Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00018
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Publication Date: October 23, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

Full Text




Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 20, No. 43
407-740-0401 www.First(


FIRST COLO

WkBAN
Your Real Hometown Ba
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
mu ous
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Learn how to avoid risks and
keep trick-or-treating safe.
Page A12



A local fashion designer
reincarnates old clothes.
Page A10









Obama Rally
The Obama campaign stopped
in Orlando Monday; a local got
to meet the candidate.
Page A4


Honorable 'C
The Wildcats lose, but tame
Apopka's prolific offense.
Page A2



.U ,;- -, o, ...*

Business Briefs........... A6
City Talks ............... A7
G.O. Family............. A12
Cinema ............... A13
Legals .............A17
Marketplace .........A18
Games. ............ A19


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www.WPMObserver.com
Member FDIC .-




Pushing for McCain


JENNY ANDREASSON
EiLA'l..,' STAFF
Residents streamed into the
John McCain campaign of-
fice in Maitland on Tuesday
to pick up yard signs, chat
with fellow supporters and
offer to work the phones.
"It's like this all day
long," said office co-chair-
man Allen Trovillion, who
along with his dog, Chop-
per, greeted folks as they
walked in.
Many were attracted to
a rack of T-shirts with the
slogan "No'bama ... Yes
Mama!" referring to McCa-
in's running mate, Alaska
Gov. Sarah Palin.
Beyond the table filled
with bumper stickers and
buttons, rows of yard signs
neatly lined the entire wall.
"This is the only place
you can get signs in Orange
County," Trovillion said.
Signs are $3 a piece and are
in high demand.
Trovillion, a former
state representative, said
B.J. West and he decided to
open the office after real-
izing there was a need for
one in the Maitland-Winter
Park area. The closest Re-

see MCCAIN on page A3


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Allen Trovillion, a volunteer and co-founder of the Maitland McCain campaign of-
fice, shows off an anti-Obama T-shirt being modeled by Troyillion's dog, Chopper.


$0.35 + tax


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wityBil.Cmmnt Ond


Fire Dept.

will choose

site in Nov.

JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
The Maitland City Council
whittled down a list of pro-
posed locations for the new
fire station to two Monday
night the current station's
site on Packwood Avenue
and a site on Horatio and
Swoope avenues.
The final location is
scheduled to be selected in
a pre-session meeting Mon-
day, Nov. 10.
The 10,500-square-foot
fire station was supposed to
be built as a part of develop-
er Vincent Pellicane's Trevi
complex. Last month Pelli-
cane listed his land for sale,
leaving the city scrambling
to find a new spot for the
promised fire station.
The Council agreed at
the workshop that the most
economical choice would
be to demolish the current
station and use that site for
the new building. The pro-
cess would also be sped up
because the city wouldn't
have to buy any land, Com-
munity Redevelopment Di-
rector Verl Emrick said.
The alternative site in-
see FIRE on page A4


Who's who on the Nov. 4 ballot


JENNY ANDREASSON
P.R'F:',, i:F' STAFF
Early voting is in full swing, with just
a week and a half to go before Elec-
tion Day. Presidential nominees John
McCain and Barack Obama dominate
the national stage, but here's a look at
who's vying for seats tied to Orange
County:

Orange County Sheriff
In the race for retiring Sheriff Kevin
Beary's position are Republican John
Tegg and Democrat Jerry Demings.
Tegg is the former police chief of"
Edgewood and is a retired chief of the


Orange County Sheriffs
Office. He's a University
of Central Florida grad-
uate, having earned his
Bachelor of Criminal
Justice. He has his mas-
ter's in public admin-
istration from the Or- Tegg
lando campus of Troy
University.
Demings served as Orange Coun-
ty's Public Safety director from 2002
to 2008. He was chief of police for the
city of Orlando for four years, but was
with the department for a total of 22
years.


Tegg has received en-
dorsements from Attor-
ney General Bill McCol-
lum, who called him a
"cop's cop," and U.S. Rep.
Tom Feeney of Oviedo.
Demings is endorsed
by Kevin Beary and the Demings
Orlando Sentinel.
In their own words:
Tegg writes on his Web site,
JohnTeggForSheriff.com: "I want to
take back the streets of Orange Coui-
ty by increasing patrols, reducing
unnecessary spending and staff posi-
see POLITICS on page A4


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* CBS construction
* Vaulted ceilings
* Laminate wood floors
* Saltillo tiled kitchen & dining room
* New roof in 2007, buili in 1958
* Community boat ramp
* Area of excellent schools
Sells REGARDLESS OF PRICE/
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Broker Participation Avail Call to Qualify!
Owners: Heirs ofl re Estate of Germane FrenAel






ITusa O 3


News


'Cats chase Darters in solid game


F',,IT 3 i LAURENCE SAMUELS THE OP1 'r-VER
The Blue Darters celebrated a victory over Winter Park's Wildcats on Friday, though it was close for most of
the game. The Apopka team has had a remarkable season, but had to push to beat the Wildcats.


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
The Winter Park Wildcats entered
Apopka's football gridiron with ev-
eryone expecting them to be road
kill Friday, but they emerged from
a shockingly close effort four quar-
ters later, downed only by a 27-14
margin.
That low-scoring game took the
Blue Darters by surprise, coming off
a 65-28 blowout of Wekiva the week
before. But the Wildcats forced
the Darters into a defensive game,
keeping the scoring as restrained as
they could hope from the prolific
Apopka offense.
But the Darters scored early to
take the lead, and they didn't look
back from there. Two first-quarter
touchdowns made the score 14-0,
but neither team would score again
before the end of the half.
In the third, the Wildcats crept
closer than any local team but Edge-
water has been in the third quarter,
with running back Zee Ware burst-
ing through the Darters' line for a
24-yard touchdown run.
With the extra point, the 'Cats


were within a touchdown of a tie
game. Then Ware struck again, this
time with a big 67-yard run to shock
the Darters' defense. Another point
after put the score at even 14-14.
The game was an awakening for
Ware, who had struggled to find the
end zone in his past two games af-
ter a sparkling early season.
With their first loss to an in-state
team on the line, the Darters re-
sponded, scoring two unanswered
touchdowns to ensure the victory.
Friday the 'Cats (2-4) take on
University High at 7:30 p.m., part of
a three-game road trip. The Cougars
(1-5) are coming off a 40-7 blowout
at the hands of Boone.

Trinity Prep
On Thursday the Trinity Prep
Saints rolled over Berkeley Prep
28-22. The Saints rose to 4-2 over-
all with the win, and 1-1 in the dis-
trict.
They travel to district rival Taylor
at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23. Taylor
is the district bottom-dweller, with
a 1-4 overall record and 0-2 in the
district.


Bed and breakfast gets cold reception


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
A developer's second attempt to put
a bed and breakfast in Winter Park
was shot down unanimously by the
Planning and Zoning Commission
this month.
Doug Trovillion had proposed the
three-story, nine-room project on a
lot on Pennsylvania and Minnesota
Avenues. The lot is zoned residential
and the Commission didn't want to
approve a business there, said Jeff
Briggs, city Planning and Commu-
nity Redevelopment director.


Trovillion said there are other
businesses in the area, including a
day care and a school. He said staff
recommended the project but that
the Commission is "anti-develop-
ment."
Neighbors attended the hearing
in opposition to the project. One
neighbor said later that a bed and
breakfast should be in a renovated
house, not a new building. "It's sort
of an oxymoron," the neighbor, who
asked not to be identified, said.
"That's baloney," Trovillion said.
"Show me that in the code."


It could be in the city code soon,
though.
Briggs said the Commission
-plans to firm up the definition of a
bed and breakfast. Whether or not
it should be an older, more estab-
lished building will be weighed.
What really infuriated the neigh-
bors, the resident said, was that
Trovillion had submitted a petition
to the city "like he had taken it to
the neighbors."
Trovillion said the 30 people on
the petition all live in Winter Park.
Property records show that some


of the addresses on the petition
are places of business, four people
listed a medical office building ad-
dress, and two of the addresses are
in Trovillion family-owned proper-
ties.
There are not formally adopted
standards for such petitions, but
the Commission probably noticed
the signatures weren't from the im-
mediate neighborhood, Briggs said.
"Anybody can sign a petition but
the signatures that have the most
weight are the people who are the
most affected."


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


e gaP 2 Thursday October 23, 2008


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McCAIN I Campaign signs are a popular item


SI < continued from the front page


SBrvan Iielson w ll continue to support the ongoing
expar'sion of the incentives in the A + Plan
These incentives encourage teacher excelelnrte and
also create a safe learning environment for every
single student and teacher in Florida
SBryan lelson will continue to focus education on
the basics: good teachers, safe schools and sound,
pradtical programs.
J Bryan Neison will continue to fight, for the
resources needed for our classrooms so our
children earn a year's worth of learning in a year's
time. This will provide our children with the skills
they need to succeed in our Global Economy.
SBryan Nelson has been on the front lines in the
state legislature, fighting for improvements to our
workforce education programs. Bryan's Ready to
Work legislation will match willing employers with
motivated students and assist in helping students,
who are not planning on attending college, find
immediate placement inthe workforce.


c, .z o*. 4 0V i
10 am 6 pm
On Sunday you can %cle by
absentee ballot ONLY at the
Supervisor of Elections Office
from 10 am 4 pm
wwvw.ofelecticns.com
Early Voting Locations
Orlando Public Library
'01I E C(:,.nirail B ld IC :. r[.:",,.rI
S North Orange Branch Library
1211 E. Semoran Blvd., Apopka
(corner of SR 436 and Thompson Rd.)
West Oaks Branch Library
1821 E. Silver Star Rd., Ocoee
(east of Clarke Rd.)


ij i -- -






Pol l al d i mel pd I l apprv Bryjr. R ubl n li S e eprn t c 38
Pfoirai adIit-inn r~ad to, el anormed to Bryar, td r. ResuiCan tsr Suie Repr.rses ttieve D s t ct 38


Bryan Nelson's Early Voting Sites
Education Priorities: Days and Hours
nrr i n Pii-t.,


I


- -c -


Thursday, October 23, 2008 Page 3


Winter Park / Maitla r


*1-^


publican office was in Orlando on South
Semoran Boulevard.
This office, on the corner of Horatio
and Orlando avenues, has been open for a
little more than a month and is sponsored
by the Republican Party of Florida.
One woman who came in said she had
already littered her home with McCain
signs and was now getting some to put up
at her workplace.
"This can't happen," she said, referring
to Barack Obama being elected president.
"McCain's not my first choice but he's my
only choice."
Trovillion, who spent eight years in the
Florida Legislature, said Obama's plan to
"spread the wealth out" is socialism, and
he warned that could put the country on a
path toward communism.
He complimented McCain's experience
in the Senate and the military and Palin's
family values. "The tvo of 'em are the best
choice we have for America," he said.
At least two volunteers at a time manned
the phones Tuesday morning, urging ab-
sentee voters to drop their ballots in the
mail. After they complete that list, they'll
start calling all local Republicans and in-


dependents with a friendly reminder to
vote, he said.
"People are calling and we need more,"
Trovillion said.
Volunteer Alex Homem, a Maitland resi-
dent, has spent the last week volunteering
a couple of hours a day on the phones. He's
excited because this is the first election
that he's been of age to vote in.
Reading from the script that empha-
sized the importance of this election,
Homem said McCain and Palin are "ready
to shake up Washington."


John McCain's Maitland campaign office, at
145 S. Orlando Ave., has them for $3 each. They
also have signs for other Republican candidates,
such as U.S. Rep. John Mica, and McCain-Palin -
T-shirts, stickers and buttons.
Precinct walks are managed from the Maitland
office. Volunteers can pick up maps and a list of
addresses of local registered Republicans who
routinely vote and walk door-to-door.
Hours of operation are 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, and 1-6 p.m. Sunday.


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gu A Thrdy October -- 2.2 -Wt --P a


Barack, meet Susan


Presidential candidate Barack Obama visited Orlan-
do on Monday, Oct. 20, with Sen. Hillary Clinton for a
rally outside the Amway Arena. Winter Park campaign
volunteer Susan Skolfield, at right, met the candidate
before he went on stage.
The Winter Park office will host a "Walk For Barack"
at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 25, from the campaign office
at 200 N. Denning Ave. to the Winter Park Library.




PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK (BELOW)
-THE OBSERVER,
AND ORLANDO MAYOR BUDDY DYER (AT RIGHT)


I k


Th
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Parents worry


over budget cuts

Orange County doesn't know what
MARY-ELIZABETH HITTEL to do if there are more cuts," Mor-
GUEST REPORTER gan said. "I can't imagine what they
e financial future of Orange would find acceptable to cut next.
unty Public Schools, and the My children's schools didn't suffer
rt-times flip for middle and this year but I can tell how hard the
gh schools, are distressing par- school employees are working and
ts throughout the county, being stretched."
The school system faced a $1.5 This year's $1.5 billion cut to the
lion cut of the 2008-2009 bud- overall budget meant a 7 percent
this summer that resulted in the cut for each of the system's seven
Ss of 585 teaching jobs. A budget districts and 6 percent for each
t of as much as $3.5 billion could school. Elementary schools saw
low next year. cuts anywhere from $200,000 to
Joie Cadle, School Board vice $300,000, middle schools $350,000
airwoman, said of next year's to $450,000 and high schools
allenges, "It is too early in the $700,000 to $1.3 million.
ocess to have a plan." She won- As part of School District 1,
red aloud, "Will we be able to Winter Park High School suffered
ovide the same level of service a cut of $1.1 million. Feeder school
ross the board and will all pro- Glenridge Middle cut more than
ams remain? I can't promise $200,000. Principal Michele Er-
at, but we will have to balance ickson said that academic classes
e budget." were not impacted by the cut but
Becky Morgan, a mother of two clerical positions, administration
A, ---... . Q. -,.....t. tp, and elective classes were. "I had


in tIe county, is anxioUUS aUoUL tle
school system's fate. "I'm terrified
for my children and worried that


> turn to BUDGET on page A8


FIRE I Council talks fire site


< continued from the front page


cludes two lots, 540 E. Hor-
atio Ave. and 142 S. Swoope
Ave., which create an "L"
shape. Each lot has a differ-
ent owner and would re-
quire the city to negotiate
purchases.
Councilman Phil Bo-
nus and his family own the
Swoope property. The other
property, adjacent to the
Melting Pot plaza, is owned
by a real estate company.
Bonus said the owners
of the sites would make the
acquisition easy for the city.
"The group is ready to go
fast as lightning," he said.
"You couldn't get a more
cohesive group."
Councilwoman Bev Re-
ponen said the fire chief
shouldn't have to wait any
longer for this fire station
and building it on the prop-
erty that the city already
has is a "win-win."
She added that the city
has been "putting the cart


before the horse" when it
comes to planning public
facilities. "We've let the
developers lead us around
and we keep saying all
right," she said. "It's our
city hall. It's our fire sta-
tion. It's our money and
it's our land. We need to
take command of what
we got."
Bonus agreed the cur-
rent site was most eco-
nomic but he said the
Horatio sites would give
the fire department in and
out bays on both Horatio
and Swoope and improve
response time to the east
side of the city. "The site
would be great if it wasn't
for that pesky money," he
said with a laugh.
The list of proposed
sites brought to the Coun-
cil included the Wachovia
Bank property on South
Maitland Avenue.


POLITICS I Wood's been tax collector since '68


< continued from the front page

tions, increasing civilian positions, and by
improving the pay and benefits to the cur-
rent personnel..."
Demings writes on his Web site, JerryDe-
mingsForSheriff.com: "I will be focusing on
new initiatives to combat violent crime, re-
engineering drug enforcement, removing
illegal guns from our streets, refocusing on
community-oriented policing, increasing
deputy pay and improving fiscal respon-
siveness."

Orange County Tax Collector
Incumbent Earl K. Wood, a Democrat, is
being challenged by Republican Jean Ruiz-
Sandor and write-in Pablo "Johnny Q" Qui-
nones.
Wood, an Orlando resident, has held the
office since 1968 and is the longest-serving
tax collector in Florida.
Ruiz-Sandor, a county resident since
1985, said on her Web site, JeanRuizSandor.
com, that the office is "ready for the 21st
Century."
Quinones, an Ocoee resident since 1987,
says on his Web site, FireTheBoard.org, that
Wood is a "stay-at-home tax collector" who
needs to be replaced.


Orange County Property Appraiser
Incumbent Bill Donegan, a Maitland resi-
dent and Republican, is being challenged
by Mary Emily Shannon, a 30-year Orange
County resident and Democrat.
Donegan has held the office since 2002
and is a former Maitland councilman and
Orange County commissioner.
Shannon has worked for her family's ap-
praisal company since about 1985.
Visit MaryEmilyShannon.com arid Bill-
Donegan.com for more information.

Orange County Supervisor of Elections
Incumbent Bill Cowles is challenged by
Windermere resident and Republican Man-
ny Garcia.
Cowles has held office since 1996 and
has 19 years experience in conducting elec-
tions, according to his Web site, BillCowles.
con.
Garcia has spent time working in the
Puerto Rican governor's Washington, D.C,
office and at the Department of Housing
and Urban Development, according to his
Web site, ElectMannyGarcia.com.


bWinter Park/i Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday, October 23, 2008


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-628-8500, ext. 302
kyle@observernewspapers.com

EDITOR
Alex Babcock
407-628-8500, ext. 304
alexb@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-628-8500, ext. 306
stephanie@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-628-8500, ext. 311
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-902-8563
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-628-8500, ext. 309
legal@observernewspapers.com


Volume 20, Issue Number 43


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observernewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us


ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-628-8500, ext. 303
tcraft@observernewspapers.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Shelly Langston
407-628-8500, ext. 303
slangston@observemewspapers.com


Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com 1 407-628-8500 1 e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


aP e 4 Thursday October 8







Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, October 23, 2008 Page 5


-. .2 '

Winter Park

Burglary/theft
A blue Huffy beach cruiser was
stolen from an open garage on
South Lakemont Avenue on Oct.
13. The thief left a blue Huffy
Stone Mountain bicycle in place
of the stolen bicycle.
A thief entered the residence
of 300 Killarney Drive on Oct. 13.
The thief stole a small digital com-
bination safe containing a Walther
PPKS hand gun, a Walther P99
blue hand gun, social security
cards and U.S. Passports.
Three thieves robbed a victim
at gunpoint, on Oct. 15. They es-
caped in a while Ford Escape with
the victim's pants and wallet.
Auto theft/burglary
A thief broke the driver's side
window of a vehicle parked on
Cypress Avenue and Palmetto
Avenue on Oct. 13 and stole a
Garmin GPS unit.
On Oct. 15, a thief broke the
driver's side window of a white
SUV on 1200 North Lakemont
Avenue and stole a Kate Spade
purse and a Coach wallet.
A thief reached into the open


October 12 to October 19
passenger side window of a car
on West Comstock Avenue and
stole a black leather Liz Claiborne
purse on Oct. 13.
A white 2003 Jeep Liberty was
stolen from 220 Howard Drive, on
Oct. 18.
Criminal mischief
A vandal egged a house on
Carvel Street on Oct, 13.
On Oct. 14, a perpetrator was
arrested on Rouen Avenue for
stalking.
A vandal slept overnight ip a
bedroom of a church on South
Lakemont Avenue, after kicking
in the door of the building on Oct.
14.
On Oct. 19, two unknown
people were arrested during
an open house party, on 800 An-
tonette Avenue. The arrests were
made after police responded to a
noise complaint.
Drugs
On Oct. 18, an unknown person
was arrested for possession of
cocaine on Aloma Avenue, while
driving without an assigned tag


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, October 23, 2008 Page 5






Pae6 TusaOtbe 3 08Wne ar atadOsre


Business


Masterpiece Interiors of Winter
Park, a full-service design firm ser-
vicing clients throughout the state,
has made a key move in its business
operations with the
promotion of Lisa
Mulholland to De-
sign Director.
Mulholland, an
interior designer
who has been with ..
the award-winning
company since Mullholland
2004, will be re-
sponsible for overseeing the design
teams for Masterpiece Interiors' three
separate entities Residential, Re-
sort and Model Merchandising.
Mulholland is a resident of Oviedo.
Masterpiece Interiors provides
services for such clients as Engle
Homes, Lennar Homes, Standard
Pacific Homes, Ryland Homes and
Ginn's Reunion Resort.
Electricians at Palmer Electric
Co. have completed the installation
of enough wire and cable to stretch
along the 1-4 corridor from Daytona to
Tampa in the new Dynetech Centre, a
30-story, mixed-use building recently
completed in downtown Orlando. In
addition to 600,000 lineal feet of cop-
per wire, aluminum wire and armored
cable, Palmer's electricians installed
110,000 lineal feet of conduit,-800
lineal feet of bus duct and 4,000 fix-
tures in the high-rise that now houses
street level retail, structured parking,
office space, residential apartments
and amenities that include a roof-top
pool.
The 600,000-square-foot building


was developed by Lincoln Property
Co. Baker Barrios Architects of Or-
lando designed the building.
John Turner, President of J. Rolfe
Davis Insurance, is proud to an-
nounce that John Rutland has been
promoted to executive vice president
of employee benefits at the agency's
corporate headquarters in Maitland.
Hired in June of 1990, Rutland
began representing J. Rolfe Davis
as an independent
insurance broker
and FINRA (Financial
Industry Regula-
tory Authority) reg-
istered agent. Over
the years, he has
provided successful
plans for business Rutland
and personal insur-
ance. His practice also includes long-
term disability insurance, retirement
plans and long-term care products.
John Rutland received a Bachelor
of Arts degree from Mercer University
in Macon, Ga. in 1967.

The Winter Park Chamber of Com-
merce announced an organizational
philanthropy program called "Cham-
ber Cares" in March. Chamber Cares
is a year-to-year fundraising cam-
paign that will award money to one
community organization, cause or
project. Each year, a new project will
be chosen by the Board of Directors.
The Winter Park Chamber of Com-
merce is seeking application from
Winter Park
Chamber non-profit 501(c)(3)
members to be the recipient in 2009.


Applications are available at the
Winter Park Welcome Center or by
mailing Kimberly at kmcdonald@
winterpark.org. Applications must be
completed no later than Oct. 30. The
Board of Directors of the Winter Park
Chamber of Commerce will review
the applications and select an orga-
nization by Dec. 1.


To make a contribution, please
contact the Winter Park Chamber of
Commerce at 407-644-8281 or visit
www.winterpark.org.

The Winter Park Angels, a group of
accredited investors who provide eq-
uity capital to early-stage entrepre-
neurial companies located in Florida,


has announced that it has funded its
first portfolio company, PlusOne Solu-
tions, Inc., headquartered in Oviedo.
PlusOne Solutions provides soft-
ware and services that enable the
recruitment and management of a
nation-wide network of service pro-
vider networks across multiple ser-
vice industries.


Did You Know That:
* 40-60 percent of all seniors will spend time in a nursing home.
* In Florida, nursing home expenses average $6,000 per month, or $72,000 per year.
* Many nursing home residents will spend their entire life savings on the nursing home.
But, Did You Also Know:
* There are sound, proven legal and financial strategies that may preserve your assets from nursing
home costs.
* You may employ these strategies even if you DO NOT qualify for long-term care insurance.
* You may employ many of these strategies even after you or a loved.one has entered a nursing home.


Wednesday, October 29, 2008
6:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
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3 Ways to Vote

Which method is most

convenient for you?


V Vote By Mail


Call (407).836-VOTE (8683) by October 29
to request a ballot by mail.


V Early Voting Visit the Elections Office or select libraries
throughout Orange County October 20 -
November 1 to cast your ballot prior to
SElection Day. Check your Official Sample
Ballot, call (407) 836-VOTE (8683) or visit
orangevotes2008.com for exact locations
and hours of operation.


V Election Day


Visit your polling place on November 4
between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Watch the mail for
your Official Sample Ballot which contains the


location of your polling place.

Let's All Vote In 2008.

Orange County Supervisor of Elections
119 W. Kaley Street, Orlando 32806
(407) 836-VOTE (8683) or (407) 836-2070
www.orangevotes2008.com or www.ocfelections.com


;:~


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,,I


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


PaPe 6 Thursday, October 23, 2008


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, October 23, 2008 Page 7


City Commission
fleeting highlights
The City Commission met
Oct. 14 at 3:30 p.m. in City
Hall Commission Cham-
bers. Below are a few high-
lights from that meeting:
The request to approve
the grant agreement with
Orange County for $250,000
in Community Develop-
ment Block Grant funds for
housing rehabilitation was
approved.
The request to approve
the lease agreement for the
installation of T-Mobile cel-
lular antennas and equip-
ment at Showalter Field was
approved.
The request to extend the
conditional use approval for
two years for applicant Rob-
ert Vega for the Ye Ole Brick
condo building located at
125 S. Interlachen Ave. was
approved.
The request to approve
the 2008 Resident Online
Survey questions was ap-
proved with modifications:
The second reading of
the ordinance increasing
the budgeted transfer from
the Water and Sewer Fund
to the General Fund from
13.3 percent to 15.0 per-
cent of the average annual
non-sewer revenues for the
36-month period was ap-
proved.
The second reading of
the ordinance relating to
boating and water safe-
ty, amending the user fee
schedule was approved;
The resolution that set
forth the city's intent to


What a difference a year
makes! Just a few short
months ago, charitable or-
ganizations throughout
Maitland were concerned
about the economy, rising
fuel costs and jobs. These
concerns forced organiza-
tions such as the Maitland
Historical Society to re-
tool and reinvent its long-
running events in order to
make them more inviting,
lively and exciting.
Allen and Vicki Trovil-
lion, co-chairpersons for
this event, were up for the
task. Along with many vol-
unteers, they created an
event that included live
entertainment, dinner, si-


use the uniform ad valorem
method of collection of a
non-ad valorem assessment
for properties abutting
Keyes Avenue and Park Av-
enue for the installation of
underground electrical ser-
vice was passed.
The resolution authoriz-
ing the execution of a rail-
road reimbursement agree-
ment for the synchroniza-
tion of grade crossing traffic
control devices and future
maintenance was passed.
The City Commission rec-
ommended modifications
to the settlement agree-
ment with DI Partners, LLLP,
and adopted the agreement
subject to the modifications
made at the meeting.
A full copy of the Oct. 14
City Commission minutes
will be available on the city's
official Web site at Cityof-
WinterPark.org the week of
Oct. 27, pending approval
by the City Commission.

City Commission meet-
ing topics of interest
There will be a City Com-
mission meeting Monday,
Oct. 27, at 3:30 p.m., in City
Hall Commission Cham-
bers. Below are a few topics
of interest:
Request to approve the
Identity Theft and Preven-
tion Plan.
Request to authorize a
convenience fee of $3 to be
applied to non face-to-face
credit card and e-check
transactions.
Request to authorize the
Mayor to execute the Joint


lent and live auctions, and a
presentation honoring two
of our most distinguished
and accomplished citizens,
Charles and Joan Clayton.
The end result was a benefit
auction that became one of
the most successful events
of the Maitland Historical
Society ever!
More than 220 guests
gathered at the Sheraton
Orlando North Hotel for an
evening of silent and live
auctions, live entertain-
ment, food and drink, and
citrus-themed decor.
The highlight of the eve-
ning was the ceremony
honoring Charles and Joan
Clayton for their place in


Winter Park City Talk
by RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER


Participation Agreement
with the State of Florida
Department of Transporta-
tion that provides matching
funding of up to $1.2 million
for the undergrounding of
the city's electric distribu-
tion facilities along Aloma
Avenue.
Request of Douglas
Trovillion for condition-
al use approval to build
and operate a three-story,
10,130-square-foot, nine-
room bed and breakfast inn
at the southwest corner of
Pennsylvania and Minneso-
ta avenues.
Resolution Opposing
an amendment to the Flor-
ida Constitution requiring
that every amendment to a
city's or county's compre-
hensive plan be subject to a
vote of the city's or county's
electorate.
Visit the city's official Web
site at CityofWinterPark.org
for more information.

Fifth annual Family
Fall Festival
The City of Winter Park will
proudly host its fifth annual
Family Fall Festival on Sat-
urday, Oct. 25, from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m., in Central Park.
Winter Park's Family Fall
Festival is the kick-off event
for Orange County's Week
of the Family Celebration,
which runs Saturday, Oct.
25, through Saturday, Nov.
1, and focuses on strength-
ening the community by
strengthening families.
Mayor David C. Strong will
lead the kick-off ceremony
at 11:30 a.m. from the main
stage.
The festival will be filled
with exciting events and ac-
tivities for the entire family
to enjoy including interac-
tive inflatables, a children's
costume parade, old-fash-
ioned hayrides, pumpkin
patch in the park, art work-
shops by Crealde School of

Maitland's history. I was not
only honored to present
the awards to the Claytons,
but to also spend time with
their wonderful family. The
recognition of the Claytons
was so well-received that
the Historical Society has
decided to honor an out-
standing member of our
community each and every
year.
Considering the state of
the economy, the concern
about the success of this
year's event was higher than
ever. When the event sold
out to the elation of all in-
volved, concern turned to
cautious optimism, wonder-
ing whether patrons would
purchase items in trying
times.
To the wonderment of all
involved, this was an eve-
ning of joy, entertainment
and fun as everybody put
concerns about the econo-
my, gas prices and elections
behind them and vigorously
bid on every item through-
out the evening.
In fact, the Maitland His-
torical Society made his-
tory at their 10th Annual
Benefit Auction with gross
proceeds of just more than


Art, cookie decorating by
Young Chefs Academy, rep-
tile petting zoo by Zoo Mom
Science, swimming pool
safety tips, and hilarious
entertainment on the main
stage provided by The Outer
Toons.
Winter Park Police and
Fire-Rescue departments
will offer valuable bicycle
safety tips, free candy and
trick-or-treat bags. The Win-
ter Park Health Foundation
will also be on site to help
families establish a healthy
lifestyle through good nu-
trition, smart recipes and
healthy activities.
As patrons are invited to
enjoy free popcorn, snow
cones, cotton candy, hot
dogs and beverages, they are
also strongly encouraged
to donate school supplies
for the Week of the Family
"Tools for Schools" school
supply drive in support
of Orange County Public
Schools. Donations will be
accepted at the information
booth. For a complete list of
requested items, please visit
the Week of the Family Web
site listed below.
Scooby Doo will be in at-
tendance to greet the young-
sters, compliments of Bright
House Networks. Additional
activities will include fam-
ily history information and
interactive displays by the
Winter Park Historical Mu-
seum. And don't miss "Trick
or Treat on Park Avenue" as
local merchants welcome
children with special treats
at each storefront between
11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Special thanks to Prog-
ress Energy Florida Win-
ter Park's wholesale power
provider the Kiwanis Club
of East Orlando, the Junior
League of Greater Orlando,
the city's Parks and Rec-
reation Department, and
Keep Winter Park Beautiful
for making this event pos-


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF MAITLAN
The Maitland Historical Society hosted a benefit auction last week and honored
Charles and Joan Clayton, at center in front, for their contribution to Maitland's growth.


$50,000. The money raised
will help fund museum edu-
cation programs, which in-
clude events such as Hats,
Teas and History, Carpentry
Crew, and Maitland History
Sleuths.
Special thanks go out to
all of the volunteers who
participated in making this
event the success it has be-
come, and to all the event
sponsors: Mercantile Bank,
Sheraton Orlando North
Hotel, Progress Energy, The
Morgan Group, University
of Phoenix, Publix Super
Markets, Maitland Wine


Market, Performing Arts of
Maitland, 1-800-Flowers.
com (not the Dr.), Shipyard
Brewery, MacBeth Aerial,
and The Observer.
Once again, community
volunteers -have come to-
gether to make the commu-
nity of Maitland, "A Com-
munity for Life".
Photos from the event
can be found at: http://Pi-
casaWeb.Google.com/Mac-
BethAerial/MaitlandHistor-
icalSociety#
Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at ItsMyMaitland.com.


sible.
For more information re-
garding the City of Winter
Park's fifth annual Family
Fall Festival, please call 407-
599-3506 or visit Week-
oftheFamily.org.

CoffeeTalk rescheduled
for Nov. 14
CoffeeTalk with Commis-
sioner Bridges has been re-
scheduled for Friday, Nov.
14, at 8:30 a.m., at the Win-
ter Park Country Club.

Advisory board public
input session
The City of Winter Park Eco-
nomic Development Ad-
visory Board (EDAB) will
host a public input session
Thursday, Nov. 6, at 5:30
p.m., at the Rachel D. Mur-
rah Civic Center located at
1050 W.Morse Blvd.
The EDAB is currently
completing its strategic
plan and would like to in-
clude the ideas of Winter
Park business and property
owners in the plan. This in-
put session will provide an
opportunity for interested
parties to share their vision
.and concerns in order to
help improve economic de-
velopment within the City
of Winter Park.
To pre-register to speak
at the public input session,
please visit the city's official
Web site at CityofWinter-
Park.org and click on Gov-
ernment > Board & Public
Meetings and go to the Nov.
6 meeting.
If you are unable to at-
tend the session and would
like additional information,
please call 407-599-3665
or e-mail your inquiries to
sgutch@cityofwinterpark.
org.

Call City Hall at
407-599-3399 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org.


Maitland City Talk
'J UBY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


An event of historical

proportions!


Thursday, October 23, 2008 Page 7


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






IAU, I1- -,P hi


BUDGET


I Teachers spared, fuel sipped


< continued from page A4
to reduce P.E. by one teacher, one
computer technology class, and
art," Erickson said. "However, the
art reduction was due to a teacher's
retirement and will be added to the
curriculum once the budget is sta-
bilized."
Dr. Dev Mehta of Arnold Palm-
er Hospital has five children at-
tending Orange County schools
and, like Morgan, is worried about
what the lack of funds will cause.
"We've made it through this year
and probably will the next," Mehta
said. "But what about the next five
years? How will Orange County
handle that?"
Until the numbers are in, no one
will know.
The other issue up for debate
and affecting the budget is the time
change. In order to save operating
costs for 93 buses, a school board
vote last spring flipped the oper-
ating times for middle and high
schools in Orange County, anger-
ing parents in the process.
An Orange County CORE (Com-
munity Organized to Rescue Edu-
cation) survey found that 96 per-
cent of parents were opposed to
the change. "There was no study
done prior to the decision or vote,"
said Mary Jo Markel, one of CORE's
directors. "We have been asked by
newly elected school board mem-
ber Vicky Bell to poll our mem-
bers."
Mehta says that the flip helped
his middle school child, but was
hard on his high school band child.
"The flip has been great for her,"
Mehta said about his Glenridge
Middle student. "She now goes to
school prepared because she has
no choice but to do her homework
at night. It has been hard on my
ninth-grader in marching band.


You don't get home until 11 p.m.
some nights and then you have
to do homework? It can be really
rough."
Morgan says that the flip has
taken a toll on her family, and
doesn't feel the school board re-
ally listened to parents. "My son in
middle school, Travis, is disabled,"
Morgan said, "and trying to find
after-school care for him has been
almost impossible. Programs either
don't exist for disabled children or
they are too expensive. I have to
take my personal time to pick him
up from school and watch him. My
job is in jeopardy because of this."
Although there is strong oppo-
sition to the flip, the CORE survey
revealed that 4 percent of parents
find it is working for them. Cadle
maintains that she and the other
school board members are doing
what they feel is best for Orange
County.
"I have listened," Cadle said.
"Just because I do not agree does
not mean that I did not listen. Each
department was expected to cut
7 percent and this was the plan
proposed by Transportation ...
our transportation fleet is burning
1,000 less gallons of fuel per day.
I decided to keep teachers in the
classroom and not put gas in the
tanks of buses."
Principal Erickson said her stu-
dents and teachers have adjusted
well to the flip. "My middle school
students come to school prepared
to learn without all of the dra-
ma from unsupervised morning
hours," Erickson said. "I expect test
scores will increase."
Like the budget, the outcome of
the flip is still unsettled.
"This year has been a wake-up
call for me and many other par-
ents," Morgan said. "We as a com-
munity need to be heard."


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Thomas Jefferson Award for Legislative Service
Jaycees, Statewide Good Government Award
Outstanding Young Men in America
Ellis Island Medal of Honor Award
L. Mendel Rivers Award
Non-Commissioned Officers Association
Legislator of the Year National Award
Vietnam Veterans of America
2007 Hero of the Taxpayer Award
Americans for Tax Reform



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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


e gaP 8 Thursday October 23, 2008


(I


BBB.











Tailored to fit wounded vets


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OCr:.[:< E; STAFF

s American soldiers battle for
freedom overseas, a group of
seamstresses based out of the
First United Methodist Church here
in Oviedo fight for a related cause
- to return a little dignity to the
wounded. Together the women have
discovered the magical threads that
bind Americans on the home front.
Every Monday, dedicated mem-
bers of the sewing group arrive at
Fellowship Hall, sewing machines
in hand, ready to make a difference
in the lives of soldiers through the
Sew Much Comfort program.
Military men and women may
be relegated to wearing a hospital
gown full-time after having suffered
a serious injury. While the gown
easily accommodates medical de-
vices and offers convenience while
changing the dressings on wounds,
the clothing provides little privacy
or dignity.
The local group constructs cloth-
ing or replaces the seams of pur-
chased shirts, pants and undergar-
ments with Velcro to make getting
dressed and getting treatment a
little easier. Adaptive swimwear is
also made to facilitate water-based
physical therapy. This specially
made clothing accommodates
prosthetics and casts, encourages
personal independence and mini-
mizes the visual impact of a medical
condition.
"The goal is to provide each sol-
dier with an individually designed
and tailored wardrobe of adaptive
clothing, in order to provide them
comfort and maintain their digni-
ty, thereby facilitating the healing
process," said Pat White, the retired
Army nurse who initiated the proj-
ect locally a couple of years ago.
Anne Dunson, who has taught
sewing for more than 30 years at
local adult education outreach pro-
grams and com-
munity centers,
worked with
White to encour- The Monday sewi
age local volun- people of all se
teers to take on participants are we
the Sew Much in the Sew Muct
Comfort proj- Non-sewers may h
ect. Since they Non-sewers may
began, the patri- contributions to offse
otic group has Call the First Unite
donated more of Oviedo at 407
than 900 pieces SewMuchl
of sewn clothing for more i
to be distributed
to soldiers.
"We all felt that we wanted to
support and provide dignity to
our wounded military by adapting
clothing regardless of our feelings
about the validity of the war," White
said.
Sew Much Comfort, a national
nonprofit charity founded by Gin-
ger Dosedel and Michele Cuppy
four years ago, provides members
of the military and National Guard
with adaptive clothing at no charge.
Today, more than 1,200 seamstress-
es across the country, in Canada,
Germany, Puerto Rico and Korea,
volunteer their time and energy to
the construction of clothing. The
clothes are sent to distribution cen-
ters at Veterans Affairs hospitals
throughout the United States, Land-
stuhl Regional Medical Center in
Germany, as well as combat surgical
hospitals in Iraq, Afghanistan and
Kuwait.
Cuppy, who attended the Sept. 15


I
n

e[c
;h
h
It
d
n-
C
n


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Michele Cuppy, center, traveled from Minnesota just to meet the women behind "Sew Much Comfort," a charity that sews clothing for wounded soldiers.


meeting as a special guest, said she
traveled from Minnesota especially
to meet the women who work so
industriously behind the scenes in
Oviedo.
The process requires support at
so many levels, she explained, from
the people who make monetary do-
nations to Atipply the sewers with
materials, to the ambassadors who
work with the hospitals to help ful-
fill their needs, to the distribution
facility in Ohio that receives the do-
nated products and sends them out
where they are most needed.
"It's so wonderful all these
women work so hard," she said as
she looked around the room at the
women diligently arranging fab-
ric and sewing. "Every time they
sew something they are giving the
wounded a

Anotherguest
g class is open to at the meeting,
wing levels and Joy Campbell,
vig levels and Sew Much Com-
come to participate fort Coordina-
Comfort project tor for Florida,
elp with monetary shared the story
the cost of supplies, of the man who
Methodist Church had injuries to
365-3255 or visit his bowels and
omfort.org had to wear
formation, diapers. After
he received the
specially made
clothing, he immediately contacted
the group. "He got on the phone, he
cried, his wife cried, because it was
the first time in years he could wear
clothes," Campbell said.
"I think it is a real warm fuzzy for
them to see something handmade
that really addresses their needs,"
Dunson said. "We try to make things
that look like 'regular clothes.' I
think they appreciate that we are
trying to make them look tailored."
Volunteer seamstress Ann Sel-
by, whose husband and son are
both retired military, and whose
two grandsons are currently serv-
ing in the military, sews the special
Sew Much Comfort labels onto the
clothing. Selby said she is glad so
many people are still eager to help
the cause, especially with the cur-
rent economy, because the soldiers
are so appreciative. "We receive let-
ters from grateful families that re-
ally grab you," she said.


Volunteer Shirleen Harms also
has close ties to the military with a
great-nephew who has served in a
couple of tours in Iraq. "For them
to know there are people out there
who care and are really devoted
to them for what they have done I
think is a tremendous thing," Harms
said. "To do something like this and


use my talent and know that I am
personally affecting another young
person is a thrill to me and I am glad
I have the opportunity to do that,"
she said.
"As I do this," Harms added wist-
fully as she ran the material through
the sewing machine, "I pray for each
one of them."


Thursday, October 23, 2008 Page 9


Winter Park / Maitla r








Lifestvles__


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Winter Park clothing designer Melissa Rajsky blends fabric from old clothes with new looks in women's tops and dresses to form her "Raw Materials" clothing line, sold at Shou'Ture.


Page 10 Thursday, October 23, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer








SHOE I Fashion designer tailors custom clothes to meet life's demands


< continued from the last page

request.
Julie Walbroel, a 39-year-old civil
defense lawyer from Winter Park,
has many of Rajsky's works in her
closet.
"It's hard to buy clothes in Orlan-
do," Walbroel says. "Everyone has
the same thing or everyone's seen





Park Avenue Fashion Week is
Nov. 8-13,celebrated in the
Central Park West Meadow off of
New York Avenue.
Call 1 -843-4"8-0396 and visit
ParkAvenueFash ion\eek.com
for more information.


y A Growing Commu

in Winter Park ...

History'of Commur


it already at the Mall at Millennia or
on Park Avenue."
Walbroel said she came across
Rajsky's line when she was shop-
ping in Shou'Ture Shoe Boutique.
"What I love about Melissa is her
great eye for color. I would never
think that these different combina-
tions of colors and textures would
go great together on a dress," Wal-
broel said.
Walbroel has participated in
fashion shows in Winter Park in the
past, wearing Rajsky's designs. Since
then, Rajsky has made her two
unique dresses for charity events
and balls.
"Melissa understands my need
for a more conservative and profes-
sional look, but still makes a beauti-
ful, unique design," Walbroel said.
Rajsky has been selling her Raw
Materials line in the Shou'Ture Shoe
Boutique for more than two years.



-i







inity Bank "

With a.Long

nity Commitment

t^_ ^ r **


She said she met the owners of the
boutique at her first fashion show
in Orlando.
"We bonded over fashion," said
Willow Shambeck, co-owner of
Shou'Ture Shoe Boutique. "We just
loved her personal and unique de-
signs and thought it would be a
great addition to our store."
Not only does Shou'Ture Shoe
Boutique carry the Raw Materials
line, they also supply shoe-wear for
Rajsky's designs at fashion shows.
"Melissa really doesn't have any
competition for clients," Shambeck
said. "Her designs are one-of-a-
kind."
The Raw Materials line ranges
from $225 to $295 on average. The
Shou'Ture Shoe Boutique offers a
variety of shoes, from flip-flops to
heels, ranging from $200 to about
$450.
Rajsky plans on showing new
designs for her Raw Materials line
at this-year's Park Avenue Fashion
Week, Nov. 8-13. She also plans on
showcasing a new line called Mama
Mia, which will focus on coordinat-
ing mother-daughter fashion.
"I am a single mom with two kids
and want to incorporate them in
what I do," Rajsky said.
Raw Materials will also be show-
cased in a trunk show hosted at
Shou'Ture Shoe Boutique on Nov.
11 during the Park Avenue Fashion
Week. Rajsky said she will be show-
ing holiday formal dress designs
during this show.
Austin Walker, the executive pro-
ducer of Park Avenue Fashion Week,
said he's excited to see what Rajsky
has to offer this year.
"Melissa is willing to try new


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK- THE OBSERVER
Shou'Ture owners Willow Shambeck, left, and Me-
lixa Carbonell offer the "Raw Materials" line in their
Park Avenue store, along with high-end shoes.

things and creates dialogue with
her clothes," Walker said. "Her de-
signs are cutting-edge in this age of
being green."
Walker said that Rajsky's intern,
Melissa Walker, will be participat-
ing as one of the five finalists for the
Emerging Local Designer Contest
held during the Park Ave. Fashion
Week.
"Melissa is a great mentor. I'm ex-
cited to see what her intern has to
offer," Walker said.
Rajsky said she plans on expand-
ing her clothing line by offering
the line in boutiques like Shou'Ture
Shoe Boutique nationwide. Visit
RawMaterialsByMelissa.com for
more information.


w


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, October 23, 2008 Page 11


Pacitil








Page 12 Td


Family
,-




Fall Festival on the park
this Saturday
.Winter Park hosts its Fifth Annual
Family Fall Festival in Central Park
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Oct: 25;
The family-oriented festival will
feature interactive inflatables, a
children's costume parade, old-
fashioned hayrides, pumpkin
patch in the park, art workshops,
cookie decorating, reptile petting
zoo, swimming pool safety tips,
and entertainment on the main
stage provided by The Outer
Toons. Visitors receive free
popcorn, snow cones, cotton
candy, hot dogs and drinks.
The Winter Park Police and
Fire-Rescue departments will
offer fire-safety programs, bicycle
safety tips, free candy and trick-
or-treat bags. Local merchants
once again will welcome children
to stop by their stores and collect
candy as they "Trick or Treat on
Park Avenue" between 11 a.m.
and 2 p.m.
Call 407-599-3506 for more
information.

Rollins College hosts
ninth Halloween Howl
Halloween Howl is a fun and
safe daytime event for the family.
Some of the "spooky" activities
include a costume contest, trick-
or-treating, haunted houses, arts
and crafts activities, and carnival
games. Food and beverages
will be available for purchase.
Children have the opportunity to
get in even more trick-or-treating
in the residence halls and tour
haunted houses created by Rollins
student organizations. This event
is free and open to the public.
The event is from 2 p.m. to 5
p.m. Saturday, Nov. 1 on the Mills
Lawn of Rollins, at 1000 HoltAve.
in Winter Park. Visitor parking
is available at the SunTrust
Plaza Parking Garage off of Park
Avenue.
Call the Office of Community
Engagement at Rollins College
at 407- 691-1250 for more
information.

Central Florida Zoo
offers haunted hayride
The Central Florida Zoo's "Zoo
Boo Bash" hosts trick-or-treaters
Saturday, Oct. 25 and Sunday,
Oct. 26 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Dress up as your favorite
character, grab your goodie
bag, and trick or treat with the
animals at Central Florida Zoo
this Halloween. There will be
face painting, a haunted hayride
and a special pumpkin patch
to entertain visitors of all ages.
Guests will also learn about
the myths and realities of some
misunderstood animals.


Keeping it scary, but safe
i~ms ~rw. __---- --*------ '""-*ai~aa~aiaawBi^


Ashanti Thomas, 6, proudly displays a long-stemmed pumpkin at Hagerty High school's pumpkin patch Friday evening, Oct. 17, in Oviedo.


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF
Halloween night stirs up images of
children dressed up as villains, heroes
and princesses bursting with excite-
ment as they ring doorbells and fill
their bags with candy. Unfortunately,
while the night should be filled with
good-natured enjoyment, more chil-
dren are injured on Halloween in pe-
destrian-automobile accidents than
any other holiday. As the spooky night
of Allhallows Eve approaches, be sure
to take special precautions to make
sure your little goblins stay safe.

Choosing a costume
It is imperative that the Halloween
costume fit properly and.the child is
wearing comfortable shoes to prevent
tripping either on the costume or the
curbs. According to the National Safe-
ty Council, the No. 1 cause of injury
on Halloween is accidental falls while
walking door to door.
Bright costumes make it easier for
motorists to see children walking. Al-
ways bring a flashlight, and if possible,
trim bags and costumes with reflec-
tive tape for added protection. When
purchasing a costume, look for a label
indicating the costume is flame resis-
tant, which means it will still catch
fire, but can be quickly extinguished
if ignited.


or


The U.S. Consumer Product Safety and don't:
Commission suggests children use
cosmetics rather than a loose fitting Candy safl
mask that might obstruct vision or The U.S
breathing. If a mask is crucial to the Commissi
costume, the commission advises let their cl
that it fit securely and the eyeholes an adult h;
are large enough to allow full vision.
All costume accessories, such as
swords, should be soft and flex-
ible to prevent accidental in-
jury. Brian Meyers, spokes-
person for the Maitland
Police Department, sug-
gests parents pin a -
name and address ; '
on small children in .
case they get lost
in the dark.


Walking
door-to-door
Meyers en-
courages the bud-
dy system while o
trick-or-treating.
Arrange for an adult
to accompany a group p.
know the route your '- .
child will travel and arrange
a return time. Make sure your child
knows to go to homes that have lights
on and remind them to never enter a
person's house unless accompanied
by an adult. Always use sidewalks
when available rather than the street


recat


> turn to CALENDAR on A14


These locations are offering a
treating. Check them out!
SANFORD
Central Florida Zoo
Oct. 18, 19, 25. 26
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

ORLANDO
Fashion Square Mall
Oct. 31
6 p.m. to 8 p.m.


A - *.
_M:


run across lawns.

ety
. Consumer Product Safety
on advises parents to not
children eat any treats until
as carefully examined them
for evidence of tamper-
ing. Throw away all un-
wrapped or suspicious
candies. Also ensure
the candy will not
pose a choking haz-
ard for smaller chil-
dren. The Food and
Drug Administra-
tion recommends
S children have a light
snack prior to the
outing to help pre-
vent the desire to
nibble on treats.


mw_ ; Safety at home
Use caution when
Suing candles as lumi-
ii naries to light pump-
*--o kins and remember to
extinguish the flame after a
few hours. Meyers recommends
ople take extra safety precautions
d lock up valuables such as bicycles
d lawn mowers and report suspi-
)us activity to your local police de-
rtment.


fun and safe place for trick-or-

WINTER PARK
Central Park
Saturday, Oct. 25
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

WINTER SPRINGS-
Winter Springs Town Center
Saturday, Oct. 18
5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.


Page 12 Thursday, October 23, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


r. ?- A
r






VInItIer RIr UI IX/d Observer Thursday, O r 2, 2


Cinema


,Area movieimes, fo Frday*Oc..2


HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 3
(G) 11:45am, 12:10,12:40,2:20,
2:45, 3:15, 5:00, 5:30, 7:05, 7:40,
8:10,9:40,10:20,10:50, 12:15am,
12:50am

PRIDE AND GLORY (R) 1:05,
4:00,7:30,10:25

SAW V (R) 12:35,1:25,2:55,
4:15,5:15,7:35,8:20,9:55,10:35,
12:25am

MAX PAYNE (PG-13) 11:50am,
12:20,2:15,3:10,4:40,7:25,8:15,
10:05,12:30am

THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES
(PG-13) 11:45am, 2:10,4:55,7:20,
9:45,12:10am

SEX DRIVE (R) 5:35,10:50

W. (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 7:45,
10:40

BODY OF LIES (R) 12:30, 3:25,
6:55,10:00


CITY OF EMBER (PG) 11:55am,
2:30,4:50

QUARANTINE (R) 5:05, 10:15,
12:35am

BEVERYLY HILLS CHIHUAHUA
(PG) 1:15, 4:20; 6:45, 9:25,11:50

NICK AND NORAH'S INFINITE
PLAYLIST (PG-13) 12:15, 2:50,
7:50

RACHEL GETTING MARRIED
(R) noon; 2:40, 5:20, 8:00,10:45

RELIGULOUS (R)12:05,3:30,
6:50,9:35,12:45AM

EAGLE EYE (PG-13) 11:40am,
2:25,5:10,7:55,10:55

FIREPROOF (PG) 1:00, 3:50, 7:00,
10:10

NIGHTS IN RODANTHE (PG-13)
7:10,9:50, 12:20am

APPALOOSA (R) 12:25,3:20,
6:45,9:30,12:40am

THE DUCHESS (PG-13) 12:50,
3:40,7:15,10:30


'High School Musical 3' Opens Friday


Two high school lovebirds, nearing the end of senior year, worry about
being separated by college. They team up with their classmates to stage
a musical that expresses their hopes and anxieties about the future.

1 hour 52 minutes G


Also opening Friday 'Saw V'


4:00, 6:30

ANIMATION SHOW 4 (NR) 9:15

GAY ORLANDO FILM FESTI-
VAL Saturday, Oct. 25 Oct. 26
Showings at 11:00am and 1:30


The legacy of serial killer Jig-
saw must carry on, and the last
living person who can do it is a
forensics expert who must go
on the hunt in order to protect
his secret. Along the way, he
engages people and tests their
limits with his trademark deadly
games.


1 hour 28 minutes R


Calendar
Orange County Public Schools
hosts a Magnet Fair to showcase
magnet programs in elementary,
middle and high schools from 5 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23 at Jones
High School, 801 S. Rio Grande Ave.
in Orlando.
The event is a community open
house allowing parents and students
the opportunity to speak with magnet
coordinators, get information regard-
ing the programs, and pick up an ap-
plication. Individual schools will also
provide a more in-depth presentation
of their magnet program at school
sites. Orange County Public Schools
offers a wide range of magnet pro-
grams from science and aviation to
finance and criminal justice. Magnet
schools are highly successful pro-
grams in the district. For the 2008-
2009 school year, there were an esti-
mated 5,000 applicants with a rise in
middle school applications.
Call Marilyn McClain of School
Choice Services at407-317-3200, ex-
tension 2715 for more information.

Put your character on the line, or on
the "clay," from 6-8 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 30 at Stonewood Grill and Tavern
at Tuscawilla, at 5248 Red Bug Lake
Road in Winter Springs. Pre-register
for the 4th annual tennis exhibition,
to be played Sunday, Nov. 16. A $25
donation at the Stonewood reception
will also allow you in at the Nov. 16
awards banquet at the Tuscawilla
Country Club after the tennis exhibi-
tion. Bring your tennis champion or
sponsor your favorite player.
Register with Henry Vales at
hvales@dountoothers.net or call
321-262-6269

The Alzheimer Resource Center's
15th Annual Caregiver Educational
Conference is from 8:30 a.m. to 3:45
p.m. Saturday, Nov. 1 at the Calvary
Assembly Church of God at 1199 Clay


St. in Winter Park.
Early registration is $25, or $30 at
the door.
Call Cindi Spurgeon at 407-843-
1910, extension 301, for more infor-
mation.

Laugh your way to a better mar-
riage from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 6, 13, 20 and Dec.
4 at Community of Christ Church at
David Walker and Dora Avenue.
The Golden Triangle YMCA encour-
ages you to come build your fam-
ily relationships through this video
series. Mark Gungor, one of the top
marriage and family speakers in the
.United States, created this highly re-
garded seminar. This four part DVD
series will be facilitated by the chair
of our Christian Emphasis Committee,
Pastor Kenneth Fleming and Com-
munity of Christ Church Pastor Bill
Wegner.
There is a maximum of.100 spaces
for each session, so be sure to re-
serve your space.
A sign-up sheet is in the lobby of
the Golden Triangle YMCA. This series
is free to attend. Refreshments and
child care will be provided.

The Goldenrod Chamber of Com-
merce hosts the 30th Annual Fes-
tival and Parade this Saturday, Oct.
25. There will be a pancake breakfast,
parade, kids corner, cookout, dessert
bake-off and museum tours.
Aloma Avenue will be closed from
Forsyth Road down to Goldenrod
Road from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
for the parade, which runs from 11
a.m. to noon.
The event is centered at Goldenrod
Station, an old renovated fire station
at 4755 N. Palmetto Ave. east of Win-
ter Park.
A political mingle and barbecue will
follow the parade. Children will have
bounce houses, carnival games, face


painting, cookie decorating and a col-
oring contest, all for free.
The dessert bake-off is from 1 p.m.
to 2 p.m. The Goldenrod Museum will
be open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The
pancake breakfast lasts from 7 a.m.
to 11 a.m.

Seminole Community College's
Planetarium is hosting a free family
Halloween Extravaganza that will fea-
ture the planetarium's show "Into the
West: Astronomical Origins of Hallow-
een"; educational and safety informa-
tion; and traditional Halloween treats.
The event will include a costume
contest for children 12 and younger;
candy and prizes; a haunted school
where kids will learn about snakes,
owls and other night creatures on
hand for Halloween; and telescopes
for peering into the wonders of the
night sky.
The event is from 7-11 p.m. on
Saturday, Oct. 25 in SCC's Plan-
etarium on the Sanford-Lake Mary
Campus.
Visit www.scc-fl.edu/planet or call
407-708-2360 for more information.

Trick out your pet, and treat it
to a day of fun at the First Annual
Hiss and Howl-O-Ween Pet Costume
Contest and Adoption Event from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25 at
Seminole County Animal Services,
232 Bush Blvd. in Sanford (across
the street from Flea World).
It will be a fun-filled day of dog-
gie games, food, face painting for
the kids and a Howl-arious costume
contest for your pets. The costume
contest begins at 1 p.m. You can
even dress up too if you are part of
your pet's costume theme. The event
and contest are free, and prizes will
be given for the best costumes.
There will be dozens of great dogs
and cats just waiting to be adopted.


The Winter Park Economic Devel-
opment Advisory Board will host
a public input session at 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 6 at the Rachel D.
Murrah Civic Center located at 1050
West Morse Blvd.
The board is currently complet-
ing its strategic plan and would like
to include the ideas of Winter Park
business and property owners in the
plan. This input session will provide
an opportunity for interested parties
to share their vision and concerns in
order to help improve economic de-
velopment within the City of Winter
Park.


:-- Oaks
(ASSIS/ Park
AS I| Stl:i 1,;


To pre-register to speak at the pub-
lic input session, please visit www.
CityofWinterPark.org and click on
Government > Board & Public Meet-
ings > November 6. Call 407-599-
3665 or e-mail sgutch@cityofwinter-
park.orgJor more information.

The Winter Park Barack Obama
campaign office hosts a "Walk for
Barack" at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 25.
Supporters will march in support of
the Illinois senator and presidential
candidate from the local volunteer
office at 200 N. Denning Ave. to the
Winter Park Library.


Call us for a tour
or more information
407-718-7937
1759 Alabama Dr., WiVter Park
wwwaPabnamaoaks.comn


I


Thursday, October 23, 2008 Page 13


Winter Park / Maitia r






Page 14 Thursday, October 23, 2008 Winter Park / Maitiand Observer


New Store Hours
Monday Saturday
10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Sunday 10 a.m. 5 p.m.


329 North Park Avenue
Suite 101
(next to Panera Bread)
Winter Park, FL 32789


407.539.2528

www.Jacobsons.com


CALENDAR I


< continued from page A12
Haunted hayride comes
to the country
Mikenda Farm 4H Club will be having
a Haunted Halloween Hayride and
Festival from 4-10 p.m. on Saturday,
Oct. 25. Events will include a family-
friendly hayride, haunted horror
hayride, costume contest, Halloween
games, pumpkin-carving contest,
and a professional photographer to
take pictures of you or your little
ones in their Halloween costumes.
Full concessions will be on site
all evening so bring your hunger.
The event is near the intersection
of Lake Pickett and Ft. Christmas
roads. Follow the signs the day of
the event. Tickets are $5 in advance,
$8 the day of the event. Visit www.
mikendafarm.com/4hclub.htm for
more information.

Disney's magical twist
on Halloween
Mickey's Not-So-Scary Halloween
Party returns to the Magic Kingdom
Oct. 23, 24, 26, 30 and 31, from 7


p.m. to midnight.
Visit the park in costume, and
trick-or-treat for candy with some
of your favorite Disney Characters,
also dressed up for the evening.
Visit )OisneyWorld.com for more
information.

Friendly spooks
lurk at SeaWorld
SeaWorld's Halloween Spooktacular
continues Oct. 24, 25, 26 and 31,
beginning at 11 a.m. each day. Join
in on the fun and trick or treat in your
costume among the friendly sea
witches, mermaids, pumpkin fish
and ice witches. Follow the special
SeaWorld map and fill your candy
bag at the 15 treasure stations.
Enjoy the "Countdown to Halloween"
live musical stage show with Count
von Count and Elmo from "Sesame
Street." More than 35 fanciful sea
creatures including Gummy Worm
Wanda and Swedish Fish Suzy will
stroll through the park and play with
guests.
Visit SeaWorld.com for more
information.


Jacobson s



We've moved back home!

Come visit our new boutique!


Page 14 Thursday, October 23, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Opinion/ E!Molal


Perspectives

by...


A walk 'n talk for Obama


I've been giving some
thought to the next presi-
dential election. 2012
is only 48 months away.
Here's my pick for the Re-
publicans. It'll be a Sarah
Palin/ "Joe the Plumber"
Ticket. Dumb and Plumber.
That's right. Dumb and
Plumber. (You heard it
hear first.) It's a natural.
What with the Republicans
constantly dumbin' down
America! Why not a presi-
dential ticket to, like, you
know, so totally "wow" the
Republican base? A little
exorcism (religion), a little
lead into gold economic
policy and, whoa, hey,
maybe threaten to invade
Venezuela, (Spread democ-
racy plus oil! Is that good or
what?) and you've covered
all three legs (constituen-
cies) of the Republican
Party.
Remember the first Re-
publican debate (so very
long ago) and the mod-
erator asked if there was
anyone on the stage who
didn't embrace evolution?
Three hands from actual
21st century Republican
candidates to be president
of the United States shot


up. Science? Who needs it?
Ha! Love it. I'm telling you,
100 years from now when
our ancestors ask, "How in
the hell could America have
fallen so low?" That's right,
"fallen." They'll show those
Republicans' hands going
up (over and over again)
and that will say it all.
I apologize. Sort of. Pick-
ing on Republicans these
days is like hunting with
Cheney. Remember when
our vice president shot a
close (arguably, too close)
friend in the head? The
type of hunting that day
was to take caged birds to
the hunt, let'um go and
blast'um out of the sky
soon after release. Not quite
shooting' apples in a barrel
(my pokin' at Republicans)
but you get my point.
So after this election, I'm
taking a hiatus. The Repub-
licans will predictably turn
on one another, cannibal-
ize (mmmm-mmm good) a
few of their own, return to
their think tanks, and write
papers on how they need
more orthodoxy, more
purity in the movement.
Those Republicans remain-
ing in office will hold regu-


lar prayer breakfasts, hold
their sanctimonious noses
and be in the minority until
the Democrats self-corrupt
themselves out of office.
And so it goes.
I've held fundraisers
(excellent reason to drink
champagne) in my home
this campaign season for
both Barack Obama and
Suzanne Kosmas, who is
running against the little
man ("lm"), Tom Feeney.
Kosmas is, to me, infinitely
preferable to Im. I thought
him absolutely wretched
(and scary) as Jeb Bush's
running mate during the
Jebster's first run at being
governor. Years later he cre-
ated the 24th Florida Con-
gressional District while in
the Florida House of Repre-
sentatives, gerrymandering
a tailor-made district of Re-
publican stalwarts.
For a Democrat to actu-
ally win the 24th two things
have to occur: A great can-
didate (Kosmas) has to
confront a fallen Feeney.
Which indeed is the case.
The Im aspired to greatness
and saw Jack Abramoff as
his ticket to the big time.
Abramoff, a corrupted
Washington lobbyist,
proved to be as crooked as
a barrel of guts, and we are
finding out to what extent
Im liked 'dembarrel vittles.
And so, today Kosmas has a
crack at, as "they" say, vot-
ing the bum out. Visit her
Web site at KosmasforCon-
gress.com.
And then we've got "01'
Term Limits" Ric Keller of
the Eighth Congressional
District. Of course, once
elected to office he backed


off his promise to limit his
service in office. Why is that
so predictable? Keller's big
congressional achievement
was the "Cheeseburger-
Cheeseburger Bill," which
"would have shielded man-.
ufacturers, distributors, and
sellers of food and bever-
ages from lawsuits blaming
them for weight gain, obe-
sity, or a health condition
related to weight gain or
obesity." For the one-time
Pillsbury Doughboy to have
initiated the Cheeseburger-
Cheeseburger Bill is laugh-
ably ironic. He is a congres-
sional non-entity, and I
support his opponent.
Alan Grayson is a smart
man with a good heart.
Give Grayson a chance by
giving him your vote. Do
it once. Do it again if he's
worthy. Cuz' we know who
ain't. Visit his Web site,
www.graysonforcongress.
com.
Let's sweep'um out and
vote'um in. Feeney and
Keller out! Elect Kosmas,
Grayson and Barack Obama
in!
To that end I encourage
every patriot of sound heart
and sure foot to join the
Walk for Obama this Satur-
day, Oct. 25. It's a rally and
a walk to encourage early
voting. We will gather at
the stream, no, at 9:30 a.m.
at 200 N. Denning Dr. in
Winter Park (Obama head-
quarters). For those so will-
ing, the motivated will walk
a little more than a mile
to the Winter Park Library
(1.1 miles). If you have an
Obama T-shirt please wear
it or dress in red, white and
blue!


Prior to the walk, I rec-
ommend a hearty breakfast
(a chocolate malt, coffee
and eggs Benedict works
for me) at the Briar Patch
on Park Avenue or a sweet
role and coffee at the Sat-
urday Farmers Market, and
then make your way to the
start point of the walk on
Denning Drive. Could be
fun. Make a party out of it.
Get a party. Walk N' Talk.
It's a stroll.
I'm already planning my
celebratory victory party
for Saturday, Nov. 8, but I
take nothing for granted.
And neither should any
Democrat! Forever remem-
ber the elections of 2000
and 2004. What profound,
sad tragedies for America.
It will take years to repair
America from the dam-
age of the George W. Bush
administration. What man
hath wrought!
I will not believe Obama
elected until I read it in
newspaper headlines -
two days after the election!
Two days.
Until then, walk your
talk! Be there! Eat first. It's a
Walk N' Talk!
Do the Avenue after-
ward. Stroll down to Timo-
thy's for a look-see. Shop
local. Buy art. It's patriotic.
You do want to be a patriot,
don't you?




> JEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@mediaamerica.us.


Letters f the lir


Central Park rail stop
threatens our village green
I declined an invitation to serve
on the Winter Park Commuter Rail
Task Force because the pro-devel-
opment interests had permeated
Winter Park government to the
point that outcomes were prede-
termined.
Rather than emphasizing the
dire need to widen roads as quick-
ly as possible to actually alleviate
commuter woes, Congressman
John Mica crammed his pet com-
muter rail project down the throats
of unsuspecting Winter Park resi-
dents under the guise of solving a
hot-button issue: time-consuming
1-4 commutes.
Winter Park residents were
duped into believing that they
would lose hundreds of millions
of dollars in federal funding, that
would supposedly ease 1-4 con-
gestion, if they didn't help Mica
cement his legacy with a huge
pork-barrel project that required
a Central Park commuter rail stop.
Despite the protestations of the
pro-development interests to the
contrary, eliminating a Central
Park stop does not sabotage com-
muter rail. It does save the finest
village green in the state, though.
Winter Park doesn't need two


commuter rail stops having one
at Florida Hospital is all the city
needs. That stop won't compro-
mise the tranquil setting of Central
Park with dozens of noisy, sooty
buses. The prospect of such a stop is
why the National Trust for Historic
Preservation listed Central Park as
"threatened."
Will Graves
Creator of Friends of Winter Park

Tax dollars toward rail project
are well-protected
I am always impressed when some-
one tackles bureaucratic waste,
fraud and abuse of taxpayer's mon-
ey. I sleep better knowing my small
contribution in public taxes is be-
ing disbursed with a sharp eye. With
this in mind, I'd like to congratulate
Tawny Olore, P.E., project manager
for the Central Florida Commuter
Rail project.
Some of the items that I learned
at the Winter Park City Commis-
sion work session on Commuter
Rail held Oct. 14:
Out of 300 projects in the U.S.,
our project was one of five that have
been given the final green light for
approval. These final approvals are
only given after numerous inspec-
tions and examinations by the


federal government. Th
project is under the micre
a monthly financial audit
ect audit by respected th
private companies. Winter
shielded by Orange Cou
containment clauses in tl
agreement, preserving .
ibility to opt out in 201"
construction dollars for tl
Park station have been
ated and "banked," but w
spent until targets are mi
funding is secure.
The future of Central
growth is dependent upo
gion's ability to move peol
ly, for the lowest possible p
first step in commuter rai
accomplished on time ar
budget or all future trans]
projects will suffer. Ms. (
done a great job protection
payers of Winter Park an
Florida. Thank you!



Special interests want to
Orange County school I
A referendum at the ver
the Nov. 4 Orange Cour
attempts to create an eigl
ber on the Orange Coun


ie entire Board.
oscope of This new official would be elect-
and proj- ed countywide, would automati-
lird-party cally serve as the Chairman of the
er Park is School Board for four years and
nty's cost have the potential of two votes on
he master every issue. On record and opposed
our flex- are the Orange County NAACP, the
7. Federal Orange County Teachers Associa-
he Winter tion, Orange County Association of
appropri- School Administrators (principals),
ill not be Orange County Democratic Party
et and all and the Orange County League of
Women Voters. The Orange County
Florida's Republican Party does not have a
)n the re- position on this referendum.
ple quick- This proposal is on our ballot be-
)rice. This cause people who want to do busi-
l1 must be ness with the school board land
id within use attorneys, developers, bond at-
portation torneys want to "change the way
Olore has' the school board does business"
.g the tax- (see LetUsVoteOrange.com). For
d Central a list of the special interests that
spent more than $300,000 to put
- Pitt Warner the referendum on the ballot visit
WinterPark. NoElectedChair.com. It appears
that the only business change they
change want is for the school system to do
board "business" with them.
y end of Just vote no on their political
... 1,,Al scheme. Our children deserve bet-
iy l~d1J


Ity aItlIL
ith mem-
ty School


- Kit Pepper
Winter Park


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, October 23, 2008 Page 15







Paae 16 Thursday, October 23, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Play On!
~I


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

Keep it Simple,

Stupid!
Albert Einstein's idea
of one of life's great
pleasures was to lick
a vanilla ice cream cone
while strolling down the
streets of Princeton, NJ.
Einstein's raison d'#tre
was to find simplicity
through solving the most
microcosmic and macro-
cosmic of natural riddles.
We live our lives in a for-
ward motion.
To remember, we shift
mentally into reverse.
The word "simpleton"
may suggest that simple is a
synonym for "stupid."
However, the simplicity
of thoughts does not deter-
mine their practical worth.
Their profundity is the
determining factor.
Shallowness of thought
denotes a lack of intellect.
"When an idea is too


weak to support a simple
statement, it is a sign that it
should be rejected."
Vauvenargues
St. John 14:8 says "God
is love." In that three-word
sentence is enough ambig-
uous profundity to provide
a lifetime of pondering.
The sentence is simple,
but its depth is infinite.
"Everything is simpler
than you think and at the
same time more complex
than you imagine."
Goethe
The natural instinct of
the human mind is to com-
plicate things!
My conviction has long
been that the prime goal of
education is for the human
mind to learn to bring
order out of chaos.
As Oscar Wilde put it,
"Life is not complex. We are
complex. Life is simple and
the simple thing is the right
thing."
Simplicity generatesits
own special benefits.
George Santayana wrote;
"A simple life is its own
reward."
When George
Washington, in his farewell
address, advised America
to avoid "entanglements,"
wasn't he saying, "Straight
ahead! Keep it simple"?
Winston Churchill
added, "All the great things
are simple, and many can
be expressed in a simple
word: freedom; justice;
honor; duty; mercy; hope."
Shakespeare dealt in
many simple but profound
truths:
"To be, or not to be? That
is the question."
"Life's but a walking


shadow, a poor player, that
struts and frets his hour
upon the stage, and then
is heard no more; it is a
tale told by an idiot, full of
sound and fury, signifying
nothing."
Shakespeare's thoughts
are simple, but his genius
clothes them in colorful
metaphors embroidered by
his endless imagination.
Quakers have historical-
ly been drawn to simplicity
in their religious thought:
"'Tis the gift to be simple,
'tis the gift to be free, 'Tis the
gift to come down where
you ought to be. And when
we find ourselves in the
placejust right, 'Twill be
in the valley of love and
delight. When true simplic-
*ity is gained, to bow and to
bend we shan't be ashamed
to turn, turn, will be our
delight, till by turning, turn-
ing we come 'round right!"
The Quaker's held hands
and danced in a circle as
they sang these words.
A circle is perfect and
eternal, for it has no end.
The finite limits of
human understanding are
not to be compared to the
infinite understanding of
the Creator.
The implication is that
we human beings can only
comprehend limited con-
cepts and it's best to keep
them simple!
Leonard Bernstein's
"Mass" exhorts us to "Sing
me a simple song!"
Truth is simple, for you
need only remember the
fact of it if you stick to
the truth, you don't need to
have much of a memory.
Dividing things into


parts is a helpful way to
handle large quantities of
material one must learn.
Thinking in logical seg-
ments organizes the mind
to remember. The first
opera I ever learned was
Puccini's "Tosca," in which I
sang Cavaradossi, the lead-
ing tenor.
I set the "Tosca" score
beside me on my teacher's
piano and said to him,
"Maestro, my Lord! I've got
to learn over 300 pages in
Italian!"
"No," said Maestro
Bellini. "You have to learn
only the first page. Then we
go on to the next page. In a
few days, we'll have learned
all the pages..."
Following that lesson,
I never let the size of any
opera score intimidate me
again.
After all, I was singing
only one note at a time,
and that was all that need-
ed to be in my mind at any
given moment.
As Henri-Frederic Amiel
wrote, "To be always ready,
a man must be able to cut a
knot, for everything cannot
be untied; he must know
how to disengage what is
essential from the detail
in which it is enwrapped,
for everything cannot be
equally considered; in a
word, he must be able to
simplify his duties, his busi-
ness and his life."
"Simple as pie" is not an
accurate expression, for
things are very dissimilar
- and so are pies! A simple
sweet potato pie and a
complex mince pie cannot
both be described by the
same specific adjective.


Chaos is meaningless
complication, whereas
order is simple and under-
standable.
Human lives can become
so complicated that they
are but a nest of panicked
turmoil.
A straight line is simplic-
ity itself and when compli-
cated people finally man-
age to "get things straight,"
peace, calm and serene
happiness become possible.
Keeping it "simple" is
not a simple thing itself,
becausepeople are not
simple.
Einstein was an excep-
tion because he found the
way to simplicity.
That great mathemati-
cian and physicist sought
to reduce all knowledge
of physics to one General
Field Theory of Relativity, a
simple mathematical state-
ment that would explain
the forces within the atom
as well as in the whole
physical universe.
One could say that
Einstein "got out of his own
way and gave freedom
to his enormous genius to
rove the infinite.
These days, when you
ask an important question,
and get a straight answer,
you feel you've been
blessed by some Higher
Power!
Sometimes even a direct
"Yes" or "No" would do the
trick, but seems impossible
to generate.
"Like the Sermon on
the Mount, the 'doctrine
of simplification' is a revo-
lution that any man can
begin here and now."
BrooksAtkinson


FALLEN APPLES NOT FAR FROM MY TREE #72


The ACORN doesn't fall far
from the Obama

What are we doing?
Where are we going?
Are a great many of us
average Americans asking
ourselves if, in the name
of the good Lord, we ever
wish to elect political lead-
ership who may bring us
any or most of the follow-
ing items:
Higher income taxes,
more taxes on 401(k)
s, 403(b)s and IRAs etc.,
unlimited government
spending, back-
ground of
con-


sorting with terrorists or
felons, registering of illegal
voters, ultra-Left Supreme
Court justices, mount-
ing inflation, increased
unemployment, reduced
military, appeasement
and losing of wars, far-Left
government-managed
economy (Socialism?),
limited freedom of speech:
i.e. "Fairness Doctrine,"
tax-payer subsidized abor-
tion on demand without
rescue of surviving babies,
government-controlled
cloning, end of traditional
marriage and family, open
borders: internationalism,
loss of American culture
and language, and finally
- increasing disappear-
ance of our identity as
Americans?
Most of us might find
that all of the above items
rub us the wrong way.
Still, people representing
some of these ideas seem
to be perfectly capable of
doing well in future elec-
tions. Would we be happy
if such things as the above
took place right under our
noses? The only true "natu-
ral equality" is that we all
have 24 hours in every day.
How we spend that time is
the essence of our lives. We


rightly help those who can-
not compete. History has
taught us that we can plan,
hope and dream, but can't
legislate results. Isn't it time
we come to a halt and con-
sider the lasting worth of
our national heritage?

Abraham Lincoln said:
S"You cannot help the
poor, by destroying the
rich.
You cannot strengthen
the weak, by weakening the
strong.
You cannot bring about
prosperity, by discouraging
thrift.
You cannot lift the wage
earner up, by pulling the
wage payer down.
You cannot further the
brotherhood of man, by
inciting class hatred.
You cannot build char-
acter and courage, by tak-
ing away men's initiative
and independence.
You cannot help men
permanently, by doing for
them what they could and
should, do for themselves."

The debate?... Of course,
we listened at least to
much of it. What purpose
did it serve to any obser-
vant people who, by now,


know both McCain and
Obama? In truth, very
little. Which man do I feel
instinctively is the one to
whom I would entrust the
future of our great country?
One of the two has already
sacrificed, as did his male
forebears. There is little or
no dirty linen in his profes-
sional past that hasn't long
been public knowledge and
he has had half a lifetime
of pragmatic government
experience. The other man
is without accomplish-
ments of any great note.
He has chosen shrewdly to
shuck off his relationships
with some of his heretofore
prime cohorts. His glib,
polished, oratorical style
sounds vacuous to my ears.
Would I trust him with the
future of our beloved coun-
try? Don't ask!

Rumors are abroad regard-
ing the spate of new taxes
awaiting us simple citizens
if Obama is elected. We sus-
pect that he will be taxing
everything in sight where
your dollars are spent for.
goods and services of any
kind. John McCain is, like
Brutus, a reasonable man.
He has served this nation
long and well, and there


is no expectation that he
would raise taxes. The
choice is ours as well as
the possible weeping and
gnashing of teeth after-
ward.

Obama would control a
Democratic House and
Senate and have little
or no opposition to any
ideas that come into his
"most Liberal" head. He,.
with Nancy Pelosi arid
Harry Reid, will constitute
an "Unholy Trinity." All
of the most feared, even
wacko, Democrats will be
unchained, and their joy
will be unrestrained.

"We must not let our rul-
ers load us with perpetual
debt." Thomas Jefferson
(Tom, where are you now
that we need you?)

TV Interviewer: "Sen. Biden,
what is your present No. 1
national priority?" Biden:
"Simple! A word in three
letters jobs!"


TAK RONEY
Louis Roney's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at LRoney@cfl.rr.com.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 16 Thursday, October 23, 2008


: ,







Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, October 23, 2008 Page 17


C0 I Notices


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR MANATEE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
FAMILY LAW DIVISION
CASE NO. 2008 DR 7851
DIV. 4
IN THE MATTER OF THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS FOR THE PROPOSED ADOPTION
OF A MINOR CHILD:
IVONNE MARIANA MEJIA
D/O/B: 3/31/1999
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:Alfonso Mejia
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Termination
proceeding hereinafter described is pending in the
Circuit Court, Twelfth Judicial Circuit in and for
Manatee County, Florda, the style of which is: IN RE:
The Termination of Parental Rights for the Proposed
Stepparent Adoption of Ivonne Mejia.
You are required to serve a copy of your written
response, if any, to it on W. SCOTT HAMILTON,
ESQUIRE, Petitioners' attorney, whose address is
2400 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton, Florida,
34205, on or before Nov. 4, 2008, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court at PO Box 25400
Bradenton, Florida 34205, either before service
on Petitioners' attorney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Petition.
S The identity of the birth father is Alfonso Mejia;
He is approximately 5'6" Brown hair/ Blue eyes/
olive complexion, and his residence addresses) is
unknown and cannot be reasonably ascertained.
Pursuant to the Petition, the child was born at
Arnold Palmer Hospital, Orange County, Florida.
The Indian Child Welfare Act is not applicable to
this child. There are no known grandparents with
rights to notice of this proceeding The grounds for
termination of parental nghts are those set forth in
Section 63.089 of the Florida Statutes.
There will be a hearing on the Petition for
Voluntary Termination of Parental Rights and
Stepparent Adoption on November 17, 2008 at
10:15 A.M., before The Honorable Scott Brownell at
the Manatee County Judicial Center, 1051 Manatee
Avenue West, Bradenton, Florida 34205. The Court
has set aside 15 minutes for the hearing.
If you executed a Consent to Adoption or an
Affidavit of Non-paternity and a Waiver of Venue,
you may have the right to request that the hearing
on the petition to terminate parental rights be
transferred to the county in which you reside. You
may object by appearing at the hearing or filing a
written objection with the Court.
If you elect to file written defenses to said
Petition, you are required to serve a copy on
Petitoner's attorney, W. Scott Hamilton, Esquire,
Price, Hamilton & Price, Chtd., 2400 Manatee
Avenue West, Bradenton, FL 34205 (941)748-0550,
and file the original response or pleading in the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Manatee
County, PO Box 25400, Bradenton, FL 34206.
UNDER SECTION 63.089, FLORIDA STATUTES,
FAILURE TO FILE A WRITTEN RESPONSE TO THIS
NOTICE WITH THE COURT.OR TO APPEAR AT THIS
HEARING CONSTITUTES GROUNDS UPON WHICH
THE COURT SHALL ENDANY PARENTAL RIGHTS YOU
MAY HAVE REGARDING THE MINOR CHILD.
Dated at Bradenton, Manatee County, Florida this
23 day of Sept, 2008.
R.B. Shore, Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Sonya Agurs
Deputy Clerk
10/2,10/9,10/16,10/23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-9141 #33
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
DENISSE GONZALEZ, VICTOR M LOPEZ, APOLONIO
GONZALEZ, JUANITA VALENTIN, and TIMBER
POINTE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 18 day of Nov.,
2008, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property
LOT 244, TIMBER RIDGE POINTE-PHASE
2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 63 PAGES 120-
124 PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgement of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
08-CA-9141 now pending in the Circuit Court in
Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired,-(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 7 day of October, 2008.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By BELINDA GARRETT
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, PA.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.:(407) 647-2157
10/16, 10/23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE 9TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CA-18356
ANDOVER LAKES PHASE I HOMEOWNERS AS-
SOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
v
PATRICIA RODRIGUEZ a/k/a PATRICIA D. RODRI-
GUEZ a/k/a PATRICIA DENISE HILLER,ARMANDO
RODRIGUEZ, JR., JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as
unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To Armando Rodriguez, Jr
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Lot 65, ANDOVER LAKES PHASE I-A, accord-
Ing to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 28, Pages 142 through 147, of the Pub-
lic Records of Orange County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is POHL & SHORT, PA., 280 W. Can-
ton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box 3208, Win-
ter Park, Florida 32790, on or before November 3,
2008, and file the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED this 6 day of October, 2008.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: Mayra 1. Cruz
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
10/16,10/23


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2008-CP-001654-0
Division "A"
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARION M. BRUZINSKI,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Marion M.
Bruzinski, deceased, whose date of death was June
13, 2007, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is P.O. Box 4994, Orlando, FL. 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is
Oct. 16, 2008.
Personal Representative
John C. Bruzinski
75 Gatehouse Road
Trumbull, Connecticut 06611
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Damon Cl Glisson, Esq.
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 187877
5908 Fortune Place
Apollo Beach, FL 33572
Telephone: (813) 645-6796
Fax (813) 645-8572
10/16,10/23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.48-2008-CP-002149-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ADA E. FARLEY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Ada E. Farley,
deceased, whose date of death was March 4, 2006,
is pending in the Circuit Court for ORANGE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 340, Orlando, FL
32801. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this courtWITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OFTHIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
. DS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is Oct.
16, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for John N. Farley
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
John N. Farley
P. Box 57
Clintondale, New York 12515
10/16,10/23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2008-CP-000950-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANGELA GAIL WILSON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You .are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in the
estate of ANGELA GAIL WILSON deceased, File
Number 2008-CP-000950-0; by the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando,
Florida 32801; that the decedent's date of death
was March 30, 2008; that the total value of the
estate is $1,800.00 and that the names and
addresses of those to. whom it has been assigned
by such order are:
Name /Address
Creditors:
Farwinds Credit Union, David V Jones / 109 E.
Church St., Orlando, FL 32802
Beneficiaries:
MINNIE LEE COLYER / 655 Katherine Avenue,
Orlando, FL 32810
FLYNN ZEIGLER / 29 Lincoln Avenue, Orlando,
FL 32810
ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order of
Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE IS Oct. 23, 2008.
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Kenneth M Beane
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 117307
KENNETH M. BEANE, RP.A.
2601 Wells Avenue, Suite 181
Fern Park, FL 32730
Telephone: (407) 629-1661
Fax Number (407) 629-1033
Person Giving Notice:
MINNIE LEE COLYER
10/23,10/30
Many found bicycles have been turned in to the Mai-
tland Police Department over the last six months. If
you have lost a bicycle, please contact Detective J.
Bulleit at 407-539-0028 to determine if yours has
been turned in.
10/23,10/30


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE ,:)..i,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 48-2008-CP-2243-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARTHA WRIGHT MILLER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARTHA
WRIGHT MILLER, deceased, whose date of death
was February 13, 2008 is pending in the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 N. Orange Ave., Room
340, Orlando FL 32801. The names and addresses
of the Personal Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unllq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO'(2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
10/16/08.
Personal Representative:
J.NICOLE VANHOOK
329 Park Avenue North
PO Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
NANCY S. FREEMAN
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 968293
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward& Woodman, PA
329 Park Avenue North, P.O. Box 880, Winter Park,
FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
10/16,10/23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2008-CP-2241-0
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JERLINE D. BERRY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary
Administration has been entered in the estate of Jer-
line D. Berry,, deceased, File Number 48-2008-CP-
2241-0; by the Circuit Court for Orange County,"
Florida, Probate Division; the address of which is
425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801; that
the decedent, date of death was June 15, 2008;
that the total value of the estate is $34,625.00 and
that the names and address of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
Name /Address
Donna B. Ansley / 3224 Milton Lane, Orlando,
Florida 32806
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order of
Summary Administration must file their claims wit'
this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME'PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
October 23, 2008.
Attorney for Person giving Notice:
/s/ Michael L. Marlowe -
Michael L Marlowe, Esquire
Florida Bar No 157000
Marlowe & Weatherford, PA.
1150 Louisiana Avenue, Ste. 4
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 629-5008
Person Giving Notice:
/s/Donna B. Ansley
Donna B. Ansley
10/23, 10/30


I ,ii : P I.i l" 3. al.Tiii 'IrJ
Pursuantto Ch 713.585(6) F.S. United American Lien
& Recovery as agent with power of attorney will sell
the following vehicles) to the highest bidder subject
to any liens; net proceeds deposited with the clerk
of court; ownedlienholder has right to hearing and
post bond; owner may redeem vehicle for cash sum
of lien; all auctions held in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lienor facility; cash or ca-
shier check; 15% buyer prem; any person inter-
ested, ph (954) 563-1999
Sale date November 14 2008 @10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
19670 1994 Toyota vin#: 4T1GK12C4RU018590
lienor: usa transmission inc 2699 s obt Orlando fl
407-648-5653 lien amt $3451.23
19671 2004 Saturn vin#: 1G8AG52F34Z122913
lienor: automex group inc 11114 satellite blvd Or-
lando 11 407-854-5434 lien amt $7797.46
19672 2002 Chevrolet vin#: 3GNEK13T52G133063
lienor; value auto painting & body work maaco auto
painting 917 mercy dr Orlando fl 407-297-8551 lien
amt $7116.78
19673 1992 Isuzu vin#: JACBGO7EXN9804698
lienor; value auto painting & body work maaco auto
'painting 917 mercy dr Orlando fl 407-297-8551 lien
amt $2992.34
19688 2005 Acura vin#: JH4DC5381S006892
lienor: fountain motor co fountain auto mall 8701 s
obt Orlando fl 407-541-3100 lien amt $3025.00
sale date November 21 2008 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
19695 2002 Dodge vin#: 1D7HA18Z02S709842
lienor: cartune automotive svcs 9800 s orange ave
Orlando fl 407-888-2582 lien amt $2370.00
19696 2004 Acura vin#: JH4DC54894S003204
lienor: cartune automotive svcs 9800 s orange ave
Orlando fl 407-888-2582 lien amt $12423.55
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
& 1911
10/23


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FE and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the high-
est bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999
Sale date October 31 2008 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
1752 1987 Roya hs vin#: 13610263W tenant: Ste-
phen m negrich ii aka steve negrich jr
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
10/16,10/23


* '


-04


THE iuL'iir r i ij i THE rjirjTM iiiii'DI L
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 48-2008-CP-001823-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNIE B. NORMAN,
Deceased.
AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ANNIE B.
NORMAN, deceased, whose date of death was April
7, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for ORANGE
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 340,
Orlando; Florida 32802-4994. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate mustfile their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is Oc-
tober 23, 2008 .
Signed on this 20th day of October, 2008.
NANCY A. NORMAN
Personal Representative
190 Riverbend Drive, #104
Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714
RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED this 20th day of
October, 2008.
IAN L GILDEN, ESQUIRE
IAN L GILDEN, PA.
Post Office Box 947807
Maitland, Florida 32794-7807
(407) 645-4446
(407) 629-0090 Facsimile
Florida Bar No.: 321941
Attorney for Nancy A. Norman
10/23,10/30


ii THE_ :I'iiuT : i ni Ie:f TrHe F4l0lt LI.i',I, 1 L
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-3606 Div. 33
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JORGE I. CARMONA and JUAN JOSE BARRERA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 18 day of Nov.,
2008, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
Lot 196, CHICKASAW OAKS-PHASE FIVE
UNIT TWO, according to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 19, Page 80-81, of the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
the Final Judgement of Foreclosure in Civil Case
No. 08-CA-3606 Div. 33 now pending in the Circuit
Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 7 day of October, 2008.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By BELINDA GARRETT
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
10/16,10/23


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jii A,;r-(eliry nT3dil .uij,.tii ,l' Ju:l ciTijl uo i
Ie.l Ild c 'I tI noliic m I bE- puDiih eil ino o we II ,s1)
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. Page 18 Thursday, October 23, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Marketplace
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Newly Renovated. Rents start at $591. Call
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PARK AVE OFFICE SPACE
Park Ave Office Space avail to Real Estate
Broker. All office equipment included. Call
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FREE 2 YORKIE TERRIERS
Free 2 Yorkie Terriers pet adoption to good
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BEDS AND FURNITURE
We Sell New Mattresses! Pillow-Top Sets
start at $275.00. All sizes. Brand New!
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HUGE FURNITURE SALE
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member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0062

CARPENTER
Robert A. Paige. Specializing in finished
carpentry to termite and wood-rot damage.
Interior and exterior. Call me and ask if I can
do your job. 352-552-6157


Oviedo High School
Reunion 30 Yrs !!!
Classes 1977 1978-1979
November 14th and 15th
Homecoming Game/Bonfire
Dinner/Dance
Register @
www.oviedohighreunion.com
Don Jacobs # 321-228-4040





Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.



WE BUY


HOUSES!
Sell Your Home
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-Is" with NO Repairs!

Call Now:

407-297-8749







Home Care Services
start at $11/hr.
Review website at:
www.LeanOnMeHCS.com
or call 407-401-8308
for more info.





Adoption
Pregnant? Considering adoption? A married
couple, large extended family, seeks to
adopt. Financially secure. Expenses paid.
Call KAREN & KEVIN. (ask for michelle/
adam). (800)790-5260. FL Bar# 0150789.

Announcements
Run your ad STATEWIDE! Run your classified
ad in over 100 Florida newspapers reaching
over 4 MILLION readers for $475. Call this
newspaper or (866)742-1373 for more
details or visit: www.florida-classifieds.
com.

Auto Donations
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON UNITED BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION Free Mammograms, Breast
Cancer Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing,.
Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted,
(888)468-5964.

Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800
in a day? 30 Local Machines and Candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033. CALL
US: We will not be undersold!


8033 WWW.FOCUSONCASH.COM.

Generate Extra Income in as little as 48
hours up to $3,500/wk or more. No selling
No MLM. Call: (800)659-7781 or visit: www.
mygoldplan.com/goodlife

Cars for Sale
Police Impounds for Sale! 95 Honda Civic
$600! 94 VW Jetta $500!! For listings call
(800)366-9813 Ext 9271.

Employment Services
Post Office Now Hiring! Avg Pay $20/hr or
$57K/yr Including Federal Benefits and OT
Placed by adSource not affiliated w/USPS
who hires. Call (866)713-4492.

Learn to Operate a Crane or Bull Dozer Heavy
Equipment Training. National Certification.
Financial & Placement Assistance. Georgia
School of Construction. www.Heavy5.com
Use code "FLCNH" or call (866)218-2763.

Health
Feeling Anxious About The Future? Buy and
read Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard. Price:
$20.00. Order Now. Free Shipping. www.
DianeticsTampa.org or Call (813)872-0722.

Help Wanted
No Truck Driver Experience-No Problem.
Wil-Trans Trucking Will Teach You How to
Drive. Company Sponsored CDLTraining. Be
OTR in Three Weeks. (888)368-1205. Must
be 23.

Drivers: ACT NOW Sign-On Bonus 35-
41cpm Earn over $1000 weekly Excellent
Benefits Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR
(877)258-8782.

A PHAT JOB! NOW HIRING 18-24 SHARP
ENTHUSIASTIC MOTIVATED GUYS & GALS
FREE TO TRAVEL USA REPRESENTING 150+
LEADING PUBLICATIONS. 2 WEEKS PAID
TRAINING, TRANSPORTATION PROVIDED.
RETURN TRIP GUARANTEED. CALL TINA OR
JIM (800)642-6147.

BEEN OUT of a job? Been out of luck? 3
week CDL Training. Company sponsorships.
Experienced driver? Free placement
assistance. Call (877)603-6565.

Driver COMPANY DRIVERS CDL-A Earn up
to 46cpm. Excellent training for students w/
CDL No forced Northeast, Average 2,500 to
2,800 miles/week. (877)740-6262. www.
pti-inc.com.

Driver: DON'T JUST START YOUR CAREER,
START IT RIGHTi Company Sponsored CDL
training in 3 weeks. Must be 21. Have CDL?
Tuition reimbursement' CRST. (866)917-
2778.

Homes For Rent
3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $12,600! Only $199/
Mo! 5% down 20 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4/
BR $259/Mo! For listings (800)366-9783
Ext 5798.

Homes For Sale
HOME AUCTION VENICE, FL 18+ Homes
Must Be Sold! Up to 3BD/3BTH Starting bids
, as low as $99K Prev Valued up to $482K Low
Down/E-Z Finance Free Brochure (800)617-
0112 www.AuctionToday.com REDC.

Land For Sale
Bank Ordered: LAND AUCTION 2000+
Properties. Land in 29 States. NO RESERVES.
Multiple Lot Packs. Min Bids at $100. Bid
Online at: LandAuctionBid.com/2

Miscellaneous
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified
Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121, www.CenturaOnline.
com.

-NOW AVAILABLE! 2008 POST OFFICE
JOBS. $18-$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE, PAID
TRAINING, FED BENEFITS, VACATIONS. CALL
(800)910-9941 TODAY!-REF #FL08.

Real Estate
STEAL MY MARSHFRONT Owner sacrifice!!!
Drop dead gorgeous Marshfront. Myneighbor
paid $389,900. I'll sell mine for less than the
bank repo's. My six figure loss is your gain.
$229,900. Call: (888)306-4734.

TENNESSEE LAND RUSH! 1+acre to 2acre
homesites, wood, views. Starting at$59,900.
Tenn River & Nick-a-Jack view tracts now
available! Retirement guide rates this area
#2 is U.S. places to retire. Low cost of living,
no impact fee. (330)699-2741 or (866)550-
5263, Ask About Mini Vacation!

VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS Log cabin shell on 2
private acres near very wide trout stream
in the Galax area and New River State Park,
$139,500. Owner (866)789-8535.


Alabama Land Bargain! 20 Acres- $69,900
$1,000 A DAY POSSIBLE RETURNING PHONE with dockable deep water! Nicely wooded
CALLS NO SELLING, NOT MLM (800)479- parcel, gorgeous open field & dockable


lakefront. Prime location- minutes from
Interstate! Close to Tuscaloosa! Excellent
financing. Call now (800)564-5092, x1 350.

"-FREE Foreclosure Listings-* Over
200,000 properties nationwide. LOW Down
Payment. Call NOW! (800)817-5434.







Orange County
Log on to WorkftrceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
Throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Warehouse/Fabricator
Job Description: Responsible for receiving
material, stocking shelves, and tagging each
Site, box or crate as needed. Verifies each
Shipped item, crate, and box and palletizes
orders as needed. Keeps machinery clean
and in good mechanical working order.
Operates forklift and loads/unloads material.
Maintains and updates inventory logs. Work
Monday-Friday, 7:30am-4:30pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9354192

Sales Representative
JobDescription:Responsibleforparticipating
in business-to-business cold calling, phone
prospecting, and face to face presentations.
Work Monday-Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $6.79 per hour plus commission
IJob Order Number: 9367648

Instructional Designer
Job Description: Responsible for conducting
research and analysis and preparing
assigned sections of reports that deal with
training related issues. Creates interim and
final products that result in the development
of instructional materials. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9296528

Medical Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for performing
administrative and certain clinical duties
under the direction of a physician. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.50-$15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9364240

Trash Collector
Job Description: .Responsible for
dismounting garbage trucks to collect
garbage and remounting trucks to ride to
the next collection point. Work Monday-
Friday, 5:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9366871

Bookkeeper
Job Description: Responsible for processing
account payables and receivables of 15
million dollars in and out. Computes,
classifies, and records numerical data to
Keep financial records complete. Performs
any combination of routine calculating,
posting, and verifying duties to obtain
primary financial data for use in maintaining
accounting records. Checks the accuracy of
figures, calculations, and postings pertaining"
to business transactions recorded by other
workers. Work Monday-Friday, 9:00am-
6:00pm.
Pay Rate: $15.00-$18.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9366918

Clerical Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for data entry,
filing and answering phones. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9367273

Graphic Designer
Job Description: Responsible for designing
and laying out newsletter layout and
performing customer service.Vork 9:00am-
5:30pm, days may vary.


Pay Rate: $12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9364273

Van Driver/Technician
Job Description: Responsible for
transporting clients to and from substance
abuse treatment programs. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10,00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9367502

Installer
Job Description: Responsible for installing,
repairing, and reworking cabinets, trim,
upholstery and various exterior parts. Work
Monday-Friday, 6:00am-2:30pm.
Pay Rate: $10.10-$14.55 per hour
Job Order Number: 9369683

Pipefitter/Steamfitter
Job Description: Responsible for welding
and pipe fitting. Performs other duties as
assigned. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $18.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9370214

Cook
Job Description: Responsible for serving as
a line cook for a hotel restaurant serving
breakfast and dinner. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9369633

Air Conditioning Technician
Job Description: Responsible for performing
general maintenance repairs to in-house
plumbing, electrical, refrigeration, kitchen
and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning
systems. Performs general maintenance and
minor repairs in accordance to standards
and may be required to assist Chief Engineer.
Work 7:00am-3:30pm, days may vary.
Pay Rate: $14.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9369457

Inventory Auditor
Job Description: Responsible for going in
to local retail merchants and physically
counting their inventory. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9369499


Housekeeping Cleaner
Job Description: Responsible for performing
any combination of light housecleaning duties
to maintain commercial establishments.
Makes beds, vacuums, replenishes linens
and toiletries, cleans rooms/bathrooms/
hallways/common areas, scrubs tubs and
sinks, dusts, and polishes furniture. Work
days and hours may vary,
Pay Rate: $7.37 per hour
Job Order Number: 9369572

Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for contacting
end users and promoting our product.
Leads are generated through website
and customers call in directly for more
information. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $ 20,800.00-$45,000.00 per year
plus commission.
Job Order Number: 9370400

Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for selling large
household appliances, greeting customers,
and assisting with paperwork. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.30 per hour plus commission
Job Order Number: 9370197

Construction Site Secretary
Job Description: Responsible for answering
- and directing incoming calls. Provides office
support and prepares and maintains files.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9369981

Business Development Associate Sales
Job Description: Responsible for developing
new business relationships and generating
interest via cold/warm calling in the special
event market. Work Monday-Friday, 9:00am-
4:30pm.
Pay Rate: $8.75 per hour
Job Order Number: 9369931

Cook
Job Description: Responsible for planning
menus, ordering food and non-food items,
and preparing meals. Loads food carts for
classroom delivery. Records consumption
and food substitutions for child allergies for
160 young children attending a childcare


S facility. Responsible for kitchen maintenance,
sanitation, cleanliness, and safety in storing,
preparing and serving food. Oversees the
safe disposal of all facility trash. Work
I Monday-Friday, 6:00am-3:00pm.
Pay Rate: $21,000.00-$28,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9370368

Account Executive Field
Job Description: Responsible for selling
transportation services to potential and
existing business customers within a
geographically defined territory. Meets and
exceeds revenue goal requirements.
Provides solutions and builds rapport
with customers using a consultative sales
approach. Grows and maintains customer
base within a defined geographic area.
Makes sound business decisions with
customers through negotiating and
Establishing business agreements. Identifies
and implements integrated automation
platforms and solutions to customer base.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.00-$20.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9369862

Maintenance and Repair Worker
Job Description: Responsible for minor
plumbing, electrical, carpentry, drywall and
painting repairs assigned by supervisor.
Maintains regular maintenance of tiled and
carpeted floors. Delivers janitorial supplies
to all agency programs. Completes all
written work orders assigned by supervisor
and returns copies to supervisor. Keeps the
maintenance workshop clean and organized.
Replaces air conditioning filters and light
bulbs. Performs grounds maintenance
I (mowing, weeding, and edging) and
supervises volunteers participating with
grounds maintenance. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9369802

Personal Financial Advisor
Job Description: Responsible for providing
personalized, confidential and professional
Housing counseling to clients via face-to-
face, telephone or internet. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $30,000.00-$34,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9370202

Industrial Machinery Mechanic
Job Description: Responsible for
construction, modification, and maintenance
of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning
refrigeration and electrical, dry and bulk
liquid conveyance, plumbing, pneumatic,
and factory oven systems. Installs, modifies,
and maintains equipment according
to engineering principles and safety
regulations. Maintains buildings,.equipment,
machinery, and electrical, plumbing,
heating, and cooling systems. Tests newly
installed machines and equipment to ensure
proper operations and safety. Work days and
hours may vary.
S Pay Rate: $16.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9369353

Supervisor of Operations
Job Description: Responsible for supervising
a shift of approximately 20 25 team
members in an office setting and overseeing
the the prepping, scanning and indexing of
medical records. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $26,000.00-$35,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9370125

Seminole County
LogontoWorkforceCentralFlorida.comwhere
you can enter the Job Title in the "Search For
Jobs" box to see more information on these
jobs and search thousands of additional
openings throughout Central Florida, at NO
COST. Apply by following the directions
listed. For further help visit the WORKFORCE
CENTRAL FLORIDA Seminole County Office
at 1097 Sand Pond Rd., Suite 1001, Lake
Mary, or call (407) 531-1225.

Admissions Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for explaining
and enrolling students into healthcare career
classes. Work Monday-Thursday, 12:00pm-
5:00pm and Friday 9:00am-4:00pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9354887

Latent Print Analyst
Job Description: Responsible for searching,
verification, and comparison of latent prints.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $36,296.00-$43,555.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9369444 -


Copyrighted Material




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FLORIDA
CITY
Tampa
Jacksonville
Ft. Lauderdale
Miami


FORECAST
THURS. FPI.
65/85 68/83
63/74 64/76
74/83 74/85
74/83 74/83


NATIONAL FORECAST


MCIY THURS.
Washington, D.C. 36/59
Seattle 40/58
San Francisco 56/74
Houston 56/67


Tallahassee 56/72 59/76 Atlanta


45/61


FRI.
40/61
45/56
54/74
49/76
49/58


SLOW 680 HIGH 84
50% chance of rain I Wind: ENE 10 mph


r LOW 70
'%bil 20'% chance of rain


- ~ "- -:., .- --,.'. .._;..
Orange CountyProperfy Appraiser
Bil/Donegon and his wife Helen Donegan


I AM ASKING FOR YOUR VOTE
ON NOVEMBER 4TH.
THANK YOU Bill Donegan


A COMMITTED PROFESSIONAL


> Certified Florida Appraiser (CFA);
> Certified by the Florida Evaluator Admissions Committee, and
Conferred by the Department of Revenue of the State of Florida;
> Member of International Association of Assessing Officers (I.A.A.O.);
> Certified by the International Association of Assessing Officers in:
Real Property Appraisal Income Approach to Valuation
Land Appraisal Property Assessment Management
> Former Home & Commercial Loan Officer for BankFIRST of Winter Park;
> Appointed by Governor Jeb Bush to the Florida Commission on Ethics.
COMMITTED TO SERVING YOU!
> Awarded the 2008 Public Information Program Award, by the International
Association of Assessing Officers (IAAO) for the development and
implementation of an effective system for taxpayers to get information
about the assessment process.
The Orlando Sentinel "Property appraisers aren't the big names on the election
ballots. But Voters-particularly homeowners-should care about who's running. Especially now.
SThe difficult economic times demand that there can't be any major glitches in the
property appraiser's office. People need equitable assessments in these volatile times.
The good news is that this office is already in the capable hands of Bill Donegan."
This is why the Orlando Sentinel endorses Bill Donegan for
Orange County Property Appraiser.
Bill Donegan has received endorsements from:
The Orlando Sentinel Home Builders Association, Metro Orlando
Orange County Farm Bureau Orange County Professional Fire Fighters
Orlando Regional REALTOR Association
Republican National Hispanic Assembly Central Florida Chapter
West Orange Political Alliance


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I Wind: SW 10 mph


DONEGAN

PROPERTY
APPRA SER


Page 20 Thursday, October 23, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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