicious
American wit Ambrose
Bierce defined happiness
as "An agreeable sensation
arising from contemplating
the misery of another."
In his conscious state,
man has conjured up voy-
aging to the moon, the
Beethoven Ninth, Hamlet,
and how to bake bread!
But the influence of man's -
subconscious mind on his
fortunes is a matter of great
conjecture.
Sigmund Freud was
hipped on the idea that
subconscious sexual influ-
ences probably rule much
of human motivation. At
the end of his life, Freud
revised his primal cause to
that of Nihilism, i.e. self-
destruction. '
A person of ironic lean-
ings could add that the his-
tory of mankind is a long
tale.of pugnacious self-
destruction.
The U.S. Constitution
speaks of "happiness,"
but does not guarantee it.
Thomas Jefferson reminds
us that we have only the
right to "pursue happiness"
- catching it is our own
problem.
"Happiness is always a
byproduct. It is probably
a matter of temperament,
and for anything I know it
may be glandular. But it is
not something that can be
denianded from life, and if
you are not happy you had
better stop worrying about
it and see what treasures
you can pluck from your


own brand of unhappi-
ness."
Robertson Davies
Leo Tolstoy said, "If you
want to be happy be!"
(Easier said than done!)
"The best way to cheer
yourself up," said Mark
Twain, "is to cheer up
someone else."
Edith Wharton quipped,
"If only we'd stop trying to
be happy, we could have a
pretty good time."
It occurs to me that,
if you tell someone "I'm
happy to see you," you
ought to punctuate it with
a smile!
"The foolish man seeks
happiness in the distance;
the wise man grows it
under his feet."
-James Oppenheim
While an aged stamp
collector may be very
happy at finding a rare
stamp, to be really happy,
a young blade may require
the company of a beaute-
ous maiden.
The human race is in a
constant search for "hap-
piness." But happiness is a
very ambiguous concept,
and its definition may vary
almost infinitely. In "The
Spectator" (1711), Joseph
Addison wrote, "True hap-
piness is of a retired nature
and an enemy of pomp and
noise; it arises in the first
place from the enjoyment
of one's self, and, in the
next, from friendship and
conversation of a few select
companions."
Here Addison points to
self-esteem and to good
companionship as two
sources of his highest per-
sonal happiness.
Trying to remember your
very happiest moments
should prove more satis-
fying than remembering


your saddest occasions.
Let's hope this is because
you have had many more
happy ones! Or is it that
our minds defensively cast
off unhappiness as soon as
possible?
"Happiness often sneaks
in through a door you
didn't know you left open,"
said John Barrymore.
"It's pretty hard-to tell
what does bring happiness.
Poverty and wealth have
both failed."
"Kin"Hubbard
"Often people attempt
to live their lives back-
wards; they try to have
more things, or more
money, in order to do more
of what they want, so they
will be happier. The way.
it actually works is the
reverse. You must first be
who you really are, then
do what you need to do,
in order to have what you
want."
Margaret Young
"Can anything be so ele-
gant as to have few wants,
and to serve them oneself?"
Ralph Waldo Emerson
"There are two things
to aim at in life: first, to get
what you want; and after
that, to enjoy it. Only the
wisest of mankind achieve
the second."
Logan Pearsall Smith
Wordsworth remarked,
"Pleasure is spread through
the Earth in stray gifts to be
claimed by whoever shall
find."
Transcendentalist
Nathaniel Hawthorne said,
"Happiness is like a butter-
fly which, when pursued,
is always beyond our grasp,
but, if you will sit down
quietly, may alight upon
you."
"Most folks are about
as happy as they make up


their minds to be."
Abraham Lincoln
"Happiness is a form of
courage."
Holbrook Jackson
"We tend to forget that
happiness doesn't come as
a result of getting some-
thing we don't have, but
rather of recognizing and
appreciating what we do
have."
-Frederick Koenig
In my opinion, simply
talking about happiness
is about as satisfying as
watching someone else eat
a gourmet meal.
"Happiness? That's noth-
ing more than health, and a
poor memory."
Dr Albert Schweitzer
Eleanor Roosevelt
mused, "Happiness is not a
goal; it is a byproduct."
"If you want others to
be happy, practice com-
passion. If you want to be
happy, practice compas-
sion."
DalaiLama
I've often heard the say-
ing that a happy person
is one who can enjoy the
scenery on a detour.
"Happy days are here
again" is a song I remember
all America singing during
the dark days of the Great
Depression.
Is happiness the normal
human state of emotions? I
doubt that seriously. As our
usual selves, we are neither
happy nor unhappy with-
out some reason.
How happy can one be?
Don't settle for the best you
can remember! Keep trying
for ever-increasing joy in
life...
"What a wonderful life
I've had! I only wish I'd
realized it sooner!"
Colette


FALLEN APPLES NOT FAR FROM MY TREE #77


Thanks!

Each Thanksgiving Day
sends this commentator's
thoughts out to dear and
helpful people in the U.S.
and in Europe, some of
them now gone, to whom
I owe lasting thanks for
kindnesses that have made
life better for me-and mine.
Is failure to say "thanks"
a growing trend in today's
world?
"Gratitude is a fruit of
great cultivation; you do
not find it among gross
people," said Samuel
Johnson in 1773.
O'Henry wrote in 1907,
"There is one day that is
ours. There is one day when
all we Americans who are
not self-made go back to
the old home and marvel
at how much nearer to
the porch the old pump-
looks than it used to...
Thanksgiving Day.. is a day
that is purely American."
My primary gratitude is,
of course, to my generous
and loving life's partner,
with whom I have shared


the best part of my exis-
tence on this Earth.
She knows I feel this way,
and I never fail to tell her
that with a kiss every day -
not only on Thanksgiving.
After Thanksgiving din-
ner, any man who normally
has trouble making ends
meet may need to get him-
self a longer belt.
My grandmother was a
very savvy lady of the old
school. She was a "people
person." She gave short
shrift to the term "self-
made man." She told me, "A
person all wrapped-up in
himself makes a very small
package."
She warned me that any
successes I might enjoy in
my life would not be mine
alone that I would owe
them in great part to other
people;friends, that is.
She said, "Show me
someone who calls him-
self a 'self-made man,' and
I'll show you a jackass."
("Jackass" was the stron-
gest and most demeaning
appellation I ever heard her
apply to anyone.)
I've been around long


enough both in North
America and Europe to
have collected a great
many colorful memories of
unforgettable events and
the people who made them
possible.
I often think that my
autobiography would best
take form as a long list of
I.O.U.s: an inventory of
the people to whom I owe
every great happening, and
rewarding emotion, in my
life.
As we grow older, we
may harbor a strong feeling
that thanks are best said
without waiting too long.
I wish now I had
thanked, at the end of each
year, the people who made
that year a good one.
Today, from the vantage
point of well-nigh 88 years,
I may inadvertently forget
some of the kindnesses and
the helping hands along
the way which have made
myriad large and small
good things happen to me
in 2008.
Special thanks to our
many good friends and
good neighbors, and to the


wonderful medical person-
nel who have served us so
nobly.
Saying "thanks" is giving
a gift that costs nothing,
and enriches both the giver
and the receiver. It seems to
me that the word "thanks"
is not heard as often these
days as it should be.
Cardinal Henley said, "I
thank whatever gods may
be for my unconquerable
soul."
"If we stopped to
think more, we would
stop to thank more." -
Anonymous
"I would rather be able
to appreciate things I can-
not have, than to have
things I cannot appreciate."
- Elbert Hubbard
"Gratitude is the heart's
memory." French prov-
erb
"Of all human feelings,
gratitude has the shortest
memory." Anonymous
"One can never pay in
gratitude; one can only pay
'in kind' somewhere else
in life." Anne Morrow
Lindbergh
Shakespeare wrote,


"Blow, blow, thou winter
wind,
"Thou art not so unkind
"As man's ingratitude."
The things one is most
thankful for are very often
private. For example, I'm
thinking about my wonder-
ful wife, Joy. I'm so thank-
ful to be married to her
because: She is Truth itself.
She's kind, courageous,
smart, capable, funny,
highly educated, forgiving,
and a super musician, i.e.
a Renaissance woman (as
well as a great cook!).
Joy is a "winner."
She brings, and has
brought me, much unde-
served credit.
What's more, she's put
up with.me for 29 years -
of fun!
My heart hums its own
quiet little refrain.
The words go like this:
"Thanks, Joy of my life!"

TLK RONEY

Louis Roney's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at LRoney@cfl.rr.com. -


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Pamo 16 hrdvNvme 2,,20








\Al/nfpnr PriL / hAitlran d hcanrvor


Thursday, November 27, 2008


ill THE ri ':ir.I Ci:iRT OF THE hinfiH JUDICIAL
iCRijfi All AND. l) i RAN.GE iCO fijjr r fLORiDA
PRFh BATE Diviinjl
File Number 48-2008-CP-2303-0
IN RE:THE ESTATE OF
LEONA V. BABCOCK,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Leona V. Bab-
cock, deceased, File Number 48-2008-CP-2303-0,
is pending In the Ninth Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida
32801. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is: No-
vember 20, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Mark D. Barth, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 0834246
RP.O. Box 590182
Orlando, Florida 32859
407-812-4242
Personal Representative:
Jason Babcock
1440 E. San Juan Ave.
Phoenix, Az. 85014
11/20,11/27

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008-CP-001961-0
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOUET JOSCLYN DENNIS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Douet Josclyn
Dennis, deceased, whose date of death was August
6, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida
32801. The names and.addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice s required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their clalma with this courtWITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBULICA-
TION OFTHIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is No-
vember 20, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
AdaAvlles-'Yaeger
Attorney for Lenford Dennis
Florida Bar No. 602061
4923 North Pine Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32792
Telephone: (407) 677-6900
Fax: (407)677-1948
Personal Representative:
Lenford Dennis
210 East Riverbend Drive
Sunrise, Florida 33326
11/20,11/27

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION.
File No. 48-2008-CP-002457-0
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CONNIE JOYCE DAVIS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Connie Joyce
Davis, deceased, whose date of death was Septem-
ber 15, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for Or-
ange County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 340,
Orlando, Florida 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIMETIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET.
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is No-
vember 20, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Eunice V. Davis
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Eunice V. Davis
11/20,11/27

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Pursuant F.S. 328.17, United American Lien & Re-
covery as agent w/ power of attorney will sell the
following vessels) to the highest bidder
Inspect 1 week prior @ marina; cash or cashier
check;15% buyer prem; all auctions are held w/ re-
serve; any persons interested ph 954-563-1999
Sale Date December 12 2008 @ 10:00 am 3411
NW 9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
V11112 2007 YDV2 FLO273NM hull id#: YD-
V45354C707 inboard pleasure gas white fiberglass
10ft r/o clajide jose Hernandez lienor: Seminole
powersport 1200 rinehart rd sandford i
Licensed & Bonded Auctioneers & Surveyors
FLAB422 FLAU765 & 1911
11/20,11/27


itl THE CIRsUIT rOURT OR CiRAnrCtE COurjr
fiLriRIDA PROBATE OIVlCiiu 0
Frie rJuTr-,' 2:i.i'v U 2O"'d 'li
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY B. DICKINSON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of BETTY B.
DICKINSON, deceased, whose date of death was
September 25, 2008, is pending In the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Room 340,
Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the Personal Rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
11/20/08.
Personal Representative:
STANLEY A, DICKINSON
329 Park Avenue North
RP.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
RANDOLPH J. RUSH
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 0332720
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
329 Park Avenue North, P.O. Box 880, Winter Park,
FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
11/20,11/27

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
SALE BY CASH AUCTION
THE FOLLOWING UNITS
On December 9, 2008, at Assured Self-Storage,
Inc. to the highest bidder for cash, items contained
in the following units:
C1006 James Ramsey Household Items
TO BE HELD AT
510 DOUGLAS AVENUE
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL
ON December 9, 2008
AT 10:00A.M.
ASSURED SELF-STORAGE, INC.
Assured Self-Storage, Inc. reseress the right to bid
and to refuse or reject any and all bids.
11/20,11/27

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2008-CP-2380-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARILYN F. DIANA,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Marilyn F.
Diana, deceased, File Number 2008-CP-2380-0,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the de-
cedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
November 27, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative
Suellen 0. Fagin, Esquire
FBN 561789
1016 Delaney Park Drive
Orlando, Florida 32806
(407) 898-1018
Personal Representative
Karen Belig
5508 Banwell Place
Raleigh, NC 27613
919-847-1357
11/27,12,4

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No: 2008-CP-2607-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BRUCE M. WIGLE, II,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of BRUCE M.
WIGLE, II, deceased, whose date of death was
November 2, 2008, and whose Social Security
Number is XXX-XX-0941, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Room 340, Orlando, Florida 32801. The names
and addresses of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice Is required
to be served must tile their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
November 27, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
BRUCE M. WIGLE, III
Florida Bar No. 0293954
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, PA.
SP.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, FL 32790-1328
(407) 644-9801
Personal Representative:
BRUCE M.WIGLE, Ill
1422 Cumbie Street
Orlando, FL 32804
11/27,12/4


'I THE CllUT IT cOURT OF THE EIHiJENiTH
JULIilAL CIRCiTil IN AND rFOR rEMIItiLt C(inuiT'
:LLIRCilA
CASE NO. 2008-CP-1865
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
DANIEL LEE BRANSON,
Deceased.,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DANIEL LEE
BRANSON, deceased, whose date of death was May
10, 2008, File # 2008-CP-1865, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is Post Office Drawer
C, Sanford, FL 32772. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the Personal Rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice has been served
must tile their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LAST OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: No-
vember 27, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
JOHN D. MAHAFFEY, JR., ESQUIRE
FLORIDA BAR NUMBER: 098690
Mahaffey & Leitch
2461 West State Road 426, Suite 1001
Oviedo, FL 32765
(407) 894-2081
Personal Representative:
DAVID EUGENE BRANSON
5079 Loblolly Bay Lane
Orlando, FL 32829
11/27,12/4


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CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE
araonvnrag narnrvm.
NOTICE is hereby given that the Board of Adjustment of the City of Winter Park, Florida on Tuesday
December 16, 2008 will hold a Public Hearing at 5:00 PM. In the Commission Chambers of City Hall.
At that time, the following variances from Article III "Zoning" of the Winter Park Land Development
Code will be heard:
#1 Request of John Paul and Kristen Reynolds for variances from Sec 58-66 "R-1AA and R-1A districts"
par (1) to allow the construction of a one story addition to be located 9.7 feet from the side lot line and
22.5 feet from the rear lot in lieu of the required setbacks of 10 feet and 25 feet respectively.
Property described as: Timberlane, Plat Book U, Page 108, Lot 5, Block A
Located at 2103 Howard Drive. Zoned: R-1A.
IS/ Stephanie J Edsall
Stephanie J. Edsall
Board Secretary
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of-the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based. (F.S. 286.0105)"Persons with disabilities needing
assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact the Board of Adjustment Secretary
(407-599-3237) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE
crrimc'am.e nnruiroqr
Notice is hereby given that public hearings will be held by the City Commission of the City of Winter
Park, Florida, on Monday, December 8, 2008, at 3:30 p.m. In the Commission Chambers of City Hall,
401 Park Avenue, South, to consider the following:
AN ORDINANCEOFTHECITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA RELATINGTOWATERWAYS;AMENDING SECTION
114-1-DEFINITIONS; AMENDING SECTION 114-6 TO ADOPT STATE CODE RELATING TO SHORELINE OR
WATERFRONT VEGETATION REMOVAL, TO INCREASE PENALTY FOR REMOVAL OF VEGETATION WITHOUT
PERMIT, UPDATING STATE NAMED DEPARTMENT FROM DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES TO
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION, MODIFYING THE CONSTRUCTION OF RETAINING
WALLS, SEA WALLS AND REVETMENTS; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA,AMENDING CHAPTER 58 "LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE" ARTICLE III, "ZONING REGULATIONS" SECTION 58-82 "GENERAL PROVISIONS" SO AS TO
, ESTABLISH STANDARDS AND CRITERIA FOR BED AND BREAKFAST INNS AND AMENDING SECTION
58-91 "DEFINITIONS" SO AS TO REVISE THE DEFINITION OF A BED AND BREAKFAST INN.
All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information is available in the City
Clerk's office so that citizens may acquaint themselves with each issue and receive answers to any
questions they may have prior to the meeting. "If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need
a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based." (ES. 286.0105) Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in
any of these proceedings should contact the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in
advance of the meeting.
11/27


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O bserver meets all statutory requirements V$a)


ONE STOP SHOP FOR CENTRAL FLORIDA LEGALS
As the publishers ol thie Wtimer Park-.Maland Observer orange Count PFLi
and the Oviedo-Winter Springs Voicel ISeminole County FLi we are your I slop1
shop tor central Florida legal notice advenising

IMPROVED CASE MANAGEMENT
Star[ Ine stalutory clock" Quickly Send uS your nonce by Monday and we 11
publish it non Thursday Observer rliwispapins improves your case management
by standing out the notarized aftidavit immndiaielv Ifollowing tea ad run
This lois you file It With the court urickly and avoil the chilly delay mony
publisher impose by holding Dack the uhidavil wnile waiting oir invoicing and
payment processing.
*PRICE GUIDE
Public Notice/Public Sale $9/col Inch
Notice to Creditors $42 50iweok
Nolice of Sale .555/week
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W W ,' ito, :& ri. ,4," $Nl ..' aun 6i 1. r. I


S' i PLACE YOUR AD
SNow Accepting email submiltals Just email us a
S text file of the notice to he published and we'll do
\ & the rest Upon complenon of the advertising we
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inter Park, FL 32789



'.. "Mow. .,


Page 17


The Voce periodical
permit #008-093
The Obsener periodical
permitMO-61868







.. ;.


TITLE 6. CIVIL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (Chs. 45-88)
CHAPTER 50 LEGAL AND OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENTS

50 031 Newspapers in whicn legal notices and process may be
DuDblished

No notice .r pubicatlon require lo be published In a newspaper
in the nature of or in lieu ol process r il any Hind nalurr, character
or descrinptpn provided lor under any law rfl the sTite 3 wineln
hereloiore or nereatler enacted and wiatner partainirng] to
construclive service. or the Initialing, assuming, reviewing,
exeiil.lnig or enforcing jurisdiction or power,. y any court in this
stale, or any noltie of sale or property real or persoural for lates,
State. county or municipal, or sheriffs. guardian's or administrator's
or any saie made pursuant to any J l
any other puDlicaliUn or rylC ning lto any aetairs of the slate.
or any country. munici or other political subdivision ereol
shalleti deem ed ave been published in accordanrce with the
siulea irAj ig for such publicallun, unless the same shall have
been purblis t1r1 ll prescribed period ol time required for suOn
publication a newspaper hich Ine lime ot sucn publication
shall ha, ,I of I year a all have been entered
S rnodiclals master ata post u : In "a
or in a new successor ol a newspaper
which together have been so published. provided however, thal
nolning herein contained shall apply where in any count there 'hall
ne nio n,-vrapar in e~isience vrich shall have been publisried
lor the length of lime above prescribed No legal publicaltion of
any km.10 nature or aescriphon, as herein defined shall be valir]
or binding or eld to10 be in comaplianceL1 wa the salutes providing
for such DuDlic3alon unless the same snill have been published
in c:i'iai':e Ailn the prO i1iir ns sciion Prooul 1o sh
putCiiId'.,n *.riil hie mdieviI uniirm jnii]a


wite rrK/Md ld I ,J;bl ~


I f.saalNotices


I






Pane 18 Thursday, November 27, 2008


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access. to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

CAREGIVER WANTED
CAREGIVER/Housekeeper wanted for my
100 year old mother at her lovely home -
Lake Sue, Winter Park. Various times day &
night. Call 317 545-5540 after 10 a.m. or
email to rosemail@comcast.net

EXPERIENCED DRIVERS
Experienced Drivers W/Class A CDL, Home.
weekends, East Coast Runs, Fruit and
Foliage up and refrigerated back. Call MCT
@ 877-564-6628

SERVERS WANTED
FT/PT, flexible hours. Beef '0' Brady's,
Lockwood and 419 at Publix shopping
center. Apply M-F 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 407-
366-2333






WATERBRIDGE TOWNHOUSE 32789
On cul-de-sac near Tennis Courts. Walk to
middle and high school, bus, W.P. hospital,
dog park. $299,900 (was $340,000). Winter
Park Land Co. Realty 407-644-2900



TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT
Altamonte Springs town house, 1 bedroom
1 bath, Spring Valley area, tennis, pool,
washer/dryer, nice, $675/mo, 407-492-
9006

SENIOR APARTMENTS
Winter Park The Plymouth Apartments:
Studio/1BR Senior Apts, All Utilities Incl.,
Newly Renovated. Rents" start at $591. Call
407-644-4551-



FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.


WE BUY


HOUSES!
Sell Your Home
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-Is" with NO Repairs!

Call Now:

407-297-8749


-E
HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
Repair and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets,
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensed/insured/
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0061

CARPENTER '
Robert A. Paige. Specializing in finished
carpentry to termite and wood-rot damage.
Interior and exterior. Call me and ask if I can
do your job. References available. 352-552'
6157

NEED HELP WITH
CLEANING, ERRANDS?
Senior citizen seeking part-time house
cleaning, we'll also run errands, grocery
shopping, and doctor's office, etc. 407-838-
8075 or 407-756-2361





JACUZZI
$1,500 Jacuzzi In Good Condition. Green
and white interior with wooden panel
siding. Seats 4-5 people. Includes cover and
portable step. Call 407-761-1298

CHANDELIER
Chandelier. Beautiful 8-arm ivory antiqued
metal, linen shades, perfect condition,
34" diameter. $85. Can e mail picture.
Linda1131vail@aol.com

DRUM SETS
Drum Sets 5 piece TKO paste hi-hat
Zildjian ride $450; congas Aspire 10" and
11" heads $200; Pearl Double bass pedal,
$120; Thin pan snare w/ stand, $80. 386-
690-0621

KAYAK
Kayak Heritage feather-lite skirt and
paddle, good condition, $220; also new
rubber inflatable kayak, great lounger, $50.
386-690-0621





Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.


-Marketplace
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HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural herbal patches, overnight
detoxification, pain relief: knees, back, foot,
gout, sciatic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer
treatment. Attach to foot great night's
sleep. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.org
(407) 970-1483





Announcements
Run your ad STATEWIDE! Run your classified
ad in over 100 Florida newspapers reaching
over 4 MILLION readers for $475. Call this
newspaper or (866)742-1373 for more
details or visit: www.florida-classifieds.
com.

Auctions
FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION FLORIDA
STATEWIDE 1000 Homes MUST BE
SOLD! Free Catalog (800)678-0517
USHomeAuction.com

AUCTIONS! Saturday December 6th 10:00
A.M. 211 Acres Highway 142, Selmer,
Tennessee. 1:00 P.M. 85 Acres Harris
Road, Crump, Tennessee. FREE BROCHURE:
(877)914-7653. Garner Auctions, Inc.
Ken Garner TN FIRM 4293. www.
garnerauctionsinc.com.

GIGANTIC 2-DAY Auction. December 3,
4, 2008 Montgomery, Alabama. Single,
Tandem & Tri-Axle Dumps, Roll Off Trucks,
Truck Tractors, Lowboys, Crawler Loaders
& Tractors, Excavators, Motor Graders &
Scrapers, Backhoes, Rubber Tired Loaders,
Articulating Dumps. Compactors Forklifts,
Paving, Skidders, Feller Bunchers, Log
Loaders, Farm Tractors. J.M. Wood Auction
Co., Inc. (334)264-3265. Bryant Wood AL
Lic# 1137.

Auto Donations
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON UNITED BREAST CANCER
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Cancer Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing,
Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted,
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Business Opportunities
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in a day? 30 Local Machines and Candy
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Serious Call (800)940-6301, www.
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$1,000 A DAY POSSIBLE RETURNING PHONE
CALLS NO SELLING, NOT MLM (800)479-
8033 WWW.FOCUSONCASH.COM.

Business Opportunity Seekers!! Help Others
while Helping Yourself. Fire your boss.
No buying, No selling, Not a MLM! www.
wealthcomestoyou.com or (800)242-0363
ext 7576

Employment Services
Post Office Now Hiring! Avg Pay $20/hr or
$57K/yr Including Federal Benefits and OT.
Placed by adSource not affiliated w/USPS
who hires. Call (866)713-4492.

Learn to Operate a Crane or Bull Dozer Heavy
Equipment Training. National Certification.
Financial & Placement Assistance. Georgia
School of Construction. www.Heavy5.com
Use code "FLCNH" or call (866)218-2763.

Help Wanted
Guaranteed Weekly Settlement Check. Join
Wil-Trans Lease Operator Program. Get the
Benefits of Being a Lease Operator without
any of the Risk. (866)906-2982. Must be
23.

DRIVERS: CALL TODAY! Sign-On Bonus 35-
41cpm Earn over $1000 weekly Excellent
Benefits Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR
(877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com

Driver- PTL Needs Company Drivers- CDL-A
earn up to 40 cpm. 1/2cpm increase every
60K miles. Average 2,800 miles/week.
www.ptl-inc.com Call (877)740-6262.

Homes For Rent
3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $11,000! Only $199/
Mo! 5% down 15 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4/
BR $259/Mo! For listings (800)366-9783
Ext 5798.

Miscellaneous
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121, www.CenturaOnline.
com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified
Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

NOW AVAILABLE! 2008 POST OFFICE
JOBS. $18-$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE, PAID


700 FLORIDA HOMES

including 110 in the

ORLANDO area
THURSDAY DEC. 4 7:00 PM
Florida Hotel & Conference Center ORLANDO

Get your next home at the price you set with NO STARTING BIDS, If
you're buying your first home or your 10th this year, today's housing
market and low interest rates make this an ideal time for you to buy!


OrlandoHouseAuction.com

OR CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE


866-539-9549


OPEN

HUDSON & HOUSE:
Saturday, Nov 22 &
NMA HALL Tuesday, Dec 2;
M""KI-'; 1 to 3 PM.


BM


$5,000 down in a cashiers check for each property. 5% premium on each sale.
All sales subject to seller's approval.
Lch f'H&MM AB110.B G Hudson, Jr ,s: BK3006464 & AU230


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


TRAINING, FED BENEFITS, VACATIONS. CALL
(800)910-9941 TODAY! REF #FL08.

Real Estate
COUNTRY ACREAGE By Owner-5 Acres,
Beautiful Mountaintop log cabin site w/
breathtaking views, gently rolling property,
surrounded by woods, 30mins. from
Cookeville, $29,900. Owner financing
(931)445-3611.

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS-Handyman
special bordering U.S.F.S. paved dr., well,
septic, singlewide with shop near Lake
Nantahala, borders paved road. Only
$49,000. http://valleytownrealty.com
(800)632-2212 valleytownrealty@verizon.
net. .

TENNESSEE LAND RUSH! 1+acre to 2acre
homesites, wood, views. Starting at$59,900.
Tenn River & Nick-a-Jack view tracts now
available! Retirement guide rates this area
#2 in U.S. places to retire. Low cost of living,
no impact fee. (330)699-2741 or (866)550-
5263, Ask About Mini Vacation!

South Carolina low. country Hunting/
Recreation Tracts for sale. Close to 1-95 in
Bamberg CO. Peaceful/secluded and loaded
with deer, turkey, hogs and timber value too.
42ac-85ac-120ac-235ac-500ac-730ac- all
on the Little Salkahatchie river. Roads, game
plots, stands new Ready to hunt. Priced
below market!! Call Now (803)826-6033
(Brokers Protected).

VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS Log cabin shell on 2
private acres near very wide trout stream
in the Galax area and New River State Park,
$139,500. Owner (866)789-8535.

Steel Buildings
"EVERY BUILDING ON SALE!" ...Manufacturer
Direct at "ROCK BOTTOM PRICES" 32x60x18
$11,995. 35x60x16 $14,285. 40x80x16
$20,995. 48x100x18 $27,495. 60x120x18
$44,900. MANY OTHERS! Pioneer Steel
(800)668-5422.

Skilled Trades/Crafts
JOB RAFTERS, INC. NOW HIRING!!!!! FIRST
CLASS SHIPYARD CRAFTS LONG TERM
WORK FL, AL, MS OVER TIME & PER DIEM
PHONE: (800)371-7504 OR (251)433-1270
FAX: (251)433-0018 EOE www.jobcrafters.
net.







Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Supervisor of Operations
Job Description: Responsible for supervising
a shift of approximately 20 25 team
members in an office setting and overseeing
the the prepping, scanning and indexing of
medical records. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $26,000.00-$35,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9370125

Driver
Job Description: Responsible for driving
Over-the-Road. Unloads freight. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9373465

Dispatcher/Administrative Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for dispatching
drivers and following up with orders by
phone and radio. Work Monday-Friday,
7:00am-4:30pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9372301

Microcomputer Specialist
Job Description: Responsible for hardware


and information technology assets and their
security. Provides all information technology
technical service support. Configures
desktop and laptop personal computers
and support. Provides customer service in
a timely manner. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $35,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9372196

Taxi Driver/Chauffeur
Job Description: Responsible for driving
automobiles, vans, or limousines to transport
passengers. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $15,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9374276

Seasonal Package Handler
Job Description: Responsible for loading,
unloading, and sorting packages. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374285

Mechanic
Job Description: Responsible for performing
vehicle tune-ups and regular scheduled
maintenance. Repairs or replaces tires,
changes oil, and changes mower blades for
2 cycle and diesel engines. Work Monday-
Friday, 7:30am-4:00pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9373194

Inventory Associate
Job Description: Responsible for performing
physical inventory tally of merchandise at
various customer retail sites. Operates a
data entry terminal and tags as necessary as
per the pre-inventory meeting instructions.
Maintain steady work flow by moving
between tags (touch keying). Adheres to
company dress code. Understands store
instructions and customer expectations.
Communicates problems to management.
Develops skills and assists in training and
cross training. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $8.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374620

Computer Aided Design Programmer
Job Description: Responsible for performing
complex and difficult program tasks for
electrical discharge machining (EDM) and
laser equipment. Creates blueprints for
parts, equipment, and tool layout. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9374695

First-Line Supervisor/Manager of Food
Preparation and Serving Workers
Job Description: Responsible for supervising
workers engaged in preparing and serving
food. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $29,000.00-$39,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9374342

Host/Hostess
Job Description: Responsible for seating
guests in outlets as assigned.Assists servers
in 'providing service to guests throughout
their dining experience and assists the
cashier in the collection of payment for all
guest transactions. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9374790

Restaurant Cook
Job Description: Responsible for preparing
food items based on recipes for the
restaurants, room service, employee
cafeteria and banquets. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9374803

Food Runner
Job Description: Responsible for completing
opening and closing side work assuring that
work station is supplied. Assembles server
orders and notifies servers that their orders
are ready for delivery to the guests. Assists
busperson and cooks whenever possible.
Keeps servers informed of any items that
have been canceled. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9374809


Serious Game Programmer
Job Description: Responsible for developing
3D graphical applications for ground, sea,
and air based operator/maintainer virtual
training devices. Analyzes, designs, creates,
modifies, ports, and maintains 3D graphics
source code for real-time interactive
simulation and training applications. Plots
paths and tactics for ground based virtual
entities (vehicles, humans and combinations
of vehicles with multiple humans inside
them) to move through various types of
terrain in order to engage or to evade fire by
the player. Incorporates new technologies
into products. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9375419

Driver
Job Description: Responsible for driving,
loading, and unloading truck. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.69 per hour
Job Order Number: 9375264

Banquet Captain
Job Description: Responsible for the
complete service aspect of an assigned
event and for laying out work assignments
for servers and bartenders. Serves as the
main contact with clients for the assigned
event and works closely with client to
ensure guest satisfaction. Leads banquet
service team and serves as liaison between
client and hotel for assigned event. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $5.00 per hour plus tips
Job Order Number: 9374935

Kitchen Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for total food
production in the kitchen. Services the main
dining room and banquet operations. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $14.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374944

Restaurant Hostess/Cashier
Job Description: Responsible foropening and
closing up the register. Handles comment
cards and closes paperwork. Takes room
service orders and completes room service
callbacks. Greets and seats guests. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374961

Room Attendant
Job Description: Responsible for performing
cleaning duties in a clean and orderly
manner. Makes beds, replenishes linens,
cleans rooms and halls, and vacuums. Work
1:00pm -9:30pm, days 'nay vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374967

Starbucks Barista
Job Description: Responsible for performing
a variety of food preparation duties other
than cooking. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9374982

Creative Worker
Job Description: Responsible for artistic
displays and restorations. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9375056

Technology Application Support
Specialist
Job Description: Responsible for performing
application administration and Project
Leader/Team Leader activities and tasks
required to provide maximum service for
partners and business customers. Supports
moderate to complex midrange business
application, throughout project life cycle,
to increase competitiveness and efficiency,
while ensuring availability and integrity of
data and systems. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $71,190.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9374702


J AU U- -


I HOME AUCTION I




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WEATHER


460 660 710 58
6 a.m. I Noon 3 p.m. I 6 a.m.


MORNING LOW 58
DAYTIME HIGH 740
Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
6:59 a.m. 5:29 p.m. of rain SSE 7 mph


MORNING LOW 56
DAYTIME HIGH 770
Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
7 a.m. 5:28 p.m. of rain SW 10 mph


MORNING LOW 52
DAYTIME HIGH 680

Sunrise Sunset 30% chance Wind
7 a.m. 5:28 p.m. of rain NW 8 mph


NATIONAL
City
Seattle
Los Angeles
Houston


Friday Sat.
40/47 43/52
50/64 50/67
43/76 38/62


City
Atlanta
Chicago
New York


I TODAY: Mostly sunny.
Highs in the lower 70s.


Friday Sat.
45/61 27/59
30/40 28/36-
43/47 35/46


~u~i~


Tampa
Pensacola


60/74 59/79
54/75 40/70


INTERNATIONAL
City Friday


London
Paris
Tokyo


38/45 38/47


35/38
47/59


35/42
45/58


WAtome





A wine club tailored just for yot.chooadith
our Cliu Elite or Club Select pa e
-ustomize your selection to asteS,
and schedule. Receive. ientay. "A
bottle just f ir club!


- our own personalized wine labed":"
your image and message. Express yd3
good taste in a highly personal way to.
celebrate a wedding, a family reunion, a, -,
$rth day, or recognize a special client-


We fea V=smalllot0 ated wines that
.igt1 Each of our
cikek ected for their high
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407-970-7272 kellystorms@cs.comr
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5
Moderate


VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS








h YOUR NAME HERE, FROM YOUR CITY!
Want to see your outdoor picture in The Observer? Then e-mail
it to editor@observernewspapers.com. Files should be at least 1MB
in size. Please include as much information about the picture as
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.. #'. TTIM,. .-r' ''


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Winter Park /Maitland Observer


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MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High
Saturday 2:02 a.m. 8:24 a.m.
Nov. 29 2:29 p.m. 8:24 p.m.
Sunday 2:39 a.m. 9:02 a.m.
Nov. 30 3:07 p.m. 9:04 p.m.

FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.
Jacksonville 56/70 49/75
Miami 66/77 66/79




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