Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00022
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Publication Date: November 20, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00022
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

Full Text













504+ tax
Member FDIC


407-740-0401 www.Firsl


FIRST COILO


Your Real Hometown 'B

,oo aOn Hwy 17-92 in Maitland


pIl.d~mmrraa~,.


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Locally owned. .

NaY .Locally produced. C

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CatS 'go for launch'


Volume 20, No. 47


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MMERCE NATIONAL

comrn rof f7 2T UO ange Avenue.
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vtp~; % ion-
bombshells and
children's thanks.
Page A8



IHN n 9, Park's Eula Jenk l
be honored at the Peaco


ISAA B OK


The rain poured
on and off over
Lake Mary as Win-
ter Park's football- team
drove upfield with the
score knotted 10-all. And
as the Wildcats watched
an. Austen Jacks intercep-
tion slowly turning into a
touchdown march, they
came one step closer to a
season-closing victory -
and a trip to the playoffs.
They would win 17-
10. over Lake Mary, end-
ing their regular season
on a high note with their
fourth wvin in a row -- and
launching them into the
regional quarterfinals.
That win came after the
intermittent rain threat-
ened to make a mud pit
out of the game and put
turnovers mn both teams
regular playbooks.
And the final turnover
would prove the most dra-
matic and game-chang-
ing, a's the Cats' Keron
Rouse stole a touchdown
pass from the Rams in
the end zone averting
a game-tying touchdown.
The lead had changed
hands repeatedly dur-
ing the game, with teams
scoring back and forth
and battling their own
lack of grip on the ball

a turn to GAME on page A2


The man charged with
building Maitland's new
downtown is embroiled in
litigation.
Bob Reese, president of
Brossier Company, was sued
in October by two creditors
and also saw a land contract
expire. That has some, such
as Maitland .Councilman
Phil Bonus, doubting Reese's
capabilities.
"He's had some difficul-
ties and inabilities to pay
debts as they arrive," Bonus
said.
But Reese said he's not
worried about it. "People
have been doubting me
since I was yastldp... Ive
out of the ground," he said.
The Brossier Company
had contracted to ~buy a
parking lot owned by the
First Presbyterian Church of
Maitland and is now rene-


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his gift for tennis to loca



Jepson esti Ame
The columnist critiques i
nationi-building po icies.
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Play DnL.......,........A 2
Legals. ...............A13
Marketplace ............A14
Games..... ..........A15


teeoern toth Rese faces afor cosure
ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK
> turn to REESE on page A2


F.Hi.10~lI E r LAURENCE SAMUELS -- THE~ i16..ERiVER
The Wildcats football team catches a rare mid-game treat on Friday as the Space Shut-
tle Endeavour blasts into orbit, as viewed from Lake Mary High School.


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But some residents accused the city
of hatching a devious plan to make
it possible to forcibly annex the~ rest
of the property later by exploiting a
loophole.
Part of the code in annexing prop-
erty into the city states that if unin-
coirporated enclaves are less than 10
acres, they can be annexed forcibly by
the city. If the city convinced only a
few homeowners to annex by choice,
the rest of the enclave would then be
smaller than the maximum size for
forcible annexation.
.Resident John McCabe accused the
city of circumventing a previous refer-
endum by residents in which the hom-
eowners voted not be annexed.
"As of now we're entitled to a ref-

> turn to ISLAND on page A2


"When we bought [our house] we
didn't even realize it was an island,"
resident Howard Ball told the City
Commission. "It's an anomaly to have
this little island."
Ball stood before the Commission
trying to make sense of an offer, by
the city to allow homeowners to have
their property annexed piece by piece,
turning a block of independent Or-
ange County land into a jigsaw puzzle
of missing pieces.
Five residents had indicated an in-
terest in joining the city at a previous
meeting, but were vastly outnumbered
by residents in the small neighbor-
hood who~i-efused.
"This ordinance is giving the five
who want to come in the opportunity
to do that," Development Director Jeff
Briggs said.


ISSAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

They were already surrounded, but
five Orange County- residents had to
decide Monday if they wanted to give
up or join the city of Winter Park.
Tiny islands of land called enclaves
still float around areas of Winter IPark,
where pockets of friends and neigh-
bors live right next to each other, but
aren't part of the same city. *
For the residents of Orange Coun-
ty's St~onehu'rst neighborhood, the is-
sue couldn't be more cut and dried of
the awkward relationship they have
with Winter Park.
They're surrounded on all sides by
the city, but along the street of Stone-
hurst Drive, they're in their own little
world, just a bit larger than 10 acres.


Winter Park / Maitland


Builder

TreSSUre'S

the wary

JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF


City could absorb 'island' enclave


09 49 22 9 56 42 2





N WS


00 mm unity


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Families and Businesses for 25 years
MA~RK LANG & ASSOCIATES
Attorneys

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Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qlualifications and experience."


Winter Park / Maitiand Observer


e gaP 2 Thursday, November 20, 2008


The Bridgebuilders of Winter Park, Inc. honored Mayor
David Strong with their Brotherhood Award at their fourth
annual Brotherhood Award Dinner Tuesday, Nov. 18. The
award recognizes individuals who have worked unself-
ishly to improve relationships among all of the citizens in
Winter Park and to help make it more of a city that is in-
clusive for all of its citizens.

Orange County Commissioner Bill Segal presented
the Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida with
a check in the amount of $5,000 at their Empty Bowls
luncheon on Nov. 11. The money, from Segal's office ac-
count of left over campaign funds, will go to helping needy
families during the holiday season. Segal challenged other
elected officials and former candidates to do the same
with their left over funds.

Donors and volunteers of the Central Florida YMCA
got spotlighted at their annual celebratiorrfor advancing
health and prevention options Sunday, Nov. 16. The event,
held at the Orlando Museum of Arts' 22nd Annual Festival
of Trees, thanked nearly 1,000 volunteers and donors for
their commitment to helping the YMCA.
107-year-old YMCA member Frances Shevenaugh


presented the Dr. P. Phillips Champion of Youth Award
to Patl9r Maddox, President and CEO of the Winter Park
Health Foundation, who was recognized for her long-time
commitment to reducing childhood obesity through the
creation of healthy alternatives. Shevenaugh attends the
Winter Park YMCA on Mizell Avenue.

The Childrenis Rights Foundation, Inc. is opening a
thrift store Dec. 1 to expand their food pantry and bet-
ter serve their clients and community. The store will be
located at 9555-A S. US HWY 17-92, Maitland, FL 32751,
just north of the Maitland exchange, next to the Sewing
Studio. All net proceeds will benefit the Childrenis Rights
Foundation, Inc., and programs for at-risk children, fami-
lies and the prevention of child~abuse.
Volunteers and donations of clothing, hangers, plastic
bags and non-perishable food items are needed, especial-
ly during these hard economic times. No donation is toi
small and all donations are appreciated, although space
prevents us from accepting furniture or large appliances
at this location.
If you have any questions or would like to volunteer or
donate to the store please visit www.PreventChild~tbuse-
Now.org or call the office at 407-834-9797.


< continued from the front page

to hold scoring to~ a mini-
mum.
Both teams would score
crucial field goals on either
side of halftime, with the
turning point for the Cats
coming on a 30-yarder
from Alex Rowlinson.
A playoff spot was al-
ready decided for the Cats'
after beating Edlgewater
to solidify a district run-
ner-up finish. But the Cats
may need to improve their
scoring~ ability heading
into the playoffs. In their
past four wins they have
only scored more than two
touchdowns once.
Now the Cats (6-4) are


looking toward the post-
season and a first-game
regional matchup against
East Ridge. That's not the
best playoff pick for the
Cats to get their feet wet,
with the Kni hts on a .
nine-game winning streak.
Their only loss of the sea-
son came against South
Sumter 24-20. The team
also only lost one game all
season.
The two teams had
not met this season, and
haven't met in the play-
offs. They kick off at 7:30
p.m. Friday, Nov. 21 at
East Ridge High School at
13322 Excalibur Road in
Clermont.


Dauksch Family Partner-
ship filed Oct. 3 to foreclose
on Reese's vacant Winn-
Dixie property, claiming he
owes $500,000 plus inter-
est.
Reese contracted to buy
the land from Dauksch for
$3.28 million in January
2006. "Brossier has failed to
pay the note even though it
matured on June 2,.2008,"
the filing states.
Regarding the Dauksch
family's actions, Reese said,
"That was a nervous Nellie
that will be resolved."
Claims have also been
filed against Reese's per-


sonal property.
A suit filed by Jaguar
Credit Corporation regard-
ing payment of Reese's
$125,000 Aston Martin was
voluntarily dismissed Oct.
28. Jaguar claimed that Re-
ese missed his July payment.
Also, a lien was filed in May
against his Orlando condo.
The Registry at Michigan
Park Condominium Asso-
ciation claims Reese owes
about $1,400 in mainte-
nance fees. -
Those items reflect a
miscommunication, Reese
said, and do not influence
his business dealings with


the city. "I have $5.5 million
of my own money in the
(Maitland) deal, I should be
the one who's worried."
Reese's Maitland project
has been stalled because he
has been unable to secure
financing for it, not uncom-
mon in today's market. This
has the city forging ahead
with a municipal project
Reese was supposed to be a
part of.
On Nov. 10 the Maitland
Council decided to build
the city's new fire station
on an existing station's site,
a move that changes the
town center plans. Bonus


said the city could still select
Reese to construct the proj-
ect. Reese said he "needs to
be" involved.


< continued from the front page

gotiating to extend it until
March 2009).
"Now is the time to rene-
gotiate contracts ... we still
control all the key pieces of
the project," Reese said.
The church's attorney,
Terry Hadley of Swann and
Hadley in Winter Park, said
the initial contract was ne-
gotiated more than a year
ago for a roughly 1-acre
parcel located across from
the church.
Meanwhile, another sell-
er hasn't been so coopera-
tive.


< continued from the front page
erendum on this," McCabe
said. "If you pass this, we'll
permanently be deprived of
that right. This is -a deliber-
ate attempt to disenfran-
chise residents."
Four doors down, David
Mallon agreed.
"I believe it violates the


letter and the spirit of the
law," he said. "City ordi-
nance says you cannot cre-
ate enclaves. If you do this,
you'd have six enclaves."
But not all the homeown-
ers had fears of negative
changes once they entered
the city.
"I don't understand the
big fear that the taxes are


going to go up and trees are
all gonna die just because
you went into Winter Park,"
resident Charlie Rosenfeld
said. .
After one homeowner
backed out of the deal, re-
ducing the number of agree-
able annexers to four, the
city voted 4-1 to pass the
deal to annex the rest. But


the legislation will come
back up for a second read-
ing at Monday's Commis-
sion meeting, and the city
will hear opinions and vote
again on~ the issue.
Until then, Stonehurst
will stay it's own little. island
- inside and outside the
city.


In your area and be
Experienced, Hocensed, Insured and
rollablel For morte Informnation/
reservations, call Ann at: .


.r









rSi:


.rt~nlyi invitedc to th~is F~ree


:Chrristia~n Scinc~e lecturle, bi~




W~herer FirdG hU~f~brist, Scientis,
(30orner ci~f~~ i id Yk and Whipil~i'
in Wiriter'dk Parki~.:~.

Festive holiday organ preltidie at 4:45p.m.
with lectxtre following at 500~p.m.
-Chilc Cre prOVided


GAME i Wildcats claw-way into

postseason tournament


REESE I Builder chalks troubles up to misundlerstandcings, market troubles


gert
** 11ticed



Sadves~rtise
: .:*. here









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ISLAND I Neighbors at odds as city prepares to annex four homes










Grand Lady lived for her church


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Winter Park /Maitland Observer


Thursday, November 20 2008 Page 3


This is the last in our scenes profiling the Grand Ladies of Win-
ter Park, who will be honored at the Winter Park! Historical
Association's second annualPeacockE Ball to be held Nrov. 2 1.
A few tickets are available for $150 per seat. The evening's
activities include cocktails, a live auction, dinner catered by
Arthur's, introduction of the honorees, and dancing to The
Buzz Catz. Call 32 1-303 -97 73 for more information.

MARTHA MCHENRY


to get married at age 15, the
group had dwindled down
to a trio. Her husband came
to Orlando to pick fruit and,
once established, sent for
his new bride in Georgia.
Some years later they di-
vorced. Eula later married
Cephas Jenkins who was a
butler, a chauffeur, and later
a landscaper. They moved
to Winter Park in 1954. He
passed in 1985.
Eula Pearl's life had three
dominant themes music,
church and education -
and often the lines between
them blurred. After shecame
to Orlando in 1937 she be-
gan singing in the choir of
the Bethel Baptist Church.
She sang so ~well, she was
named director. It was then
she thought she had better
take music lessons. When
the church's youth director
left to return to Haiti, she
was asked to take her place.
She not only refused that
position, but also quit sing-
ing in the choir.
Then came a dramatic
transformation: She fell ,
deathly ill with a disease
that defied diagnosis and
lingered for three months.
One night she had a dream,
or perhaps a vision. The
Lord "anointed" her with an
incredibly beautiful sopra-


no voice. She regained her
health and now had perfect
pitch. She dedicated herself
to God and began her life's
mission to save souls, espe-
cially those of children.
She became active in the
Children's Evangelism Fel-
lowship. The organization's
records show that she led
over 800 children to Christ.
She held Bible studies all over
in churches, the Westside
Community Center, even in
yards under trees. She told
Eleanor, "Whien the Lord
healed my body and showed
me my work, I made him a
promise ... I've had people
to tell me that just sitting in
my company, not saying a
word to anybody, changed
their lives, because I guess
whatever is within, it kind
of goes out." She also had a
prison ministry at the 33rd
Street Jail for 10 years.
Another passion in Eula's
life was education. Back in
Taylor County, school for
black children ended in the
seventh grade. Eula was de-
termined to graduate from
high school. At the age of
38, she was valediCtorian of
the Jones High School class
of 1963.
Eula became a champion
of higher education. She was
chosen to serve on Valencia


Community College's Black
Advisory Committee. In
2001 she received Valencia's
first Dare to Dream award.
While in her 80s, Eula Pearl
enrolled in her first college
classes. She studied speech
and humanities. As at Jones
High School, she motivated
her much .younger fellow
students.Ifsomeone around
her pulled an attitude, she'd
admonish, "Put a smile on
your face. You are the child
of the King!"
On Dec. 9, 2002, Mayor
Glenda Hood declared a
Mrs. Eula Jenkins Day for
her promotion of higher
education in general and at
VCC in particular.
Eula's home base was Mt.
Moriah Missionary Baptist
Church where she sang in
the choir for over 50 years.
She was a director of the
church's youth programs.
Hercrystalline, angelic voice
took her to many churches
and' special events around
Winter Park. She sang at
retirement homes and at
state and national church
conventions. Finally, she
sang via a recording at her
own funeral, "If I Can Help
Somebody As I Pass Along."
There was not a dry eyein
Mt. Moriah Missionary Bap-.
tist Church.


I did not interview Eula Pearl
Jenkins. Instead, I watched
the white-robed choir and
her fellow deaconesses,
all clad in white suits and
dresses and hats, proceed
from the double doors ofMt.
Moriah Missionary Baptist
Church down .the parallel
aisles to the altar where Eu-
la's body rested peacefully in
a white coffin. ,
They sang a rousing gos-
pel hymn, one of Eula's fa-
vorites. The song's strong
rhythms begged for clap-
ping, but no one did. Dur-
ing her long illness, she had
planned her own funeral-
that she "hoped would last
a half a day." The program
listed nine Reverends, four
Sisters and one niece. Pre-
dictably there' was a lot of
music. In her life Eula had
taken to heart the Psalm-
ist's exhortation to "make a
joyful noise unto the Lord.
Serve the Lord with gladness


and singleness of heart."
It was like Easter Sunday.
The congregation filled ev-
ery pew and all the chairs
lining the aisles. An overflow
crowd gathered by the front
doors and in the church's
yard. They had come to cel-
ebrate Eula Jenkins' long,
God-ceritric life.
In June of 2001, as part
of the Winter Park flistori-
cal Association's oral his-
tory project, Eleanor Fisher
interviewed Eula. In this in-
terviewN she stated, "I never
worked. I had a husband
who supported me. The
church has been my life."
The youngest of 11 chil-
dren, Eula Pearl Knolton was
born inl918 inTaylor Coun-
ty, Ga., on a cotton farm. She
began her singing career at
the age of 3 as a member of
the Knolton Family Singers.
They traveled from church
to church singing gospels.
By the time she left home


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Enloy eatilngl ouledll Ion
tleaulliul park Avenue Burffel
I:a~~lnr napeclallst Iln iE 14,

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pHO:Ti 6 1 ISAAC BABCOCK THE I:E El aLF
Audrey Cramer, 8, of Winter Park acts as a perch for a butterfly at an exhibit by
the Lukas Nursery of Oviedo during the Going Green Fair on Saturday, Nov. 15, in
Winter Park's Hannibal Square, organized by local libraries and the Sierra Club.


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O Winter Park / Maitland
ObSefVer


Volume 20, Issue Number 47


Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor: Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
~---~Winter Park / Maitland Observer@ 2008


USPS 00-6186
ISSN 1064-3613


Page 4 Thursday, November- 20, 2008


Winter Park /Maitland Observer


Burqllary/theft
A white male removed window screens
from a house on Howard Drive, trying to find
an unlocked window, on Nov. 11. The suspect
had short-cut dirty-blond hair and a curved
earring in one ear. He left in an older, small
two-door Cadillac.
The rear door of a business on Lakemont
Avenue was partially pried open on Nov.
11 in an attempted burglary. The suspect fled
when the alarm activated.
A black female stole a lawn mower from a
carport on Nov. 10 at a house on Rouen Av-
enue.


.Auto theft/burqlary
Someone entered an unlocked vehicle on
Carolina Avenue and stole a wallet and a Tau-


rus .45 caliber handgun on Nov. 13.
On Fairbanks Avenue, someone stole all
four wheels from two vehicles and left the
vehicles on blocks on Nov. 13.
Someone broke a front passenger window
on Nov. 8 and stole an iPod Touch and an iPod
iTrip FM tuner from a vehicle on Fairbanks Av-
enue.


Battery
For domestic battery, someone was ar-
rested on Nov. 9 at Denning Drive and Swoope
Avenue'


Criminal mischief
A convicted felon was arrested on Aloma
Avenue oh Nov. 11 for carrying a concealed


Winter Park

Robbery
On Nov. 12, 2008, at about 7:52 p.m., the
Winter Park Police Department responded
to a report of an armed robbery and shoot-
ing that occurred at the Park Avenue Dell lo-
cated at 2161 N. Park Ave. Arriving officers
met with the clerk who had sustained a gun-
shot wound to the arm and chest. The victim
stated that two black males entered the store'
committed an armed robbery and shot him pri-
or to fleeing the scene. One of the subjects is
described as 5'8" with a thin build and a mus-
tache. The second subject is only described as
a black male. The victim, Sairoz H. Nathani, is
currently in the hospital in stable condition at
ORMC.
Any person with information regarding this
crime should contact either CrimeLine at 407-
423-TIPS or the Winter Park Police Department
at 407-644-1313.


*b~~:
!:a~'jR i .'::: ~::


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
----CONTACTS --


Published Thursday, November 20, 2008


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-628-8500, ext. 302
kyle@observernewspapers.com
EDITOR
Alex Babcock
407-628-8500, ext. 304
alexb@observernewspapers.com
DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-628-8500, ext. 306
ste phan ie@observern ewspapers.com


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-628-8500, ext. 311
jennya8observernewspapers.com
Isaac Babcock
407-902-8563
isaacb~observernewspapers.com
LEGALS 1 CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-628-8500, ext. 309
legal~observernewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher~observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya~observernewspapers.com
COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@M ed iAmerica. us


ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-628-8500, ext. 303
tcraft~observernewspapers.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Shelly Langston
407-628-8500, ext. 303
slangston~observernewspapers.com


Louis Roney
LRoney~cfl.rr.com


Member of: P,0. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wp mobserver. com I407-628 -8500 1e- mail: ed itor~o bservernewspapers. com


November 8 to November 14
firearm and possession of an altered firearm.
A window was damaged on Nov. 10 on a build-
ing along Lee Road.



Someone was arrested on Nov. 12 on Aloma
Avenue and Edinburgh Drive for possessing
marijuana and carrying a concealed and al-
tered firearm in a pharmacy.

Someone was arrested on Fairbanks Avenue
and Interlachen Avenue for driving under the
influence on Nov. 10.


C el eb rati ng nat ure

;:s~i~f-~i~;5 .


7he Orlando Philhalrmonric Orc-heracr presNbF~4

'' HOME FOR

THE HOLIDAYS

SA~TURDA4Y, NOVEMBER 29, 2008 2:00 &L 8:00 PM
Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre
Concert Sponsor: Mlassey Serrices
SArtists Sponsor\: FEizabeth Mlorse Genius Funmdation & A~T&T Real YenowP Pages'
Andre-w Lane. conductor / he Holilay Singe-rs! A nme Suns, vocr~ist
CELEBRATfE A HOLIDAl T~RADITON WFITH THE OnuANOo PHH.H.RMlONIC IN
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Rollins College student Sabrina Ramirez, at left, strikes her best
pose during a dance marathon to raise money for the Children's
Miracle Network on Saturday, Nov. 15, on campus in Winter Park.
The event ran through the night. It's the second annual event and
largest student-organized event at Rollins.


THIE DAVEY TREE EXPERT COMPANY
Di'scover'I The Dav~ey Diffe~rencet.
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Extensive Diagnostics
(laboratory, radiology, ultrasound)
Alternative Therapies Microchip
Puppy & Kitten Packages
Annual W~eliness Packages
Orthopedics Chiropractitioners
Grooming Daycare & Board~ing


Pet Care Center of Apopka &
Pet Resort of Apopka
2807 Rock Springs Rd.
Apopka, FL 32712 (407) 884-8924
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The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refulse to pay.
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i__pExpireDec~emble 31, 2008


Thursday, November 20, 2008 Page 5


tiJ P k / M itl d Obse r


Having worked at J. Rolfe Davis
for 13 years, both Clement and Suttle
have put in countless hours of hard
work and dedication on their way to
receiving their individual promotions
to Vice President. And with 15 and 19
years of service to J. Rolfe Davis re-
spectively, Post and Holt will now be
serving as Assistant Vice Presidents.
Winter Park-based Palmer Electric
Co. was honored with two awards
from the Florida Association of Elec-
trical Contractors at the statewide
organization's annual~convention on
Oct, 25 at the Marriott Resort and Spa
in Marco Island. In the Commercial
Mega Project category, Palmer gar-
nered an Award of Excellence for its
work on the 32-story Dynetech Centre
in Orlando, and won Special Recogni-
tion in the Medical-Industrial category
for Hospice of the Comforter, a health-
care facility in Altamonte Springs.
Grubb and Ellis Commercial Florida
recently negotiated a long-term sub-
lease of 1 0,090 square feet of Class
A office space in Maitland Promenade
One at 485 N. Keller Road in Maitland.
Anne Deason, vice president in the
firm's Office Group, negotiated the
transaction.


The Sheraton Orlando North Ho-
tel in Maitland is now a designated
member of the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection's (DEP)
Green Lodging Program.
To become a designated member
of the Florida Green Lodging Program,
hotels must implement a variety of
green practices, including water con-
servation, a linen reuse program, en-
ergy efficiency achieved with Energy
Star appliances, and programmable
thermostats. The hotel also reduces
waste by providing the opportunity
to recycle, purchasing items in bulk,
purchasing recycled materials, and by
recycling ink and toner cartridges. In
addition, the hotel uses green clean-
ers and high efficiency air filters.

Keene Construction Company of
Maitiand announced that Naomi
Whitehill Cheshire was appointed
office manager.
.~~ A graduate of the
'University of South
Florida with a BA
degree in Business
Management, her
responsibilities in-
clude the manage-
ment of day-to-day
Cheshire operations as well


as supervision of administrative staff.
Keene is building its 10th Kohl's
Department Store in Florida in Royal
Palm Beach. The 90,000-square-foot
store is slated for completion in early
2009 and follows other Kohl's stores
constructed by Keene in Boynton
Beach, Cape Coral, Clearwater, Coco-
nut Creek, Jensen Beach, Lake Park,
Narcoossee, Orange City, and at The
Loop in Kissimmee.
Mattamy Homes USA, the U.S. divi-
sion of Canada's largest home builder,
recently acquired 68 town home sites
on New Broad Street in Baldwin Park
near downtown Orlando.
Laura Bailey, vice president of
sales and marketing for Mattamy
Homes USA, said the homebuilder
plans to start construction of unique
three-story town homes with option
for four-story with private elevators
during the first quarter of 2009.

John Turner, President of J. Rolfe
Davis Insurance of Maitland, is
proud to announce that Diane Clem-
ent and Beverly Suttle have been
promoted to vice presidents in Com-
mercial lines. Patti Post and Cindy
Holt have been promoted to assistant
vice presidents in Commercial Lines.


I


anray Mercedes-Benz 7 asss.uym ss


i


- 5 p.m.


River Oaks Anirnal Hospital
800 Miami Springs Dr.
Longwood, FL 32779
(407) 774-1515


East Lake Animal Clinic
31415 CR 435
Sorrento, FI 32776
(352) 735-2882


UP V N


Cranes Roost Park


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1-4 and SR 436


Saturday & Sunday ~ 10 a.m.


Out -ptet resort
Soffers the finelgst
I luxury pet bo~arding
SIn Cenitral Floridal
1Limit 1 co pon pe ~erson.
Not. valid with aney ot er offer
I Expires Decembe 31, 2008 ,,


Join us for this free community event with
more than 150 fine artists, an interactive


a rea, live music, culinary


child ren's art


delights, wine and spirits and so much more!

Presenting Sponsors -


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-


Winter Park /Maitland Obser


e gaP 6 Thursday, November 20, 2008


Second reading of the or-
dinance annexing 1802 and,
1812 Stonehurst Road; 528
E. Lake Sue Ave. and 441 E.
Kings Way.
First reading of the ordi-
nance revising the shoreline
protection ordinance.
Request of Strollo's Mar-
ket and Caf6 at 200 W. Fair-
banks Ave. to amend the
previous conditional use
approval to extend their
hours of operation now 9
rt t to n 9 p~ o i a~.

consuP ign Appdro di b
Commission (4-1) with the
condition to stay open un-
til 10 p.m. and to serve beer
and wine only.
First reading of the or-
dinance adopting a new
definition of bed and break.
fast inris and establishing
standards and criteria for
bed and breakfast inns. Ap-
proved by P&Z Commission
(5-0) with the condition to
remove, all reference to bed
and breakfasts in all zoning
designations.
Request of Eucalyptus
Properties for a vertical
zoning special exception/
conditional use for up to 25
percent of the interior non-
Park Avenue frontage floor
space within the building
at 212-218 N. Park Ave. 1)
Conditional Use: Approved
by P&Z (5-0) for 25 percent
non-retail on the first floor;
2) Exception to the Condi-
tional Use: Approved 3-2 to


nity wor kshops, extending
throughout four months,
from July to October, has
served to help conceptual-
ize and crystallize the con-
cerns of the citizens of Mai-
tland.
Other public meetings
included a scoping meeting
to entertain ideas and com-
ments of other government
agencies, meetings` of the
Planning and Zoning Com-
mission and City Council to
finalize community issues,
and a joint workshop of the
City Council and Planning
and Zoning Commission to
focus on "tools" to imple-
ment the many ideas ex-.
pressed in the EAR.
With the collaboration
of consultants and Com-
munity Development staff,
a draft EAR document, in-
cluding maps and pertinent
background data, is being
prepared to focus on the
issues and concerns of the
city. -

Chronology of the
development of the EAR
July 1-The city conducted a
"Scoping Meeting" to deter-
mine the scope of review of
the EAR. -
July 10 The city hosted
the fli-st of three communi-
ty workshops to provide an
opportunity for citizen in~
volvement in the develop-
ment of the EAR.
Aug. 7- A proposed Letter
of Understanding or LOU
was presented to the Plan-
ning and Zoning Commis-
sion for their review and


continue to exclude real es-
tate offices from the' ground
floor within the 25 percent
non-retail.
Visit the city's official Web
site at CityofWinterPark.org
and clicking on "Govern-
ment" > "City Commission"
for more information.

city Hall closed, no trash
Of f0CyCling pickup
In observance of the Thanks-
giving holiday, City Hall will
be closed Thursday, Nov. 27,
andTFridayw lov 28noWse
Management pickup on
Thanksgiving Day, Thurs-
day, Nov. 27. The makeup
day will be Saturday, Nov
29.

Celebrate with Holiday
Pops in Central Park
The City of Winter Park in-
vites you to celebrate the
spirit of the holiday season
as the Orlando Philharmon-
ic Orchestra presents its an-
nual Holiday Pops concert
Sunday, Nov. 30, at 6 p.m.,
in Winter Park's charming
Central Park. This free pub-
lic concert is made possible
'by the Charlotte Julia Hol-
lander Trust.
This wonderful outdoor
event has become a tra-
dition in Central Florida.
Bring a blanket and a picnic
and get ready for a concert
program of holiday favor-
ites that will be sure to put
everyone in the spirit of the


recommendation. The LOU
summarized the five Major
Issues of Local Concern and
formulated a foundation
for the EAR. The LOU was
drafted for submittal to the
Department of Community
Affairs to request its concur-
rence.
Aug. 25- The Maitland
City Council reviewed and
approved transmittal of the
LOU to the Department of
Community Affairs for their
review and concurrence. .
Sept. 16- The city hosted
the second of three commu-
nity workshops. This work-
shop provided an opportu-
nity for attendees to review
issues and topic areas relat-
ed to each issue.
Sept. 26- The eity received
written confirmation from
the Department of Commu-
nity Affairs accepting the
five issues identified in the
LOU.
Oct. 2- The city hosted
the final community work-
shop which provided an
opportunity for attendees
to review and comment on
the key recommendations
for the EAR relating to the
issues, including the back-
ground for each issue, major
topic areas, current city ini-
tiatives and potential tools/
amendments.
Oct. 27- At the Joint City
Council/Planning and Zon-
ing Commission Work-
shop, representatives fr-om
Glatting, Jackson, K~ercher,
Anglin Inc. answered qlues-
tions regarding the initial
Issues of Local Concern part
of the draft EAR document.


season.

Dec. 1 CRA Agency
work session
The City Commission will
hold a Work Session Mon-
day, Dec. 1, at 3:30 p.m., in
the City Hall Commission
Chambers, located at 401
Park Ave. S. to discuss the
community center.
Immediately following
this work session, the City
Commission will convene
for a work session to discuss
potenta lth:11a telrorca

stop.

2008 Winter Park Boat
Parade canceled
Winter Park's Boat Parade
- Festival of Lights, will not
take place this year. In what
would be the fifth year of
the event, there was a lack
of financial resources and
volunteers needed to host
the event.
The event raises funds for
the Albin Polasek Museum
and provides a unique lake-
side lighted parade for resi-
dents and visitors along the
Winter Park chain of lakes.
Volunteers are needed to
take leadership roles for the
2009 event. Call Debbie Ko-
manski at 407-647-6294 for
more information.

Call City Hall at ,
407599-3399 and visit us
at Cityof7~interPark.org.


N~OV. 21 Resident
Survey deadline
If y a Cit of Win-
ter uarkrre s dent and have
not completed your 2008
Rsddn Stre rotieii tet
Friday, Nov. 21.
Please log on to the
city's Web site and click on
the Resident Survey but~
ton found on the home
page. Each city household
was mailed a postcard that
contained a unique pass-
word that allows residents
to access the survey online.
Please make this year's sur-
vey a priority and let your
Opinion be heard.

Nov. 24 City
Commission meeting
There will be a City Commis-
sion meeting held Monday,
Nov. 24, at 3:30 p.m., in City
Hall Commission Cham-
bers. Below are a few topics
of interest:
Approve the purchase of
traffic signal maintenance
services from Control Spe-
cialists Co. for fiscal year
2009, piggybacking the City
of Maitland contract. -


Request to approve the
amended interlocal agree-
ment for Public School Fa-
cility Planning and Imple-
menai o ConcIra i y

manager to e cute and the

age the agreement with the
state of Florida to house and
operate the Mutual Aid Ra-
dio Cache (MARC) unit for
Region 5. -
Request to consider the
Fire Rescue Staffing Over-
time Reduction Action
Request to approve the
Business Recognition Award
Program.
Request to approve the
contract with the federal
lobbyist.
Request to approve the
legislative agenda for the
state lobbyist.
Request to approve the
fee waiver policy as recom-
mended by the Parks and
Recreation Commission.
Direction requested re-
garding Charter review.
Request to approve the
memorandum to be sent to
the Orange County Com-
mission regarding commut-
er rail.


Public hearings before the
Planning and Zoning Com-
mission and City Council
will be scheduled later this
year and will extend into'
the first part of 2009.
The Planning and Zoning
Commission will hold two
more meetings (on Thurs-
day, Nov. 20 at 7 p.m. and
another to be announced),
and the .City Council will
hold one more meeting, to
be announced, prior to for-
warding the final EAR doc-
ument to Department of
Community Affairs.
Planning for the' future
is important for everyone's.
life. Planning for the city's
future is essential for the
community and future gen-
erations of the Maitland cit-
izenry. Speaking now about
issues relevant and vital for
our future through this EAR
process provides valuable
opportunity for citizen in-
put and renews and estab-
lishes the city's vision for its
fixture destination.
Mfter the EAR is adopt-
ed by the Council and ac-
cepted by the state, the city
will then begin amending
its Comprehensive Devel-
opment Plan based on EAR
guidance.
The city would like to
thank the citizens who ac-
tively participate in all of
our government processes.
This ensures that the city of
Maitland remains "A Com-
munity for Life."

Call City Hall at
407-5 39-6200 and visit us
.at ItsMyMaitland.comn.


Public participation that
provides input to our.1Iqng-
range strategic plans is vital
to our continuing success as
a community. Many thanks
to Sara Blanchard and Jac-
queline Holt in Maitland's
Community Development
Department for their many
long hours of dedication to
our city and to this week's
City Talk article.
Mayor Doug Kinson

Maitland takes a new
10ok at its future
The city of Maitland is pre~
paring its Evaluation- and
Appraisal Report, or EAR, a
process that is required by
state law to be carried out
every seven years. The pur-
pose of the EAR is to assess
the successes and short~
comings of the Compre-
hensive Development Plan
or CDP, and to identify how
the plan should be changed
to address changed circum~
stances. .
A CDP should function as
a living document to guide


the city's growth as envi-
sioned by the city and its
citizens. The EAR is used to
determine what changes are
needed in the CDP to reflect
the community's vision for
the future, including what
issues need to be addressed
to meet the expectations
of its citizens and what an-
ticipated amendments and
tools for evaluation could
be used to address these is-
sues.
An "issue" is generally a
matter of concern to the
existing and future growth
and development of the
community. Identification
of an issue or issues is basic
to the EAR process in order
to frame the topics impor-
tant to the community that
will shape the EAR and sub
sequent CDP amendments.
Public participation is
fundamental to the success
of city planning and growth
management and, as such
is central to the formula
tion of the EAR. The partici-
pation of the residents of
Maitland in three commu-


Maitlandl takes a new look

ata "g. .p g tg. ag





-I


~


Holiday Events Guide

Sunday, Nov. 30: A Holiday Pops concert performed by
the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra at 6 p.m. in Winter
Park's Central Park. The concert is free. Call 407-896-
6700 for more information.

ThursdaV, Dec. 4: The 30"' Annual Christmas in the
Park Celebration. The Bach Festival Choir performs
from the main stage in W~inter Park's Central Park. The
program begins at 6 p.m. Call 407-645-5311 for more
information,

Friday, Dec. 5: The annual Tree Lighting Ceremony and
Holiday Stroll beginning at 5 p.m. in Winter Park's Central
Park. Call 407-644-8281 for more information.

Friday, Dec. 5: Popcorn Flicks in Winter Park's Central
Park. "Gremlins" will be shown at 7 p.m. Call 407-644-
8281 for more information.

Saturday, Dec. 6: The 56t"Annual Winter Park Christmas
Parade on Park Avenue, starting at 9 a.m. Call 407-644-

8281, .,, fo mr ifomtin


r'juri------~---"----r


Thursday, November 20, 2008 Page 7


' 'r Park / Maitland Observer


C;1
"~4--; ~- ;;
n


-- P


-~~ ?-
~:~" r



PHiOTO BY LAURENCE SAMUELS - TH~E oBSERVER
Tennis instructor Mark Pachtner huddles with a group of young athletes on the courts of Red Bug Lake Park. The German immigrant has taught in the United States for 10 years, including in Tuscawilla.

AMY K.D. TOBIK similar ease. The world of tennis has kids," Pachtner said. "I ranl teaching professionals who
OBSEVERSTAF Mak Pchtnr areay always been a dream for the junior program and I re- have both USPTA (United


ally liked it and have been
doing it ever since."
While in Bavaria, Pacht-
ner also conducted one-
week training camps in Italy
and the former Yugoslavia
for men's league teams. He
played in the country's most
competitive league and
is among the 8 percent of


States Professional Tennis
Association) and PTA (Pro-
fessional Tennis Associa-
tion) certifications.
The Red Bug Lake tennis
program, located in Casse'l-
berry, draws people at all
skill levels from beginner

> tumn to TENNIS on page A9


feels at home on the Red
Bug Lake Park tennis courts
as he enthusiastically en-
courages hundreds of play-
ers per -week. With 25` years
of teaching experience, the
Oviedo resident joined the
Seminole County Parks and
Leisure Department as head
tennis professional in July.


Pachtner, who came to the
United States 10 years ago
fr-om Germany. At 16 years
old, he was the youngest
teaching professional in his
homeland of Bavaria and
during his college years he
organized and operated
tennis programs. "Nobody
wanted to teach the little


"Good job," the instructor
calls to the young players in
his charming German ac-
cent. "You got it, nowyou are
doing it right." The teacher's
passion for the game of ten-
nis is contagious as the stu-
dents eagerly chase the balls
in an effort to return with


A\on~a Ave


'


* Your Dirabetes
Heladq~uarters
Power Scooterr
*Wheekhiairs
Lift (hairs
* Mr~asectomy
Supplies


* Adult Diapeir Home
Deli~vexry Proagram
* B~ath Safety
Equipment
*I Oxygen Supplies
*r Hozspial lBeds
* And So M~uch More!


I OS leStvI


Visit Our Winter Park Store
2069 Aloma Ave.


Huge Holiday Sale!
Give The Gift Of Health






Pae8 hrsaNovember 20, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observr





G.O. ~ ~ ~ --;ri


Thanks iin .. a
Thanksgiving can ~`
mean the ideal family get-
together or a day of awkward -
moments, uncomfortable silences
and eruptions of family feuds.
Here is a selection of Debra Fine's
top conversation bombshells:

"Are you two ever going to get
married?" Most of us mothers (I
am guilty as charged!l along with
the rest of the planet presume
that longtime dating results in
marriage. It ain't necessarily so!
And for those young people at
the table already blissfully wed:
"'When are you two going to make
me a grandmother?" Back off! 11
they wanted you to know their
intimate intentions they would be
sure to send you a press release.

"Why did you two leave that
beautiful home for this dump?"
APR and no interest loans created
a housing crisis for all, not just
those strangers you read about in
the newspapers. Remember what
Mom always said, if you have
nothing nice to say, be quiet!


are content. It's a burst of happiness
leaping out.
Ever think about the voices y-ou
lov-e to hear? W~e all have those people
in ou r lives who, at the sou nd of their
v-oice. make us feel happy- or reliev-ed
o~r exsci ed. I k~now; I feel all three at th~e
sound of my husband's voice at the
end of the day. OIr how about those
recognizable v-oices on commercials
o~r on the radio? How- about kids on
the other side of the fence laughing
or argu1ing ov-er a game? Regardless of
w-helher that voice is trying to soothe
us. jell us something or encourage
us. it's not just the w-ords that mlatter.
but the tone and cadence that help to
con\ince us.
Ler's not fo-rget our inner v-oice -
that sometimes annoying; somletimles
prophetic little chatter inl our head
that steers our hearts and helps us
make decisions. That innervo;ice tries
to guide us. Sometifnes we listen a~nd
sometimes we go hi anothdjr direc-
tion. When that happens, my inner
voice, who is a haughty little -thing,
will repeat ad nauseam, "I told You so,
I told you so ...." My inner voice and
the pit in my stomach enjoy working
together.
SOn Nov. 4 we all had the opportu-
nity to use our voice in a most essen-
tial, powerful way. We got the chance
to exercise our right to vote and elect
a` new president. It was an opportu-
nity to make our voice heard, set a
good example and fulfill the
moral obligation we
all have to participate
in our government.T ad-
mit, I was tired of hearing
the candidates go round
and 'round. I felt a bit wea-
ry, but I kept my eye on the

S> turn to OH on page A10


"I knew your candidate did not
stand a chance; what do you have
to say for yourself now?" Slop
gloating, there are plenty people
eating turkey after the election, no
need to rub it in. We are all in this
together.

"Aren't you full yet?" or "Why
aren't you eating anything?"
Leave us alone about what we
eat or don't eat and worry about
what you put in your own mouth.
Just because eating at the holiday
dinner table is a marathon of
gorging for some, for others it may
be an Olympic feat of discipline.

"Yes, I know you're a parent. But
haven't you ever thought about
working?" Is this just a reflection
of the mommy wars? Whether
someone chooses to work outside
of the home or stay at home with
the kids, it is their choice. and we
should respect that choice and
instead show a genuine Interest
In her.

"Did you cook this yourself, or did
you just thaw it out?" You may be
asking because you sincerely wish
to know how you can create this
dish yourself but you are putting
the host/hostess on the spotl.
Instead ask for the recipe after
the meal. li it was not homemade
she will let you know at that time
or maybe be coy and say that the
recipe is a family tradition that Is
not shared outside the family!

Debra Fine is author of "The
Fine Art of Small Talk." Visit
DebraFine.com for more
information.


C o


_
___
_L___~
`"


"The way I can draw
- it makes me hap-
py to have talent."

Eric H., age 7


"I'm thankful I can
draw. School helps
me be creative."

- Johtn S., age 7


"I am thankful for my
family, food and the
things-that I have, like
my glasses."

Mila G., age 7


"I am thankful for
my family, friends,
classmates and my
principal."

Sam S., age 7


The big ~/


Vfakie oil~r voi e;It's what makes yoteunique.


Turkey

Talk


GINA DiPAOLO



nie of the most unique quali-
v-oice. Almost as unlique as our
fi ngerpint s. Our \ic~e iden ti fies us to
the w-orld. We canl do aw-esomre th~ings
w-ith our r-oice. Whether w-e talk;. sing,
laugIh. yell. w-hisper. cry- or dbcu~s.,
each expression~ says a little rsome-
thing about how- and w-hat w-e fe-el on
the inside. O~ur voice expresses our 1
thoughts, and it in-dexes o~ur charac-
ter. It's not just beautiful -- it's signifi-
cant. .
-What's your favorite thing to, do
wiith your voice? Love to sing.5i ngi ng
makes me feel good. It lifts my soul.
I've noticed, though, that as I've got-
ten older, I sing less. I find myself a bit
embarrassed to break out into song
any time the' notion hits me. Perhaps
I'm concerned that people in the gro-
cery store would rather enjoy their
shopping experience-without a crazy
lady lifting her soul. I envy my chil-
dren. They sing whenever they feel
the urge. The baby makes up songs..
We have no idea what she's saying
but, my goodness, is she having fun.
You can tell by the smile on her face,
that smile that shines right through
the song. My children sing when they


This week, Amy K.D. Tobik asked children
at Carillon Elementary in Oviedo:

"What BO jfou MaOSt thankfUI10Tr

this Thanksgiving?"
Interested in getting your face on The Buzz? Call us at 407-628-8500 and
ask for Editor Alex Babcock to sign up for a visit to your school.


"I am thankful for a
change of seasons."

- Samantha G;.,
age 7






__


Ca lend ar

Rollins College welcomes dramatist Natalie
Krasnostein and her one-act play "In God's Bed-
room" at 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 23 at the Fred Stone

The Ia is a oern interpretation of the Biblical
texts of Samuel. The event is free. The theater is at
Fairbanks and Chase avenues,
Visit www.winterparkinstitute.org or call 407-
691-1995 for more information.

The Rollins College Opera Company presents
Henry Purcell's "Dido and Aeneas" at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 21 and Nov. 22 at the Tiedtke Concert
Hall in Keene Hall at the intersection of Chase and
SHolt avenues. The event is free.
Call 407-646-2233 for more information.

The Rollins College Department of Music pres-,
Sents compositions by students at 7:30 p.m. Sun-
day, Nov. 23 at Tiedtke Concert Hall on campus. The
event is free.
Call 407-646-2233 or e-mail sthrom@rollins.edu
for more information.

Author Diane Reed signs copies of "Three Wom-
en: One Dream" at See Eyewear from 7-9 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 20. The store is at 342 S. Park Ave.
in Winter Park. Call Traci Jones at 1-888-361-9473
for more information.

S> turn to CALENDAR on next page


< continued from page A7

thro gh advanced tournament
players. The park offers women's
and men's teams, leagues and pri-
vate lessons. Round robins pro-
vide an opportunity for players
to meet up and play up to three
rounds with' different partners
and opponents.
For younger players, Red Bug.
offers Junior Training for children
as well as USTA (United States Ten-
nis Association) Junior Team Ten-
nis with opportunities to play in
tournaments. The public tennis
program has professionals on
staff during the summer months
and 12 during the school year.
Pachtner said the response to
the newest program at Red Bug,
Called Cardio Tennis, has been tre-
mendous. The class offers a com-
bination of drills to give players of
all abilities a high-energy workout
while im rovmn skills. "We put on
the music, you run drills and get a
nice workout in a sport you really
like while being outdoors," Pacht-
ner said. "We had 120 people sign


I_ U_ ~_ _1__ _~rr_


Thursday, November 20, 2008 Page 9


WVinter Park / Maitland Observer


up the first week," he added with
a big grin.
Connie Savolainen, who takes
lessons fr-om Pachtner, said she
can tell he enjoys teaching the
strategy of the game and with it
the fun and pleasure you can get
when finishing a point off or hit-
ting a really nice shot.
"[Pachtner] can push you to
your limit, but that's a good thing.
He brings with him thle love of the
game, the knowledge, strategy,
teaching ability, and true interest
in his players and teams," Savol-
ainen said.
Pachtner said he encourages
people of all' ages to join in, even
if the person has never even held
a racket. "It's a sport for life. You
canl play when yrou are in 70s or
80s myi parents do," he added,
smiling. "I taught a grandmother
who was 65 years old and after a
few months she could play with
grandchildren."
Giving back to the communi-
ty has always been important to
Pachtner, who has also success-
fully organized fundraisers during


his career, including the Special
Olympics Tennis F~un Day at Tus
cawilla Country Club last sum
mer.
"I had a cousin who had Down
syndrome and died at an early age
and neyer had a chance to par-
ticipate in something like this,"
Pachtner~ said. He said he hopes
to organize a similar event at Red
Bug in the future. -
Enthusiasm on the court is one
of Pachtner's biggest assets. "I am
their cheerleader, trying to -make
it positive. It's always easy to learn
if it is kept fun. Don't take yourself
too seriously, so you can enjoy it,"
he said.
Pachtner encourages his stu-
dents to focus on what he refers
to as "WIN," which stands for
"'What's Important Now."
"Don't care about what hap-
pened yesterday, or what is to-
morrow. It's not about winning
or losing because at the end of the
day 50 percent of the players have
to lose. If you winl a set," he added
with a big smile, "what else canl
you ask for?"


C~m~lmAi~L~L~III


Presented by:




THE MAYFLOWER
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December 5th

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Central Park 6. Park Avenue
will be transformed into a Winter Wonderland at
The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce's
Holiday Stroll. Bring the entire family for q~
a night of cheer to this FREE event:
Visit Santa Claus Live Music p
,Clown Lighting of the Tree
7pm Movie The Gremlins ~ j9~5
Fresh-Made Snow Cookies for the Kids
Holiday Cards Winners Announced
Winning Designs Nowi Glreeting Cards Available for Purchase


%Br.'~ ;,~'-:-~:ZJhn'W:c
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r,4': 'r ri
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?I a
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~p~ 8~'
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TENNIS I Instructor pushes players of all ages 'to the limit'


. .1






"J1'- ~~~ -----


Cinema


CHANGELING (R) 12:45, 3:50,
7:50, 10:50

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 3:
SENIOR YEAR (G) 12:40, 3:15,
6:55, 9:45,12:20am

SYNECDOCHE, NEW YORK (R)
1:10, 4:20, 8:05, 10:55

THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES
(PG-13) 11:50am, 2:15, 4:50, 7:15

RACHEL GETTING MARRIED
(R) 12:10, 2-45, 5:40, 8:15, 10:45

THE DUCHESS (PG-13) 12:50,
3:35, 6-40, 9:30, 1~2:05am


2 hours 2 minutes PG-13


i


I


O. anwhuea


Vddings

~jiiversaries



SBirthdays

Graduations
SCelebrations



407-628-8500 ext. 303


:
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0 1e gaP Thursday November 20, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Ob7ere


BOLT, (PG) 11:40am, 12:20pm,
2:05, 2:40, 4:35, 5:05, 7:00, 7:45,
9:25, 10:15, 11 50, 12:40am

TWILIGHT (PG-1 3)11:40an,
12:30pm, .1:00, 2:30, 3:45, 4:30,
5:15, 6:50, 7:20, 8:10, 9:40, 10:20,
10:55, 12:30am

QUANTUM OF SOLACE (PG-13)
11:45am, 12:15pm, 1:20, 1:.50,
2:20, 2:50, 3:55, 4:25, 4:55, 5:25,
6:30, 7:05, 7:30, 8:00, 9:05, 9:35,
10:05, 10:35, 11:40, 12:10am,
12:40

MADAGASCAR 2 (PG) 11:55am,
12:25, 2:25, 3:00, 5:00, 5:30, 7:25,
7:55, 1 0;00, 10:30, 12:15am

ROLE MODELS (aR) 1:05, 3:40,


SOUL MEN (R) 9:50

ZACK AND MIRI MAKE A
PORN0 (R) Noon, 3:05, 5:35, 8:15,
10:40


Bolt is the canine star of an action TV show who believes he really pos-
Sesses the powers of his on-screen alter ego. When he gets separated
ffom his studio, he must find his way back, along with a hamster and a cat.

1 hour 36 minutes PG


ai~rrlllll~r~rl;I~ LAlso opening Friday -- 'Twilig ht'



and falls into a relationship
: 4, ,with a mysterious, beautiful boy
MADAGASCAR 2 (PG) 7:00, named Edward, who turns out
a-in to be a decades-old vampire.


r don't complain
her concerns on any issue. If she
doesn't vote, she doesn't feel she
has the right to suggest or com-
plain. Pretty hard-core, but prac-
tical. It takes personal responsi-
bility to a new level.
Me? Iwas ecstatic to go to that
-polling place on Election Day.
I brought my sample ballot all
filled out and took my kids to let
them help me voice my opinion
on the issues facing our country.
It almost made me want to sing.


or call 407-647-3677 for more
information.

The Winter Park.Day Nursery
invites the community to a
hands-on tour of the com-
munity-supported children's
nursery. Community support
enables the nursery to continue
with its mission to enable chil-
dren to thrive in a safe, stimulat-
ing and challenging environment.
The event is from 11:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 23 at 741
S. Pennsylvania Ave.


< continued from last page

Howard Shelley, internationally
acclaimed British pianist, per-
forms at The Thomas Center
of AHl Saints Church in Winter
Park at 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 23.
Shelley will perform and conduct
from the keyboard works of Mo-
zart and Schumann along with
string soloists from the Orlando
Philharmonic.
Tickets are $60-$100, includ-
ing hors d'oeuvres and drinks,
along with other benefits for


higher-priced seats. Call 407-
599-4316 for more information.

The Daughters of the Amed-
can Revolution Orlando Ghap-
ter is the largest is Florida with
256 members. Monthly meet-
ings are at the First Congrega-
tional Church in Winter Park the
first Saturday of the month at
12:30 p.m. The group's annual
Christmas party this year is at
the Country Club of Orlando on
Dec. 13. .
Visit nerowolf.org/darlorlando/


Lim Y le" bmeOfer


12 and Under!


Ofer' valid for (noen-insurane)] patients only.

$78 Welcome Appointment for Children Ages


. .;T
I'
i ,J ~ I
r
-
-
;
i,-


j


I ~:


II IIII


I(I


'Bolt' Opens Friday


CALENDAR I British pianist in Winter Park


OH i Sister: Vote, or

( contmu~ed from page Ag

prize: the first Tuesday in No-
vember.
Respectfully, I would' like to
see the whole process of' elect-
ing our president be condensed
into a six-month span, but this
concept is a whole other article.
Those weary of politics
should still ask, though, if it's
worth passing up the chance to
vote. My sister has a theory: Her
vote gives her the right to voice


$221
VALUE!
Includes
Exam,
(-leaning
& X-Rays!


V *
Kids Welcome
Appointment







Winter Park / Maitland Observer


0 lnlon/


Per spec tives



by ** *





Why is ever yone ea ways

plc kin' on mes "


Lettesto


aF\~~











Get it on paper and.
Send it to us at.

editor@observernewspapers.com


Share your thoughts with
youT COmmunity through
your local news source!


Pgn~i


Thursday, November 20, 2008 Page 11


thing resembling our val-
ues. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong.
The saddest movie I have
seen in 20 years was the
2003 film titled "Osama." It
dealt with among other
things the plight of wom-
en in Mfghanistan under the
Taliban. It will absolutely
leave you heartbroken and
crying. So incredibly sad.
As is a lot of this best of all
possible worlds.
If I were Pope for the day,
I'd tell the Mfghans we are
out of there in a year and
every female who wants to
leave that nation will get
a visa to America. Every
mother, daughter, sister and
baby can come to America.
WJle cannot transform the
world into some "Disney-
ized" replica of America.
Nor are we obligated (at
all) to do so. We need to
mind our own business and
take care of business here at
home. Let America be that
shining city on the hill, a
beacon, an example to the
world. It is not America's
manifest destiny, however,
to be forever at war in the
world. America took the
wrong turn historically.
"I believe that the heavi-
est blow ever dealt at li~b-
erty's head will be dealt
by this nation [the United
States) in the ultimate fail-
ure of its example to the
Earth." Charles Dickens
We can change. Yes, we
can. We must.


TABLK IJEPSON

Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper,
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


national conversation as to
why. Why would Islamic fa-
natics target little ol' us? Lit-
tle ol' Snow White America.
How could they! We never
seriously addressed that
question. Ask yourself that
question now. Why was
America attacked on Sept.
11? Uh, uh, uh...
Do I think the attack was
justified from an Islamic
perspective? Absolutely
not. But I am an American
with all the related preju-
dices and nationalistic bi-
uses associated with being
an American. Ask a Saudi,
however, or an Egyptian,
Iranian or Pakistani.
I do know we are war-
ring with Islam, but to what
end for America? I(do not
want to wait until the'end
of .2011 to get our troops
out of Iraq. I want to start
exiting tomorrow. Obama
said repeatedly on the cam-
paign trail that 18 months
was a good time frame. I
hope he honors his words.
But Obama wants to
take the troops that are
leaving one Islamic nation
Iraq and shift them to
Afghanistan. To what end
I ask? What outcome do
you foresee, as an American
citizen, for our land war in
Mfghanistan? Please read
the history of that region.
With hubris, we think "our"
way is the ~preferred way
and that history is on our
side and that "all's well that
ends well." Sigh.
Kids, I hate to disabuse
you from an idea. America
is on the losing end of the
stick if we think we are go-
ing to transform and stabi~
lize Mfghanistan into any-


repeatedly poses the obser-
vation (as an ironic device),
"We live in the best of all
possible worlds." Well, the
operative word (to me) in
that sentence is "possible."
It doesn't take much of a
perceptive individual to
look around this world and
conclude, "I can imagine
better." Can you?
Why is America con-
stantly at war? Why does
America require a military ~
budget large than thie rest
of the combined world?
Why does America have
thilitary personnel sta-
tioned all over our planet?
Why are our troops fighting
in two Islamic nations with
numerous military bases
throughout that region?
Why do Islamic jihadists
target America? Have you
-ever asked yourself, "Why
would al-Qaida repeatedly
target the United States for
attack, culminating in the
Sept. 11 tragedy? Why?"
As a ninth-grader, I
would stand in my bed-
room with my buddy Ron
Jones and throw a dart at a
map of our small city. and
where it landed we would
go. It led to some grand ad-
ventures.
Do you think that is
what al-Qaida did? Tossed
a dart at the world and, lo
and behold, down came the
towers? From the perspec-
tive of being an American,
what happened on Sept. 11
is incomprehensible. It was
a cowardly attack -- except
the belligerents were will-
ing to die that was totally
unjustified. I was stunned,
as were we all.
But we never held the


"anointed." Not content.
to just nurture and sustain
our own democracy and
capitalism I might add -
we have been taught that
we have a moral obligation
to spread our way and-our
values around the world,
and that the world will be
better for Amnerica's gift.
As an abstract concept I
have sufficient pride in our
democratic institutions and
enough hubris as anyone to
say, "You bet-cha! The world
needs to be democratic and
capitalistic ~because that is -
what I respect and relate
to."
Alas, my father said it
best: "Who died and made
you Pope?"
I argue that America's
foreign policy since the
completion of the second
World War (actually from
1898 with our disgusting
"little" war with Spain) has
been aggressively imperial"
istic, confrontational and
self-defeating.
One of my favorite all-
time books is Voltaire's
"Candide." In it, the author


"I think we must save
America from the mission-
ary idea that you must get
the whole world on to the
American way of life. This is
really a big world danger."
- Gunnar Myrdal
I recently concluded
teaching a history unit on
Manifest Destiny. I believe
it offers a clue as to why
America is so damned med-
dlesome in the world.,It was
originally a justification for
Americans to expand west
to bring the full flower, of
democracy and progress to
those not so blessed. It was
a rallying cry and cause ce-
18tbre not only for our occu-
pation of the North Ameri-
can continent but possibly
our obligation to bring the
fruits of "our way" to the
rest of the world.
Americans'are often
smug myself included -
about how we're the first
"intentional" democracy in
history... and all that that
suggests. We have cpme to
believe we are this grand
human experiment and
as such are special and


Spanish and she is looking
forward to utilizing her
background and experi-
ences to serve the constitu-
ents of House District 38.
As always, I am proud
to serve you and am more
than happy to assist you
in whatever capacity I can
with state issues and agen-
cies. If you need assistance,
please do not hesitate to
contact me at the district
office at 407-880-4414.
Once again, thank you for
allowing me the privilege
to represent you in the
Florida Legislature. -
State Rep. Bryan N~elson
Apopka

JO SOn'S COmments are
raCist toward whiteS
I noticed the racist com-
ments by writer Chris
Jepson concerning white
people, or,*as he calls the~m,
"pasty white people." I'm
a European-American
and I've known people of
all races. I don't like the
negative comments about
my race, and any race for
that matter. Since I'm a
European-American I'm


letting you know that this
kind of writing is offensive.
But then, it's also a perfect
example of how success-
fully self-hate has been in-
culcated into white people,
thanks to the endless po-
litically correct monologue
emanating from the media.
Well, it sure will be in-
teresting to see how it all
turns out when Europe-
an-Americans become a
minority in this country.
When that happens Mr.
Jepson may finally be able
to empathize with the rac-
ist comments directed at
people of his own race.
Maybe he'll be learning
Spanish too so he canl un-
derstand the slogan of a
popular politically correct
advocacy group: "Todos por
la Raza, Fuera de la Raza
nada."
They say a conservative
is a liberal who has been
mugged. There's going to
be a lot of those in the fu-
ture.
Mike Hartrich


applauded for doing her
job for the citizens oif Win-
ter Park. She is the only one
talking dollars and sense.
Sally Flynn
Winter Park

DistriCt 38 has
a f0W nOW finends
With the election now be-
hind us, it is time to look
forward to new beginnings
and new faces in the House
District 38 office. First and
foremost, I'd like to.express
my sincerest appreciation
and gratitude for Ms. Alice
Berkley who has faithfully
served the constituents
of House District 38 for
20 wonderful years and is
retiring at the end of No-
vember.
Moving into the office
is Ms. Maria Pecoraro, who
will serve as my legislative
assistant starting Dec. 1.
Ms. Pecoraro is a recent
graduate of the University
of Central Florida and is an
alumna of Kappa Kappa
Gamma Sorority. Ms. Pec-
oraro's bilingual ability al-
lows her to serve constitu-
ents both in English and


Dillaha is acting in
CitiZORS' best interest
The truth about Winter
Park City Commissioner
Beth Dillaha's good work:
The citizens voted for
commuter rail.
They did not know that
the former Commission
would sign a contract with
Orange County that could
potentially bankrupt the
city,
Winter Park and Mait-
land are the only two cities
that have to pay uncapped
30 percent of operation
and maintenance costs for
commuter rail after the
honeymoon. All the other
counties that will be served
by the rail system are pay-
ing all the operation and
maintenance costs for their
cities. -
Orange County is the
only county not paying
these costs.
Commissioner Dillaha is
trying for a more fiscally re-
sponsible contract for the
taxpayers of Winter Park.
The above truths need
to be printed and Commis-
sioner Dillaha should be





FALLEN APPLES NOT FAR FROM MY TREE #76


Page 12 Thursday, November 20, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Obs~erver


And then, having noth-
ing better to do than
think, they do what we
lesser minds do when we
mull over inost of the best
ideas we've ever have, i.e.:
they diange their minds!
Hawking has reportedly
now revised his thinking,
and believes that the uni-
verse isn't going to implode
to an immeasurably small
speck after all, but just .
shrink down-a helluva
lot something lots of us
wouldn't mind doing per-
sonally.
SNow along comes Alan ~
Dresser, who upsets a lot
of the people who are able
to understand what he
has written in his book,
"'Voyage to the Great
Attractor."
In January 1986, a con-
clave of Dressler and six
other cosmic scientists set
up shop on the island of
Hawaii.
According to The New
York Times, this socially
heterogeneous group
brought with them their
telescopes, their comput-
ers, and a lot of data bout
500 galaxies they had long
been collectively observing
in an expanding universe.
The seven men worked
for six years to increase
their knowledge of the
origin and evolution of
galaxies, the enormous
formations of stars that are
the building blocks of the
universe. -
In the end, these seven
galaxy-mappers in Hawaii
said that they had uncov-
ered something bizarre and
inexplicable that flies in
the face of the mathemat-
ics of all accepted models
of the cosmos.


They had found, they
purported, that a giant
hunk ini space some 500
million light-years in
diameter and containing
upward of a million galax-
ies is exerting a powerful
gravitational pull on our
galaxy, The Milky Way, and
other galaxies as well.
We and our celestial
neighbors -are being tugged
at 2 million miles per hotir
out into space in a very 10p-
sided manner. The galaxies
are not, after all, expanding
evenly, as the best minds
have been telling us.
Shakespeare said, "The
fault is not in our stars, but
in ourselves."
At the end of "Voyage
to the Great Attractor,"
Dresser digresses into the
realm of genetic and bio-
mechanical experiments
where mart is playing God,
and may end up destroying
what has been, up to now,
the evolving human race.
Dresser believes that
science will have most of
the basic physical answers
regarding matter and space
within the next few hun-
dred years. But ~he says we'll
probably never know what
was taking place during
Planck time, and for sure,
we won't figure out what
was going on before the Big
Bang.
That seems a reasonable
conclusion, inasmuch as
even the maddest scientist .
has rarely believed that he
was God. Napoleon maybe.
But God? Nah!
Me?
I've decided just to wait
it out.


remained in the same place
relative to each other.
Having proved Einstein
was no dummy, I reacted:
"Okay, so after relativity,
what's next?" "
Since those days, the .
Shapleys, the Hawkings, -
and other astronomical
visionaries have taken rela-
tivityr into the non-demon-
strable, as far as the aver-
age person is concerned.
Infinity is a concept that
these higher mathemati-
cians throw around a lot,
and then they tell us we
human beings cannot con-
ceivte of, because our minds
are finite. .
Who's arguing?
In Glacier National
Park some summers ago, I
bought a fascinating book
called "Black Holes and
Teepee Rings" by Robert M.
Watkins:
Watkins explains the Big
Bang and black holes and
Other such baffling imagi-
nation-stretchers in a way
which I can read as easily as
a history book, and which
I believe I understand. He
even makes that infini-
tesimal, decisive micro-
moment called "Planck
time" comprehensible.
In that tiny fraction (a
decimal point followed
by 41 zeroes and then a 1)
of the first second of the
universe's existence, after
Creation (the Big Bang),
things occurred which will
probably never be figured
out by anyone, no matter
how long man exists.
All known laws of phys-
ics and mathematics break
down when scientists fig-
ure their way backward
through billions of years to
Planck time.


Planck time is not only a
mathematical moment, but
a philosophical, even theo-
logical, moment, before
which something or some-
body must have gotten the
cosmic idea.
During Planck time, the
machinery was started to .
carry out the idea. Pieces
of the plan have already
revealed themselves to the
curious mind of man,
But the deepest secrets
of that prime force remain,
perhaps forever, hidden
within the first indescrib-
ably brief moment of
Creation.
Creation implies a
Creator, whether or not -
we can ever describe Him/
Her/It. Most people believe
in an incomprehensible
reason behind what was
created. We want to find
out where we are headed
in the billions of years that
lie ahead before everything
gets critical for survival of
not just the fittest, but of
anything at all.
If we are going to .
implode back into a fleck
of little or no dimension,
and of infinite mass, how
do we know whether the
Cosmic Mind is ever going
to start another Big Bang,
or remain pensive forever
in frigid, dark nothingness?
When guys from
Poincare to Einstein, from
Hoyle to Hawking, get their
Steady State or Big Bang
equations up on the black-
board, they seem to be
dead certain that they have
'found the secret of it all.
They proclaim that their
yards-long mathematical
formulae will stand the test
of time. I guess they mean
finite human time. .


Conservative
Cultural Commentar
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wvife Joy Roney

PUll Of flIB

great attractor
Trying to learn about
the universe has
Changed a lot since I
was a kid.
The trouble is, they keep
changing the universe on
us!
In my boyhood, Einstein
was upsetting people by
getting them to imagine
themselves doing things on
moving trains in such a way
that they looked as though
they were standing still to
people standing outside on
the ground
WJ~hen trains were pull- -
ing out of our little station
in the Park downtown, I
sometimes walked or ran
alongside, and tried to find
someone moving the oppo-
site direction in the train.
The only reliable mov-
ers were usually the waiters
in the dining cars. I tried
to arrange it so that the
guys carrying trays and I


This Armistice Day, Nov.
11, 2008, brought my
thoughts back to 11 a.m.
on Armistilce Day 1937. In
observation of the World
War I Arm~istice, we players
were standing at attention
for one minute with an6th-
er football team in the
middle of Harper-Shepherd
Field off Orange Avenue
in Winter Park. As we got
ready for the kick-off, a car
drove on to the field, and a
classmate jumped out. He
shouted to us, "Albert Wells
was killed an hour ago in 2
hunting accident, in a field'
off the road to Oviedo."
My thoughts on Armistice
Day are not only on the
friends an'd comrades I lost
in World War II, but also
on my high school class-
mate who died 71 years ago
Armistice Day.

Obama addresses the
throng: "I'm gonna give
you free health care, hous-
es, cars, clothes, money
and jobs." Voice from the
throng: "What do we need
jobs for?"


Yesterday a correspondent
on TV said, "Obama won't
have any trouble stepping
into the Commander-in-
Chief position. Eisenhower
did it successfully." I served
under five-star General
Dwight Eisenhower dur-
ing World War II. He had
worked his way up in the
ranks from 2nd Lieutenant
to top command, had
several million people
working under him in the
biggest military operation
in history, and had served
as President of Columbia
University. What, pray
tell, has Barack Obama
ever done in a position
of authority? Sen. John
McCain at least had Senate
experience after a valiant
military career.

Who was our most dis-
mal President since 1900?
Jimmy Carter? Will Barack
Obama be better than ~
Carter?

Steve Walsh, whose estate
was reported in the press
to be some $6 million, was
said to have owed some


$255 million. My neighbor
asked me, "H-ow do you get
in debt that far without
having enormous assets as
collateral?" I admitted that
I had no idea, but told him
that he had reminded me
that my wife owed me my
$17 weekly allowance ...

My b.w. tells me that Costco
seems more crowded these
days whereas the grocery
store seems less so. Fill in
your own reasons ...

The present Secretary of
the Harvard Class of 1942
tells me that of the.1,050
boys that started college in
the fall of 1938, only 200
remain.

Brava to Commissioner
Beth Dillaha for her words
to the City Commission on
Nov. 10, when she pushed
for reassessment of Winter
Park's commitments in
building and maintaining
a commuter rail system.
In these difficult finan-
cial times, costs could be
patently high, and involve
the city in out-of-the-ordi-


nary open-ended expenses
and accident liabilities,

One thing seems requisite:
that every Winter Parker
know the per-capita costs
of the railroad, and how
much we shall use it.
Shouldn't CSX be liable for
all accident-costs?

The late night comedy
pundits are going to have a
tough time coming up with
Obama jokes. That's why
God created Joe Biden!

Will a North American
Union, long in the works,
soon become a reality, and
wipe out our borders with
Canada and Mexico?

Does the future of our
country look as bright as it
did when Ronald Reagan
was president?

The government of the U.S.
is, in the long run, a "people
business," like any other
enterprise. The problem is
in finding superior people
to run and then getting
them elected.


One hears over and over
that the Democrats will
eliminate A.M. radio com-
mentators if possible. Can't
the Left-wingers .broadcast
with effective-commenta-
tors of their own?

The present "recession"
would seem to be world-
wide, with the U.S. faring
up to now better than
most. It is, of course, best
for us when all other
countries are doing well,
and can afford to buy our
goods. We seem to be in
a habit of picking up the
costs of failures by other
economies.

"Middle age is having a
choice of two temptations,
and choosing the one that
gets you home earlier."
Dan Bennett


PlayI O


TALKO C1OEYE

Louis Roney's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at LRoney~cfl.rr.com.





ea8Notice


Get local news front a
lOcal sources Receive

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WP MOBSEFIVEit.COM(


FLORIDA, PROBATE OMSION
File No.: 2008-CP-002023-0
Division 1
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELEANOR F. SCHWARZ,
Deceased.
AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ELEANOR F. SCHWARZ, deceased, File Number
2008-CP-002023-0, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, he
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801. .
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below. *
All creditors of the decadent and other persons
basing claims or demands against decadent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER 0E3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
SOF THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decadent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must fle their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAINIS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING .THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAM FILED TWO (2)YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE O DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice
isNov.13, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
PATRICKA. RALEY, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 264202
Infantino and Berman
SP. 0. Drawer 30
Winter Park, Florida 32790-0030
Telephone: (407) 644-4673
Facsimile: (407) 644-4128
Personal Representative:
THOMAS V. INFANTINO
P.O. Drawer 30
Winter P rk,eFlorid 3 794060030
SFacsimile: (407) 644-4128
11/13, 11/20
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2008-CP-002402-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Dorothy Shaw Panning alk/a Dorothy S. Panning,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Dorothy Shaw
Panning a/kla Dorothy S.PFanning, deceased, whose
date of death was September 24, 2008 is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 425 North
Orange Avenue, Room 340, Orlando, FL 32801. The
names and addresses of the Personal Representa-
Oive and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
Served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM
All other creditors of the decadent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first



BARRED.

The date of the first publication of this Notice is
11/13/08.
Personal Representative:
Judith Ann Hindman
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor
P O. Box880
Winter Park(, FL 32790
Nancy S. Freeman
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 968293
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
329 Park Avenu~e No ,k,2n FI20%,0P.O. Box 880

Telephone: (407) 423-42461/31/0

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL








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Winter Park /Maitland Observer


FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008-CP-001961-0
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOUET JOSCLYN DENNIS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CRED TORS
The administration of the estate of Douet Josclyn
Dennis, deceased, whose date of death was August
6, 2008, is pending in the circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida
32801. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative s at-
tomney are set frth below.
SAII creditors of the decadent and other persons
having claims or demands against decadent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per
sons having claims or demands against decadent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERl-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED 1WO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER [HE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is No-
vember 20, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
AdaAviles-Yaeger
Attorney for Lenford Dennis
Florida Bar No. 602061
4923 North Pine Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32792
Telephone: (407) 677-6900
Fax: (407) 677-1948
Personal Representative:
Lenford Dennis
210 East Riverbend Drive
-Sunrise, Florida 33326
11/20, 11/27

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY'
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2008-CP-002536-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY B. DICKINSON,
Deceased.
-NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of BETTY B.
DICKINSON, deceased, whose date of death was
September 25, 2008,.is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Room 340,
Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the Personal Rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
AlI creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publidation of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT S DATE OF DEATH IS
Th ate o~f et ofiast pbeication oe this Notice is


STANLEY A. DICKINSON
329 Park Avenue North
PO. Box 880
Widit~ Park, FL 32790
RANDOLPH J. RUSH
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 0332720
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward &Woodman, PA.
329 Park Avenue North, P.O. Box 880, Winter Park,
FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
11/20, 11/27

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBAfE DIVISION
File No. 48-2008-CP-002457-03
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF





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TINO HSNOTICE O ULI AE
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NOWTHE FOLOING UNE ITS -EID S

OnDeember 90, 2008, tAsrdSl-trg.
Inc.to hey higes bier for ash iteems contained
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SATMOilNTE SPRINGS, FL 1

OuN Dceme 9, 2008s

11/20, 11/27


CRRCUIT, ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA. PROBATE
DIVISION
CASE NO. 48-2008-CP-002493-0
IN RE: Estate of
LAURENCE LUSTIS, ,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of th~e estate of LAURENCE
LUSTIG, deceased, whose date of death was October
31, 2008, RIle Number 48-2008-CP-002493-0,
Is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florlida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 North Orange Avenue, Room 340, Orlando,
Florida 32801. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decadent and other persons ~
having claims or demands against decedent s
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE ~
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
AII other creditors of the decadent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE .TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
November 13, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A. .
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801
Personal Representative:
JONATHAN LUSTIG
23 Quincy Close
Ridgefield, Connecticut 06877


Pursuantto Ch 713.585(6) F.S. United American Lien
& Recovery as agent with power of attomey will sell
the following vehicles) to the highest bidder subject
to any Ilens; not proceeds deposited with the clerk
of court; owner/Iienholder has right to hearing and
post bond; owner may redeem vehicle for cash sum
of Ilen; all auctions held in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lienor facility; cash or ca-
shler check; 15% buyer prem; any person Inter-
ested ph (954) 563-1999
Sale date December 12 2008 @ 10;00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
19784 2003 Ford vin#: 1FDWF36L63ED74661
Ilenor: extreme auto repair 2650 s Orlando dr san- ~
ford fl 407-328-5871 lien amt $2660.96
sale date Oncember 19 2008 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FI 33309.
19821 2004 Mazda vin#: JM3LW28A840510467
lienor: classic mazda east 2074 ri semoran blvd
Orlando fl 407-798-9555 lien amt $3554.94
19822 2003 Mercedes vin#: WDBNG75J23A350237
lienor: contemporary cars inc Mercedes benz of Or-
lando 810 n Orlando ave maitland fl 407-645-4222
Ilen amt $2010.83
19823 2000 Chevrolt vin#: 1G1NE52JOY6131862
lienor: j & j auto tires inc jv tires & muffer 9903
e colonial dr Orlando fl 407-207-6967 lien amt
$1704.77
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
& 1911
11/20
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
SALE BY CASH AUCTION
THE FOLLOWING UNITS
On December 2, 2008, at Assured Self-Storage, 1nc.
to the highest bidder for cash, items contained in
the following units:
C1046 Larissa Causey Household Items
TO BE HELD AT
510 DOUGLAS AVENUE
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL
ON December 2, 2008
AT 10:00 A.M.
ASSURED SELF-STORAGE, INC.
Assured Self-Storage, Inc. reserves the right to bid
and to refuse or reject any and all bids.
11/13, 11/20


Irr THE rAI.IIfT I(01.58 rF THIE rIraITn JijoI':IAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DMVSION
File Number: 48-2008-CP-2303-0
INRME:TEESTATE OF
LEONA V. BABCOCK,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Leona V. Bab-
cock, deceased, File Number 48-2008-CP-2303-0,
is pending In the Nlnth Gkrcuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida
32801. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
'torney are set forth below.
AII creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decadent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uldated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims wth this court WTHIN
THE LATER OF 3 IVONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
AII other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAMS NOT.SO FILED WILL8E FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is: No-
vember 20, 20Q8.
Attomey for Personal Representative:
Mark D. Barth, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 0834246
P.O. Box 590182
Orlando, Florida 32859
407-812-4242
Personal Representative:
Jason Babcocke
1440 E.SanJuan Ave
Phoenix, Az. 85014
11/20, 11/27


0 2/13, /11















leylOPPIed~ial e




Sydcte Atet?


MHI SpTgbi lie F R CENTA aFLOa D 0 aGA0 oConyF)
andthe Oviedo-Wnter Spnngs Voirce(Seminolalouhry, FL l aeamyour 1 lrp
shop for central Florida legal nakep advernising

IMrlPROVED CASE MANAGEMENT
Start the stalulary lock" quiccly Send us your ntie Dy Monda~y and wel II
pubilrs~ i on Thursday. Observer Newjspaers Imoroves your crae manageminI
by sendmg out mes notarlzed affidavit immealraely following the adt run
This IMts you file II wlit hne court Iulihly and jvoild hes Cosily always many
publlshers Impose by holding bark the aridavll uhile wralllng forr Invoicing and
payment prcejssng

'PRICE GUIDE -
Public N~OICe/Publie Salt 501 col men
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MBll.I (19l I.....ullve Ollve
:kt7. Walls C,jlE FL Ji11H'1


Thursday, November 20, 2008 Page 13


TS


The Voice pedodical
pernt lr(08083
The Observer periodcall
Spermit#00-6185i








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Winter Park /Maitland Observer


NOW AVAILABLE! 2008 POST ~OFFICE
JOBS. $18-$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE, PAID
TRAINING, FED BENEFITS, VACATIONS. CALL
(800)910-9941 TODAY! REF #FLO8.

Real Estate
TENNESSEE LAND RUSH! 1+acre to acre
homesites, wood,views. Starting at$59,900.
Tenn River & Nick-a-Jack view tracts now
available! Retirement guide rates this area
#2 in U.S. places to retire. Low cost of living,
no impact fee. (330)699-2741 or (866)550-
5263, Ask About Mini Vacation!

COUNTRY ACREAGE By Owner 5 Acres,
Beautiful Mountaintop log cabin site w/
breathtaking views, gently rolling property,
surrounded by woods, 30mins. from
Cookeville, $29,900. Owner financing
(931)445-3611.

NC MOUNTAINS 2+ acres with great view,
very private, big trees, waterfalls & large
public lake nearby, $49,500 Bank financing.
(866)789-8535.

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS-Handyman
special bordering U.S.F.S. paved dr., well,
septic, singlewide with shop near Lake
Nantabala, borders paved road. Only
$49,000. http://valleytownrealty.com
(800)632-2212 valleytownrealty@verizon,
net.

Buy Lot Now, Bllild when you Sell in FL.
Mountain Views/Pristine Riverfront/ CLAY
COUNTY, NC. Pre-developed incentives end
11/29. www.harrisonspotlight.com Chip
Manuel (888)473-5253.

Steel Buildings
"EVERY BUILDING ON SALE!" ...Manufacturer
Directat "ROCK BOTTOM PRICES" 32x60xi8
$11,995. 35x60x16 $14,285. 40x80x16
$20,995. 48x100x18 $27,495. 60x120x18
$44,900. MANY OTHERS! Pioneer Steel
(800)668-5422.








Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

SHousekeeper
Job Description: Responsible for performing
housekeeping job related duties such as
changing bed linens, replenishing linens/
supplies, cleaning rooms by dusting,
mopping, vacuuming, and clean hallways.
Performs back house cleaning duties such
as steward cleaning, kitchen attendant
cleaning and dishwashing. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9277800

Customer Service Representative
Job Description: Responsible for making
outbound calls and receiving inbound calls.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9372974

Accounting Manager
Job Description: Responsible for fiscal
management of the agency. Maintains
standard methods of accounting in
accordance with agency policies and
uphold general ledger. Manages cash flow,
facilitates preparation of annual budget,
prepares monthly-financial statements and
cash flow reports, and prepares monthly
grant invoices and budgets for grant
requests. Provides support for annual audit,
monitors and adjusts department budgets,
and examines daily incident reports. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9360511

Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for selling large
household appliances, greeting customers,
and assisting with paperwork. Work days
and hours may vary


Pay Rate: $7.30 per hour plus commission
Job Order Number: 9370197

Kitchen Manager
Job Description: Responsible for the day-
to-day kitchen operations during their
designated shifts. Prepares and serves
the breakfast meal with the assistance of
volunteers, cleans and organizes the kitchen
area after each meal service, and manages
the evening meal service in the absence
of the Director of Kitchen Operations,
Works with food donors and volunteers
to stimulate continued food donation and
volunteer participation in the meal program
and receives and properly stores all food
donations in a timely manner. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9371235

Database Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for consulting
with management and clients to review
project proposals and to determine
goals, time frame, funding limitations,
hardware and software needs, procedures
for accomplishing project, staffing
requirements, and allotment of resources.
Establishes standards and procedures for
the initial build out and delivery of both
remote and hosted Database Services
delivery including Change Management for
delivery processes and systems. Formulates
and defines systems architectures and
direction to align with strategic business
initiatives. Work days and hours may vary,
Pay Rate: $90,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9371970

Drafting Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for directing a
team which support mechanical, structural
and electrical engineers for the creation and
modification of Computer Aided Drawings
(CAD) generated for the aircraft installation
of the In-Flight Entertainment (WFE) system
designs. Ensures resource loading and
day-to-day tasks are completed. Oversees
modification of existing, and creation of new,
AutoCAD (electrical and structural) drawings
to incorporate configurations developed by
engineering. Develops standard processes
and procedures for drawings.Work Monday-

Pa R te :$ 5 00.$70,000.00 per year .
Job Order Number: 9371869

Takeover Representative
Job Description: Responsible for taking over
outbound calls from vacation advisers and
closing sales while helping them enhance
their closing percentages and sales per
hour. Works with supervisors to help meet
sales goals, training, and reporting needs.
Assists in the development of training
programs for new hires and existing staff to
increase production levels. Monitors agents
and "call walk" to help set up takeovers in
the call monitor agents for training purposes
on closing, setup and objections/rebuttals.
Work Monday-Saturday, 4:00pm-10:30pm.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9371432

Manager
Job Description: Responsiife for traveling
to colleges and universities across the
country to implement colleges' best
practices methodologies for the overall
user services organization including help
desk, desktop support, lab management,
and customer service. Provides training for
teams of technical support representatives
for advanced computer desktop support,
advanced help desk support, lab
management, and other user services
organizations. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $55,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9372252

Shop Sales Associate
Job Description: Responsible for providing
customerservice while keeping merchandise
stocked, in order to serve volunteers/
customers. Performs daily cashiering duties
including taking monies for shop sales and
non-inventory items. Answers the phone,
takes phone orders, and prepares orders
to be shipped out. Receives in-orders and
sends back damaged/returned items. Work
Monday-Saturday, hours may vary.
Pay Rate:$9.00-$10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9372230

Paralegal/Legal Secretary
Job Description: Responsible for handling a
wide range of legal support duties. Interacts


!with clients, drafts/transcribes legal
correspondence and pleadings, schedules
depositions, hearings and mediations,
organizes files, answers phones, and
performs other duties as assigned. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $25,000.00-$60,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9316801

SCheflHead Cook
Job Description: Responsible for various job
related duties and responsibilities related
to food preparation, cooking, and serving/
presentation. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $7.25-$9.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9372803

Senior Software Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for creating
and developing software programs that
support end users needs. Implements
new systems anti programs service and
maintains current programs and services.
Supports quality assurance department to
ensure successful start up projects. Work
Monday-Friday, hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9373752

Teacher
Job Description: Responsible for attending
to children at schools, businesses, private
households, and child care institutions.
Performs a variety of tasks including
Dressing, feeding, bathing, and overseeing
Splay of children. Work days and hours may
Vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
SJob Order Number: 9373530

General Maintenance
SJob Description: Responsible for performing
Routine maintenance of hotel and guest
rooms. Work days and hours may vary.
SPay Rate: Salary based upon experience
SJob Order Number: 9373554

Visual Merchandiser
Job Description: Responsible for strategizing
and managing seasonal store sets in
partnership with Store Manager. Manages
the overall visual merchandising in-season
process to maintain consistent assortments

aa d pNe cadsne prnastion cnisbec
is upheld. Provides support and specialist
insightto Store Manager in orderto maximize
business profitability and collaborates ideas
Sto achieve targets and goals. ReinforceS
how company goals and objectives relate
to product and merchandise presentation.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.00-$7.25 per hour
SJob Order Number: 9375099

Computer Software Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for creating
and maintaining the internal database
application. Prioritizes work, uses
programming best practices, and adhere
Sto coding standards. Creates and maintains
unit tests and documentation. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9373471
Maintenance Person
Job Description: Responsible for the upkeep
of eight acres Of land including maintaining,
repairing, and managing duties including
electrical issues, irrigation system, fencing,
recreational activities area, and farm house.
Work Monday-Friday, 7:00am-4:00pm.
Pay Rate: $8.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9361695

Front Desk Receptoiost
Job Description: Responsible for filing,
verifying insurance, and providing customer
service. Follows-up and confirms calls,
checks-in and checks-out clients, schedules
appointments, coordinates referral, and
processes charts. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate:$9.25 per hour
Job Order Number:9362351

First Cook
Job Description: Responsible for preparing
and cooking large quantities of food for an
airline catering company. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.45 per hour
Job Order Number: 9371848


Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F
Please contact Connie O'Hanion for more
information, 407-365-7585.




I1


Announcements
Run your ad STATEWIDE! Run your classified
ad in over 100 Florida newspapers reaching
over 4 MILLION readers for $475. Call this
newspaper or (866)742-1373 for more )
details or visit: www.florida-classifieds. i
com.

Auctions
FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION FLORIDA
STATEWIDE 1.000 Homes MUST BE
SOLD! Free Catalog (800)678-0517
USHomeAuction.com

Auto Donations
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON UNITED BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION Free Mammograms, Breast
Cancer Info www.ubct~info FREE Towing,
Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted, /
(888)468-5964.

Business Opportunities
$1 ,000 A DAY POSSIBLE RETURNING PHONE
CALLS NO SELLING, NOT MLM (800)479-
8033 WWW.FOCUSONCASH.COM.

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800
in a day? 30 Local Machines and Candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 802000033. CALL
US: We will not be undersold

BeEmpowered! Re lze liacaleFulfitlknent

Returning 2 min-phone calls. Not MLM. Full
Training & Support. References Available.
Serious Call (800)940-6301, www.
cashresultstoday.com

Business Opportunity Seekers!! Help Others /
while Helping Yourself. Fire your boss. I
No buying, No selling, Not a MLM! www. i
wealthcomestoyou.com or (800)242-0363
ext 7570

cars for sale
Police Impounds for Sale! 97 Honda Accord
$400! 95 Acura Integra $600!! for listings
call (800)366-9813 Ext 9271.

Employment Services
Learn to Operate a Crane or Bull Dozer Heavy
Equipment Training. National Certification.
Financial & Placement Assistance. Georgia
School of construction, www.Heavy5.com ,
Use code "FLCNH" or call (866)218-2763

Post Office Now Hiring! Avg Pay $20/hr or
$57K/yr Including Federal Benefits and OT.
Placed by adSource not affiliated w/USPS
who hires. Call (866)713-4492.

Health
Feeling Anxious About The Future? Buy and
read Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard. Price: /
$20.00. Order Now. Free Shipping. www.
DianeticsTampa.org or Call (813)872-0722. i

Help Wanted
No Truck Driver Experience-No Problem.
Wil-Trans Trucking Will Teach You How to
Drive. Company Sponsored CDL Training. Be
OTR in Three Weeks. (888)368-1205. Must
be 23.

DRIVERS: CALL TODAY! Sign-On Bonus 35-
41cpm Earn over $1000 weekly Excellent
Benefits Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR
(877)258-8782 www.meltantruck.com

Exchange Coordinators Wanted EF
Foundation seeks energetic and motivated
representatives to help find homes for int'I
exchange students. Commission / travel
benefits. Must be 25+. (877)216-1293.

Driver PTL Needs Company Drivers-
CDL-A earn up to 46 cpm. 1/2cpm increase
every 60K miles. Average 2,800 miles/week.
www.pti-inc.com Call (877)740-6262.

Homes For Rent
38/2BAdForecio5 rer @ / a0! nly $199/
MR $59/Mol For listings (800)366-9783 Ext


Miscellaneous

*Mdc *Bsn~ees *P legl sCop trs

Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121, www.Centura~nline.


AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified
SJob tpl a e en esian~c. )CALLS Aation


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to -earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundrecdien tinortgage argraas. Say

Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

CAREGIVER WANTEll
CAREGIVER/Housekeeper wanted for my
100 year old` mother at her lovely home -
Lake Sue, Winter Park. Various times day &
night. Call 317 545-5540 after 10 a.m. or
email to rosemail~comcast.net






ONLINE TRAINERS WANTED
Looking for 3 self-motivated people to
learn how to set up and operate Mini-Office
Outlets from home, www.FreedomGuide4u.
com

INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS
WANTED!
50' yr old Distribution Company looking for
online trainers. Flexible hours, work from
home. www. FreedomGuide4u.com


WATERBRIDGE TOWNHOUSE 32789
On cul-de-sac near Tennis Courts. Walk to
middle and high school, bus, W.P hospital,
dg park $299 900 (was $34300000). Winter
Park Land Co. Reaty 476-20




TOWN HOUSE
Winter Park excellent location, 2b/12b
upstairs, Living/Dining area downstairs, eat-
in kitchen, powder room, washer & dryer.
$900/mo. Call 407-645-2642.

TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT
Altamonte Springs town house, 1 bedroom
1 bath, Spring Valley area, tennis, pool,
washer/dryer, nice, ~$675/mo, 407-492-
9006 -




FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524-

COMMERCIAL SPACE IN OVIEDO-
1,300 sq. ft. brand-new commercial space
available. Located within the beautiful
new Oviedo Town Center community. This
community is part of the new Oviedo on the
Park major mixed-use development. This
space can be used for: hair salon, nail salon,
or other personal service. Please contact
Denisse at 407-741-8600.

WINTER PARK OFFICE SPACE
Intersection of University and Goldenrod,
New Orleans style building, signage,
great prices tvbee unit40from 800- ,750
square fe vial 474211








Sell Your Home
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-ls" with NO Repairs!

0811 NOW:

407-297-8749






HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural herbal patches, overnight
detoxification, pain relief: knees, back, foot,
gout, sciatic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer
treatment. Attach to foot great night's
sleep. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.org
(407) 970-1483


11(I ~I


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry
painting, (whole house or interior rooms) '
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too smail. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

KITCHEN/BATHR00M SURFACES
Repair and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensed/insured/
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0061

CARPENTER
Robert A. Paige. Specializing in finished
capnt to termite and wod-rot da ae
cnter r and exterior. Call meand ask if iacae
d ou job. 352-552-6157


CL AN I WNG ER S?
Senior citizen seeking part-time house
cleaig w'll also ru rds grcr
shop n wned doctor's office ec.s,07[og 8
8075or 407-756-2361





JACUZZI
$1,500 Jacuzzi In Good Condition. Green
and white interior with wooden panel
siding. Seats 4-5 people. Includes cover and
portable step. Call 407-761-1298


Page 14 Thursday, November 20, 2008


I! ._ Co Syicahted Materialted Content


Available from Commercial News Providers





I ~_ _~I ______I__ _


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Page 15


Thursday, November 20, 2008


Winter Park / Maitla r


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WEATHER


VIEWI FROMV YOUR NECK OF THdE WOO0DS









iusi? n~ .:~iiE.u . YOUR NAME HERE. FROM YOUR CirY!
Want to see your outdoor picture in The Observer? Then e-mail
it to editor~a'observernewspapers.com. Files should be at least 1MB
in size. Please include as much information about the~picture as
possible, for example where the image was taken, what time and
whoe Is in it. Horizontal shots are preferred.


MAllRINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time' Low High
Saturday 9:35 a.m. 3:20 a.m.
Nov. 22 9:58 p.m. 3:33 p.m.
Sunday 10:26 a.m. 4:16 a.m.
Nov. 23 10:44 p.m. 4:23 p.m.

FLOR AB FORECAST
City Friday Sat.


- i-- --


i 118 W. Comlstock Av-e.
WEinter Park FL 32"89)

Do you enjoy taking care of the small repairs around your home? Are endless
lists of Saturday projects relaxing therapy? If not, then turn to Skolfield Homes,
a name you can trust. We have a n~ew division called Skolfield Services.
The growth in our primary business of major renovations, additions, kitchens
and baths has recently allowed us to add sever41 more exceptional craftsmen to
our team. As we complement our main business with this new division, we are,
in a way, circling back to our 1979 roots and living our philosophy of "taking
care of the client."
our service van is outfitted with supplies, tools, and most importantly an ex-
tremely talented craftsman, Bob Decker.
Our fee: $85 per hour plus materials; a relaxing stress-free Sathirday: priceless!
To schedule an appointment call 407-647-7730


Saund "GaseIC~r*M'. Saund Care. SaUnd Zi/ManeC~e,


ra~l~rr~ri mTODAY: Mostly sunny.
Highs in the upper 60s.
41 0 630 69. 510
6 a.m. Noon 3 p.m. 1 6 a.m.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


6 1e gaP Thursday Novem 8


Utl IDE# "yjn Mo rate



MORNING LOw 51"
DAYTIME HIGH 680

Sunrise Sunset 0 % chance Wind
6:53 a.m. 5:30 p.m. of rain NNW 5 mph


:~1o
""MORNING LOW 570
SDeAYTIMBaE HIGH $$o

Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
6:54 a.m. 5:29 p.m. of rain NE 12 mph


E;IZ~~~I~~~ P "~B~R
MORNING LOw 550
DAYTIMIE HIGH 690

Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
6:`55 a.m. 5:29 p.m. of rain NE 10mph


Jacksonville
Miami
T ampa
Pensacola


46/62
62/74


49/59
65/74


46/69 53/71
37/60 .43/61


Friday Sat.


Friday Sat.


City
Atlanta
Chicago
New York


35/53 35/41


412/50
52/78
45/60


40/48
51/n77
66/55


24/48
26/30
26/39


25/50
32/39
27/39


London
Paris
Tokyo


34/51
44/61


31/40
46/57


and no;t
seen


6''11 0 11


DI
93,


1




'
I
5CC.


)o people sound like! they are
mumbling?


Do you find yourself turning up
the volume on the tv?

Do you frequently ask people to
repeat themselves?

Your journey away from hearing loss begins here!
O(scov&Tv dih~ gOtA red to& CtO htO
www.OrlandoHears.com n


1460 Lake Baldwin Lane
Baldwin Park
407-898-2220 ,


.,92%"AEr..


INTEPRNA~gll~TIOAL
City Friday


NATIBONAL
City
Seattle
Los Angeles
Houston


SKOLF~~IEL HO I




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