Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00015
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Publication Date: October 2, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

Full Text




Winter Park/ Maitland


Volume 20, No. 40
407-740-0401 www.FirstCol


FIRST COLOD

*^B NI
Your Real Hometown Ban
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
Cmu,,gt


New musical production puts
"horrors" back in this classic.
Page A7


He's coached for UCF and the
NFL; now he's at a prep school.
Page A2



An Oviedo author offers a novel
way to tame unruly children.
Page A9



Timber Creek's football team
proved a formidable challenger.
Page A3


CFl[ IDIoo

Business Briefs............A5
CityTalks.............A6
Calendar................A8
Play On! .............A12
Legals.............. .A13
Marketplace............A14
Games................A15


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Thursday, October 2,2008
onyBank.net
Locally owned.

NY Locally produced.
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Downtown in the


Weak economy 7

puts Maitland's

plan on hold


JENNY ANDREASSON I&
OBSERVER STAFF -?

M aitland's vision
for a new down-
town is still just
that an intangible con-
cept without enough land
to rise from. But the devel-
oper charged with revital-
izing the city's core says his
project is still perfectly vi-
able. His lack of financing
is due to a sour economy.
"As soon as the world
gets their head out of their as many as 650 residential
ass, we can get this going," units, and a 200-room ho-
Brossier Co. President Bob tel. Purposely absent from
Reese said Thesday. the project: condominiums.
The developer agree-- The four-block project is
ment, one year old last likely to rise on the north-
week, includes an outline ern side of the city, although
for 500,000 square feet of Reese has not closed on
office and retail space in- the land. Most of the dated
eluding a new city hall goals outlined in the Sept.


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COMMERCE NATIONAL
BANK & TRUST
On the corner of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
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23, 2007, developer's agree-
ment have come and gone.
The Maitland City Coun-
cil isn't concerned with the
original timetable, Commu-
nity Redevelopment Agen-
cy Director Verl Emrick
said. A deadline just passed
Tuesday, Sept. 30, when the
Council could have declared


Commerce head's adieu


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
is scouring the city for a new leader, after
six-year president Sam Stark announced
his resignation last week.
Stark, whose last day is Oct. 24, is leav-
ing to head the Central Florida Sports
Commission, a nonprofit entity that re-
cruits sporting events and sports-related
business to Central Florida in order to
further economic development.
With a background in sports marketing,
Stark said his new job fits him perfectly.
"It's a clear case of not running away from
something but running to something," he
said. But that's not to say he won't miss
the Chamber that has accomplished so
much during his tenure.


Stark


"I think his leaving will
be a loss to the city and
the Chamber," Winter Park
Mayor David Strong said.
Stark was "instrumental"
in having the Winter Park
Welcome Center-built, he
said.


Also serving as Chamber
headquarters, the Center
opened a year ago and serves as an infor-
mationil center for visitors. It was paid
for by the city and the Chamber.
Stark's leadership has strengthened
the ties between the city, the Chamber
and the community, Strong said. "Hope-
fully ties will continue to improve with
whoever the next leader is," he said.

see STARK on page A3


Reese in default, possibly
leading to a canceled agree-
ment. "At this point, there is
no reason to take the dras-
tic step of pulling the plug,"
he said.
But a group of concerned
citizens disagree, saying that
see DOWNTOWN on A3


Aldi opens

early to an

eager throng

JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Shoppers clustered outside
discount grocer Aldi on
Thursday, waiting for the
doors to open to the public
for the first time. Because of
the anxious crowd, employ-
ees opened up earlier than
planned, said Bob Schmalz,
Aldi director of store opera-
tions.
By Friday afternoon, cu-

see ALDI on page A4


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News




NFL coach helps prep school squad


ISAAC BABCOCK
E STAFF


blue and yellow hel-
met flashes through
the reflection of two
chrome shades, just about
the time "rock and roll!"
shoots out of Mike Kruc-
zek's mouth and a player
streaks downfield, catching
a bullet wrapped in brown
pigskin.
There are nearly half a
dozen new faces on Trin-
ity Prep's football coaching
lineup this season, but none
of them as conspicuous as
Kruczek's. Whether you call
it "crew check" or "crewk-
zek," it's hard to mistake the
name. If it sounds familiar,
that's no coincidence. He
grabbed two Super Bowl
championship rings shar-
ing quarterback duties with
Terry Bradshaw with the
Steelers, and coached the
UCF Knights for 10 straight
seasons. Yes, that Mike Kruc-
zek.
But Kruczek's is not the
usual career track for a man
who, as of the preseason of
this year, stood on the side-
lines for the Trinity Prep
Saints.
It's hard to be more suc-
cinct than Kruczek's own
explanation. Inasmuch as
time can be blurred over
the course of a long hot
summer, Kruczek stepped
onto a plane in Arizona as
the offensive coordinator
for the Phoenix Cardinals,
and stepped off in Orlando
looking for a new job. That
came calling almost imme-


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Mike Kruczek, center in ballcap, offers pointers to Trinity Preparatory School football players at a recent practice. The offensive coordinator held the same job with the NFL's
Phoenix Cardinals just last season, after having coached UCF's football team and playing in the NFL himself. He's a longtime Orlando area resident and lives near Trinity.


diately.
"I told [Trinity Prep head
football coach Drew Nem-
ec] that I didn't have any-
thing to do this fall, so he
asked me if I wanted to be
his offensive coordinator,"
Kruczek said.
Despite the long flight
across the country, the job
couldn't be any more at
home for Kruczek, whose
house is almost literally
across the street from Trin-


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ity Prep.
"I've lived right here for
as long as I've lived in Or-
lando," he said. "That's go-
ing on 20 years."
It didn't hurt that Nemec
and Kruczek both had chil-
dren playing in the same
Pop Warner football league.
Nor did it hurt that Kruczek
has a knack for teaching
youngsters.
"It gives me something to
do and I can help the kids


out at the same time," Kruc-
zek said. "So it works out
well for me."
Despite a dramatic
change in the team's style
of play Kruczek decided
to give it a college-style of-
fense -- players were al-
ready adapting and improv-
ing in the third week of the
season.
Austin Barton, who led
the team's running game
last year, was accustomed


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to Nemec's coaching style, a
running the game. But with
Kruczek calling the shots on
offense, the changes are for
the better, he said.
Kruczek's demanding
plays called out behind
those mirror-tinted shades
had to be toned down a bit
for the Saints. As a small
class 2B team, they don't
have enough players to field
a full defense and offense,
let alone a special teams
squad. Most of the players
play both ways.
Barton and his younger
brother' Taylor connected
on a play that took him
nearly the full length of
the field for a touchdown
last week, but if you ask
the Saints' star running
back what he's hoping for
this season, he'll tell you
to make a tackle, with his
brother's help.
That poses a significant
challenge for a coach used
to working with special-
ized players.
Assistant Coach Derek
Wolfe, also a newcomer on
the team, said it's football
like the old days.
"It's a throwback way
of playing," he said. "They
haven't played both ways
in the NFL since the '50s or
'60s. It's a challenge, but I
like it."
For Kruczek, whose
high-flying career took a
side trip to Trinity Prep, he
said he's going to enjoy it
while it lasts.
"I'm waiting for that call
to go back to college or the
NFL," he said. "Until that
comes, I'm glad to help."


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer










A trouncing at Timber Creek


ISAAC BABCOCK
I(, ,E.f',Er STAFF

The Wildcats football team once
again saw a slim lead evaporate into
a solid loss as they fell to Timber
Creek 24-7 last Friday, Sept. 26.
Both teams turned defensive in
the first half, with Winter Park try-
ing to avoid a repeat of the offensive
slugfest Timber Creek had against
Winter Springs in week three.
Coach Tim Shifflet had said that
stopping Timber Creek's quarter-
back would be an important fac-
tor in beating the No. 14-ranked
Wolves. But after some first-half jit-
ters, Tyler Marincov proved nearly
unstoppable.
A slow offensive game in the first
half was punctuated by relentless
but unfruitful runs by the Wildcats.
The 'Cats struck first when quar-
terback Jeff Hoblick raced from
midfield to the end zone, and the
'Cats went up 7-0 on the extra
point.
The 'Cats managed to hold the
Wolves to only one score in the
first half a touchdown just before
halftime but that was all the scor-
ing the Wolves would need to take
the Wildcats' lead for good.
'Cats' running back Patrick Mputu,
who had emerged as a key threat on


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Though Winter Park High School quarterback Jeff Hoblick managed to strike first in the game against the Wolves, his Wildcats were quickly overwhelmed.


the ground in his first three games,
was wrapped up consistently by the
Wolves' defense.
Only running back Zee Ware
managed a big play, falling one
lucky tackle shy of a touchdown on
a kickoff return.


Hoblick's ejections from the
pocket proved some of his team's
most. effective ground support. Af-
ter being chased outside, he found
himself gaining yardage on his own
feet more often than through the
air.


Near the end of the game the mo-
mentum had gone all Wolves, and
the 'Cats couldn't catch their stride
in time to beat the clock.
The 'Cats take a week off before
hosting Colonial High School on
Friday, Oct.'10.


STARK I Winter Park leader to head Orlando sports marketing group


< continued from front page

Chamber Chairman Matt
Certo said a search commit-
tee will be advertising and
then interviewing presiden-
tial candidates in the com-
ing weeks.
"We're looking for some-
one who brings us new per-
spectives and new ideas,"


Certo said, "who will help
us to build on Sam's good
work."
The new president's big-
gest challenge? Steering the
Chamber through rough
economic times, Stark said,
and continuing to, supply
useful information to busi-
ness owners and the com-
munity. "There's still always


a lot of opportunities for
growth, so I'm sure some-
body will come in and find
those and take advantage of
those," he said.
Stark will replace John
Saboor, who resigned in
July to join World Wrestling
Entertainment, the WWE.
Saboor helped recruit the
organization's WrestleMa-


nia event to the Citrus Bowl
this year.
Stark said he is thrilled
about the new opportuni-
ties that will come along
with Orlando's new venues
and the renovation of the
Citrus Bowl.
"It's a great time," said
Kathy Milthorpe, chair-
woman of the Commis-


sion's Board of Directors.
"We couldn't be more ex-
cited about having him join
the team."
But Starkwon't disappear
from Winter Park. He said
he's going to stay involved
with the Chamber in a dif-
ferent facet: as a member.


DOWNTOWN I $14M plan draws

critique from former mayor;

project needs $300M financed


< continued from the front page
starting with a clean slate
may not be so bad. Four-
term former Mayor Homer
Hough said the city is rely-
ing on Reese to pull it out of
growing debt.
A nearly $14 million
general revenue bond is to
be repaid with taxes from
completed downtown
projects.
"Maitland -is in a
Catch-22," Hough said.
"They are hungry to have
a new city hall and fire sta-
tion but they've exhausted
their financial means."
Reese dismissed 'the
group's concerns as "silly."
"The black helicopter folks
are going to come out and
oppose things," he said.
Deadlines aside, Emrick
said it is crucial that Bro-
ssier closes on the proper-
ties in the northern part
of the city. "That is one of
the touchstones the city
will look at to determine if
there is a need to sit down
and assess whether or not
to go forward," he said.


But the land won't be
secured, Reese said, until
he can get financing for
the $300 million project.
"We're not going to close
until we're ready to do the
whole show," he said. "You
don't want to have a lot of
inventory especially in
these times. It would actu-
ally work against us."
Reese said he continues
to have about five meetings
a week with potential fi-
nancers. He's even explor-
ing new possibilities such
as financing through hedge
funds.
So it's back to playing
the waiting game.
Mayor Doug Kinson said
once the Council settles on
a location for its new fire
station which could hap-
pen as early as Oct. 22 it
will start to discuss the lo-
cation for its new city hall,
which is a "central part" of
the Brossier project.
"The hope from Mait-
land's perspective is that
it continues to move for-
ward," Kinson said.


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Winter Park, FL 32789
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Thursday, October 2, 2008 Page 3 .


Winter Park / Maitland Observer








Page 4 Thursday, October 2, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


ALDI I store offers no-frills, low bills


PHOTu W ISAAC BABCOCK
Global grocery chain Aldi entered the Central Florida market last week with new stores offering mostly store-
brand food and cost-cutting efforts to reduce bills. Grocery bags cost 5 to 10 cents; cart rentals are 25 cents.
Customers bag their own groceries. The retailer is based in Germany but has more stores up North.


< continued from the front page
rious customers were still flowing
steadily into the intimate super-
market ,on Aloma Avenue in the
Aloma Square Shopping Center,
east of Winter Park.
Shopper Carmen Rivera of East
Orlando said the store reminded
her of a small wholesale retailer be-
cause of the stacked cardboard con-
tainers of products Aldi does this
to cut the cost of stocking shelves.
"The prices are reasonable it
gives you a break," Rivera said.
A "specialty discount grocer,"
Aldi sells mostly its own brands;
part of the reason for this, the chain
says, is that it saves consumers up to
50 percent on purchases compared
with traditional supermarkets.
For example, a gallon of milk at
Aldi is $2.79, compared with $3.79
at another local grocery store.
The store brands are always test-
ed against the national brands to
make sure they meet or exceed na-
tional quality, Schmalz said.
Geneva resident Randy Deavers,
shopping with his wife, Cindy, said
it's natural to be wary of the qual-
ity of an unfamiliar store's brands.
"We've got half a buggy full," Randy
said with a laugh. "I guess we'll see
when we get home."
But if a customer isn't satisfied
with a.product, Aldi's "double guar-
antee" replaces the product and re-
turns the money, Schmalz said.
Aldi also keeps costs low by hav-
ing customers bag their own gro-


series and having a coin-operated
shopping cart system return
the car, get your quarter back so
employees don't have to retrieve
carts.
Customers roamed the three-
cart-wide aisles Friday, grabbing
food items for the coming week-
end. The store is designed to let
customers get in and out in 10 or 15
minutes, Schmalz said. The prices
are clearly displayed and "the small
format is easy to navigate."
One thing Rivera said she wasn't
happy about was that Aldi does not
provide grocery bags a trait that-
Schmalz says takes some getting
used to.
Plastic bags are 10 cents a piece,
paper bags are 6 cents, and reusable
canvas bags are $2.
Other grocers have also limited
their use of plastic bags, including
Whole Foods Market, which elimi-
nated plastic altogether, for envi-
ronmental reasons. But Aldi origi-
nally did it so they didn't pass on
the cost to the customer, he said.
"We did it before it was cool to do
it," he joked.




Specialty discount grocer Aldi is now open at
6766 Aloma Ave., east of Winter Park. Hours
are from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through
Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sundays.
Visit AldiFoods.com for more information.


Survivors go to Disney























PHOTO COURTESY OF WALT DISNEY WORLD
A father and son who survived a night swimming in the Atlantic were treated to a day at Disney World
on Sept. 27. Father Christopher Marino, at left, and son Christopher Marino Jr.,second from right, were
joined by daughter Angela Marino, second from left, mother Robyn Bishop, center, and stepfather Ed
Wolfson, at right. The two Christophers were swept out to sea while swimming at Daytona Beach on
Sept. 6. Disney treated them to a day at the Magic Kingdom, where they served as grand marshals for
a parade down Main Street USA. As the two floated adrift, they shouted "To infinity and beyond!" a
catchphrase of Disney character Buzz Lightyear, whom they met at the park.




Students get walking

Though it may appear an ordinary
scene, students at Dommerich
rated the first Walk n Roll Wednes-
day on Sept.10 by walking or riding
bicycles to school. The effort is meant
to improve student health while help-
ing the environment. Dommerich
reports that 24D students partook in
The school's location in a neigh-
borhood and adjacent to Maitland
Middle School and tight parking lot
makes pedestrian students especially
welcome in lieu of students individu-
ally delivered by car by their parents.
On Wednesday, Oct. 8, students
will again partake in the event, but
this time alongside students through-
out the globe making the same effort.
School Day."





PHOTO COURTESY OF
JULIE FLETCHER


Winter Park! Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday, October 2, 2008


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-628-8500, ext. 302
kyle@observemewspapers.com

EDITOR
Alex Babcock
407-628-8500, ext. 304
alexb@observemewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Lacy Rushin
407-628-8500, ext. 306
lacyr@observemewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-628-8500, ext. 311
jennya@observemewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-902-8563
isaacb@observemewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-628-8500, ext 309
legal@observemewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observemewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observemewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us


ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-628-8500, ext. 303
tcraft@observemewspapers.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Shelly Langston
407-628-8500, ext. 303
slangston@observemewspapers.com


Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive-
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2008


Volume 20, Issue Number 40


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Page 4 Thursday, October 2, 2008






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, October 2, 2008 Page 5


Business


A place that sees mothers on their
due dates now has a due date of its
own the Dr. P. Phillips Baby Place
at Winter Park Memorial Hospital,
a Florida Hospital, is due to com-
plete a major expansion project by
fall 2009. The size of the current
Baby Place facility will double with
the expansion, to provide even roore
families with extraordinary care and
boutique services.
The 47,000-square-foot structure
will house 34 postpartum rooms, 13
labor rooms, three cesarean-section
operating rooms, a nursery and a
new neonatal intensive care unit.
Both the existing and new facili-
ties have the entire family in mind,
providing a unique experience for ev-
eryone. Families can enjoy amenities
including a new mother concierge
program, free mommy and daddy
massages, afternoon teas, gourmet
celebration dinners, baby portraits,
complimentary valet, private appoint-
ments with lactation consultants and
birth certificate availability on site.
Each suite is also equipped with
hardwood floors, private bathrooms,
mini refrigerators, an interactive flat-


screen television, a DVD player and
a large sleeping sofa for family and
friends spending time with delivering
mothers.
Winter Park Memorial Hospital de-
livers about 2,500 babies annually.

Central Florida's oldest continu-
ously operating electrical contracting
company, Palmer Electric Co., has
branched out of East Central Florida
and opened an office, in Lakeland.
The company has signed a long-term
lease on a 1,550-square-foot office
and warehouse in Ruthven Com-
merce Center.
President Tom Beard said in
a press release that the electrical
contractor can now expand its geo-
graphical reach from Polk County to
Florida's west coast. Contracts have
been secured to wire four single-
family and townhome communities
in Polk County. For KB Home, Palmer
is on the job at Festival Point and
Parkridge both in Mulberry, and at
Bridgewater in. Lakeland. In Auburn-
dale, Palmer is wiring single-family
homes in Lake Juliana Estates for
Toll Brothers.


Palmer Electric Co. is a provider
of electrical contracting and service
to contractors and builders for new
construction and renovations of resi-
dential, commercial, institutional and
industrial buildings as well as provid-
ing service and repairs to utilities,
businesses and consumers. Founded
-in 1951, the company employs a staff
of 350 from its headquarters in Win-
ter Park. Visit www.palmer-electric..
com for more information.

The Central Florida office of SIKON
Construction Corporation an-
nounced the company completed
two new SuperTarget stores: a
186,212-square-foot store in Deer-
field Beach and a 185,000-square-
foot store in Coral Springs. Both
were designed by RSP Architects,
Minneapolis, according to longtime
Florida construction veteran Dale E.
Scott, senior executive vice president
of SIKON.
The company's Central Florida of-
fice is at 500 N. Maitland Ave., Suite
303, in Maitland. SIKON is headquar-
tered in Deerfield Beach.


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Thursday, October 2, 2008 Page 5


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Pae6 TusaOtbr2 08 itrPr atadOsre


Preparing for better times ahead,

Metavante Corporation breaks ground!


Our current economy is be-
ing compared to the crash
of 1929. Seemingly each day
the news is increasingly dire
with respect to jobs, invest-
ments and retirement. But
in Maitland, there is light at
the end of the tunnel as we
have prepared ourselves for
the worst and continue to
support initiatives that will
see us through this crisis.
At a time when most
companies are cutting back


and laying off, Maitland
has multiple projects un-
der construction that are
providing jobs to hundreds
who might otherwise be out
of work, and hereby stimu-
lating our local economy. In
addition, our projects will
provide important future
tax revenues when most
other communities will be
suffering the impacts of tax
reform and our national fi-
nancial condition.


In our strategic-planning
process, the city identified
the redevelopment of Mai-
tland Center as key to our
long-term financial success.
This commitment has paid
off in that Metavante Cor-
poration, one of the largest
banking solution compa-
nies in the world, has chosen
to locate its headquarters
for its Orlando banking so-
lutions center right here in
Maitland Center. Metavante
Corporation delivers bank-
ing and payments technolo-
gies to more than 8,000 fi-
nancial services firms and
businesses worldwide. They
join an impressive list of
blue-chip tenants including
EA Sports, Charles Schwab
and Zom Corporation.
Maitland leaders met
with the players involved
early on and decided this
was the type of project and
company we wanted to at-
tract. In the end, a win-win
scenario was created where


all parties would benefit.
Metavante decided on
Maitland after an extensive
search of many municipali-
ties. Liberty Property Trust
committed to constructing
the 220,000-square-foot
building in the Maitland
Summit office park after
Metavante signed a lease for
nearly half of the facility.
This project represents one
of the largest office projects
under construction in all of
Central Florida.
In addition, this building
will be LEED Leadership
in Energy and Environmen-
tal Design Gold certified
and will be constructed
under the guidelines of a
"green" building, with the
goal of obtaining United
States Green Building Coun-
cil certification!
The official groundbreak-
ing took place on Sept. 9,
with the building expected
to be completed in Novem-
ber 2009. Seemingly every


Metavante employee was
represented, with all in-
volved looking forward to
the dedication ceremony in
better economic times.
This project shows Mait-
land's commitment in help-
ing to assure our residents
the long-term financial sta-
bility our future generations
require, no matter what the
short-term economic rami-
fications might hold.
Additional information
can be found at ItsMyMai-
tland.com, Metavante.com
and LibertyProperty.com.

P.S. Don't forget about
"Art and Music Under the
Stars" beginning this Fri-
day evening and continu-
ing through Sunday, and the
Maitland Farmers Market
on Sunday, beginning at 9
a.m.!

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at ItsMyMaitland.com.


Winter Park City Talk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER

As a reminder, the next City the City Commission at 3:30
Commission meeting will p.m. Monday, Oct. 27, both
be held at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, in the City Hall Commission
Oct. 14 in the Commission Chambers at 401 S. Park
Chambers at City Hall, at Ave. to consider the follow-
401 S. Park Ave. ing public hearings:
Request of Douglas
Coffee Talk with Trovillion for condition-
Karen Diebel postponed al-use approval to build
Karen Diebel postponed and operate a three-story,
The Coffee Talkthat was 10,130-square-foot, nine-
scheduled for 8:30 a.m. Fri- room bed-and-breakfast
day, Oct. 3 at the Winter inn on the vacant property,
Park Country Club has been zoned R-3, at 1003 and 1009
postponed to Friday, Dec. 5 S. Pennsylvania Ave. at the
due to scheduling conflicts, southwest corner of Penn-
sylvania and Minnesota av-
Planning and Zoning enues.
public hearings Request of Engle and
A public hearing will be Volkers Real Estate to amend
held by the Planning and Chapter 58 "Land Develop-
Zoning Commission at 7 ment Code," Article III, Zon-
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 7 and by ing, Section 58-92 "Defini-











Personal Hygiene Care/ Day/Night, Live-In/
Medication Reminders Live-Out Care
Meal Preparation/Diet Temporary or Long-Term
Monitoring Weekends, Holidays,
Light Housekeeping 24-Hour Care
Errands and Shopping e Long-Distance Caregiving
Joyful Companionship Respite for Family Caregivers
Affordable Hourly Rates Alzheimer's Special Care




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www.VisitingAngels.com
License #30211313


tions" so as to change the
definition of real estate of-
fice so that Engle and Volk-
ers Real Estate or any like
real estate office may locate
on the first floor along the
Park Avenue corridor.

City Commission
work session
The City Commission will
hold a work session at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 14 in the City
Hall Commission Chambers
to further discuss commut-
er rail.
The public is invited to
attend, however, no public
comment will be taken.

Ethics Board talks
campaign caps
The Winter Park Ethics
Board invites all interested
Winter Park citizens to at-
tend an upcoming Ethics
Board meeting at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 15 in the
City Hall Commission
Chambers where campaign
finance reform will be dis-
cussed. Attendees will be
able to share their input
on what they think the cap
should be on the amount
of personal and business


contributions made to cam-
paigns.
Public participation will
ensure that the views and
concerns of the community
will be considered prior to
the Board's recommenda-
tion to the City Commission.
If you are unable to attend
this Ethics Board meeting,
you may share your input by
submitting an e-mail to eth-
ics@cityofwinterpark.org
before Wednesday, Oct. 15.
Additional questions
or concerns regarding the
Winter Park Ethics Board
maybe directed to 407-599-
3236.

Neighborhood Council
reaches out to residents
The Winter Park Neighbor-
hood Council strives to
maintain and advance liv-
able, clean, safe and friendly
neighborhoods by improv-
ing communication, coop-
eration and the exchange
of ideas within and among
Winter Park's diverse neigh-
borhoods. In addition, the
Council assists residents
in forming new neighbor-
hood organizations, aids
established neighborhoods


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facing opportunities and
challenges, and adminis-
ters a yearly grant program
for eligible neighborhood
projects. In these and other
ways, the Council works to
promote Winter Park as the
city of good neighbors.
The Council is updating
its neighborhood contact
list and invites all neighbor-
hood organizations to pro-
vide contact information to
receive the latest news and
information about upcom-
ing opportunities. There is
no need to be a member of
an association. All neigh-
borhood activists are en-
couraged to sign up.
Call 407-599-3497 or e-
mail your information to
lhayes@cityofwinterpark.
org.

Fifth Annual Family
Fall Festival
Winter Park will proudly
host its fifth annual Family
Fall Festival from 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25 in
Central Park.

Call City Hall at
407-599-3399 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org.


Rattan Wicker
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i


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~i.---~ --_---~ ----_ ---


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


PaPe 6 Thursday, October 2, 2008


.'*''


k





ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

A deep breath, and then,
like fire, lyrics burst from
Michelle Allsopp's lungs,
setting alight a tale of re-
demption for a downtrod-
den man saved by a killer
plant. Little Shop of Horrors
has returned to Orlando,
with a promised gritty real-
ity rarely seen in the fiercely
farcical tale, according to
Director Dan Roche.
"I wanted the world of
the play to feel grittier and
darker," he said.
Steam rises from sewer
drain covers in the garbage-
strewn street, and the stage
itself comes alive as Skid
Row.
"This isn't a Disney set.
It's gonna be a world that's
a little scary, a little danger-
ous-feeling, but there's a lot
of tongue-in-cheek humor."
The stage is nearly set for
the iconic man-eating plant
drama, just in time for Hal-
loween season. Just to make
sure everybody's paying at-
tention, the artists inside


The Plaza theater on Bumby
Avenue have covered the
outside of the playhouse
walls with tentacles seem-
ingly bursting out onto the
street. Their slogan: Eating
Orlando Alive.
On Monday afternoon,
Roche reached out of the
darkness below the stage
and into the limelight to
chase away the last of a
dance scene's miscues be-
fore dress rehearsal time.
"Everything is about the
little tiny details," Roche
said. "It's those details that
say this is a professional pro-
duction that's better than
what people are used to."
But a big detail nobody
is likely to miss was already
built weeks ago.
Kerry Silson weighs an-
other 29 pounds when
he straps on the largest of
four man-eating plant pup-
pets called Audrey Two
built specifically for this
production by Hollywood
designer Paul McAvene. Sil-
son is lucky. The original
one weighed 60 pounds and
was well-known for send-


I .' In o .p ISa ma Bn c ha BOUr e t ..:.
Kerry Silson and Scott Silson, expert puppeteers, play an integral role in bringing the show's main character, Audreyto life.


ing puppeteers to the doc-
tor's office.
As Silson moves the gi-
ant green-and-red plant's
head, it comes alive on a
darkened stage just a few
feet around the corner from


Little Shop's infamous Skid
Row. Come Friday night,
he'll be eating four people
per show as characters lit-
erally disappear down the
plant's throat.
That extra dose of dan-


ger keeps in step with the
original musical, which
Roche used as the basis. for
his admittedly less-Disney-
fied interpretation.

> turn to HORRORS on next page


A s% ; ...


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breast imaging capabilities available at Florida Hospital.


Thursday, October 2, 2008


Page 7


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Lifestyles




Killer singing plant attacks Orlando


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The skill to heal. The spirit to care.


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For more information or to
schedule an appointment,
call 407-646-7798.







Page 8 Thursday, October 2, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Cinema


Area mov~slie[U tIimeIU s] fori'Friday, ct.
-T e.imesa regenerallyvaldfoy Su


510-N. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park
407-628-0035
AN AMERICAN CAROL (PG-
13)12:20, 2:30, 4:40, 7:00, 9:35,
12:20am

BEVERYLY HILLS CHIHUA-
HUA (PG) 11:45am, 1:35, 2:05,
4:10, 5:10, 7:05, 7:45,9:45,10:20,
.12:15am

BLINDNESS (R) 12:30,3:30,7:00,
9:55,12:40am

FLASH OF GENIUS (PG-13)
12:35, 3:20, 6:55,10:05,12:45am

HOW TO LOSE FRIENDS &
ALIENATE PEOPLE (R) 12:40,
3:25, 8:05,10:45

NICK AND NORAH'S INFINITE
PLAYLIST (PG-13) 12:05, 2:20,
4:35, 7:25, 9:40, 12:25am

RELIGULOUS (R) 12:15, 2:50,
5:25,7:55,10:35

EAGLE EYE (PG-13) 11:40am,
1:20, 2:40,4:00,5:30,7:40,8:15,
10:15,10:50, 12:50am





Calendar
SCC's Automotive Program will
highlight alternative fuel vehicles at
its second annual Car and Truck Show
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4
on the Sanford-Lake Mary Campus.
The event will be held in conjunc-
tion with National Alternative Vehicle
-Day Odyssey, sponsored by the Na-
tional Alternative Fuels Training Con-
sortium.
Among the alternative vehicle of-
ferings: Hydrogen cell Ford Focuses
from Progress Energy; hydrogen-fu-
eled buses; a Smart Car; a fully elec-
tric Scion eBox, which has a lithium
ion battery; all-electric GEM cars.
The show will be held at the SCC's


FIREPROOF (PG) 1:00, 3:50, 7:20,
10:10

MIRACLE AT ST ANNA (R)
12:10,3:35,8:20

NIGHTS IN RODANTHE (PG-13)
11:55am, 2:25,4:50, 7:30, 9:50,
12:10am

APPALOOSA (R) 12:25,3:15,
7:35,10:55

GHOST TOWN (PG-13) 1:15,
6:50,9:30,12:30am .

LAKEVIEW TERRACE (PG-1 3)
1:30, 4:15,7:15,10:00, 12:35am

IGOR (PG) 11:45am, 2:00,4:10

MY BEST FRIEND'S GIRL (R)
12:00, 2:55, 5:40, 8:10,10:50

BURN AFTER READING (R)
11:50am, 2:10,4:30,8:00,10:25,
12:50am

RIGHTEOUS KILL (R) 3:40

TOWELHEAD (R) 7:10,10:40

THE WOMEN (PG-13) 11:50am,
2:35, 5:15,7:50,10:30


CFADA Professional Automotive
Training Center. Call Jason Gaschel at
407-708-2278 for more information.

Oktoberfest comes to Casselberry
from 2 p.m. to midnight Saturday,
Oct. 4, thanks to the German-Amer-
ican Society of Central Florida. Enjoy
German food, beer, music and danc-
ing, for $5. Children 12 and younger
are free. The event is at 381 Orange
Lane in Casselberry. Call 407-834-
0574 for more information.

Shop and support the SPCA of Cen-
tral Florida from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 4 at Ten Thousand Vil-
lages at 346 Park Ave. North in Winter
Park.
Ten Thousand Villages, a nonfor-


Jon Paul Trevisani
M.D. F.A.C.S.
Board Certified Plastic Surgeon
Medical Director of The Aesthetic Surgery
Centre Medispa

Skin Rejuvenation Treatments for sun
spots, rosacea, red facial vessels, deep
and fine wrinkles, large pores, acne
scarring and blemishes.
Photo Skin Rejuvenation using Intense Pulsed Light
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Botox@ Cosmetic
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and smooth away facial wrinkles
* Radiesse@ dermal filler ideal for total facial contouring






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Maitland, Florida 32751
407-677-8999 BBB
WWW.JPTREV.COM


'Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist' Opens Friday


Nick is nursing a broken heart. Norah is questioning the world.
With nothing in common but a love for music, they find a legendary
band's secret show and end up on their first date.


1 hour 30 minutes PG-13


Also opening Friday


1100 -S. Orlaido A ie., Mitiand
407-629-0054 -'
CHOKE (R) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15


profit organization that supports fair
trade for artisans worldwide, will do-
nate 10 percent of sales to the SPCA
of Central Florida, the leading animal
welfare organization in Central Flori-
da. Shop for handcrafted jewelry and
home d6cor while helping needy pets
in Central Florida!
Call Monisha Seth at 407-461-
1768 or Robin Longley at the SPCA at
407-248-1758 for more information.

The University Club of Winter Park
presents a free "WineFest" from 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4. The
wine tasting event is open to the pub-
lic. Light refreshments and soft drinks
will also be provided.
Founded in 1934, the nonprofit
club located at the corner of Park and
Webster avenues, offers-educational
programs and grants to college stu-
dents and community groups.
Call 407-644-6149 or visit Uni-
versityClubWinterPark.org for more
information.

Most Precious Blood Catholic
Church in Oviedo hosts a pet bless-
ing event from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Oct.
5 at Lawton Chiles Middle School on
State Road 419 in east Oviedo. Peo-
ple can bring their pets to be blessed
by the priest amid supporters such
as the Seminole County Animal Ser-
vices and other organizations related
to pets and animals. Beside the usual
array of dogs and cats there will
be some exotic animals and a few
unique ones like pet skunks and rare


'Beverly Hills Chihuahua'
Chloe, a diamond-clad Beverly
Hills Chihuahua, hardly notices
Papi, a Chihuahua who's crazy
for her. But when she gets lost
in Mexico with only a street-
wise German Shepherd to help
her find her way home, Papi
heads south of the border to
rescue his true love.


1 hour 25 minutes PG


exotic tortoises.

Orlando hosts a Walk for Farm An-
imals on Saturday, Oct. 4 starting at
the Ethos Vegan Kitchen at 1235 N.
Orange Ave. in Orlando. Registration
begins at 11 a.m. with the walk at
noon. The effort benefits Farm Sanc-
tuary, which has efforts to -escue
farm animals with poor livingcondi-
tions and raise awareness through
educational campaigns.
Registration costs $15 in advance
and $20 on that day. Visit www.
WalkForFarmAnimals.org to register.

The Chenrezig Project, a Tibet-
an Buddhist study and practice
group, hosts its first meeting in,
Winter Park at the First Congrega-
tional Church of Winter Park at 7
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2. The group will
meet each month on the first Thurs-
day. Admission is free.
The church is at 225 S. Interlachen
Ave. E-mail Mark at mwinwood@
ChenrezigProject.org or call 352-
324-3419 for more information.

The Valencia Community College
Symphonic Band, Woodwind and
Brass Ensembles, directed by Don
Schmaus, presents a concert at 1 -
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2 in the atrium
of Building 3 of the East Campus.
Soloists will also be performing. The
program is free. The East Campus
is at 701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail
in Orlando. Call 407-582-2498 for
more information.


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HORRORS
Puppet comes
to life in show

< continued from the last page
"In the Broadway pro-
duction ... I thought they
cartoonized it," Roche
said. "Everything became a
joke."
To that aim he's making
sure all the details are as re-
alistic as they come.
These are the last days
for turning pure fiction into
gritty reality, and in its final
stages the puppeteer train-
ing verges on laborious.
Puppeteer specialist Scott
Silson wrests half an hour's
worth of tutoring into 10
seconds of stage time. Real-
ism is the running mantra.
"At its root level all pup-
petry has one -goal, and
that's to make it live," Scott
Silson said.
Come Friday night, it'll
be dinnertime for Broad-
way's hungriest plant.




Little Shop of Horrors" premieres
at The Plaza Theatre on Friday, Oct
3, and runs through Oct. 26. Show
times are 7:30 p.m. Thursday, 8
p.m. Friday, Saturdays at 2:30
p.m. and 8 p.m., and Sundays at 3
p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $38
for general admission and $33 for
seniors and students.
Tickets for opening night are $58.
The theater is at 425 N. Bumby
Ave. in Orlando, near the Orlando -
Executive Airport.


Page 8 Thursday, October 2, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


LANDSCP,


E-SOfl I


M. III O






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, October 2, 2008 Page 9


Discipline by example


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF

ecky Bailey tells her story with
a level of passion in her eyes
and an excitement as if it hap-
pened only yesterday.
While working as a volunteer aide
with- mentally challenged children
34 years ago, Bailey met a boy named
Marcus. Marcus didn't follow the in-
structor's directions one day while
swimming at a local park he simply
didn't want to leave the water.
As teachers yelled at him and made
all sorts of threats to throw away his
lunch and leave him at the lake, Bai-
ley begged the supervisor to give
her a chance to talk to him.
"Itr as an inspiring mIo-


Becky Bailey's books onler
insIruction on now u 1 help
cnliaren. i:onirl their lives
Fi.7. BI AMY
K.D.TOBIK
i F,1E


"Picking apples
with my mom
and dad and two
brothers."
Anna,
age 5


"I think of
flowers growing
and some leaves
falling."
Connor,
age 8


ment, because I had no credentials,
I had no experience and no skills,"
Bailey said. "My intent when I walked
into that water was to connect with
that child. Not try to make him get
out," she said.
While her sincere efforts were met
with failure that day, Bailey caught a
quick glimpse of what would become
her life's passion to find a better
way.
"When we get to discipline, we
think it is about control. And it's not
- it's about connection because the
connection gives you the willingness
when you need an ounce of coopera-
tion," she said.
Bailey, who has lived in Ovie-
do for 20 years, is an award-
Nwinning author of seven
books related to guidance
Aand discipline plus several
children's books and CDs.
She is well-known locally
for her contribution to the
Early Childhood Education
department at the Univer-
sity of Central Florida and
is an internationally rec-
ognized expert in child-
hood education and
developmental psy-
chology.
Twelve years ago,
Bailey founded Loving
Guidance Inc., a com-
pany located in Ovie-
do devoted to creating
positive environments for
children, families, schools
and businesses. She esti-
mates her philosophy
has touched the lives of
hundreds of thousands
of people through her
workshops held across
the country. The Con-
scious Discipline program


has been implemented in both pub-
lic and private schools and day cares
across the country, including school
districts in Alaska and a school in
Mexico City.
Bailey's social-emotional programs
help teachers create "school fami-
lies" using caring as the foundation.
Research indicates schools utilizing
Conscious Discipline experienced a
decrease in aggression and impulsivi-
ty/hyperactivity in "difficult" children
and an increase in academic scores.
Fern Creek Elementary, a school
that serves some of the poorest areas
in downtown Orlando, began imple-
menting the Conscious Discipline
program five years ago and has expe-
rienced enormous success. "In that
time, our mobility rate has dropped
from 104 percent to 86 percent, and
working with homeless students, this
is an amazing stat," said Holly Chris-
tian, Conscious Discipline Coordi-
nator at the school. "By building the
school family and creating a safe en-
vironment, we have seen our higher-
level referrals (such as weapons and
fighting) drop," she added.
Bailey's programs give parents and
teachers the tools to change their ap-
proach to discipline while utilizing
what is scientifically known about
the brain. "I think it helps to under-
stand the brain. It helps us realize that
[children] aren't just trying to be bad. I
think it gives us some objectivity to see
what is going on and understand it
gives us more patience," Bailey said.
"We tend to think of discipline
starting with a conflict, but what trips
us up is the upset. Some of us aren't
good at handling upset and it's not
that our parents did a bad job, they
didn't know either," Bailey said. "If we
learn to manage ourselves, it is easy to

> turn to DISCIPLINE on the next page


This week, Amy K.D. Tobik asked children at

Layer Elementary School in Winter Springs:


"What do you think of when you

hear the word 'autumn?"'

Interested in getting your face on The Buzz? Call us at 407-628-8500
and ask for Editor Alex Babcock to sign up for a visit to your school.


"Leaves falling
even in
Florida."
Ella,
age 6


"I think of
colorful leaves
falling down."
- Jennifer,
age 10


"Picking fall-
colored flowers."
Madeline,
age 5


Calendar



Oviedo hosts series of
kid-friendly events
Oviedo Fun Days return on
Thursday, Oct. 9 and Friday, Oct.
24 at Riverside Park on Lockwood
Boulevard.'Children ages 5-12
can swim, play indoor and outdoor
games, and do arts and crafts.
The program lasts from 7:30 a.m.
to 6 p.m.
Riverside Park stages a
spooktacular Halloween Party on
Friday, Oct. 24. Tickets cost $10
and include pizza, a small drink,
candy and a raffle ticket. There will
be a costume contest with prizes
awarded to the best costumes.
The program lasts from 6:30 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m. Tickets go on sale at
10 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 5.
Oviedo's Teenie Weenie
Halloweenie event for children 5
and younger is from 10 a.m. to
noon on Friday, Oct. 31.Admission
is one bag of individually wrapped
candy. There will be costume
contests, games and more!
Call Sal Rovetto at 407-
971-5579 or e-mail srovetto@
cityofoviedo.net for more
information.

Walk to School with
kids around the globe
Dommerich Elementary School
in Maitland will join schools from
around the globe in celebrating
International Walk to School Day
on Oct. 8.
About 250 students from
Dommerich will be walking to
school Wednesday along with
parents, teachers and community
leaders. The event begins at 7:55
a.m. and will last until school
begins at 8:45 a.m.
In the U.S., International Walk to
School Day is expected to include
5,000 schools from all 50 states.
Walkers from the U.S. will join
children and adults in 40 countries
throughout the world.
Walk to School events work to
create safer routes for walking
and bicycling and emphasize
the importance of issues such
as increasing physical activity
among children, pedestrian
safety, traffic congestion,
concern for the environment and
building connections between
families, schools and the broader
community.
In addition to Interational
Walk to School Day, Dommerich
Elementary has designated one
day each month as abike and walk
to school day. These are known
as Walk n' Roll Wednesdays.
Participants receive a punch card
and will receive rewards at the
end of the year. The first Walk n'
Roll Wednesday in September had
240 participating students.
This event is being organized
by The Bike and Walk Committee
of Dommerich Elementary PTA.
Call Jody Lazar at 321-439-1007
or e-mail jodylazar@yahoo.com
for more information:


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, October 2, 2008 Page 9







Paae 10 Thursday, October 2, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


PERFORMING Live, continuous music all weekend, accenting the artists at
Arts of The 32nd Annual Maitland Rotary Art Festival
Surrounding Lake Lily I October 3-5, 2008

Entertainment Schedule:


South Stage
Friday, Oct. 3rd
6 8:30 David Schweizer & Jessy Daumen
9-9:30. Amanda Clark.
Saturday, Oct. 4th
11:00-12:30 Dennis, Jeff & Bari
1:00 2:30 Acoustic Swamp Project
3:00 4:30 Madison Meltz
5:00 5:30 Maitland Youth Community Choir
Shenandoah
An American Folk Suite
That Dixieland Sound
A Patriotic Salute
The Star Spangled Banner
6:00 7:30 Tom Evan Minstrel
7:30 8:00 Orchestra tune & sound check
8:00 9:00 MSO Conducted by Margaret Patten
Fanfare for the Common Man by Aaron Copland
The Stars and Stripes Forever by John Philip Sousa
By The Light of the Silvery Moon by Gus Edward
Moonlight Serenade by Glenn Miller
Armed Forces Salute
The 1812 Overture by Tchaikovsky
Encore: Star Wars, John Williams
9-10pm MSO breakdown


North Stage

Friday, Oct. 3rd
6:30 10 Jason LoGrande
Saturday, Oct. 4th
11:30-1:00 Jai Michael Barry
1:15 2:45 John Lazar
3:00 3:30 Amanda Clark
4:00 5:30 Fellowship Quartet
6:00 8:00 Kayonne Riley
9:00 10pm Lauren Rebel & Blues Mama
Sunday, Oct. 5th
12:00 -1:30 John Martino
1:45-3:15 Patty & Michael
3:30 5:00 Dan Jordan & Rich Walker


5th
Jazzmin'
Mountain Brew
Orlando Brass Quintet


Maitland Symphony
Orchestra


Cheryl Anderson, Director, Maitland Market Music "M3" i Margaret Patten, Director, Maitland Symphony Orchestra "MSO"
Betsy Bone, Director, Maitland Youth Community Choir "MYcc" I Vince Lepore, Sound Engineer, Full Sail Course Director


DISCIPLINE I Author's philosophy

emphasizes monkey see, monkey do


< continued from the last page

teach it to our children."
When people reach a level of
anxiety and distress, the emo-
tional center of the brain can be
triggered. "The emotional cen-
ters of our brains, the CD-ROM
that has been handed down
from generation to generation,
starts playing in our brains. Our
buttons get pushed, the CD-ROM
starts playing, and next thing you
know we become our mothers,"
Bailey said with a laugh.
"People need to know how
to get out,of that situation," she
said, "which is the biggest chal-
lenge facing parents, teachers, all
of us."
Bailey gives the same advice
to parents, teachers and children
when it comes to self-control: "Be
a STAR," which stands for Smile,
Take a deep breath And Relax be-
fore you open your mouth.
People need new skills, Bai-
ley believes, not quick fixes. "We
need a way to resolve our inter-
nal conflicts and be the person
we want children to become,"
she writes in her classroom man-
agement book, "Conscious Disci-
pline."
"We have mirror neurons in
our brains, which guarantees a
child will copy your behavior,"
Bailey said. While copying proves
helpful with skills like speech, it
also affects behavior and emo-


tional regulation. "They copy
what we do not the little lec-
tures we give when we are calm,"
Bailey said. For example, when a
child hears a parent scream at an-
other driver for cutting him off,
the child will likely mimic that
behavior when he is told "no" and
feels cut off.
If people could make them-
selves aware of the negative
things they say, they would want
to change their own behavior.
"We wouldn't have to work hard,
we wouldn't have to learn 45 mil-
lion skills, we wouldn't have to go
to 100 classes, just the awareness.
The shift isn't that difficult," she
added.
"Educators are starved for this
information," Bailey said, "this is a
way to access their own brilliance
during times of conflict and stress.
When we are dealing with hu-
man relationship issues you have
to come out with the patience of
a saint and the emotional intelli-
gence of the Dalai Lama to handle
this," she said.
"Self-regulation is a tough skill,
but we can do it. Overall we have
come to the point where we can
move the ball forward. We can
access the higher center of our
brains and evolve ourselves. It
took all the generations before us
to get us here," Bailey said. "This is
our generation's gift."
Visit LovingGuidance.com for
more information.


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3:30 5


Paae 10 Thursday, October 2, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Opinion/ ElojMa


Perspectives

by...


PCP t SeCT o


It's going to be painful


It's like the Palin campaign
is a Biblical story. Recall
God's forgiving words to
Eve upon discovering her
sin of curiosity. Genesis
3:16, "Unto woman-he said,
I will greatly multiply thy
sorrow and thy conception;
in sorrow thou shalt bring
forth children." I love this
stuff. There it is. Right there
in black and white. In sor-
row Sister Palin, you shall
bring forth your campaign
to be vice president.
And, oh, has it been pain-
ful to hear. If I've heard it
once from friends and ac-
quaintances, I've heard it
half a dozen times: "Palin
is dumb." I respond that
Palin is not dumb. She is
unprepared. She's bet-
ter prepared to be a cult
leader than president of
the United States. Have you
yet watched the video of
her being prayed over, to
be protected from witches?


Yes, two days before she an-
nounces her candidacy to
be Alaska governor, one of
her church ministers im-
plores God to protect Palin
from witches. Witches!?!
No, Palin is not stupid.
Her upbringing has serious-
ly handicapped her to func-
tion in the modern world.
If you believe witches are
real and Biblical end-times
are just around the corner,
you shouldn't be on the
trigger of America's nuclear
weapons. Seriously, "I can
see Russia" Sarah Palin is
not a thinking, modern
American. Or is she? Do
you believe in witches? Do
you believe God has it in
for humanity such that he's
shortly going to destroy
all the disbelievers? In our
lifetime? If you do, Palin is
your girl!
Her nomination is about
John McCain. He selects
an air-biscuit conservative,


an attractive woman who
speaks fluently in tongues
to the Republican base.
It ain't pretty, it's politics.
Imagine our conversation
and McCain's campaign
today if he had picked Mitt
Romney. But he didn't. He
chose Sarah Palin.
Listening to Sarah Palin
makes me both laugh out
loud and feel uncomfort-
able. I admit it, I laugh at
Sarah Palin. I laugh at her
ineptness, her simplicity,
her circuitousness of argu-
ment, her platitudes and
her craven appeals) to the
conservative voter.
I am uncomfortable, too,
when she speaks. I some-
times cannot watch and if I
do, it is with splayed fingers
across my eyes. She seems
so out of her league, so ill-
prepared, so deer-in-the-
headlights caught. Her eyes
and demeanor seem to im-
plore, "What do I say now?
Oh, God please let this in-
terview be over!" I don't like
my leaders to make me feel
uncomfortable with their
competencies and Sarah
Palin does that in spades.
We've had quite enough of
that already with President
Bush. Sarah Palin makes me
question her readiness and
her ability to lead because
she clearly does not under-
stand the complex issues of
our times and the options.
Palin also makes me
uncomfortable with her


simplicity of thought, her
black and white approach
to world and national
problems, when what is
required is the ability to
make distinctions in the
many-shades-of-gray-world
we actually inhabit. As
Obama said of McCain in
the first debate, we don't
need a president wielding
a hatchet when a scalpel is
called for.
Thursday's debate be-
tween Sarah Palin (eluci-
datory seppuku onstage,
please) and Joe Biden is go-
ing to be painful to watch.
I do not envyJoe Biden.
He needs to stay focused
on John McCain and that
McCain as president will
be just another four years
of Bush, and perhaps even
worse. If Palin is pressed to
produce anything but su-
perficial sound bites, she'll
wilt like week-old lettuce
on a stale old mooseburger
bun. Palin has been por-
trayed as a mile wide and
four inches deep. We'll see
that Thursday night. Bush
was once described as all
hat and no cattle. Palin is all
smiles and little substance.
.She has not adequately pre-
pared herself to be substan-
tive.
Even conservatives of
note are questioning Mc-
Cain's choice of Palin.
George Will. David Brooks.
Catherine Parker has actu-
ally called for Palin to do


the right thing: resign her
candidacy now and return
to Alaska to take care of her
newest child. From a female
conservative columnist no
less!
Palin's nomination was
Biblically predicted to end
in sorrow. Don't-cha know,
don't-cha see. I won't call
her actual nomination a
stillbirth as it did "enliven"
the faithful, but for the rest
of America, Sarah Palin is a
sorrowful reminder to what
depths we have descended,
when politics is the only
consideration when deter-
mining what is good for
America. Palin was McCa-
in's conception. His alone.
Rather than this cheer-
less, prophetic allegory
from the Bible, let us con-
sider another story about
birth. I offer "Franken-
stein," Mary Shelley's sor-
rowful portrayal of concep-
tion. I'll leave to each read-
er her own metaphorical
interpretations, but John
McCain did create Sarah Pa-
lin. It is a fact.
It is understandable that
'many Americans are terri-
fied by the prospect of
what has, willfully, been
given life.


> JEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him atjepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters tM the EdIMfTr


Roney's perspective
rare in the media
As one who spends the
summer on Cape Cod -
in the bluest state in the
Union and reading The
Boston Globe (equally
cobalt), I find it refreshing
that The Observer offers its
readers both colors on the
political spectrum: the red
and the'blue.
Louis Roney's conser-
vative perspective gives
The Observer the kind of
balance too often missing
in many of today's left-
leaning newspapers. Our
unique national character,
our individuality, means
we Americans think for
ourselves. Give us the lib-
eral position, but give us
the conservative as well,
and we'll draw intelligent,
fact-based conclusions.
Louis Roney is the
"citizen of the world" that
Barack Obama can only
imagine himself to be. As
an opera star, Mr. Roney
spent his entire career
singing in the major capi-
tals and cities of Europe
and North America. Now
going on 88, and retired
from the stage, his wisdom


and wit have earned a new
set of fans: those who love
him for his writings.
Whether or not your
editorial board agrees with
his positions, please let us
hear from Louis Roney.
You'll be doing for journal-
ism what many newspa-
pers have long abandoned:
reporting both sides of the
story.
Kathryn Grammer
West Falmouth, Mass.

Rail plan looks
backward, misses mark
Commuter rail, as envi-
sioned in Central Florida,
resides in the antiquated
world of bricks and mor-
tar. Rather than trying to
mistakenly adapt a freight
rail for completely dif-
ferent needs, we need to
think outside the box and
be much more holistically
and forward-looking. How
about focusing on mov-
ing information where
possible, not people? And
incentivize the private
sector: Generously reward
in-fill, re-development and
high-density development;
promote telecommuting.
Concurrency backfired;


it promoted sprawl and
dealt a recoverable blow to
the urban cores. Now we're
trying to fix it with a Band-
Aid. Just how many people
are going to ride the com-
muter rail? And how are
they going to get to and
from it? Why are we ignor-
ing connectivity to Nona
and Horizon West?
I'm no rocket scientist,
but acquiring and operat-
ing a rail line at huge cost
to make Volusia and Osce-
ola more developable, with
-stations in Sanford and
Lake Mary well away from
employment centers, just
doesn't make sense. Let's
pour our limited resources
into Orlando proper and
really reduce our carbon
footprint, commute times
(big quality of life issue
for many of us) and nu-
trient loadings from our
lawns, to identify a few
benefits. Commuter rail is
backward-looking when
we need to be truly innova-
tive to solve not yesterday's
problems, but tomorrow's,
which we haven't even yet
identified.
William Shallcross
Winter Park


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, October 2, 2008 Page 11


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Pane 12 Thursday, October 2, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Play


xI.


Conserv
Cultural Con
By Louis I
Distinguished Profess
2004 Fla. Alliance foi
Assisted by beloved

HITCI


I asked my b
most people
being marr
I surely would
her to say that i
of softs and s
This poor Oh
smiles when she
our marriage, ai
ing to quit whili
hoping that she
up one day havi
out my many lin
To me, our m
has been a joyoi
escape from me
empty social pe
tions. In truth, g
hitched opened
door to a private
love and peace,
and security.
Of course, the
important little
the person you n
can't imagine w
live with anyone
my b.w. And I ca
anyone else wit]
marbles being r
spending her lif


I typical down-home coun-
try-boy opera singer!
It's not a good idea to
go around bragging about
your marriage, particularly
if you're making recom-
mendations to footloose
friends to follow you into
the fold of wedded bliss.
When I was single, my mar-
ried friends urged me to
"tie the knot." A good many
of them were at one time
or another in divorce pro-
ceedings to untie the knot
ative they had once eagerly tied.
mentary Some people say that
Roney marriage resembles a pair
or Emeritus, UCF of oxen irretrievably yoked,
r the Arts award and aimed in the same
wife Joy Roney direction. That ain't bad, as
long as the oxen like each
HED other and remain headed
in the same direction.
.w. what Is marriage risky? Of
e think that course. So is crossing the
ied is. street. There are some risks
don't expect that are not worth not tak-
t's a prison ing. The risk of spending
he didn't. one's old age in loneliness
liolass still and too much privacy is
e speaks of not a happy one.
nd I'm will- I found myself changing
e I'm ahead, myself slowly but surely in
won't wake various ways after I married
ng found my b.w., ways that diminish
citations. the friction of two free-
arriage spirited former performing
us 30-year artists determined to have
.aningless a good life together.
regrina- Living in their own
gettingg house together is an
for me the enlightening trip for two
e world of newlyweds. They learn not
pleasure only where everything is,
but which areas take spe-
e most cial care and which areas
detail is should be private territory
marry! I for one or the other. In this
wanting to promise of privacy lies the
e else but central requisite of a long
in't imagine romantic relationship. Not
h all her only physically but mental-
iant about ly and spiritually, each mate
e with your must respect* the needs of
the other.


Questions and remarks
about each other's back-
ground and upbringing
must be approached gin-
gerly, and never be pushed
beyond a comfortable vol-
unteer basis as to answers.
As to religion, let the
chips fall where they may
in smiling good humor. As
long as my mate makes no
demands that I join a cult
believing that the moon is
made of green cheese or
some other such lunacy -
anything she believes is OK
with me.
When Einstein was
asked if he believed in God,
he reportedly answered: "I
am sure of one thing: I did
not make myself" As he
also did not claim that he
had created Mrs. Einstein;
I guess he had a peaceful
marriage.
These are some smile-
producing words about
marriage.:
Marriages are made in
heaven, but so again are
thunder and lightning.
If you want your spouse
to listen and pay strict
attention to every word
you say, talk in your sleep.
Marriage is grand and
divorce starts at 100 grand!
Married life is very frus-
trating. In the first year of
marriage, the man speaks
and the woman listens.
In the second year, the
woman speaks and the
man listens. In the third
year, they both speak and
the neighbors listen.
When a man opens the
door of his car for his wife,
you can be sure of one
thing: Either the car is new
or the wife is.
Marriage is when a man
and woman become as one;
the trouble starts when
they try to decide which


one.
Before marriage, a man
will lie awake all night
thinking about something
you said. After marriage, he
will fall asleep before you
finish.
Every man wants a wife
who is beautiful, under-
standing, economical, and
is a good cook, but the law
allows only one wife.
Every woman wants a
man who is handsome,
understanding, economical
and a considerate lover, but
again, the law allows only
one husband.
Man is incomplete until
he marries. After that, he is
finished.
"No matter how hap-
pily a woman may be mar-
ried, it always pleases her
to discover that there is a
nice man who wishes she
weren't."
H.L. Mencken
"A happy marriage is
a long conversation that
seems all too short."
Andre Maurois
"If it hadn't been for my
wife, I couldn't have stood
married life."
Don Herold
Every girl waits for the
right man to come along,
but in the meantime, she
gets married.
To a woman of 18, mar-
riage is an adventure, at 22
a career, at 30 a goal, and at
40 a haven.
Married life wouldn't be
* so bad if men and women
were as anxious to stay
married as they were to get
married.
Marriage is singular: you
add one and one and get
one.
No woman ever reaches
30 without being asked to
marry at least by her par-
ents.


A fool and his money are
soon married.
There are only two kinds
of married couples: the
compatible and the com-
batable.
There is only one way
to make a happy marriage,
and most husbands and
wives would like to know
what it is.
In order to have a good
spouse, you have to be one.
Don't marry on a shoe-
string, you may find it hard
to keep tied.
Marriage is a game
where the man is on the
deposit, and the woman on
the draw.
"Marriage: The state or
condition of a community of
a master, a mistress and two
slaves, making in all, two."
Ambrose Bierce
Marriage is not a word,
it is a sentence a life sen-
tence.
Marriage is very much
like a violin; after the sweet
music is over, the strings
are attached.
It is true that love is
blind but marriage is defi-
nitely an eye-opener.
There was a man who
said, "I never knew what
happiness was until I got
married ... and then it was
too late!"
"Ah Mozart! He was hap-
pily married but his wife
wasn't."
VictorBorge
"If you never want to see
a man again, say, 'I love you,
I want to marry you, I want
to have children...' they
leave skid marks."
Rita Rudner
"By all means marry. If
you get a good wife, you'll
be happy. If you get a bad
one, you'll become a phi-
losopher."
Socrates


FALLEN APPLES NOT FAR FROM MY TREE #69


"It doesn't matter how
big a ranch ya' own, or
how many cows ya' brand,
the size of your funeral is
still gonna depend on the
weather."
Harry Truman

"'Class' is an aura of con-
fidence that is being sure
without being cocky. Class
has nothing to do with
money. Class never runs
scared. It is self-discipline
and self-knowledge. It's the
sure-footedness that comes
with having proven you
can meet life."
Ann Landers

I regret much that Laura
Ingraham's weekday AM
morning talk show has
been pulled from local
radio. She's one of the very
best and a woman!

Great composers' monu-
ments come to life in con-
cert halls, opera houses,
home music rooms, and
all other places where
music is enjoyed. Music
exists only when it is being
played, sung oriheard. On
paper, it is nothing but
lines, dots and a few weird


symbols. When the first
note of Puccini's "Un bel
di vedremo" is heard in
"Madama Butterfly," the
genius of Puccini is alive
and well in the spaces that
carry his sounds. His real-
ity springs to life in the
hearts of those to whom he
speaks in his own special
way. No marble statue or oil
portrait of Puccini can con-
vey his aura as do his notes
when they fill one's ears
with his music.

A Winter Parker for whom
I have lasting respect and
esteem is Russell Troutman.
The noted lawyer is an
intellect of the first order
and charmingly retains the
intellectual curiosity that
has spurred him through-
out his life.

Recent cataclysmic actions
by top American financial
forces get the government
into big business in a huge
new way. The result of a
government takeover of e
heretofore private busi-
ness ironically resembles
pure Marxism, regardless of
intent.


Byron King, co-editor of
Outstanding Investments,
declares that, in his opin-
ion, Saudi Arabian oil
reserves have been for years
monstrously exaggerated.
The Saudis' public stance is
phony, says King, and when
their oil runs out as it
soon will, he says the
wells will be dry in that
land. The change in the
cost of American oil could
be enormous. So, for gosh
sakes! Let's, like, drill!

Recent days have included
a flurry of major financial
changes in the U.S. The
bank we use has changed
its name for the fourth
time! All the while, the
most important change is
the quiet devaluation of the
good old American dollar ...

As the French say, "The
more things change, the
more they remain the
same." The best thing to do
may be to keep your feet on
the ground and your head
in the air.

Meanings of women's
words of wisdom sent
to me by my daughter


Beverley, in Connecticut:
(1) Fine: This is the word
women use to end an argu-
ment when they are right
and you need to shut up.
(2) Five Minutes: If she is
getting dressed, this means
a half an hour. Five minutes
is only five minutes if you
have just been given five
more minutes to watch
the game before helping
around the house.
(3) Nothing: This is the
calm before the storm. This.
means "something" and
you should be on your toes.
Arguments that begin with
"nothing" usually end in
"fine."
(4) Go Ahead: This is a dare,
not permission. Don't Do
It!
(5) Loud Sigh: This is actu-
ally a word, but is a non-
verbal statement often mis-
understood by men. A loud
sigh means she thinks you
are an idiot and wonders
why she is wasting her time
standing here and arguing
with you about "nothing."
(Refer to #3 for the mean-
ing of nothing.)
(6) That's Okay: This is
one of the most danger-
ous statements a woman


can make to a man. "That's
okay" means she wants to
think long and hard before
deciding how and when
you will pay for your mis-
take.
(7) Thanks: A woman
is thanking you, do not
question, or faint! Just
say "You're welcome." (I
want to add a clause here
- This is true, unless she
says "Thanks a lot" that
is pure sarcasm and she is
not thanking you at all. Do
not say "You're welcome" ...
that will bring on a "what-
ever").
(8) Whatever: Is a women's
way of saying "Drop dead!"
(9) Don't worry about it, I
got it: Another dangerous
statement, meaning, "This
is something that a woman
has told a man to do sev-
eral times, but is now doing
it herself." This will result
in a man asking "What's
wrong?" For the woman's
response, refer to #3.


LK RONEY
Louis Roney's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at LRoney@cfl.rr.com.


Page 12 Thursday, October 2, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer












Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, October 2, 2008 Page 13


i ) .I Notices


1~ .1


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY
Case No. 08-CA-8h
TRUSTCO BANK.
Plaintiff,
v.
WATERFORD LAKES CAR WASH LLC, a F
Limited Liability Company; CASSANDRA
Individually; MARK LANG & ASSOCIATES
OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE
COUNTY, a Political Subdivision of the St
Florida, and THE UNITED STATES OF AM
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the
October, 2008, at 11:00 a.m. in Room
Courthouse of Orange County, Florid
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida, the u
Clerk will offer for sale the following
real property:
TRACT 1
Lot 12. WATERFORD LAKE PLAZA, ai
to map or plat thereof as recorded
Book 49, Pages 11 and 12, of tIh
Records of Orange County, Florida.
TRACT

Drainaglje Easement made ana exec
ccklhed Md n Comrolmaion ii, f





1, '200:2 i:i fcial Riecnlds Book 6,1:
68G3 a;.:i o F at a n Pjuil; cilcoids of
County, FIcnda i l in accordance e
iermls of said Easementi

The aforesaid sale will be made purs
Final Judgement of Foreclosure in Civ
48-2008-CA-008566-0, now pending in
Court in Orange County,.Florida.
In accordance with the Amerii
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilitit
a special accommodation to participate
ceeding should contact Court Administr
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlan
32801, telephone number 407/836-205
than seven (7) days prior to the proceed
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, o
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Senr
Any person claiming an interest in
from the sale, if any, other than the prop
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 16 day of September, 200
Lyi
Clerk of the C
By Norma
CIRCUIT C
AsD
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, PA.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH
CIRCUIT FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FL(
Case No.: 2008-B
MIRIAM LAUREANO
Plaintiff,
vs.
GIOVANI HERNANDEZ, JOSE R. HERNANI
JOSE X. HERNANDEZ
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Giovani Hernandez, 2127 Sorrento
Park, FL 32792
Jose R. Hernandez and Jose X. Hernat
Roberswood Dr, Powder Springs, GA :
fendants, and to all parties claiming
through, under or against Defendants, a
ties having or claiming to have any ni
interest in the property herein described
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that you have been
as defendant in a legal proceeding filed
for Partition of Real Property. The actii
real property in Orange County, Florida,
described as follows:
Lot 50, Laural Springs, according to
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4 p
Public Records of Orange County, Flo
The action was instituted in the Nir
Circuit Court, Orange County, Flonda, ai
MIRIAM LAUREANO vs. GIOVANI HERNAP
R. HERNANDEZ and JOSE X. HERNANDEZ
You are required to serve a copy of y
defenses, if any, to the action on Franc
Jr, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address
948181, Maitland, Florida 32794-8181
fore 30 days from date issued, and file
with the clerk of this court either before
Francisco Colon, JR or immediately af
otherwise, a default will be entered aga
the relief demanded in the complaint or
The Court has authority in this suit
judgment or decree in the Plaintiff's inti
will be binding upon you.
DATED: Sept. 8, 2008
LYDI
Clerk of the Ninth Judicial C
Orange Cou
By BEUND
CIVIL C
D
9/18,9/25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE
FLORIDA, PROBATE DMSION
File No.: 48-2008-
IN RE: ESTATEOF
DORRIS VIVIAN PARKER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of D
IAN PARKER, deceased, whose date of
March 19,2008; File Number48-2008-I
is pending in the Circuit Court for ORAN
Florida, Probate Division, the address
425 NORTH ORANGE AVENUE, ORLANDO
The names and addresses of the pers
tentative and the personal representative
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth
having claims or demands against dec
tate on whom a copy of this notice Is req
served must file their claims with this c
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE Tl
FRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE O
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A CO
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent an
sons having claims or demands against
estate must filetheir claims with thiscou
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRS
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
IDA PROBATE CODEWILL BE FOREVER E
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PE
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this n
October 2,2008.
Attorney for Personal Representa
DONALD W.SCARLETT
Florida Bar No. 112821
Donald W.Scarlett, PA
1003 East Concord Street
Orlando, FL 32803
Telephone: (407) 422-8189
LESA GARRETT
Personal Repreesntative
6985 MEDITERRANEAN ROAD
ORLANDO, FL 32822


JUDICIAL NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
, FLORIDA Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
i66, Div. 40 677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the high-
est bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
rlorda satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
LEVINE, i doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
; STATE property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
,ORANGE in reserve
:ate of inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
ERICA, check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999
16 day of Sale date October 10 2008 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
350 of the 9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
a, 425 N. 1738 1994 Esco tl vin#: 405120LAXRJ000163 ten-
ndersigned ant: waiter j Longman
described
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
& 1911
9/25,10/2
according
in Plat IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
e Public CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2007-CA-001162-0
DIVISION: 34
RUTHY MARRERO,
Plaintiff.

utedi by KAY HUSSAIN. iakin KAY ERDMAN AL EEM HUS-
avo' or SAIN, STEPHEN MOSES RAMPERSAD andi nl oiil'el






Sramte it I. Lt.. I ALIIEEHM HUSSAIN. and KIA HUSSAIN
wit Ilie Third Party Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO KAY HUSSAIN a/k/a KAY ERDMAN
uant'to the YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to
il Case No. I the following-described property in Orange County,
ithe Circuit Florida:
Lot 36, BACCHUS GARDENS, SECTION ONE,
cans With according to the Flat thereof, recorded in Flat
es needing Book 6, Pages 50-51, of the Public Records of
in this pro- Orange County, Florida.
action at 37 has been filed against you and you are required
ido, Flonda to serve and original of your written defenses, if
0, not later any, with the Orange County Clerk of Court within
ing. If hear- 30 days from the first date of publicatiortand to
or Voice V) serve a copy on Third Party Plaintiff's Attorney, John
ice. G. Pierce, of the Law Firm of Pierce and Associates,
the surplus P.L., whose address is 800 North FerncreekAvenue,
perty owner Orlando, Florida 38083, within 30 days from the
file a claim first date of publication; otherwise a Default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
8. Complaint.
dia Gardner
circuit Court LYDIA GARDNER, CLERK OF COURT
J. Felshaw By: Kelly Grubbs,
COURT SEAL As Deputy Clerk
deputy Clerk 425 North Orange Ave.
Suite 310
Orlando, Florida 32801

Copy to:
John G. Pierce, Esquire
Pierce & Associates, PL.
9/25,10/2 800 North Ferncreek Avenue
Orlando, FL 32803
JUDICIAL
ORIDA In accordance with the Disabilities Act, persons with
CA-019851 disabilities needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should contact Court
Administration at 1-407-665-4330 not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing
DEZ and impaired, (TOD) 1-+800-955-8771m or Voice (
1-800-955-9770, via Florida Relay Service.
9/11, 9/18, 9/25,10/2
Cir, Winter IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
ndez, 2989 FLORIDA
30127, De- FILE NO.: 07-CA-2062-14-W
interest by, DIRECT MORTGAGE FUNDING,
and all par- Plaintiff,
ght, title or vs.
EDWARD S. CARROLL, and
designated OMAYRA CARROLL,
against you Defendants
on involves NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45
more fully Notice is given that under a final judgment dated
September 22, 2008, in Case Number: 2007-CA-
the plat 2062-14-W of the Circuit Court of the Eighteenth
page 16, Judicial Circuit in and for Seminole County, Florida
rida in which Direct Mortgage Funding is the Plaintiff
ith Judicial and Edward S. Carroll and Omayra Carroll are the
id is styled Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder
NDEZ, JOSE for cash at the Seminole County Courthouse, 301
Z. N. Park Avenue, Room S201, Sanford, Seminole
rour written County, Florida 32771 at 11:00 a.m. on October 28,
aisco Colon, 2008, the following described property set forth in
is PO Bbx the Order of Final Judgment:
,on or be- LOT 5, OF TRINITY BAY PHASE II, ACCORD-
the original ING TO THE PLATE THEREOF, AS RECORDED
e service on IN PLAT BOOK 34, AT PAGES 45 AND 46,
ter service; OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SEMINOLE
inst you for COUNTY, FLORIDA, A.P.N. #: 36-21-30-507-
petition. 0000-0050
to enter a Dated: September 24, 2008


rest which

AGARDNER
circuit Court
inty, Florida
A GARRETT
COURT SEAL
eputy Clerk
,10/2,10/9
COUNTY,

CP-1670-0



DORRIS VIV-
death was
CP-1670-0,
1GE County,
of which is
, FL 32801.
onal repre-
e's attorney
her persons
edent's es-
luired to be
court WITHIN
IME OFTHE
iR 30 DAYS
PY OF THIS

d other per-
decedent's
rt WITHIN 3
T PUBUCA-
TIME PERI-
THEFLOR-
BARRED.
19OD SET
(2) YEARS
E OF DEATH

cet is:






Dn


10/2,10/9 1


MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of Circuit Court
By Mary Stroupe
Deputy Clerk
Publication of this notice was made on Oct. 2, 2008,
and Oct. 9, 2008, in the Winter Park / Maitland Ob-
server.
10/2,10/9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE
DIVISION
CASE NO. 48-2008-CP-002197-0
IN RE: Estate of
JOHN C. BARDI,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JOHN C.
BARDI, deceased, whose date of death was July 12,
2008, File Number48-2008-CP-002197-0, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court .for Orange County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 425
North Orange Avenue, Room 340, Orlando, Florida
32801. The names and addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal Representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBUCATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MOREAFTERTHE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is
October 2, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRWAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, PA
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801
Personal Representative:
MARTA E. BARDI
6972 Needle Pointe Drive
Orlando, Florida 32822
10/2,10/9


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR MANATEE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
FAMILY LAW DIVISION
CASE NO. 2008 DR 7851
DIV. 4
IN THE MATTER OF THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS FOR THE PROPOSED ADOPTION
OF A MINOR CHILD:
IVONNE MARIANA MEJIA
D/O/B: 3/31/1999
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:Alfonso Mejia
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition forTermination
proceeding hereinafter described is pending in the
Circuit Court, Twelfth Judicial Circuit in and for
Manatee County, Florida, the style of which is: IN RE:
The Termination of Parental Rights for the Proposed
Stepparent Adoption of Ivonne Mejia.
You are required to serve a copy of your written
response, if any, to it on W. SCOTT HAMILTON,
ESQUIRE, Petitioners' attorney, whose address is
2400 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton, Florida,
34205. on or before Nov. 4, 2008, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court at PO Box 25400
Bradenlon, Florida 34205, either before service
on Petitioners' attorney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Petlloni
The identify of the birth father is Alfonso Mejia;
He is approximately 5'6' Brown hair/ Blue eyes/
olve complexion, aind his residence address(es) is
iinkno.n and cannot ihe rPeasint)ly aCRistained
ul[iiIant1 to cII Petitiun, the C1|ud ,\'s 1,01 a1 l
Aino ti aniii Hospital, Oiini1 Conty itond

11"s c0 ild The aw no lknp',wn w ai dpi aents aitli
I;lst:; o notice of this proceeding. Ti he gouilina io [

Ttere will be a Ilearing on the Peition-for
Voluntary Termination of Parental Rigihts and
Stepparent Adoption on November 17, 2008 at
10:15 A.M., before The Honorable Scott Brownell at
the Manatee County Judicial Center, 1051 Manatee
Avenue West, Bradenton, Florida 34205. The Court
has set aside 15 minutes for the hearing.
It you executed a Consent to Adoption or an
Affidavit of Non-paternity and a Waiver of Venue,
you may have the right to request that the hearing
on the petition to terminate parental rights be
transferred to the county in which you reside. You
may object by appearing at the hearing or filing a
written objection with the Court.
If you elect to file written defenses to said
Petition, you are required to serve a copy on
Petitioner's attorney, W. Scott Hamilton, Esquire,
Price, Hamilton & Price, Chtd., 2400 Manatee
Avenue West, Bradenton, FL 34205 (941)748-0550,
and file the original response or pleading in the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Manatee
County, PO Box 25400, Bradenton, FL 34206.
UNDER SECTION 63.089, FLORIDA STATUTES,
FAILURE TO FILE A WRITTEN RESPONSE TO THIS
NOTICE WITH THE COURT OR TO APPEAR AT THIS
HEARING CONSTITUTES GROUNDS UPON WHICH
THE COURT SHALL END ANY PARENTAL RIGHTS YOU
MAY HAVE REGARDING THE MINOR CHILD.
Dated at Bradenton, Manatee County, Florida this
23 day of Sept, 2008.
R.B. Shore, Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Sonya Agurs
Deputy Clerk
10/2,10/9,10/16,10/23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 48-2008-CP-000956-0
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN FINLEY, JR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Benjamin
Franklin Finley, Jr., deceased, whose date of death
was February 6, 2006, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the ao-
dress of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
OOS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is Oc-
tober 2,2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Candace N. Finley
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832

Personal Representative:
Candace N. inley
Post Office Box 4382
1430 Stillman Boulevard
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35403
10/2,10/9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR ORANGE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
File No. 48-2008-CP-002130-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOANN HENDRIX,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of JOANN
HENDRIX, deceased, File Number 48-2008-CP-
002130-0, is pending in the Circuit Court for Or-
ange County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 425 N. Orange Ave., Orlando, FL 32801.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attomey
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, including unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedents
estate, Including unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE RRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is Oc-
tober 2, 2008.

Barbara McNulty, Personal Rep.
2225 Viento St., Orlando, FL 32822
JAMES P.PANICO, PA
By: James P. Panico, Esq.
111 S. Maitdand Ave.
Maitland, FL 32751
(407) 647-7200
Fax: (407) 647-1420
Attorney forPersonal Rep.
Florida Bar No.: 105436
10/2,10/9


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2008-CP-1771
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LINDA L. GRANDE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration has been entered in the estate
of Linda L. Grande, deceased, File Number 2008-
CP-1771, by the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
Probate Division, PO Box 8099, Sanford, FL 32772-
8099; that the decedent's date of death was July 7,
2008; that the total value of the estate is SO and that
the names and addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
Name /Address:
Kelley Lynn Grande / 7261 Abbey Lane, Winter
Park, FL 32792

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT
All creditors of tile estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom i
provision for full payment was made in the Order of
Summary Administration must life their claims with
tlls court WITHIN THE 11ME PERIODS SET FORTH
NI SECTION 731702 OF THtE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE
ALL Cl AIMS AND DEMAiNDS NOT SO ;LD 'NILL '
NOTWITiHSTANDIN 1 ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
l IMF PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO 121 YEARS OR
MOiRE AFTER THE DECEDENT 'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED
Tioe (late of first publication of this notice is Oc-
tober 2, 2008.

Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832

Person Giving Notice:
Kelley Lynn Grande
7261 Abbey Lane
Winter Park, Florida 32792


10/2,10/9
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
Case No. 48-2008-CP-001823-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNIE B. NORMAN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ANNIE B.
NORMAN, deceased, whose date of death was April
7, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for ORANGE
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 340,
Orlando, Florida 32802-4994. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is Oc-
tober 2, 2007.
Signed on this 24th day of September, 2008.
NANCY A. NORMAN
Personal Representative
190 Riverbend Drive, #104
Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714
RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED this 25th day of
September, 2008.
IAN L. GILDEN, ESQUIRE
IAN L. GILDEN, PA.
Post Office Box 947807
Maitland, Florida 32794-7807
(407) 645-4446
(407) 629-0090 Facsimile
Florida Bar No.: 321941
Attorney for Nancy A. Norman
10/2, 10/9


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

CITY OF WINTER PARK
NOTICE OF INTENT AND
aroanmonennac NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that the City of Winter Park intends to use the uniform method for collecting
special assessments within the platted Morseland Subdivision (plat Book 0 Page 13), within the
municipal boundaries of the City of Winter Park to fund the City's undergrounding of the neighborhood
electrical facilities.
Notice is further given that the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida will hold a Public
Hearing at the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Flonda
32789 at 3:30 p.m., October 14, 2008 to consider adoption of a Resolution expressing its intent to
use the uniform method for collecting the assessments levied against certain properties in Morseland
Subdivision (plat Book 0 Page 13) more particularly described as the area east of Keyes Avenue, south
of Stovin Avenue, north of Webster Avenue and west of Park Avenue*
"If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, le/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based." (Fs. 286.0105)
"Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate In any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting."
Cynthia S Bonham, City Clerk
9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
SWinter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE


Notice is hereby given that public '' ,,., i .' I City of Winter
Park, Florida, on Tuesday, October 1 .""' i, *. '.. i, .. *' a i f City Hall, 401
Park Avenue, South, to consider the following
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA ESTABLISHING A FORMULA FOR
THE TRANSFER OF FUNDS FROM THE WATER AND SEWER UTILITY TO THE GENERAL FUND:
PROVIDING FOR CODIFICATION; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA RELATING TO BOATING AND WATER
SAFETY, AMENDING SECTION 114-59, USER FEE SCHEDULE; RECEIPTS; APPLICATION OF
REVENUES, TO PROVIDE FOR A DAILY USER FEE; ELIMINATING 1 DAY AND 2 CONSECUTIVE DAYS
FEES; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information is available in the City
Clerk'soffice so that citizens may acquaint themselves with each issue and receive answers to any
questions they may have prior to the meeting. "If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need
a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105) Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in
any of these proceedings should contact the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in
advance of the meeting.
/s/ Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC, City Clerk


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
You are hereby informed that the City Council of the
City of Maitland, Florida, will hold a Public Hearing
on the following proposed ordinance:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MAITLAND,
FLORIDA AMENDING CHAPTER 13, SECTION
13-36, 38 OF THE CITY OF MAITLAND
CODE OF ORDINANCES INCREASING THE
FEtS CHARGED FOR FALSE ALARMS OF
ALARM DEVICES; PROVIDING FOR FEES
TO BE CHARGED FOR FALSE 9-1-1 CALLS;
AMENDING THE TIME PERIOD FOR PAYMENT
OF FEES CHARGED AS A RESULT OF
FALSE ALARMS AND FALSE 9-1-1 CALLS;
CLARIFYING THE LANGUAGE OF THE
ORDINANCE; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The Public Hearing will be held at 6:30 P.M.,
or as soon thereafter as possible, on Monday,
October 13, 2008, in the Maitland City Hall Council
Chambers, 1776 Independence Lane, Maitland,
Florida, 32751.
A copy of the proposed ordinance is available in
the office of the City Clerk for inspection. Interested
parties may appear at the hearing and be heard
with respect to the proposed ordinance.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision
made at this meeting or hearing, will need a record
of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal
is to be based. Persons with disabilities needing
assistance to participate in any of these proceedings
should contact the City Clerk's office (407-539-
6219) 48 hoursin advance of the meeting.
CITY OF MAITLAND
Maria T. Waldrop, CMC
City Clerk
10/2





Get local news from a local
source! Receive The Observer
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PUBLIC NOTICE
Effective immediately, the regularly scheduled
meetings of the Maitland City Council, held on the
second and fourth Mondays of each month, will be-
gin at 6:30-PM, in lieu of 7:00 PM.
For further information, please contact the City
Clerk's Office at 407-539-6219, or visit the City's
website at www.itsmymaitland.com.
CITY OF MAITLAND
Maria Waldrop, CMC
City Clerk
10/2

CITY OF MAITLAND, FLORIDA
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS 132-09
AUDITING SERVICES
The City. of Maitland is seeking proposals for
auditing services for FY 2009 through 2011. The
request for proposals may be obtained on the City's
website at www.itsmymaitland.com or by contact-
ing Ms. Sharon Anselmo, Finance Department,
1776 Independence Lane, Maitland, Florida 32751;
e-mail sanselmo@itsmymaitland.com; or phone
(407) 539-6201. Proposals are due by 3:00 pm,
Friday, October 17, 2008.
10/2


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Paae 14 Thursday, October 2, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Marketplace
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FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 753
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PARK AVE OFFICE SPACE
Park Ave Office Space avail to Real Estate
Broker. All office equipment included. Call |
407/741-8541.





Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and 'comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.



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Adoption
Pregnant? Considering adoption? A married
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Call KAREN & KEVIN. (ask for michelle/
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Announcements
Run your ad STATEWIDE! Run your classified
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Auto Donations
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000
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Building Supplies
METAL ROOFING. Buy direct from
manufacturer. Over 20 colors in
stock, several profiles to choose from.
Quick turnaround. Delivery available.
(352)498-0778, (888)393-0335.- www.
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Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800
in a day? 30 Local Machines and Candy
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Financial Freedom for you. $1000/day
returning phone calls. Not MLM. No buying
or selling products. Legal, moral and ethical.
www.mygoldplan.com/bigmoney (888)276-
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OWN A RECESSION Proof Business
Established accounts with the average
owner Earning over $200K a year call 24/7
(866)622-8892 Code X.

Employment Services
Post Office Now Hiring! Avg Pay $20/hr or
$57K/yr Including Federal Benefits and OT.
Placed by adSource not affiliated w/USPS
who hires. Call (866)713-4492.

Learn to Operate a Crane or Bull Dozer Heavy
Equipment Training. National Certification.
Financial & Placement Assistance. Georgia
School of Construction. www.Heavy5.com
Use code "FLCNH" or call (866)218-2763.

Help Wanted
DRIVERS: CALL ASAP! $$ Sign-On Bonus
$$ 35-41cpm Earn over $1000 weekly!
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meltontruck.com.


a Guaranteed Weekly Settlement Check. Join
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Need a career??? Become a Nationally
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Job Fair, October 5. NSC- Technologies.
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Cypress. Hiring welders, Outside Machinists,
Sheet Metal, Riggers, Pipefitters, Shipfitters,
Marine Electricians. Info: (757)399-1738,
(757)438-2540, (615)473-3415.

Drivers. IMMEDIATE OPENINGS. Fast Growing
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home. Top Pay! FREE Co. Benefits. Min exp
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Driver: DON'T JUST START YOUR CAREER,
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2778.

Homes For Rent
Venice New 1 and 2 bedroom homes
from $900 per month in active lifestyle
community with waterfront sites, resort
amenities, on-site activities and events.
(866)823-9860.

Miscellaneous
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121, www.CenturaOnline.
com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
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approved program. Financial aid if qualified
Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation
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NOW AVAILABLE! 2008 POST OFFICE
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TRAINING, FED BENEFITS, VACATIONS. CALL
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Real Estate
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(866)696-5263 x4576.

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available nestled in the 'mountains of NC
along 150 miles of shoreline. 30% discounts
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TENNESSEE LAND RUSH! 1+acre to 2acre
homesites, wood, views. Starting at $59,900.
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NC MOUNTAINS 2+ acres with great view,
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*LOW $ DOWN HOMES* Gov't& Bank Repos!
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Sporting Goods
SGUN SHOW, OCTOBER 4-5. SAT. 9-5 & SUN.
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1-75 OVER 1200 TABLES! BUY-SELL-TRADE.
INFO: (563)927-8176. NATIONAL ARMS
SHOW.







Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
con where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.


all f idr


I
i
i


Crawler Crane Operator
Job Description: Responsible for operating
a hydraulic style crawler crane 80 ton
or larger. Work Monday-Saturday, 7:00am-
5:30pm.
Pay Rate: $30.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9363666

Account Coordinator
Job Description: Responsible for developing
advertising ideas and campaigns and
coordinates with the media department.
Assists with fulfilling marketing and
advertising strategies. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9364268

Graphic Designer
Job Description: Responsible for designing
and laying out newsletter layout and
performing customer service. Work 9:00am-
5:30pm, days may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9364273

Accounts Receivable Clerk Collections
Job Description: Responsible for posting
cash and performing tasks requiring
resolution of issues. Provides account
reconciliation and payment research.
Negotiates payment plans for assigned
accounts. Posts cash receipts to open
accounts receivable, identifies payment I
discrepancies, and initiates collections or
disputes resolution process. Performs in-
depth customer payment analysis to record
actions required to resolve disputed items.
Maintains contact with internal and external
customers in order to address all payment
issues. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.81 per hour
Job Order Number: 9364299

Tax Preparer
Job Description: Responsible for interviewing
taxpayers while preparing their tax returns.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.25-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9362990

Estimator- Orlando
Job Description: Responsible for performing
work with plans and specs to develop
estimates. Performs take offs of plans as
provided. Reads, interprets, and applies
specifications to anticipated project
costs. Inputs information into computer
spreadsheets. Researches and applies
material costs as needed. Researches and
applies labor costs as needed. Develops
final estimate and proposal letter. Keeps bid
file and plans in proper order and file. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $25,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9360512

Computer Numerical Control
(CNC) Machinist
Job Description: Responsible for setting-up,
programming, and operating machinery.
Work Monday-Friday, 7:30am-3:30pm.
Pay Rate: $16.00-$23.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9361207

Yard Loader
Job Description: Responsible for loading and
unloading all deliveries made and received
by company. Communicates with company
and non-company drivers as well as will-
call customers, reports directly to the Yard
Supervisor and/or Manager. Conducts cycle
counts, communicates unsafe conditions,
acts, or injuries to Yard Supervisor.
Practices forklift and yard vehicle operation,
maintenance, and housekeeping. Maximizes
payloads, conducts inspections, confirms
customer orders, minimizes loading errors,
and maintains paperwork and product
transfers. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$13.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9362634

Personnel Records Team Leader
Job Description: Responsible for leading
the Personnel Records team in the various
processes of collecting, updating, and
retention of personnel records and files
while ensuring that the procedures for
controlling access are maintained and
observed. Works with leadership to develop
and adjust policies and procedures. Provides


Copyrighted Material



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direction, delegation, counsel, and expertise
to individual team members. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $40,284.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9351417

Proof Operator
Job Description: Responsible for the
encoding and balancing of incoming proof
with accuracy and efficiency. Encodes and
balances all incoming proofs with a high
degree of accuracy and efficiency. Meets
established productivity targets. Ensures
quality control is performed to assist in
achieving established reject rates. Ensures
all efforts are made to meet service level
commitments and critical deadlines.
Performs prescribed maintenance and
cleaning of machines. Reports hardware
malfunctions. Develops and shares ideas
to increase productivity and/or improve
service. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour plus bonus
Job Order Number: 9358512

Medical Receptionist
Job Description: Responsible for performing
secretarial duties including. scheduling
appointments, billing patients, and compiling
and recording medical charts, reports, and
correspondence. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$11.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9365904

Laser Technician
Job Description: Responsible for the
assembly, alignment and troubleshooting
of diode pumped laser resonators for
rangefinder and other applications. Builds
and tests prototype and pre-production
solid-state lasers and laser rangefinders.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $19.23 per hour
Job Order Number: 9366743

Service Inspector
Job Description: Responsible for filling the
duties of a lawn technician including lawn
spraying and pest and household pest
control. Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $25,000.00-$30,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9365791

Primary Stock Associate
Job Description: Responsible for maintaining
a neat, clean and organized stockroom.
Oversees replenishment process. Supports
and ensures execution of all shipment
receiving and processing procedures to
fast-to-the-floor/shipment flow processing
standards. Ensures sales floor is replenished
per company guidelines and is cohesive
to merchandise flow. Operates the cash
register and/or assists at the cash wrap and
sales floor. Performs processing of damaged
and defective merchandise. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.00-$7.25 per hour
Job Order Number: 9366669

Electrical Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for creating
designs to support program activities.
Oversees projects from inception to
production. Creates system level documents.
Utilizes technical support staff to complete
tasks, but will also have hands on skills to
be self sustaining. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $74,333.00-$115,212.00 per
year
Job Order Number: 9366018

Production Scheduler
Job Description: Responsible for performing
requirements planning based on a bill of
material or a list of required parts from
design engineering. Creates a build schedule
and determines need dates of required
procurement. Generates parts and materials
requisitions. Interfaces with procurement
to determine best deliverables dates most
beneficial to the program. Develops cost
data as required in order to generate and
update spend plans. Develops, monitors,
and summarizes procurement status and
production status on a daily, weekly, and
monthly basis. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $42,000.00-$64,000.00 per year


Job Order Number: 9366011

Engineer Technician
Job Description: Responsible for assembling,
wiring, and soldering. Assembles non-
standard units and build to schematics,
wiring diagrams, assembly drawings.
Performs a variety of complicated tasks
using non-standard work instructions.
Assembles parts and mechanisms to meet
tolerances and product specifications. Uses
hand tools and power tools to assemble
units according to product specifications and
requirements. Reads blueprints, schematics,
and technical orders to determine methods
and sequence of assembly operations. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $11.00-$17.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9366019

Janitor I
Job Description: Responsible for vacuuming
residual floor, washing equipment,
disassembling and reassembling equipment,
sweeping floors, and checking floor system.
Removes garbage and cleans production
offices, maintenance shop, lunchroom,
locker rooms, pastry shop, lobby, shipping
and warehouse equipment, and ovens.
Observes and reports pest activity. Removes
rust and any flaking paint from equipment
and paints equipment when necessary. Sorts
and bales recycle materials. Provides soap,
hand sanitizer, and paper towels at all wash
stations. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$14.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9366455
Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine
Specialist
Job Description: Responsible for diagnoses,
adjusts, repairs, or overhauls trucks, buses,
and all types of diesel engines. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9365765

Monitor/Handyperson
Job Description: Responsible for monitoring
and verifying parking stickers, posting
parking violation stickers, checking locations
of satellite dishes, delivering visitors'
parking stickers, checking for commercial
vehicles on premises, monitoring activities
of homeowner association and performing
other duties as required. Work Monday-
Sunday, 8:00am-6:00pm.
Pay Rate: $9.50-$10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9364632

Pharmacist
Description: Responsible for overseeing the
operations of the Pharmacy Department
including customer service, profitability,
investment control and compliance
with federal, state and local laws and
regulations and company policies and
procedures. Oversees the work of the
Pharmacy Technicians and Customer
Service Team Members, greets customers,
and provides information and assistance
on prescriptions and over-the-counter
merchandise. Receives, fills, and refills
prescriptions, ensures- proper billing and
collection of cash and third party payments
for maximum profitability. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $113,547.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9363929

Licensed Practical/
Licensed Vocational Nurse
Job Description: Responsible for caring
for ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled
persons in hospitals, nursing homes, clinics,
private homes, group homes, and similar
institutions. Works under the supervision
of a registered nurse. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $20.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9363135

Medical Secretary,
Job Description: Responsible for performing
secretarial duties utilizing specific
knowledge of medical terminology and
hospital, clinic, or laboratory procedures.
Schedules appointments, bills patients,
and compiles and records medical charts,
reports, and correspondence. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9363136


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer
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MAITLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY'S
10TH ANNUAL BENEFIT AUCTION
WITH CO-CHAIRS ALLEN &VICKI TROVILLION.

October 10, 2008, at 6:30 p.m.
Sheraton Orlando North Hotel
600 N. Lake Destny Drive Mattland, FL 32751
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SeniorObserver


Volume 18, No. 10


THRIVE @55ANDEYOD CI


For the mind, bod


and soul


PHI U BY ISAAC BABCOGK SENIOR OBSERVER
At the Mayflower Retirement Community in Winter Park, instructor Mim Dubuc leads seniors as they strike tai chi poses. The ancient Chinese art form trains better balance and range of motion.


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE OBSERVER

441 here is a lot of energy in
1. the air today," Mim Dubuc
says as she slowly stretches her
arms outward, palms parallel
with the floor. The movements
are smooth and methodical as
she transforms the space into a
calm, peaceful spot. "When your
hands tingle it means it is work-
ing," she says quietly. "You can
feel the energy in your finger-
tips."
Dubuc has been sharing her
delight in the ancient Chinese
art of tai chi with fellow residents
at the Mayflower Retirement
Community in Winter Park for


more than 13 years. Now in
her mid-90s, Dubuc is regarded
by her peers as the tai chi guru
whose passion and enthusiasm
inspire men and women of all
ages to exercise.
Every Tuesday* afternoon a
group of dedicated Mayflower
residents stroll into the recre-
ation room in an effort to reduce
stress, increase flexibility- and
boost energy levels.
"As you get older, whether you
realize it or not, you start to
lose some of your sense of bal-
ance and your natural grace,"
Dubuc said, "so it's important
to do what you can to keep that
sense of balance alive. There are
so many people who don't pay


any attention to that until it is
too late and they wait until they
lose their balance at home and
fall," she said.
As the students move their
arms to the soft Hawaiian music,
some look straight ahead while
others close their eyes as they
concentrate on their posture.
"Place all your worries and aches
and pains in a ball and take it to
the other side," Dubuc tells the
class as they are gradually trans-
ported into another realm .by
the gentle movements.
Dubuc said she chose the
soothing sounds of Hawaiian
music, reminiscent of her time
spent with her husband sta-
tioned in Hawaii during World


War II, because it maintains the
same rhythm and time so she
can go from one number to the
next without having to pause.
The ancient Chinese art of tai
chi pronounced "tie-chee" -
dates back more than 2,000 years
and was originally developed as
a form of self-defense. Today,
people of all ages connect their
mind and body through the 19
official tai chi movements and
one pose. According to the Web
site of the Mayo Clinic, a not-for-
profit medical practice, studies
show tai chi can reduce anxi-
ety and depression, slow bone
loss in women after menopause,

see TAI- CHI on page B5


The ABCs of diabetes



Tips to manage complications from the disease


While awareness is growing
about the seriousness of diabe-
tes, more needs to be done to
fight this deadly disease. That's
the word from experts who
consider diabetes to be the big-
gest public health crisis of the
21st century.
During American Diabe-
tes Month this November, the
American Diabetes Association
is asking the American public


"Why should you care about dia-
betes?"
According to John B. Buse,
M.D., president, Medicine & Sci-
ence, American Diabetes Asso-
ciation, "Few people realize the
seriousness of diabetes. Not only
does it affect many aspects of a
person's daily routine, but the
complications that can occur as
a result of diabetes can be dead-
ly. It is possible to delay or even


avoid these complications with
proper diabetes management
and treatment."
Proper diagnosis and control
can help reduce the risks for a
number of serious complica-
tions, some of which are life-
threatening. These include:
Heart disease and stroke -
Adults with diabetes have heart

see DIABETES on page B6


El. 1990


I







SeniorObserver October 2008


NEWS SENIORS CAN USE, SINCE 1990

Kyle P. Taylor
Publisher
kyle@observernewspapers.com


Alex Babcock
Editor
alexb@observernewspapers.com

Amy K.D. Tobik
Reporter
amykdtobik@bellsouth.net

Jenny Andreasson
Reporter
jennya@observernewspapers.com


Isaac Babcock
Reporter
isaacb@observernewspapers.com


609 Executive Drive, Winter Park, FL 32789

Observer Newspapers is a member of:
*Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
*Maitland Chamber of Commerce
*The Florida Press Association
*Central Florida Press Club


Lacy Rushin
Designer
lacyr@observernewspapers.com

Jonathan Gallagher
Copy Editor
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Tracy Craft
Advertising Sales
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


Pat Lovaglio
Advertising Sales
plovaglio@observernewspapers.com


I 407-628-8500 I WPMObserver.com

Published monthly by Observer Newspapers,
publishers of the:
*Winter Park/Maitland Observer
*Oviedo/Winter Springs Voice


The publisher reserves the right to refuse or edit ad'.-rtimrii-rn iii conirt i .r
letters to the editor for reasons of libel or ip.j.x ii aiilry
We encourage you to send us your opinion.
All material is subject to copyright the Senior Observer.


The Senior Observer's September edition
featured a mislabeled photograph of cro-
quet player George Stewart. He is pictured
at right. We apologize for this error.


Beardall Senior Center
800 S. Delaney Ave.
Orlando
407-246-2637


GEORGE STEWART
GEORGE STEWART


St. Cloud Senior Center
Indiana Ave. & 8th St.
St. Cloud
407-892-2533


Marks Street Senior Center Osceola Senior Center
99 E. Marks St. 1099 Shady Lane
Orlando Kissimmee
407-245-0921 407-846-8532

Maitland Senior Center Sanford Senior Center
345 S. Maitland Ave. 401 E. Seminole Blvd.
Maitland Sanford
407-539-6251 407-302-1010

RSVP Senior Volunteers Senior Resource Alliance
407-422-1535 407-228-1800

Alzheimer Resource Center Seminole County
407-843-1910 Better Living for Seniors
407-228-1800


TV goes digital



in February


anyone who gets televi-
sion over the air with
an antenna should take
steps now to prepare for the
conversion to digital TV before
the Feb. 17 deadline.
On that date, all full-power
television stations in the JJ.S.
will stop broadcasting using
traditional analog technology
and move exclusively to broad-
casting digital TV, aka DTV.
"We encourage viewers to
take care of this now so they
aren't left behind," said John
Boland, chief content officer of
PBS. "Given the government's
first-come, first-served con-
verter box coupon program
and the possibility of reception
problems, it's best to prepare
now. And digital channels are
already available, so viewers
who make the switch will have
instant access to more free pro-
gramming."
If you use an antenna to re-
ceive over-the-air television,
you can switch to DTV either
by connecting your television
to a converter box that allows
DTV signal reception, replac-
ing your analog TV with a new


digital TV, or subscribing to a pay
service, such as cable or satellite.
Consumers who own a digital
TV set should already be receiv-
ing over-the-air DTV signals.
Every household in America
is eligible for two government-
sponsored coupons worth $40
toward an approved converter
box. Converter boxes cost $40
to $70. For coupons or to learn
more about the coupon pro-
gram, call (888) DTV-2009 or
visit DTV2009.gov. The coupons
expire 90 days after issue.
Consumers who currently
have good analog television
reception should continue to
receive good digital reception.
However, some households may
experience problems. Adjusting
the home's outdoor antenna
or purchasing a small indoor
antenna could resolve such dif-
ficulties. Information about an-
tennas can be found at Anten-
naWeb.org.
PBS has created numerous
resources to help viewers make
the switch. "Get Ready for Digi-
tal TV," a 30-minute special from

> turn to DIGITAL on the next page


PHOTO COURTESY OF NAPSA
Kevin O'Connor, left, and Norm Abram, hosts of "This Old House," will host a 30-minute special titled "Get
Ready for Digital TV" that will air in October on PBS to help viewers make the switch to digital TV.


SObserver


*e U
Phone Numbe S*
for Snior


SeniorObserver


October 2008









Recording women's war history


The female experience is a vital
part of America's military expe-
rience, and the Veterans History
Project created a new initiative
to honor the contributions of
women in the military.
Women make up 15 percent
of those in active military ser-
vice, and by 2010 will constitute
10 percent of all living Ameri-
can veterans. They have one-of-
a-kind experiences to share, and
the Library of Congress is one
place their stories can be told.
The Veterans History Project
(VHP) at the.Library of Congress
American Folklife Center was
created by Congress in 2000 to
collect, safeguard and make ac-
cessible the personal accounts
of American war veterans. -
The VHP has grown to be the
largest oral history program in
American history, having col-
lected nearly 60,000 firsthand
recollections approximately
3,500 of them from female war
veterans.
Visitors to the Project's Web
site, www.loc.gov/vets, can see
and hear from women like Vio-
let Hill Gordon, a young black
woman who, at the height of
segregation, joined the Women's
Auxiliary Army Corps and went
on to become a commanding
officer in the Central Postal Di-
rectory during World War II.
Rhona Marie Prescott, a chief
nurse in a remote hospital. in


An Khe during the height of the
war in Vietnam, tells another
compelling story. With Army
doctors in short supply, Prescott
was called to perform surgeries
in makeshift tents in non-sterile
environments and decide who
might be saved.
Another military history mak-
er was Darlene Iskra, who enlist-
ed in the Navy in 1979 and went
on to become one of the first
females to graduate from dive
school. Her tenacity and talent
won her a loyal following in the
higher echelons of the Navy, and
in December 1990 she became
the first woman to take com-
mand of a U.S. Navy ship, aptly
named the Opportune.
You can become a volunteer
historian and record stories for
this important program. Go to
the VHP Web site and learn step
by step how to get involved.
There is a timely need for in-
terviews from veterans of World
War II, the Korean War and the
Vietnam War. In addition, VHP
seeks interviews from female
veterans from all conflicts, vet-
erans representing all minor-
ity communities, as well as
Merchant Marine, Coast Guard,
National Guard and Reserve vet-
erans.
Visit VHP at www.loc.gov/
vets, e-mail volip@loc.gov or call
1-888-371-5848.


[. I, : TE' i ':T VE1
Violet Hill Gordon joined the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps during World War II.


DIGITAL I PBS educates about TV switch


PHOTO COURTESY OF PBS.ORG
On the PBS Web site, www.pbs.org/dtv, users can find information to help them understand the upcom-
ing switch, when over-the-air television broadcasts will go from being analog to being digital.


< continued from the last page

the home-improvement gurus
at "This Old House," will debut
on PBS stations in October. PBS
also offers a DTV Web site, www.
pbs.org/dtv, with helpful infor-
mation, including download-
able fact sheets such as DTV Ba-
sics and DTV Myths and Facts


in English, Spanish and large-
print formats. The site also in-
cludes video DTV Tips and links
to other DTV-related sites.
Viewers with questions can
call the PBS station to learn
how to get ready for digital TV
and to find out what kind of
programming is available on
the current digital channels.


Downtown Orlanldo

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Low Income Elderly


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Call today
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FL. Relay



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Call us today at 407-628-8500 and ask for Tracy or Pat.


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We provide a loving home where each member
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License # AL10968 .


I


SeniorObserver


October 2008


O-rllrr
::~::,,








IhiIly cat vomnIting signal problem

11 .1 lk

/ Copyrighted Material.


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers

1., .B I low
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October 24th 3:30-6pm
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GET LOCAL NEWS FROM A LOCAL SOURCE!
SUBSCRIBE TO THE SENIOR OBSERVER FOR THE
LATEST "NEWS SENIORS CAN USE!"

EDITOR@@B@ERg ERNEWSPAPERSD@Di


--ATTENTION--

Notice to Orange County Voters

Voters needing bilingual assistance or assistance
in reading and/or marking their ballots at Orange
County Early Voting sites, or at the polling place on
Election Day, are allowed to bring a person of their
choice (except employers or Union Representatives)
to help them. Poll workers and Election Staff are
also trained to provide this assistance, if needed. All
voting locations are Handicapped Accessible and
-ADA compliant voting equipment is available. If you
have questions about voting procedures, ask your
poll worker for assistance. If you make a mistake
marking your ballot, you may ask for up to two
replacement ballots to insure that your.vote counts.


Orange County Supervisor of Elections
119 W. Kaley Street, Orlando 32806
(407) 836-VOTE (8683) or (407) 836-2070
www.orangevotes2008.com or
www.ocfelections.com

Equal Opportunity Employer


Hep s elbrte or 0t Anierar
at urbeautiHBfulOl intr ark Faclit


October 2008


SeniorObserver


.... .. ....-- ::: ::







October 2008 Senio~Observer


TAI CHI I Students see results after a few weeks of relaxing tai chi


< continued from the front page

develop balance and coordina-
tion, improve cardiovascular fit-
ness, lower blood pressure and
relieve chronic pain.
Resident Elizabeth Brownlee
has been taking tai chi for 13
years and said she finds the
experience very relaxing. "You
can be upstairs (in the residen-
tial apartments) and you think,
'I don't want to go down,' and,
then you do and you feel better.
It's very calming," she said.
Resident Joan McComber,
who has been taking the class
for nearly four years, added, "It
is a wonderful activity; it's relax-
ing and it is so good for balance.
I feel great after class. Exercise
is very important and this par-
ticular activity has balance and
music, which is conducive to
meditation. And Mim is won-
derful."
As the 45-minute class comes
to a close, the students use slow,
deep breathing techniques
believed to heal certain ail-
ments. Tranquil and at peace,
the class finishes with the bal-
ance and focus needed for the
tai chi consciousness pose.
Dubuc said her students tell
her after a few weeks of tai chi
that they feel healthier,. have a
better range of motion and sleep
more soundly.
"The head of the physical
therapy department tells me she
can tell the people who have


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK SENIOR OBSERVER
Tai chi instructor Mim Dubuc, seen here at the head
of the class wearing a white shirt, sets her classes to
Hawaiian music because of its constant rhythm and
its connection to her time spent stationed in Hawaii
with her husband during World War II.


had tai chi. She said when she
measures their balance she can
always tell," Dubuc said with
a smile. '"That's why I am still
doing it."


*2 -
irs ILu \ I
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r '&aS F0 -a'-<


Call as for a tour
or more information
407-718-7937
F5TT- Albana Dr-, Winter ;,i:


Assisted Living Residence


Make Faith House Your He

Our Amenities Include:


* Warm Home Cooked Meals
* Housekeeping/ Laundry
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* Assistance with Medication
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* Scheduled Transportation
Services


* Monitored & Secured
Environment a
* 24-Hour Staffing
* Private & Semiprivate
Accommodations
* Scheduled Day Trips
* Daily Activity Program


Faith House is committed to providing excellent
service in a loving home-like environment.
0 ur warm and inviting 13 bed assisted living facility is located
on Lake Catherine off County Road 419 in Chuluota.
At Faith House you can be sure your loved one will receive tender
loving care by our experienced, caring and supportive staff
Faith House is owned and operated by a registered nurse whose
put pose and passion is to provide the elderly with the best quality
cir i Iove andri rPcnert


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407-366-9961
Chuluota/Oviedo


1 -' ', -


321-947-1888
Winter Springs (Opening Soon)


"


October 2008


SeniofObserver


. ............ -- -. .- :






SeniorObserver October 2008


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Syndicated Content


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DIABETES I Vigilance pays off in fight against diabetes


< continued from the front page-

disease death rates about two
to four times higher than adults
without diabetes.
Blindness Diabetic retin-
opathy causes 12,000 to 24,000
new cases of blindness each year,
making diabetes the leading
cause of new cases of blindness
in adults 20-74 years of age.
Kidney disease Diabetes is
the leading cause of kidney fail-
ure, accounting for 44 percent
of new cases in 2002.
Amputations More than 60
percent of non-traumatic low-
er-limb amputations occur in
people with diabetes.


The good news is that remem-
bering the "ABCs of diabetes" can
help prevent or delay the onset
of diabetes complications:
A is for the A1C-A test that
measures the average blood glu-
cose level over the past two to
three months. For most people
with diabetes, it is important
to keep their A1C at less than 7
percent.
B is for Blood Pressure Peo-
ple with diabetes should have
a target blood pressure of less
than 130/80 mmHg.
C is for Cholesterol LDL
(bad) cholesterol should be be-
low 100 mg/dL; HDL (healthy)
cholesterol should be above 40


mg/dL for men and 50 mg/dL
for Tromen. Triglycerides should
be below 150 mg/dL.
The American Diabetes Asso-
ciation is the nation's premier
voluntary health organization
supporting diabetes research,
information and advocacy.
For more information, visit
Diabetes.org or call 1-800-DIA-
BETES (1-800-342-2383). Infor-_
mation from both these sources
is available in English and Span-
ish.
The purpose of American Dia-
betes Month is to help raise pub-
lic awareness about why control-
ling diabetes is so important.
Courtesy of NAPSA


* -
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SeniorObserver


October 2008


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October 2008


SeniorObserver


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Special Open House Event!


1 Day Only! October 14th, 2008


Come in for a personal listening demonstration
on October 14th only.,- Jana Rentz, Au.D., Phonak .
Technology Expert will be available to answer your
questions regarding this new technology and even
offer suggestions on your current hearing situations. Jana Rentz.,Au.D.


Dr Riess has expertise in the fitting of digital hearing aids,
FM devices and cochlear implants. She is the founder of
Hearing Associates of Central Florida where she works with
patients of all ages.
Dr. Melissa Riess

100% FREE Hearing Screening

and Consultation during this event!


ASSOCIATES
,OF CENTRAL FLORIDA


Hearing Associates of Central Florida
1460 Lake Baldwin Lane, Suite A, Orlando, FL 32814
407-898-2220
www.OrlandoHears.com


Bigtis~ihyuadrcieU o$0 f n aro
S. .k x~ ia iitlHerngIstu ens
Exies 10.7:08 Do ies.otopl t pevos u* e.~


"Change Is Inevitable, But You Can

Manage It To Your Advantage."


As an experienced financial planner,
Elizabeth Brothers understands the
importance of anticipating change
and taking control wherever you
can. That's why she moved to
The Mayflower. "In financial
planning, it's important to know
you have some control over medical
costs," she says. "A continuing
care retirement community like
The Mayflower enables you to do


t .. I'





Mb-I
3E^^^.


that. But don't wait too long or
you won't be able to enjoy all the
benefits a CCRC has to offer."
If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at
The Mayflower. It's a good plan
for the future.
Call today tesecure a spot on
our waiting list.

(407) 672-1620


THE MAY FLOWER
A Plan /or il'[ Future -
1620 Mayflower Court
Winter Park, Florida 32792
(407) 672-1620
www.themayflower.com
(lS141 PRAD 60 O21i. I


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CoMMUNITYBULLETIN


AARP group meets in
Winter Park on Oct. 21
The AARP Winter Park Chapter 1047 hosts
its monthly meeting at the Rachel D. Murrah
Civic Center at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. at
1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21. Our speaker
. is Charles Lewis, AARP Legal Services
Attorney. Call President Dora Harms at 407-
629-2585 for more information.

Play tennis with fellow
seniors in Altamonte
Vintage Tennis, a group of players 55 and
older, meets at 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 3 at
Sanlando Park in Altamonte Springs. The
group hosts this annual celebration to start
another year of good health, with round-
robin tennis and snacks. The event is free.
Sanlando is at 401 W. Highland St. Call
Marie Cheeseman at 407-834-1230 for
more information.

Maitland Senior Center
offers wealth of activity
The Maitland Senior Center hosts a variety
of events in October. Here's their calendar:
Monday, Oct. 6, 1 p.m. Math Club: Does
the Bell Shaped Curve Ring a Bell?
Monday, Oct. 6, 2 p.m. Book Club
Tuesday, Oct. 7, 11:30 a.m. Lecture:
"Problems Facing the Next President"
Tuesday, Oct 7, 1:30 p.m. Investment
Club: Led by Bill Long
Friday, Oct. 10, 11:30 a.m. Video: African
Queen (Hepburn and Bogart)


Tuesday, Oct.14, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. -
Questions and discussion with representa-
tives from the Republican and Democratic
parties.
Wednesday, Oct. 15, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. -
First session: Hand-building clay workshop
- (Slab, coil, pinch.)
Monday, Oct. 20 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. -
Senior Advisory Board Meeting open to the
public.
Tuesday, Oct. 21, 11:30 a.m. Lecture:
Financial Questions and Solutions to:
"When Seniors Need Assistance from their
Caregiver Child"
Wednesday, Oct. 22, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. -
Second session: Clay workshop (Kiln
loading, care of, types of firing, types of
glazes.)
Tuesday, Oct. 28, 11:30 a.m. Highlights
in Art by Don Miller
Call the Maitland Senior Center at 407-
539-6251 for more information.

Help needed caring for
the most vulnerable
Samaritan Care Hospice nonprofit orga-
nization is looking for caring volunteers
who can assist terminally ill patients and
their caregivers by adult-sitting while the
caregiver runs errands, providing emotional
support and companionship, and more.
Call Damaris Johnson-Santos at 407-
514-1320 or e-mail damaris.johnson@
samaritancarehospice.com for more infor-
mation.


..................


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Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers

* *


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I I I I I I I' I "I I I


October 2008


SeniorObserver


.

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