Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00014
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Publication Date: September 25, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

Full Text



Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 20, No. 39
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY

*ASS BANK
Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
.... Member FDIC


Thursday, September 25,2008

Locally owned.

Locally produced.

Widely read.

www.WPMObserver.com


$0.35 + tax
Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL
BANK & TRUST
On the comer of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
407-622-8181 www.CNBT-FL.com
C u i it .i


* _.f t- .. ,',-.* -
A longtime Park Avenue tenant
moves out due to rent rates.
Page A2



Check our Web site for a story
about Whole Foods Market's
fundraiser for autism research.
Visit WPMObserver.com



A Longwood company shows
off a rain collection system
designed to irrigate lawns.
Page A7

.: : . ... .. .

An autumn tradition opens in .
Mount Dora in October.
Page AlO




Business Briefs............A4
.City Talks...............A6
Community Bulletin........A8
Play On!................A12
Legals...............A13
Marketplace............A14
Games.................AA15


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rni I Iu i. IJmHmB DrDbUUR I ce I.D 1ci
Winter Park City Commissioner Karen Diebel speaks to a crowd of reporters and commuter rail supporters Monday outside City Hall to counter colleague Beth Dillaha;


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

inter. Park's battle
over commuter rail
went another round Mon-
day, both inside and outside
City Hall.
Commissioner Karen
Diebel struck first, calling
a press conference on the
City Hall steps to attack
what she called an attempt
to kill the commuter rail
plan for the city.


The blame for that lay
with fellow Commissioner
Beth Dillaha, she said.
"Apparently Beth Dil-
laha does not trust the hard
work, study and analysis
that four counties and .11
cities whose 75 elected offi-
cials, hundreds of planning
and transportation and fi-
nancial staff and their vol-
unteer task force who spent
the past five years absorbed
in the details about how to
bring commuter rail to Cen-


tral Florida," Diebel said.
Diebel referenced a push
she said was coming from
Dillaha to derail the com-
muter rail plan before the
city signed an agreement to
begin planning and work
on a commuter rail station.
Dillaha had contended
that the city would possi-
bly be responsible to pay
millions of dollars if prom-
ised federal funding to help
build the station didn't
come through after the


City sets '09 tax rate


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Arguments flew during the final discus-
sion of Winter Park's tax rate Monday,
but the City Commission opted to make a
slight increase to a millage level of 4.0923
- about $4.09 per $1,000 of taxable prop-
erty value. Last year's rate was 3.995.
That vote came after hours of discus-
sion between city staff, residents and the
Commission about keeping the old tax
rate, which applies to property owned in
the city, or to set it at the new 4.0923.
City Manager Randy Knight said that


due to Amendment One passingearlier
this year the tax value for homes would
likely be lower for city residents Com-
pared to last year, despite the seemingly
increased tax rate.
"If your assessed valuation is the same
as last year then yes the 4.0923 would be
an increase, but to call it a tax increase is
not an accurate description," Knight said.
Commissioner Beth Dillaha agreed.
"I'm in favor of the 4.0923 and I'm not
in favor of cutting the capital for any proj-
ects," she said. "I know you want to say

see BUDGET on page A5


city agreed to partner with
the county and the Cen-
tral Florida Commuter Rail
Commission.
"We've been going along
with this project without
any agreement at all, which
is a concern to me," Dillaha
said at a previous City Com-
mission meeting. She made
a presentation during the
meeting in which she raised
questions about the city's

see RAIL on page A2


Sam Stark resigned as president of the
Winter Park Chamber of Commerce in
an announcement Tuesday, Sept. 23.
Ais last day will be Oct. 24; he's leav-
ing to head the Central Florida Sports -
Commission.
"It's hard to leave after six good
years," Stark said Tuesday. "This is a
clear case of not running away from
something but running to something."
The Chamber will form a search
committee to find Stark's replacement,
Chairman Matt Certo said. "Sam has
left some big shoes to fill."
-JennyAndreasson,
Observer staff






Page 2 Thursday, September 25, 2008 Winter Park / Maitand Observer


News


Park Ave. icon moves out


JUSTINE GRIFFIN
GUEST REPORTER

he Black Sheep sewing shop clos-
es its doors on Park Avenue after
nearly 35 years in Winter Park, moving
to Mills Avenue where rent will be more
practical.
Reflecting on the closure, owner
Anne Jones said, "There is nothing con-
sistent but change but it is hard to give
up the history of this building."
Jones has owned and operated the
needlepoint and knitting shop on Park
Avenue for the last two years. The shop
closed its doors on Park Avenue on
Saturday, Sept. 20, and will re-open on
Wednesday, Oct. 1 at 1322 N. Mills Ave.
Jones said that she is looking for-
ward to a location with more room and
cheaper rent.
"I'd rather be putting money into in-
ventory for my store than rent," Jones
said. "Park Avenue is pricing out low-
margin businesses like mine."
John Craig, a men's fashion retail
store next door, plans on expanding
into the old Black Sheep location. The
new expansion should open March 1.
Offering his take on why a store like
Black Sheep isn't viable on Park Avenue
anymore, John Craig owner Craig De-
longy said, "[The Black Sheep] is not a
walk-in traffic type.of store. You're pay-
ing for the location and traffic that Park
Avenue brings."
Delongy has been on Park Avenue


for 13 years and said that the rent has
always been fair and reasonable,
"Park Avenue is a niche location.
Some products just do better than oth-
ers," Delongy said.
Both Delongy and Jones share the
same landlord from the Elizabeth Morse
Genius Foundation, Richard Strauss.
"[The Black Sheep] is more of a desti-
nation shop and doesn't benefit much
from the walk-in traffic that Park Av-
enue brings," Strauss said, though he
added that he's sad to see the shop go.
"Even though the shop is part of Park
Avenue's history, she's planning for the
future," Strauss said.
Jones said she is looking forward to
offering more of a variety of products as
well as classroom space in the new loca-
tion on Mills.
"I feel that the move will make the
shop more like my place," Jones said.
Since buying the shop in 2006, Jones
said she's had little room to expand or
change.
Of Mills, she said, "It will be a much
more welcome environment."
Barbara Allen, one of the five original
owners who opened The Black Sheep in
1974, said that she, too, is sad to see the
shop go.
"I understand why she's moving, but
it just makes me sad to think that the
shop isn't going to be on Park Avenue
anymore," Allen said.

> turn to BLACK SHEEP on page A5


?W ~r


010











PAN


-I
PHOTO BY ABIGAIL GEIGER THE OBSERVER
The Black Sheep closed last Saturday as the business prepares to move to Mills Avenue.


I '


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A Festival of Art, Wine and Jazz at the Winter Springs Town Center
Str along ati Bunlberg Bm ie~arOd d vew th WO& f o ...f

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Or visit our website: www.wsfota.org _
teh. ainome*0>tA.^a).. ^..rwin.. m i^.Q.8.


RAIL I Rally pre-empted rail scrutiny


Former Winter Park Mayor Joe Terranova and other commuter rail backers rallied Monday in front of
City Hall where City Commissioner Karen Diebel spoke to the media defending a train station.


< continued from the front page

liability if outside funding disap-
peared.
But during a presentation of
her own during the Commission
meeting Monday, Diebel refuted
fears that the city would have
any financial responsibility dur-
ing the early stages of the com-
muter rail project.
"Winter Park has no financial
responsibility for commuter rail
for at least eight years," Diebel
said. "Understand that in 2017 if
commuter rail costs are-unman-
ageable for our city, we have the
power to shut down commuter
rail in Winter Park. It's obviously
not about money today."
Diebel said that terminating
the city's commitment to build
a commuter rail station could
prove costly.
"If Mrs. Dillaha succeeds in


killing commuter rail in Winter
Park now, Winter Park will be on
the hook for nearly $500,000 if
we break our contract."
At the Monday Commission
meeting the city entertained
speakers from numerous part-
ners in the commuter rail plan,
who answered financial ques-
tions to put the Commission at
ease.
But the Commission couldn't
come to a final decision on the
commuter rail plan, electing to
talk more at a later meeting.
As the meeting ended, Dillaha
had some final words pointed at
Diebel for what she called disre-
spectful statements.
"I think we should have some
respect for each other and each
other's opinion," Dillaha said. "I
didn't get that feeling this after-
noon."


Page 2 Thursday, September 25, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


.. .


ji










Spirits rose and fell at Boone
ISAAC BABCOCK
F I


The Winter Park Wildcats always
turn up their game a notch when
they play Boone, Coach Tim Shif-
flet said. They had done it last year
when undefeated Boone needed
four quarters to make their first
score. And Friday night in Orlando,
they needed four quarters to break
a scoring curse against the Wildcat
defense.
The Braves won 21-7 in a hard-
fought game that saw neither team
gain offensive traction on a wet
field until the fourth quarter.
"We have to make it a defensive
game," Ghifflet said.
Last year the Wildcats, under
Shifflet, had managed to hold the
Braves scoreless for three quarters
before the Braves, who would go on
to an undefeated regular season, fi-
nally scored to win.
Last Friday was a rehash. The
Wildcats'had dominated in the first
quarter, with Austen Jacks helping
his team to five sacks in the first,
quarter alone.
That crushed the Braves early,
and they didn't recover for most of
the game. That wasn't too much of
a hindrance though, as the Wildcats
couldn't find their way into the red
zone in the first half of the game.
A slick field, one that had ham-
pered both teams last season under
similar circumstances, held them
both back again. That included
Winter Park running backs Patrick
Mputu and Zee Ware, who couldn't
put together enough yards to find
the end zone.
The only score the Wildcats
would get in the whole game came
off a fumble recovery in the fourth
quarter.
Not that the defense wasn't doing
its best to pull off scores the Cats' of-
fense couldn't muster. They picked


PHOTOS BY LAURENCE SAMUELS THE OBSERVER
Though the Winter Park Wildcats pushed back against a dominant Boone Braves defense, the 'Cats fell 21-7 on Boone territory last Friday, Sept. 19.


off the ball three times and forced
turnovers on the Braves more than
any team this season.
But eventually the Braves' of-
fense caught fire, and it was all over
as the clock ticked down to zero.
Late-game offense could haunt


the Wildcats again at 7:30 p.m. this
Friday, Sept. 26, as they travel to
Timber Creek.
The Wolves fought a losing battle
against the Winter Springs Bears last
Friday that saw both teams scoring
twice in the final quarter before the


Bears pulled ahead for a 31-28 win.
The Wolves share a 1-2 record
with the Wildcats, though Timber
Creek's games have all been high-
scoring affairs compared with Win-
ter Park's."


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


ThurdaySeptmber25, 008 Page 3






Payu I Ihur OUda Ve0r


Business


The Foley and Lardner law firm
hosted a Leadership Education Se-
ries with The Burnham Institute for
Medical Research recently
At Foley's Orlando office, fea-
turing.speaker Stuart A. Lipton,
director of the Burnham Institute's
Center for Neuroscience, Aging and
Stem Cell Research in La Jolla, Ca-
lif. Lipton developed the Alzheim-
er's disease drug Namenda.
Pictured are Lipton, left, and Ed
Baxa, a partner in Foley and Lard-
ner, who is a Winter Park resident.

Maitland's Sheraton Orlando
North has joined the Florida De-
partment of Environmental Protec-
tion's Green Lodging Program. The
hotel installed low-flow plumbing
fixtures, started a linen reuse pro-
gram, and installed Energy Star ap-
pliances and programmable ther-.
mostats. The hotel also cut down
on waste through recycling and
other ways and uses green clean-
ers and high efficiency air filters.
Visit www.dep.state.fl.us/green/
for more information.




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Sb Winter Park/Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday, September 25,2008


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-628-8500, ext. 302
kyle@observemewspapers.com

EDITOR
Alex Babcock
407-628-8500, ext. 304
alexb@observemewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Lacy Rushin
407-628-8500, ext. 306
lacyr@observemewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-628-8500, ext. 311
jennya@observemewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-902-8563
isaacb@observemewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-628-8500, ext. 309
legal@observernewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observemewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observernewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us

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LRoney@cfl.rr.com


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rfwradio@yahoo.com

ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
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tcraft@observemewspapers.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Shelly Langston
407-628-8500, ext. 303
slangston@observemewspapers.com


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer@ 2008


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Volume 20, Issue Number 39


Piano virtuosos, inductees and new trees

World Series of piano

playing comes to town
Pianist Yekwon Sunwoo of South Korea plays
in the semi-finals of the Grand Bohemian Orlando
International Piano Competition on Thursday, Sept.
18 at Rollins College, host of the preliminary rounds.
Sunwoo faced competition from Russia and Australia
in the finals last weekend at the Bob Carr Performing
Arts Centre in Orlando.


I PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK
THE OBSERVER





Sons of the Revolution-

induct new members A
44
Sons of the American Revolution's Central Florida
Chapter inducted five new members this month. From
left, they are Joshua Wilson of Chattanooga, Tenn.,
Michael Danforth of Orlanod, Robert Peecher of Es-
tro, Mark Bagozzi of Orlando, Chapter Registrar Cecil
Thompson of Altamonte Springs, George Gastfield of
Orlando, National SAR Trustee Ron Hamilton and Chap-
ter President Norm Myers, both of Winter Park.
PHOTO COURTESY OF
SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION -



Park's West Meadow gets

a ring of shade trees
A .Winter Park High School students from left are Diana Kravchenko,
16, Matt Vedrin, 17, Jenni Sujka, 16, Sara Cooper, 16 and Ryan Grail, 17,
helpedlpd plant trees Saturday, Sept. 20 at the new Central Park expansion,
V called the West Lawn, as part of the Keep Winter Park Beautiful organiza-
tion's efforts.

S : ".-Vm.

.- ., PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK
OBS.0, ERVER


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Paw hrsaSptme 2,20






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, September 25, 2008 Page 5


BUDGET I Leaders
defend tax rate

< continued from the front page

we're not raising taxes, and we're
not."
But former Mayor Joe Terra-
nova said it's a bad time to raise
the millage, despite the possible
lower net income for the city as
a result.
"It's very tantalizing to set the
rates at the 4.0923 level ... but in
this economic climate it is not a
good idea to be raising taxes," he
said.
Mayor David Strong said he
understood the fear behind rais-
ing the rate, but that the city
needed the money to help keep
the budget balanced.
"I think we're sympathetic
to wanting to keep the current
village rate," he said. "I said sym-
pathetic, not agreeable to it."
In the end the budget and
millage rate passed 4-1, with
Commissioner Karen Diebel dis-
senting.


BLACK SHEEP I Shop moves after 35 years


in Winter Park
-:*[ .. _


nti d frm PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
< continued from page A2 Customers enjoy sewing crafts on the Black Sheep's last day in Winter Park, on Saturday, Sept. 20.
Allen helps out at The Black The Black Sheep Shop originally enue before moving to the location
Sheep as a needlepoint finisher. She opened in Winter Park on Grenada on Park. The Black Sheep shop has
said she plans to continue helping Court. The shop then moved to a been on Park for the last 14 years.
at the ne W location, location on West New England Av-


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ThurdaySeptmber25, 008 Page 5


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






P~iOA 6 Thursday. September 25, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


City's electric utility
helps hurricane victims
On Sept. 18, the city of
Winter Park Electric Utility
Department dispatched a
three-man line crew to Lou-
isville, Ky., to aid in power
recovery efforts for about
139,000 Hurricane Ike vic-
tims who have been left in
the dark.
Following a disaster, all
utilities depend on mutual
aid in their recovery efforts.
While in Louisville, Win-
ter Park linemen will assist
EON-US, the holding com-
pany that owns Louisville
Gas and Electric and Ken-
tucky Utilities, in providing
restoration to its customers.
The line crew will be joining
others from all throughout
the U.S., setting poles and
rebuilding power lines.
The duration of the crew's


The city of Maitland is for-
tunate in that we have, in
my opinion, many of the
most talented, skilled and
professional employees we
could ever hope for. Sharon
Anselmo, Management Ser-
vices director, is no excep-
tion. Time and again she has
stepped up to take on more
than her share of responsi-
bility. The following article,
written by Sharon, captures
the essence of my beliefs, di-
rection and priorities during
the past three years. I could
not have written it better
myself. Thank you Sharon
for your contributions and
commitment to our great
city!
- Mayor Doug Kinson

Managing public money is
a matter of public trust, and
we take that job seriously.
There are many definitions
of fiscal responsibility, and
we look to our history as a
city to govern our actions
to prepare for the future. We
have always charged our de-
partments to run efficiently,
and through our perfor-
mance-based budgeting
system, we regularly report
to our elected officials how
the resources we requested
meet the needs of our stake-
holders. The elected officials
evaluate the levels of service
we achieve against the re-
sources requested. The opin-
ions of residents, businesses
and board and committee
members are solicited at ev-


stay in Louisville is currently
undetermined and depends
solely on the magnitude of
the power line damage.

Sept. 22 City Commis-
sion meeting highlights
The Winter Park City Com-
mission met on Sept. 22.
Below are a few highlights
from that meeting:
-Budget public hearings
-The second reading of the
ordinance adopting the
millage rate at 4.0923 mills
was approved.
-The second reading of the
ordinance adopting the FY
2009 annual budget was ap-
proved with modifications.
-The city manager's annual
evaluation was re-scheduled
for Tuesday, Oct. 14.
-The adjustments to the city
fee schedule were approved
and will become effective


ery Council meeting.
Maitland has a tradition
of conservatism, which
through the years has posi-
tioned us well to deal with
economic downturns. In
response to the impacts we
now feel, cautionary spend-
ing of city funds was placed
into effect early in fiscal
year 2007, as the city put the
brakes on projects and ser-
vices that were not related
to core services or required
levels of service. During fis-
cal year 2008, department
heads were charged with
reducing expenditures and.
evaluating open positions.
As a result, the fiscal year
2009 budget is less than fis-
cal year 2008, with 12 un-
filled positions. Our prop-
erty tax rate remains one of
Central Florida's lowest.
But managing city re-
sources involves more than
conserving. The harder task
is managing resources:- as-
sessing needs, setting pri-
orities and appropriating
funds. It's easier to say "no"
to everything. It's harder to
study the city's responsibili-
ties and past performance,
assess the needs in depart-
ments, and ultimately de-
cide where the money goes.
Yet, new services, such as the
Farmers Market, sprung to
life to continue to provide
city events. Longstanding
commitments to the com-
munity were completed.
In addition to cautionary
spending and cuts, we need


Wednesday, Oct. 1.
-The second reading of the
ordinance repaying the
General Fund advance to
the Electric Services Fund
in the amount of $2,856,026
with funds from the Water
and Sewer Fund was tabled
for the Tuesday, Oct. 14 City
Commission meeting.
-The first reading of the
ordinance. increasing the
budgeted transfer from the
Water and Sewer Fund to
the General Fund from 13.3
percent to 15 percent of the
average annual non-sewer
revenues was approved.
-The first reading of the or-
dinance relating to boating
and water safety, amending
the user fee schedule, was
approved.
-The first draft of a settle-
ment agreement with DI
Partners LLLP was approved
with modifications and is
scheduled for the City Com-
mission to take action on
on Tuesday, Oct. 14.
A full copy of the Sept.
22 City Commission min-
utes will be available on the
city's official Web site at Cit-
yofWinterPark.org the week
of Oct. 13, pending approval
by the City Commission.


to plan ahead for needs such
as transportation infrastruc-
ture in order to avoid a fu-
ture crisis. As Tropical Storm
Fay showed other munici-
palities, an effective storm
water program is critical to
the safety and health of our
residents. Throughout fiscal
year 2008, the Lakes Advi-
sory Board and City Coun-
cil examined the need for
a dedicated funding source
for the lakes, storm water
and drainage projects that
have been part of the city's
Stormwater/Lakes Manage-
ment Plan since 1996. Al-
though accomplishments
have been made, many pro-
grams were delayed. After a
number of public meetings,
Council approved a dedi-
cated funding source for the
plan, subject to its annual
approval for funding, begin-
ning in fiscal year 2009.
The city "continues its
emphasis on economic de-
velopment. The city's com-
mercial sector,,to date lo-
cated on the city's west side,
accounts for about 70 per-
cent of the tax base in Mai-
tland. The city continues
to fund efforts to stimulate
redevelopment and reduce
dependence on automo-
biles. Through. funding of
the Community Redevelop-
ment Agency, the city con-
tinues its commitment to
enhance downtown's role,
with a goal to energize the
streets with people and ac-
tivity as well as develop the
under-utilized parcels of
land to enhance its vitality.
A city's budget is balanced
if its resources equal or ex-
ceed its expenditures. This
allows for a deficit in peri-
ods of low economic pros-
pects that, however, needs
to be matched by a surplus
in periods of economic ac-
tivity. Fiscal responsibility in
the public sector is achieved
when officials have enough


Sept. 29 City Commis-
sion work session
The City Commission will
hold a work session at 1:30
p.m. Monday, Sept. 29, in
the Commission Chambers
at City Hall to discuss the
2008 Resident Online Sur-
vey questions.
The public is invited to
attend, however, no public
comment will be taken at
this work session.

Oct. 1 conservation
district meeting
The city of Winter Park will
be holding a conservation
district meeting at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 1, at the
Hannibal Square Heritage
Center located at 642 W.
New England Ave.
The purpose of the meet-
ing is to solicit input regard-
ing the opportunity to des-
ignate West Winter Park as a
conservation district.
In order for the City
Commission to move for-
ward and determine specif-
ic boundaries and goals of a
West Winter Park Conserva-
tion District, neighborhood
residents must express an
interest in this initiative. .


discipline to be able to-
equate revenues with expen-
ditures over the long term. A
city never plans for retire-
ment and does not have a
profit motive. Dividends
are only paid in terms of the
benefits received by the res-
idents. Fiscal responsibility
in Maitland is looking to the


For more information,
please call 407-599-3665 or
e-mail sgutch@cityofwin-
terpark.org

Oct. 7 planning and zon-
ing public hearings
The Planning and Zon-
ing Commission will hold
a public hearing at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 7 and the City
Commission will hold one
at 3:30 p.m. Monday, Oct.
27, both in the Commission
Chambers of City Hall locat-
ed at 401 S. Park Ave.

City hires community re-
development director
On Sept. 8, the Winter Park
City Commission confirmed
the hiring of Sherry Gutch
as the city's new communi-
ty redevelopment director.
In this new position, Sherry
will expand her responsi-
bilities to include managing
the Community Redevelop-
ment Agency area and ad-
dressing economic devel-
opment concerns for the
entire city.

Call City.Hall at
407-599-3399 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org.

future and planning effec-
tively to meet those needs.
A financially feasible plan is
the most efficient use of the
resources currently avail-
able to build this "Commu-
nity for Life."
-SharonAnselmo
Director ofManagement
Services, Maitland


FM 89.9 ORLANDO
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Family Comics & Cards Essence Luxe Linens
. II, I .-. Salon & Day Spa E ,,, :.-., I, I...
i l, Ii. iH,, ,, ,,,, ,, ,, I, r n Ii ,u.: :,.I ,; :. : 1ii.r. iF linurn-I.
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Barbara Coffee Winter Park Hair Studio Park Avenue Jewelers
LM FT, LHM C '"" "'.',, H" H, ',"- q ,,,,,,I :, :
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What is fiscal responsibility?


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Pane6 hrsa, etebr 5 20





AMY K.D. TOBIK
C..-, E ,' STAFF


hen the skies opened up
to afternoon showers
during the Oviedo But-
terfly and Nature Art Show at Lukas
Nursery this past weekend, Gabby
Milch jumped into action. "Rain
barrels are an old technology come
anew," Milch said as she swiftly rear-
ranged the collection of 55-gallon
cisterns on display.
It was only a matter of minutes
before a considerable amount of
water accumulated .in the large
black drum. "For every half inch of
rain per 1,000-square-foot area, you
can get 55 gallons of water," Milch
said with a big smile. The fresh rain-
water is free of chlorine and other
additives so it is ideal for establish-
ing new plants, flower and vegeta-
ble gardens and any potted plants,
Milch explained. Harvesting rain-
water for personal use also helps
reduce storm water pollution since
the water doesn't wash contami-
nants into the drains and ultimately
into lakes and rivers.
Milch, president of Milch & Asso-
ciates of Longwood, a company that
advises communities about alterna-
tive, ecologically friendly methods
of business, joined members, of the
Seminole Soil and Water Conser-
vation District at an information
booth to educate visitors about
rainwater harvesting and conserva-
tion.
Seminole Soil and Water Conser-
vation District Group 2 Supervisor
Steve Barnes was also on hand to
make residents aware of the current
local water crisis.
"Central Florida is a pretty bad
area for waste," Barnes said. "One of
the biggest problems is that we use
more than .half of our residential
water on lawns."
It is wasteful to use the potable
water, water that has been treated,
filtered, chlorinated and sometimes
fluorinated to water the grass. "It's
like watering your lawn with beer,"
Barnes said with a laugh.
If people don't start conserving,
Barnes warned, money will have to
be spent on pricey and ecologically


risky measures, such as taking water
from the St. John's River or creat-
ing desalinization plants to utilize
ocean water. Taxes may have to be
increased in order to lay pipes and
to convert to desalinization. While
these options may be inevitable in
the long run, Barnes said he aspires
to postpone such measures with
conservation.
Currently, Seminole Cotinty re-
lies on pumped groundwater found
in the spaces between soil particles
and rocks for drinking water. The
use of residential irrigation cisterns,
such as the ones on display over the
weekend, will help ease the reli-
ance on groundwater and educate
people on conservation, which in
turn may make the difference for
the future of Florida's water supply,
Barnes said. As residential growth
continues, too much reliance on
the groundwater withdrawals could
eventually impact the lakes, springs
and wetlands.
Unfortunately, conserving water
has becomes a matter of priorities.
One local family, Barnes told visi-
tors at the booth, used 89,000 gal-
lons of water one month, while his
own family of four with a swimming
pool used only 4,000 gallons. "They
are taking something that doesn't
really belong to them," Barnes said..
"[The water] belongs to us and our
kids and our grandkids."
A water cistern can be purchased
online or made at home by using a
55-gallon food-grade plastic bar-
rel (recycled plastic if possible),
hose bib, Teflon screening, Teflon
tape, bungee cord, PVC glue and an
adapter for overflow.-Milch, along
with Vicki DeSormier, Seminole Soil
and Water Conservation District as-
sociate supervisor, decorated some
of the cisterns used at the nature
and art show with painted flowers
and renderings of impressionistic
works of art to beautify the yard.
"It's a nice way to have art and'util-
ity combined," Milch said.
People get excited, Milch said,
when they see how much water ac-.
cumulates in the cistern. When they
begin to keep track of rainfall ver-
sus usage, they start to understand
the importance of conservation and
use less water overall, Milch added.


:-EhI :.1 .' ISAACBAB U CUUK -- '-'" L, U ":
Artist Gabrielle Milch shows off her painted rain barrels at the Oviedo Butterfly and Nature Show last
weekend. She's part of a movement to bring back the low-tech water collection technique to save water.


"The Florida aquifer is one of the
richest sources of fresh water in the
world, it is irreplaceable there
have been wars to have the kind of
water we have," Barnes said. "We
get almost 60 inches of rain a year,
which is higher than most places


in the U.S. And we still have this
chronic shortage and it's not be-
cause we don't have enough water,"
Barnes said. "It's not a shortage of
water it's a shortage of leader-
ship. There is plenty of water to go
around if we manage it properly."


Meet Grand Lady Rose Bynum


Few people can claim Rose
Bynum's pedigree. She is a
fourth-generation Winter
Parker. Her great-grandfa-
ther Dempsey Phillips was
a cook on a train that came
to Winter Park from Vir-
ginia. He liked the town so
much he hopped off and
stayed. When Winter Park
celebrated its centennial in


1982, Rose's mother Olive
Charlton and Ray Trovillion
were honored in the parade
as Winter Park's oldest liv--
ing natives.
Today Rose lives two
doors west from the house
in which she was born on
Jan. 25, 1925. She is proud
that her original home,
built by her father Richard


Charlton in 1915 at 512 W.
Canton Ave., has been des-
ignated by the Winter Park
Historic Preservation Com-
mission registry of Historic
Places. Richard bought four
lots on West Canton Avenue,
one for each of his four chil-
dren's future homes. At the
corner of Canton and Penn-
sylvania Avenue, where Rose
now lives, her father created
a playground with swings, a
seesaw and croquet lawn. In
those days black children
couldn't use the white chil-
dren's park. Until he died,
Rose's brother lived across
the street. Her daughter,


Audra, lives next door.
The accessories in a per-
son's living room reveal a
lot about that resident. This
holds true in Rose Bynum's
home. On the mantle over
the fireplace is a collection
of porcelain angels, remind-
ers of the many human an-
gels who have influenced
Rose's life. In turn, there
are many who regard her
as such.. One of the earliest
was Mrs. McMasters, a lady
on the East Side. She had
begged Rose's mother to
help her care for her home
and little boy, Jimmy. She
reasoned that Rose and Jim-


my were the same age and
Olive could watch over both
children.
On any given day you
could see little Rose and
Jimmy McMasters furiously
pedaling their tricycles up
and down the sidewalk near
the Winter Park Country
Club. Before leaving for sum-
mers up North, Mrs. McMas-
ters would deliver boxes of
new school clothes for Rose.
Reminiscing.about the ever-
thoughtful Mrs. McMasters,
Rose smiles as she recalls
the many rainy days Jimmy's

> turn to BYNUM on page A9


This is second in a series ofprofiles of the Grand Ladies
of WinterPark who will be honored at the Winter Park
HistoricalAssociation's second annual Peacock Ball.

MARTHA McHENRY
GUEST WRITER


~--~-~------11-~1-~


Thursday, September 25, 2008 Pg


Wrlinter Park / Maitland Observery


.V I I f .. " ._ .- .. ..- '. ". ". ., -




They catch rain to save Florida's H20






Pane 8 Thursday, September 25, 2008 Winter Park I Maitland Observer


Cinema


Areamovi tims forF3..4 ySep. 2
Ti- sar geealyvai frStudy n-Srda o cl c 'c z-


Winter Park Village
510 N. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park
407-628-0035
FOREVER STRONG (PG-13)
12:55,3:30, 7:25, 10:00, 12:45am

EAGLE EYE (PG-13) 11:40am,
1:20, 2:40,4:00, 5:25,7:40,8:15,
10:15,10:55,12:50am

FIREPROOF (PG) 1:00, 3:50,7:20,
10:10

THE LUCKY ONES (R) 12:45,
3:20,7:35,10:30

MIRACLE AT ST ANNA (R)
12:10,3:35,7:10,10:40

ROBODOC (R) 12:30, 2:50,5:00,
7:55,10:20,12:35am

11:55am, 2:25,4:50,7:30,9:50,.
12:10am

GHOST TOWN (PG-13) 1:15,
3:40,6:50,9:40,12:25am

LAKEVIEW TERRACE (PG-13)
12:40,1:30, 3:25, 4:15, 715, 8:05,
10:05,10:45




Calendar
Oktoberfest comes to Casselberry
from 2 p.m.to midnight Saturday, Oct.
4, thanks to the German-American
Society of Central Florida. Enjoy Ger-
man food, beer, music and dancing,
for $5. Children 12 and younger are
free. The event is at 381 Orange Lane
in Casselberry. Call 407-834-0574
for more information.
The University Club of Winter Park
presents a free "WineFest" from 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4. The
wine tasting event is open to the pub-
lic. Light refreshments and soft drinks
will also be provided.


IGOR (PG) 12:00,2:15,4:35,6:45,
9:35,12:05am

MY BEST FRIEND'S GIRL (R)
12:05, 2:55,5:40,8:10, 10:50

BURN AFTER READING (R)
11:50am,'1:45, 2:10,4:30,7:05,
8:00, 10:25,12:15am

RIGHTEOUS KILL (R) 11:45am,
2:20, 5:20,8:25,10:50

TOWELHEAD (R) 1:05,4:05,7:45,
10:35

TYLER PERRY'S THE FAMILY
THAT PREYS (PG-13) 12:35, 3:15,
7:00,9:55, 12:50am

THE WOMEN (PG-13) 11:50am,
2:35,5:15,7:50, 10:30

VICKY CRISTINA BARCELONA
(PG-13) 4:10,9:45

TROPIC THUNDER (R) 1:10, 3:55,
\6:55, 9:25


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Founded in 1934, the nonprofit club
at the corner of Park and Webster av-
enues, offers educational programs
and provides grants to college stu-
dents and community organizations.
Call 407-644-6149 of visit Uni-
versityClubWinterPark.org for more
information.
Most Precious Blood Catholic
Church in Oviedo hosts a pet bless-
ing event from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Oct.
5 at Lawton Chiles Middle School on
State Road 419 in east Oviedo. People
can bring their pets to be blessed by
the priest amid supporters such as


the Seminole County Animal Services
and other organizations related to-
pets and animals. Beside the usual
array of dogs and cats there will be
some exotic animals and a few
unique ones like pet skunks and rare
exotic tortoises.
Orlando hosts a Walk for Farm Ani-
mals on Saturday, Oct. 4 starting at
the Ethos Vegan Kitchen at 1235 N.
Orange Ave. in Orlando. Registration
begins at 11 a.m. with the walk at
noon. The effort benefits Farm Sanc-
tuary, which has efforts to rescue
farm animals with poor living condi-


tions and raise awareness through
educational campaigns.
Registration costs $15 in advance
and $20 on that day. Visit www.Walk-
ForFarmAnimals.org to register.
The Chenrezig Project, a Tibetan
Buddhist study and practice group,
hosts its first meeting in Winter Park
at the First Congregational Church of
Winter Park at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct.
2. The group will meet each month on *
the-first Thursday.
Meetings will consist of teach-
ings, discussion and .meditation. The
meetings will be facilitated by Mark


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The church,is at 225 S. Interlachen
Ave. E-mail Mark at mwinwood@
ChenrezigProject.org or call 352-
324-3419 for more information.
The Valencia Community College
Symphonic Band, Woodwind and
Brass Ensembles, directed by Don
Schmaus, presents a concert at 1
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2 in the atrium of
Building 3 of the East Campus. Solo-
ists will also be performing. The pro-
gram is free and open to the public;
seating is limited. The East Campus
is at 701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail in
Orlando. Call 407-582-2498 for more
information.
Michael Grunwald, a Time Maga-
zine correspondent, speaks to the
challenges. of restoring the Ever-
glades at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 7 at
Harry P. Leu Gardens, 1920 N. Forest
Ave. in Orlando.
The forum lasts until noon. It is free
and open to the public. Register at
metro@mail.ucf.edu or call 407-823-
2741. Visit www.metrocenter.ucf.edu
for more information.
After five years of monthly shows,
Cranes Comedy comes to an end at
7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30. Altamonte
Springs has discontinued its sponsor-
ship of the program due to budget
cuts. Since the regular facilities at
Cranes Roost Park are still under wa-
ter, the finale will be at the Eastmonte
Civic Center on Ronald Reagen Bou-
levard south of State Road 436. The
show is free.
Leon Lilly, a former Winter Park
High School student, will be perform-
ing along with John Weyrick and Pe-
ter Alden
Call 407-571-8863 for more infor-
mation.


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Page 8 TusaSpebr2,20


Winter Park /Maitland Observer


- errlCI






Winter Park / Maitand Observer Thursday, September 25, 2008 Page 9


BYNUM I Rose had angels watching

over her, and was an angel to others


< continued from page A7

mother would drive over to the
Hannibal Square School in her
big black Buick to bring the little
girl a raincoat, umbrella and rain
boots.
After Rose attended, Hanni-
bal Square" School, she went as a
boarder to Hungerford Vocation-
al High School in Eatonville. Not
surprisingly, the beautiful teen-
ager was voted Miss Hungerford
High and as such rode on many
parade floats.
Upon graduation, Rose went
to New York and worked at the
Gotham Coat and Suit Company.
After a few years she realized that
New York didn't make her happy
like Winter Park.
She returned, and was briefly
married to Lenwood Bynum. They
had one daughter, Audra.
In the 1950s, Rose met an-
other angel who turned out to
be the love of her life, Dr. George
Schanck. She had taken her moth-
er to a medical appointment, and
as Olive's regular doctor was un-
available, Schanck substituted.
Some things are just meant to be.
Rose and George were together
for 30 wonderful years before his
death in 1980.
George had come to Orlando
from New Jersey. It was there that
he met his good friend Count
Basie. Back then, hotels were not
open to blacks. When the Count
came to town, he stayed with
George. Ronnie's Restaurant in
Colonial Plaza was a favorite place
to take the famous bandleader.
Sometimes when the band swung
through Florida, Rose and George
would join them on the tour bus.
Their passion was world travel:
The living room walls are lined
with shelves filled with souvenirs
of their many trips. There are exot-
ically dressed dolls. A book about
Christ the Redeemer reminds of a
trip to Rio during Carnival. Scrap-
books document a cruise on the
Queen Elizabeth II ocean liner
to France and Spain. Rose loved
shopping abroad and talks about
the perfect pair of boots bought in
Paris 'and the bespoke shimmer-
ing silk dress and matching purse
from Hong Kong.
The living room also discloses
another passion ... the Orlando
Magic. Rose is a charter season
ticket holder, and grouped to-
gether and prominently displayed
are all kinds of Magic parapherna-
lia, including a basketball signed
by Julius Erving and a picture of
Shaquille O'Neal.
There are also pictures of an-
gels Susan and Herbert Robinson
for whom Rose worked 40 years
as a personal assistant in their
home, supervising a staff of seven
plus the gardener. Mr. R., as Rose
called him, was a philanthropist
who often gave anonymously. He
contributed heavily to the Morse
Gallery and gave the observatory,
as well as acres of land, to UCF.
His generosity was not limited to
institutions; the Robinsons gave
Rose new cars and a new home.
They called her the daughter they
never had.
Along the way Rose raised
George's adopted grandson Chris.
Rose was Chris' angel. She took in
the neglected little 4-year-old and
loved him like a son. Chris gradu-
ated from Emory Universitywhere


"-'.



Rose Bynum will be honored alongside other
notable Winter Park women at an event in No-
vember called the Peacock Ball, hosted by the
Winter Park Historical Association.


he was.later a dean. Today he is on
the faculty at Yale.
Rose Bynum is a preservation-
ist and a historian. She has always
been involved in key West Side
institutions. The first West Side
church, Ward AME Chapel, was
founded in 1893. When the con-
gregation needed a larger build-
ing, Rose's father built the ceiling
and the altar for the church on
Pennsylvania Avenue. Her mother
was a deaconess and stewardess.
Her father was a deacon and an
usher. Rose remembers napping
beside him on the back row dur-
ing the long services. Today Rose
is secretary of the Lay People,
church historian and Leader of
Class Number Four.
On July 29,1937, the Ideal
Woman's Club was formed. Mary-
DePugh, who had moved to -Win-
ter Park from Chicago, was presi-
dent. Olive Charlton was trea-
surer. Because her mother was so
involved in the programs, young
Rose was often enlisted to stand at
the door and take tickets or help
serve dinner. When the club cel-
ebrated its 40th anniversary, Rose
was called on to give the history of
the organization. She says the club
continues to thrive, but she hasn't
gotten around to joining yet.
Today, the still-beautiful and
elegant octogenarian stays active
in the community, by volunteer-
ing her time as a docent at the
Winter Park Historical Museum.
She has served on the Board of
Directors of the Winter Park His-
torical Association. Twenty years
ago, along with Janie Baker, Rose
founded Bridge Builders, an orga-
nization dedicated to improving
communication between the East
and West sides of Winter Park. In
recent years the organization has
become increasingly important
as the East side encroaches more
and more on the West, running off
all but a few black businesses. One
thing is for certain: There will be
no three-story building or a park-
ing garage on Rose's block at Can-
ton and Pennsylvania. There is
not enough money to entice Rose
Bynum to give up her heritage.


Thursday, September 25, 2008 Pg


Winter Park /Maitland Observer







Page 10 Thursday, September 25, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Family


Bingo at Riverside
Park in Oviedo
Bring the family for an evening
of bingo at Riverside Park in
Oviedo at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept.
26. Prizes will be awarded to
the winners. Cards cost $2 each,
with a maximum of five cards
per purchase per person. Call
Sal Rovetto at 407-971-5579 or
e-mail srovetto@cityofoviedo.net
for more information.

Aquatic adver.'ur-
promised in Gein e-
Join an aquatic expert as he
takes you through the world
underwater on an Aquatic
Adventures hike! Meet up at 8
a.m. Saturday, Sept. 27 at Lake
Proctor Wilderness Area at 920
E. State Road 46 in Geneva. This
is an interactive hike where you
have the chance to learn what is
-found in the waters of Seminole.
County! You do not have to
go in the ,water to participate
in this hike. Reservations are
required! Call Amy Raub at 407-
349-0959 or e-mail araub@
seminolecountyfl.gov to sign up
and for more information.

Fun Day for kids
in Oviedo this month
When school is out, Riverside Park
is in! Come to 1600 Lockwood
Blvd. for a Fun Day program
Tuesday, Sept. 30 hosted by the
city. This fun-filled program is
for children ages 5-12. Program
hours at Riverside Park are 7:30
a.m. to 6 p.m. Children must
bring a lunch, two snacks, a
bathing suit and towel. The cost
is $25 for residents and $45 for
non-residents.
Call Sal Rovetto at 407-
971-5579 or e-mail srovetto@
cityofoviedo.net for more
* information.

Joan Walker to host
'Science Night'
Kindergarten through fifth-grade
students and their parents are
invited to "Splash into Science
Night," a. hands-on, interactive
family event focusing on the
importance of Florida's water
resources, at Joan Walker
Elementary School in Chuluota.
Splash into -Science Night,
scheduled from 6 to 8 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 29, gives students
the chance to learn about the
water cycle, how water moves
through the aquifer, and about
water conservation through a
variety of crafts and games.
Meteorologist Rob EIcher from
WKMG-TV Channel 6 will also be
a special guest volunteer.
Families are encouraged to
join students at the event in the
Joan Walker Elementary School
cafeteria, at 3101 Snow Hill
Road in Chuluota. Dinner will be
available for purchase from the
Joan Walker PTA. ,


PHOTO COURTESY OF LONG AND SCOTT FARMS
Long and Scott Farms builds an enormous corn maze annually, with a different theme each year. This year's theme is Florida Agriculture, and will be depicted as a Highland Tractor
working a farm. The Farms offer the maze as an inexpensive way to spend a day in the country. Above is last year's maze, with a space theme.


AMY K.D. TOBIK
r .. ","

or those who revel in
getting lost, Scott's
Maze Adventure Park
provides an amazing au-
tumn adventure.
Without the luxury of
special gadgets or a global
positioning system, visitors
to the Mt. Dora farm must
rely on clues and teamwork
to make their way through
a life-size puzzle surround-
ed by nearly 10-foot walls
of corn. It only seems like


there is no easy way out.
Located off
Highway 441,
the winding six- '
acre corn maze
provides a day
of good old-
fashioned fam-
ily fun. Last year Long
the homegrown offer
maze attracted a m
16,000 people au
over the course of Cou
two months. Moi
"We are ex- are
cited about this
year's theme, fc
which is Florida Th
Agriculture," said froi
Rebecca Scott Nov.
Ryan, manager of to
maze operations and
and a member of Sund
the family-owned ets
company. "Our Th


(heir Scott's Zellwood Triple
Sweet Gourmet Corn, Great
Scott Cabbage and Great
Scott Kirby Cucumbers.
Creatively cutting corn-
fields for entertainment is
a relatively new concept in
the United States. The maze
craze first began in 1993
when England's renowned
maze designer Adrian Fisher
helped create the first corn
maze in the world, which
Disney World Producer Don
Frantz called "The Amaz-
ing Maize Maze," located in
Pennsylvania.
Today, hundreds of corn


g and Scott Farms
rs an adventure in
naze of corn each
utumn at 26216
nty Road 448A in
unt Dora. Tickets
e $8 for children
3-16 and $10
ir 17 and older.
he maze is open
)m Oct. 4 through
30, from 10 a.m.
5 p.m. Saturday
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
lays. The last tick-
are sold at 3 p.m.
e farm is closed


main goal from on Mon
the beginning is reserved f
to educate and most v
inform about the Call 352
vanishing Ameri- or visit Lc
can farmer." The tFrms
thick cornfields more in
have been clev-
erly cut to depict
a Highland Tractor work-
ing the farm. The Scott fam-
ily has been farming their
land in Lake and Orange
counties for more than 45
years, and is also known for


days and is
or groups on
weekdays.
-383-6900 -
ongandScot-
s.com for
formation.


mazes are pop-
ping up across
the country and
abroad. The
Guinness Book
of World Records
declared a 40-
acre corn maze
located in Dix-
on, Calif., as the
world's largest
in 2007. Eager to
beat the record,
several farms
have increased
the size of their
maze this season.
Scott's Maze
Adventure Park
cut its first maze
five years ago
with the help
of a company
in Pennsylva-
nia called Maize
Quest. Each year
a new design is
chosen and the
family carefully
marks the fields
and cuts the in-
tricate paths ac-
cording to the


provided plan.
Anna Sciarrino, direc-
tor of sales and marketing
at Scott's Maze Adventure
Park, said the Scott family
was inspired to jump on the


"agritainment" movement
after visiting farms in the
Northeast. It was an oppor-
tunity to create additional
revenue and entertain local
families.
Experts say the challeng-
ing maze can take from 45
minutes to two hours to
complete, depending on a
somewhat keen sense of di-
rection. If you've lost your
bearings, visitors recom-_
mend climbing -the large
wooden lookout stand lo-
cated within the field to get
a bird's eye view. A secret
exit does allow visitors to
leave if necessary and flags
are given to every group in
case someone needs assis-
tance.
To make the journey
even more exciting, visi-
tors are given a game sheet
with pictures and clues to
use while wandering the
path. And because of the
agricultural theme chosen
for 2008, children will learn
about a farmer's life in Flor-
ida along the way. Special
"Maize-o-Vision" glasses
can be purchased for $1 to
help decode the mystery.
The park also boasts a
Mist Maze, a 60-foot Super
Slide, and a picnic and play
area. The Labyrinth/Rock
Maze provides guests with


a relaxing 5- to 10-minute
stroll into the center of the
labyrinth and back. Chil-
dren may enjoy the one-
and-a-half-acre Mini Corn
Maze, just. their size, which
can be completed in an esti-
mated 20 to 30 minutes.
This year the park has
added a program 'called
"Fishing for Kids" in part-
nership with "Fishing for
Success," a joint program
with the University of Flor-
ida and the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission. Children can be in-
troduced to fishing through
the catch and release pro-
gram for an additional $2.
Group farm tours are
also available for $5 per per-
son and require at least 20
participants. Hayrides are
offered on the weekends for
the general public for $4 per
person.
Sciarrino said the maze
is part of an effort to pro-
vide families with an iniex-
pensive way to spend a day
in the country and learn all
about where their vegeta-
bles come from.
"It's our way to educate
and it also provides anoth-
er revenue stream, albeit a
small one," Sciarrino said.
"It is truly a labor of love."


PESVC--O--NO rROL


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Starting at S35


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Page 10 TusaSpebr2,20


Winter Park / Maitland Observer









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Letters {M the Z Miooc


'Now is the right time'
to retool rail agreement
I read the Orlando Sentinel edito-
rial attacking Commissioner Beth
Dillaha for requesting that you
review and consider renegotiating
the terms of Winter Park's com-
muter rail agreement. Please do
not be intimidated by the Senti-
nel's ongoing support of a regional
commuter rail system with a total
disregard for the unlimited costs
on Winter Park for operating and
maintaining the commuter rail
system.
We will be paying a prorated
share of the capital regional invest-
ment through the 30-year bonds
based on track miles and a pro-
rated share of the operations and
maintenance based on boarding at
Winter Park. Winter Park taxpayers
will still pay Orange County taxes
that will also finance this project.
This means we will be taxed again
to pay Orange County's share of
the commuter rail operations and
maintenance. This is not fair to
Winter Park taxpayers who paid;
for example, more than $18 mil-
lion in ad valorem taxes to Orange


County last year.
I also understand that the Cen-
tral Florida Commuter Rail Com-
mission was formed to make deci-
sions on setting fares and other
commuter tail operations deci-
sions after the approval of the Win-
ter Park-Orange County commuter
rail agreement. All four counties
have representatives on this Com-
mission. Of the participating Or-
ange County municipalities, only
Orlando has a voting position on
this Commission, leaving Winter
Park and Maitland without repre-
sentation.
The Sentinel asked, "Why talk
now?" Now is the right time be-
cause the approval of the station
design will cause funds to be ex-
pended that Winter Park will be
required to repay if we ultimately
decide to opt out of commuter rail
due to financial constraints. In ad-
dition to station costs, will Winter
Park have to continue to pay 4
percent of the cost of the 30-year
bonds if it decides to opt out? If so,
this was not what the Winter Park
voters were told by the city before
the March 2007 election.


The terms of the agreement ex-
ecuted by the prior Commission
have not been met. This is your
opportunity to negotiate a more
reasonable financial obligation for
the city.
You have the support of many
citizens Monday as you exercise
your fiduciary responsibility in re-
viewing the current commuter rail
agreement.
Carolyn Cooper
Winter Park

Observer columnist,
sources spout 'lies'
OK, now I'm convinced that Louis
Roney doesn't review his columns
before submitting them for publi-
cation. In the Observer's Sept. 11
edition he says, "Once published,
can a vicious lie ever be effectively
erased?" and "How can we dare
to pass damning judgment upon
those who may be, to quote Tho-
reau, only 'marching to a different
drummer'?"
Then under his Fallen Apples
section, he smears Sen. Barack
Obama for a speech in Germany
and quotes a conservative colum-


nist who belittles Obama's eco-
nomic plan to give middle-income
Americans a tax cut. Analysis by
the Tax Policy Center, a joint proj-
ect of the Urban Institute and the
Brookings Institution, shows that
Obama's plan gives the biggest cuts
to those who make the least, while
Sen. John McCain would give the
largest cuts to the very wealthy.
In the Sept. 18 edition he quotes
another conservative columnist
who intentionally misrepresents
Obama's legislative record in the Il-
linois and U.S. Senates. Finally, and
possibly the most outrageous and
unforgivable, he insinuates that
Obama's policy on a woman's right
to choose would have resulted in
the death of Alaska Gov. Sarah Pa-
lin's newborn son (who has Down
syndrome). It was a vicious lie and
inappropriate for a community
newspaper.
Can this be the year we stop the
smears and lies to focus on the
economy, health care, education
and. ending the Iraq war?
Todd W Ruopp
Winter Park


0 -


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3 "-_ _


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Thursday, September 25, 2008 Pae1


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Page 12 Thursday, September 25, 2008 Winter Park / Maitand Observer


Play On!


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney,

Provence

I have traveled a good
deal in Concord,"
Henry David Thoreau
said in 1854.
Those words came to my
mind several times after
dear friends gave me a copy
of Peter Mayle's delight-
ful travel and "settling
down" masterpiece, "A
Year in Provence."
Thoreau probably
did not miss a boulder, a
gnarled elm tree, a loner
marching to his own drum-
mer, or even a clump of
violets, in his wanderings
around Walden Pond and
in the town of Concord.
And to like degree, "A
Year in Provence" testi-
fies eloquently to Peter
Mayle's acuity in scanning
the small section of South
France, which he holds
under his magnifying glass, .
a glass which focuses with
droll humor on people who
are memorable oddities,
and on food abundant,
glorious French food.
"A Year in Provence"
is concomitantly a Gallic
version of "Mr. Blandings
Builds His Dream House."
The ambitious, year-long;


snail's-pace modernization
of the Mayles' ancient stone
farmhouse- a mas pro-
vides more than thq usual
construction problems, and
parades an evolving stage-
set rife with amiably histri-
onic workers and often
unwelcome guests.
The pursuit, preparation
and consumption of local
victuals with characters
of their own intertwine
as a genetic thread in the
Mayle narrative helix. The
Mayles have an apprecia-
tive wonder at the serious
stomachs of their newly
adopted Provencale neigh-
bors.
That the Mayles had
migrated from a bland
English cuisine likely
enhanced the scrump-
tiousness of gastronomy in
the sunshiny milieu south
of the French Alps. The
Mayles' almost glutton-
ous enthusiasm for French
cooking speaks with the
zealousness of the religious
convert.
.Peter Mayle is a writer
of such easy and word-rich
style that he brings the
taste of cheeses and wines
to the reader's palate. At
book's end, I had the feel-
ing that I didn't need to
eat for at least 12 hours! As
he and his confreres drink
their aniseed marc, we
begin to understand the
aesthetic timelessness of
the'French artisan's work-
ing day.
Workers in France think
a long time about how
a thing should be done
before they get around to
tackling it. Re-doing an old
house, putting in central
heating or a swimming
pool, painting, de-rutting
and gravelling a washed-
out driveway, making and
delivering solid-stone out-
door furniture these are
more than physical, or even
aesthetic, matters.
They are, in Provence,


philosophical matters to
be pondered, mulled over.
They require more than
physical exertion, or a date
x-ed on the calendar -
they require the exact right
mood, a state not objective-
ly attainable.
A kind of noncombative
smiling patience takes over
the Mayles' life. They are so
fascinated with the people,
the scenery, the history, the
eating and drinking in a
little slice of Provence that
interminable delays even
discomforts which might
have ruffled them plenty
in London don't bring a
wrinkle to their brows in
the South of France.
Mayle tells us of his
plasterer, Ramon, distin-
guished truffiste. Elusive
and expensive (upward of
5,000 francs per kilo in the
marketplace in 1987!), the
truffle is a delicacy that can
be bought only with cash.
"The truffiste is not
anxious to participate in
the crackpot government
scheme the rest of us call
income tax."
"Truffles can't be culti-
vated; the propagation of-
truffles seems to be a hap-
hazard affair,understood
by nature. There is only one
way to enjoy truffles with-
out spending a fortune, and
that is to find them your-
self."
Trained pigs root for
truffles under the oak trees.
But peasants prod for them
with sticks, which is "less
conspicuous than walking
around with a pig. Truffle
hunters like to protect their
sources."
The Mayles learn to wait,
to enjoy. They are not inno-
cents abroad. They accom-
modate gracefully all that is
uncommon to them, even
the proximity of the small
but dangerous vipers that
inhabit the region.
While the Mayles cheer-
fully exist amid the chaos


of incomplete work on
their house, very interest-
ing workmen become the
stars of this fascinating lit-
erary portrait gallery of lov-
able, highly individualistic,
maddening people.
M. Sanchez, a sturdy
rustic who works on the
house, is a mushroom
expert. He knows which
ones are delicacies and
which ones are deadly. He
goes mushroom hunting
in the forest with a rub-
ber boot on one foot and
a tennis shoe on the other.
He leads the search with
his rubber-booted foot,
while he pokes around
in the leaves looking for
mushrooms. "The rubber
boot is to keep me from the
vipers," he says. "They like
to be where mushrooms
are."
The hermit-like neigh-
bor, Massot, says of the
vipers, "Eh, oui; they are,
not big. But if you're bitten,
you get to a doctor in 45
minutes or else."
The viper of the Luberon
region, says Massot, "will
normally avoid humans
and will attack only if pro-
voked. When this happens,
run in zig-zags prefer--
ably uphill because an
enraged viper can spring
in short straight bursts on
level ground as fast as a
running man ..."
Mayle adds, "He went
home to his breakfast leav-
ing me to pick my way cau-
tiously through the forest

Peter writes, "Provence is
such a shock to the north-
ern system; everything is
full-blooded. Temperatures
are.extreme, ranging from
a hundred degrees down to
minus 20.
"Rain, when it comes,
falls with such abandon
that it washes roads away
and closes the Autoroute.
"The Mistral is a brutal,
exhausting wind, bitter in


winter, and harsh and dry
in summer.
"The food is full of
strong, earthy flavors that
can overwhelm the diges-
tion of a less assertive diet.
"The wine is young and
deceptive, easy to drink but
sometimes higher in alco-
holic content than those
that are treated with more
caution.
"There is nothing bland
about Provence, and it can
poleaxe people as it had
our English houseguests,
Susan and Ted. They left us
to convalesce in more tem-
perate surroundings."
Mayle recounts with
straight face being invited
out to a stuffy party of
haute-couture Parisiennes
and their soignis com-
panions who comport
themselves snobbily while
eating snobbish cuisine to
the music of Vivaldi. When,
suddenly, a tape of Little
Richard belts out "Good
Golly, Miss Molly" from the
hi-fi, all hell breaks loose ...
Shoes come off, hips
swing, and the tone of the
evening is set.
When the Mayles deter-
mine to get their inter-
minable re-doing project
completed, they come'up
with hospitable and joyous
ways to arouse a common
tide of noblesse oblige in
the commune of people
involved with getting their
fine country house ready
to live in! What better way
to get everything finally
in order from a group of
fiercely individualist arti-
sans than to invite them
all with their wives to
a Christmas day @rpas to
"show off their indi-
vidual contributions to
the house's excellence? It
works.
At year's end, the Mayles
have come to understand
Provence ...


Reader Op- Ed


Maitland's opportunity to start fresh


Maitland is engaged in a down-
town redevelopment contract with
the Brossier Company through its
president, Bob Reese. This is a $400
million project. Despite trying, the
Bossier Company hasn't been able
to fully fund it. The city continues
incurring heavy costs waiting for
the tax revenue this project was to
bring.
The city has spent millions of
dollars installing the necessary in-
frastructure to support the down-
town development. In the past
five-plus years, the city has also
negotiatede" with two other devel-
opers with the same result: They
could not obtain financing. All this
"negotiation" was done without
the city first vetting the financial
ability of any of the developers.
The city wants these developers'
proposals to succeed; the city bond
debt will soon exceed a million
dollars a year. The city originally
proposed to pay the bond debt
with the increased taxes paid by
these completed projects. The city


has granted each of the developers
numerous requested extensions
of time and approved many re-
quested changes. After each change
the project is announced as being
more feasible and with a starting
time just a few months away. Yet,
nothing happens, except that the
cost to the city continues to mount.
The city and the developers usu-
ally set deadlines on these exten-
sions in the hope of spurring the
start of construction.
Some of these extensions were
reportedly based on a threat.that
noncompliance would result in the
contract being canceled by the city.
Such a deadline is going to occur
Tuesday, Sept. 30.
On Sept. 16 the city attorney,
along with his assistant and the
Maitland director of community
development, met with a group of
concerned citizens at City Hall to
answer their questions about the
agreement and its current status.
What follows is a report of that dis-
cussion.


The city officials affirmed that
at the end of this month another
of these "drop dead" extension
deadlines would occur. These city
officials expressed concern that the
Brossier Company will again an-
nounce that it has been unable to
finance the latest revised develop-
ment project.
Considering the history of the
relationship between the parties to
the agreement and the lack of any
progress toward completion of any
of the developers' prior proposals,
if the Brossier Company again fails
to secure funding, the Council can
and must act for the good of the
city use its option and cancel the
agreement.
If the city chooses to terminate
the agreement with Brossier, there
has been great concern for the po-
tential of damage liabilities against
the city from the developer. The
city's protection in the developer's
agreement is apparently subordi-
nate to the various needs of the
developer.


The current agreement has
evolved into a can of worms that
has already cost the city millions.
The city sold the public on this
project at a cost of about $13 mil-
lion, funded with bond proceeds.
The bond issue passed, but with
cost overruns, the city's costs are
currently believed to be $14 million
more than that original budget.
If the current agreement's lack of
construction activity is allowed to
continue, the cost to the city will
continue to climb, all without a
benefit to the city.
The Maitland city attorney said
if the city terminates the agree-
ment, the chance of a damage suit
against Maitland by Brossier Com-
pany or Reese is zero.
On Sept. 30, the City Council
must rid the city of the financial
burden of the agreement. It must
cancel the agreement and start
over with a clean slate.
John Scussel
Maitland


Page 12 Thursday, September 25, 2008


Winter Park /Maitland Observer






Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, September 25, 2008 Page 13


(oQ Notices


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-8566, Div. 40
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
WATERFORD LAKES CAR WASH LLC, a Florida
Limited Liability Company; CASSANDRA LEVINE,
Individually; MARK LANG & ASSOCIATES; STATE
OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; ORANGE
COUNTY, a Political Subdivision of the State of
Florida, and THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, -
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 16 day of
October, 2008, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:
TRACT 1
Lot 12, WATERFORD LAKE PLAZA, according
to map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 49, Pages 11 and 12, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
TRACT 2
Together with rights to use drainage facilities
as set forth in that certain Non-Exclusive
Drainage Easement made and executed by
Lockheed Martin Corporation in favor of
Waterford Lakes Community Association,
Inc., dated September 6, 2000, and record-
ed September 8, 2000 in Official Records
Book 6083, Page 3488, as assigned to
Orange County, Florida by Assignment dated
September 19, 2001 and recorded January
11,2002 in Official Records Book 6432, Page
6863, both of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida (all in accordance with the
terms of said Easement).
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgement of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2008-CA-008566-0, now pending in the Circuit
Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TOD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Apy person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 16 day of September, 2008.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Norma J. Felshaw
CIRCUIT COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEYP.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
9/25,10/2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2008-CP-002023-0
Division 1
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELEANOR F. SCHWARZ,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ELEANOR F. SCHWARZ, deceased, File Number
2008-CP-002023-0, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Suite
340, Orlando, Florida 32802-4494.
The-names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
basing claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is
Sept. 18, 2008. .
Attorney for Personal Representative:
PATRICK A. RALEY, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 264202
Infantino and Berman
RP.O. Drawer 30
Winter Park, Florida 32790-0030
Telephone: (407) 644-4673
Facsimile: (407) 644-4128
Personal Representative:
THOMAS V. INFANTINO
RO. Drawer 30.
Winter Park. Florida 32790-0030
Telephone: (407) 644-4673
Facsimile: (407) 644-4128
9/18,9/25
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA
COUNTY OF ONSLOW
IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE
DISTRICT COURT DIVISION
08 CvD 3361
ERIK KIMMEY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEPHANIE KIMMEY,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBUCATION
TO: STEPHANIE KIMMEY
Address Unknown
TAKE NOTICE that a pleading seeking relief
against you has been filed In the above-entitled ac-
Von. The nature of the relief being sought is as fol-
lows: ABSOLUTE DIVORCE BASED UPON ONE YEAR
SEPARATION.
You are required to make defense to such plead-
ing not later than October 20,2008, said date being
40 days from the day of the first publication, and
upon your failure to do so, the Plaintiff who Is seek-
ing relief against you will apply to the Court for the
relief sought.
This, the 3rd day of September, 2008.
MCNAMARA LAWFIRM, P.C.
Amanda G. Myers
Attorney for Plaintiff
309 New Bridge Street
Jacksonville, NC 28540
(910) 938-7191
9/11, 9/18, 9/25


IN THE CIRCUIT C IRT FOR irljil,F CAl.rT,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2008CP000433-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY BESS VOGELAAR a/k/a DOROTHY
VOGELAAR STEVENS a/k/a DOROTHY B. STEVENS
a/k/a DOROTHY B. VOGELAAR STEVENS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Dorothy Bess
Vogelaar, deceased, whose date of death was Feb-
ruary 15, 2008, and whose social security number
is XXX-XX-0953, File number 2008CP000433-0, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 425
North Orange Avenue, Room 310, Orlando, Florida
32801. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is Sep-
tember 18, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Daniel M. Hunter
Florida Bar No. 038132
Hunter & Marchman, P.A.
227 West Park Avenue
Winter Park, FL 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-6900
Personal Representative:
Anita Vogelaar
1630 Lyndale Boulevard
Maitland, Florida 32751
9/18, 9/25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2007-CA-001162-0 )
DIVISION: 34
RUTHYMARRERO,
Plaintiff,
KAY HUSSAIN, a/k/a KAY ERDMAN; ALEEM HUS-
SAIN, STEPHEN MOSES RAMPERSAD and all other
unknown Defendants, .
Defendants.
STEVEN MOSES RAMPERSAD,
Third Party Plaintiff,
VS.
STACEY SWINDLE, JENNIFER L. KERSEY, SECURE
TITLE, LLC, ALEEM HUSSAIN, and KAY HUSSAIN
Third Party Defendants.,
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: KAY HUSSAIN a/lka KAY ERDMAN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to
the following-described propertyin Orange County,
Florida:
Lot 36, BACCHUS GARDENS, SECTION ONE,
according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 6, Pages 50-51, of the Public Records of
Orange County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required
to serve and original of your written defenses, if
any, with the Orange County Clerk of Court within
30 days from the first date of publication, and to
serve a copy on Third Party Plaintiff's Attorney, John
G. Pierce, of the Law Firm of Pierce and Associates,
PL., whose address is 800 North Ferncreek Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 38083, within 30 days from the
first date of publication; otherwise a Default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
LYDIA GARDNER, CLERK OF COURT
By: Kelly Grubbs,
As Deputy Clerk
425 North Orange Ave.
Suite 310
Orlando, Florida 32801
Copy to:
John G. Pierce, Esquire
Pierce & Associates, P.L.
800 North Ferncreek Avenue
Orlando, FL 32803
In accordance with the Disabilities Act, persons with
disabilities needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should contact Court
Administration at 1-407-665-4330 not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing
impaired, (TOO) 1-+800-955-8771m or Voice (V)
1-800-955-9770, via Florida Relay Service.
9/11,9/18, 9/25, 10/2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2008-CA-019851
MIRIAM LAUREANO
Plaintiff,
vs.
GIOVANI HERNANDEZ, JOSE R. HERNANDEZ and
JOSE X. HERNANDEZ
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Giovani Hernandez, 2127 Sorrento Cir., Winter
Park, FL 32792
Jose R. Hemandez and Jose X. Hernandez, 2989
Roberswood Dr, Powder Springs, GA 30127, De-
fendants, and to all parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against Defendants, and all par-
ties having or claiming to have any rght, title or
interest in the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that you have been designated
as defendant In a legal proceeding filed against you
for Partition of Real Property. The action Involves
real property in Orange. County, Florida, more fully
described as follows:
Lot 50, Laural Springs, according to the plat
thereof as recorded In Plat Book 4 page 16,
Public Records of Orange County, Flodrida
The action was instituted in the Ninth Judicial
Circuit Court, Orange County, Florida, and is styled
MIRIAM LAUREANO vs. GIOVANI HERNANDEZ, JOSE
R. HERNANDEZ and JOSE X. HERNANDEZ.
You are required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to the action on Francisco Colon,
Jr, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is PO Box
948181, Maitland, Florida 32794-8181, on or be- :
fore 30 days from date issued, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either before service on
Francisco Colon, JR or immediately after service;
otherwise, a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
The Court has authority In this suit to enter a
Judgment or decree In the Plaintiff's Interest which
will be binding upon you.
DATED: Sept. 8,2008
LYDIA GARDNER
Clerk of the Ninth Judicial Circuit Court
Orange County, Florida
By BEUNDA GARRETT
CML COURT SEAL
Deputy Clerk
9/18,9/25,10/2,10/9


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

CITY OF WINTER PARK
NOTICE OF INTENT AND
]cLTeminranni" r NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that the City of Winter Park intends to use the uniform method for collecting
special assessments within the platted Morseland Subdivision (plat Book 0 Page 13), within the
municipal boundaries of the City of Winter Park to fund the City's undergrounding of the neighborhood
electrical facilities.
Notice is further given that the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida will hold a Public
Hearing at the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida
32789 at 3:30 p.m., October 14, 2008 to consider adoption of a Resolution expressing its intent to
use the uniform method for collecting the assessments levied against certain properties in Morseland
Subdivision (plat Book 0 Page 13) more particularly described as the area east of Keyes Avenue, south
of Stovin Avenue, north of Webster Avenue and west of Park Avenue.
"If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, Ie/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based." (Fs. 286.0105)
"Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting."
Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk
9/18, 9/25,10/2,10/9

CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

5 PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the Historic Preservation Commission
of the City of Winter Park, Florida on Wednesday, October 8, 2008 at 9:00 a.m. in the Commission
Chambers of City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida, to consider the following PUBLIC
HEARINGS:
COR 08-009 Request of William and Jacqueline Young for a Certificate of Review for repairs
and alterations to the rear accessory dwelling unit located at 757 Maryland Avenue, including
enclosing the front screened porch; adding a window and a door in the process. Contributing
element located within the College Quarter Historic District. Zoned R-2. Parcel 10. #07-22-30-
8760-00-290.
All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information will be available in the
Planning and Community Development Department office so that citizens may acquaint themselves
with each issue and receive answers to any questions they may have prior to the meeting. (407)
599-3498.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (F.S. 286.0105)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's Office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
/s/: Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC
City Clerk
9/25


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction- the following property(s) to the high-
est bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien;, all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999
Sale date October 10 2008 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
1738 1994 Esco tl vin#: 405120LAXRJO00163 ten-
ant: walter j Longman
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
& 1911
-9/25,10/2


Florida Department of
IfC Environmental Protection




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TITLE 6. CIVIL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (Chs. 45-88)
CHAPTER 5u LEGAL AND OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENTS

50 031 Newspapeis in which legal notices ana process may oe
prublinhed

No notice or oubitcaion leQuir 10to be published in a newJpaper
in the nature ol or in lieu oi process of any kina, nature cnaraclet
or seciipilon provided for under any law of the state. whiemer
herelolore or nereafter enacted, and wether perlaining toc
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any ortner publication or no Ining to any affairs of the slate.
or 3ny country, mnicI Ofn Other a political subdivision thereof,
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publiation a newsper wic t time of sucn publicalton
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alcals matter at a postoca c th.iMlll e ili bn|l ,
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be no newspaper in existence which shall have been published
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5 32







Page 14 Thursday, September 25, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
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Pay Rate: $30,000.00-$31,162.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9363489

Sales Manager
Job Description: Responsible for prospecting
and qualifying new business. Negotiates
guest room rates, meeting room rental,
function space, and/or hotel services within
approved booking guidelines, produces
and/or reviews all sales' contracts, rate
agreements, and/or banquet/catering
event orders. Works closely with other hotel
departments to facilitate services agreed
upon by the sales office and prospective
clients. Produces monthly sales-related
reports and sales forecasts. Arranges and
conducts special events, site Inspections,
and off-site presentations for potential
clients. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $32,000.00-$37,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9362325

Administrative Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for maintaining
personal calendars and appointments.
Articulate in speech and in letter/report
composition. Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $500.00-$600.00 per week
Job Order Number: 9363572

Payroll Representative 1
Job Description: Responsible for processing
payroll. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9362752

Information Technology Infrastructure
Coordinator
Job Description: Responsible for enforcing
standard product utilization by centrally
purchasing all computer related items.
Understands and administers licensing
software and other Information technology
related products. Keeps the standard
product list updated and publishes It for use
throughout the organization. Administers
national contracts with vendors of services
and components such as hardware,
software, network, telephone, long distance,
and cellular. Resolves issues with suppliers
concerning deliveries, quality, and price.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.


Pay Rate: $32,000.00-$44,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9364198.

Plant Manager
Job Description: Responsible for overseeing
manufacturing operations. Evaluates,
develops, and implements manufacturing
process, produces products based on
customer delivery, oversees employee
practices, coordinates work assignments,
enforces company policies,trains employees
on procedures, and manages work flow.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9363703

Service Relationship Specialist
Job Description: Responsible for providing
superior service to Investment Advisors.
Follows-up on information required to
process requested transactions. Responds
to questions and resolves issues within
scope of knowledge and authority. Processes
work within established time frames, in
accordance with service standards, and
Security and Exchange Commission rules
and regulations. Handles customer contacts
with the highest level of customer service.
Contacts are routine and within established'
guidelines. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9342422

Licensed Practical and Licensed
Vocational Nurse
Job Description: Responsible for caring
for ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled
persons in hospitals, nursing homes, clinics,
private homes, group homes, and similar
.institutions. Works under the supervision
of a registered nurse. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $20.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9363135

Assistant Manager Part Time
Job Description: Responsible for supporting
the store team in meeting sales goals and
objectives through execution, coaching,
and accountability. Provides training to
sales associates and supports the Store
Manager in the training and development of
associates. Monitors stock associates and
ensures delivery information is recorded
and reported. Communicates goals and
priorities to support associates, Ensures
optimum sales floor coverage and takes
the appropriate action. Keeps store well
organized. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00-$8.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9362905

Irrigation Technician
Job Description: Responsible for ensuring
the safe and appropriate installation and
maintenance of pipes to enhance the
quality of our clients' landscape. Locates
irrigation problems, clears dirt for trenching,
makes repairs to pipes and/or valves and
closes holes and cleans up site. Completes
paperwork listing materials and hours.
.Installs pipes, pulls wires to run from pipe to
valve, and flags and repairs broken heads.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$13.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9359972

Steward
Job Description: Responsible for washing
dishes and performing other job related
kitchen duties as assigned. Work Sunday-
Monday, 7:00am-1 1:0bpm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9335346

Security Officer
Job Description: Responsible for the safety
of guests and employers within the hotel.
Drives around resort maintaining safety.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number. 9332637

Sales Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for assisting
in executing sales strategies and
objectives, assisting in proposal writing and
presentations, monitoring the performance
of existing products and services,
maintaining marketing database to include
customer price and sales files, producing
regularly scheduled reports from marketing


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Available from Commercial Newt


database, and assisting with sales program
implementation, customer contracts, mailing
lists/promotions and price databases.
Assists customers with inquiries, resolves
issues, and provides administrative support
to the PAFCO sales team worldwide. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $13.00-$15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9365327

Management Analyst
Job Description: Responsible for reviewing
management plans submitted for project
feasibility, implementing strategies and.
overall project management in conformance
with federal criteria. Manages and monitors
agreements for disaster relief grants for
hazard mitigation sub-grantees to assist in
mitigating the effects of future disasters.
Corresponds with Federal Emergency
Management Agency staff on transmittal
of project summaries, recommendations,
obligations, de-obligations, project
closeouts, technical reviews, and guidance
as needed. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $18.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9364844

Architect
Job Description: Responsible for coordinating
the preparation of complete sets of plans
including multiple views, detail drawings
and assembly drawings using computer
aided design (CAD) and other techniques.
Work days and hours may vacy.
Pay Rate: $41,101.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9363331

Case Manager
Job Description: Responsible for pre-
suit case management, litigation, and
preparation of documents Works under the
supervision of an attorney. Work Monday-
Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience -
Job Order Number: 9363366

Account Executive
Job Description: Responsible for maintaining
executive level contacts with accounts;
assure continuous customer satisfaction
and protect existing revenues, provide
required proposals, contracts and reports.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $25,000.00 per year plus
commission
Job Order Number: 9362467

Tax Accountant III
Job Description: Responsible for preparing
or reviewing Federal, State and local tax
returns for a multi-state corporation.
Ensures that corporation is in compliance
with the various Federal, State and local tax
laws. Work days and hours may vary. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $50,000.00-$55,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9361663

Coordinator
Job Description: Responsible for
coordinating recruitment, employee
relations, and training. Administers safety
policies and procedures. Coordinates
warehouse deliveries, shipments, and
inspections. Coordinates fleet maintenance
and regulatory compliance. Drafts and
translates policies and handbook.Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $50,544.00-$57,200.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9365729

Secretary
Job Description: Responsible for
answering incoming calls, filing, and other
administrative duties as assigned. Work
Monday-Friday, 7:30am-4:30pm.
Pay Rate: $8.00-$10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9365536

Counter Associate/Assistant Manager
Trainee
Job Description: Responsible for taking
care of customers that come into our store,
invoicing orders on atouch screen computer,
cashing out customer orders, other duties as
assigned. Work Monday-Saturday, 9:00am-
5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $ 9.00-$10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9365680


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10TH ANNUAL BENEFIT AUCTION -
WITH CO-CHAIRS ALLEN &VICKI TROVILLION
October 10, 2008, at 6:30 p.m.
Sheraton Orlando North Hotel
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