Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00011
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Publication Date: September 4, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

Full Text



Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 20, No. 36
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY

BANK
Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
,_, Member FDIC
u .o~


Thursday, September 4,2008

In your Senior Observer:

A group of 40 players in

Winter Park keep croquet alive.

> see Section B


$0.35 + tax
Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL
BANK & TRUST
On the comer of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
407-622-8181 www.CNBT-FL.com
Com o mi


Back in its original location, the
luxury retailer has high hopes.
Page A4


Packing right could save your
children from back strain.
Page All


Winter Park and Maitland cam-
paign volunteers host a party.
Page A2



Learn which will poison you,
and which are just helpful.
Page A9




Business Briefs............A7
City Talks..............A8
CommunityBulletin........A13
Play On!................ A16
Legals ................ A17
Marketplace............ A18
Weather ................A20


I~iu


00


VHUIUS BY PETER CHHREYER
Some residents of West Winter Park have lived their entire lives within the historic enclave, including the couple above, photographed by Peter Schreyer, who donated
his pictures to the Hannibal Square Heritage Center. Mr. and Mrs. Richmond J. Lawson started a funeral home that's been housed in the same building since the 1950s.


or more than 100
years, the Hannibal
Square community
in West Winter Park has
changed and transformed.
What once was a segregated
section of small-lot homes


for grove workers became
an exiled territory, and then
a community striving to
maintain its identity.
One thing that has not
changed over that span of
time is the lack of represen-


station that Hannibal Square
has had at Winter Park City
Hall.
In 1887, two black men,
Walter Simpson and Frank
Israel, were elected to the
City Commission. Their


election would cause anger
from Democrats in Winter
Park, and would eventually
lead to the 1893 de-annex-
ation of Hannibal Square
see WEST on page A5


Home sales beat metro trend


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Winter Park is faring better
than most of Orange Coun-
ty when it comes to home
sales, according to a recent
report.
The number of non-lake-
front homes sold in Winter
Park compared with last
mid-year decreased by 30.
percent, while homes in
both Seminole and Orange
Counties saw almost a 50
percent decrease, states The
Hillman Report Mid-Year
2008, put out Aug. 18 by
Fannie Hillman and Associ-
ates, a real estate firm based
in Winter Park.
While there were sub-


stantially fewer sales, the
average prices of homes
stayed relatively stable.
The non-lakefront
homes experienced an 11
percent decrease in average
sales price, while lakefront
homes saw a 3 percent de-
crease.
But Scott Hillman,
president of the real estate
agency, said the average
sales price is skewed by
"big sales." "There are so
few sales compared to the
previous years that one
big sales price can pull the
average up quite a bit," he
said.
But more-established
areas of the county, such
as Winter Park, Maitland


and downtown Orlando,
have an advantage in the
market. "Those areas will
come out of this market a
little bit quicker than the
newer, outlying areas," he
said, citing a prolonged suf-
fering for subdivisions built


after 2005.
The last one to come out
of the storm, he said, will
be condominiums. Even
exclusive, high-end condos

see HOMES on page A6


BANK


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Branch Manager
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Suite 101
Winter Park
407-622-1120


Tim Dunham
Senior Vice President

Richard Bryan
Branch Manager
100 E. Packwood
Avenue
Maitland
407-647-3164


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-



News


Obama office opens with party

ALEX BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Presidential candidate Ba-
rack Obama's new cam- .
paign office in Winter Park
hosts a grand opening party
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 5 at 200 N. Denning
Drive, where Denning in-
tersects Morse Boulevard.
Obama, a senator from Il-
linois, will not attend the
event, though Winter Park
and Maitland area support-
ers and campaign organiz-
ers will host.
The Democratic candi-
date last appeared in the
area at a Maitland private
fundraising event in May at
the Maitland Sheraton Ho-
tel.
On Friday, Jacqueline
Jones and her band will
provide a concert of jazz,
blues and patriotic songs.
The event is free and open
to the public. Obama sou-
venirs will be available for \
purchase, and there will be
a sign-up sheet for volun-II
teer activities. PHOTO Bi ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Call 407-975-9111 for Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama's campaign gets a new office Friday in Winter Park, where Volunteers from that city and Maitland host a party.
more information.


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WWW.JPTREV.COM


Elderly home OK'd


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK- -THE OBSERVER ARCHIVi
Beds and breakfasts will still be available at a new Winter Park development, but not in the style developer Doug Trovillion
had originally envisioned. An assisted-living facility will be built on a Minnesota Avenue plot, above, adding needed beds to the
city's growing senior population. Trovillion's original bed and breakfast proposal had three times the maximum rooms allowed.


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF


A new assisted-living facil-
ity to be built on Winter
Park's Minnesota Avenue
should shorten waiting lists
at other local facilities.
The Winter Park Commis-
sion approved local builder
.Doug Trovillion's project
in a split vote at its Aug: 25
meeting, with Commission-
ers Beth Dillaha and Margie
Bridges dissenting.
Both the Mayflower and
Winter Park Towers are at
capacity, Trovillion said.
"There's a real need."
Trovillion had previous-


ly applied to build a bed-
and-breakfast inn on the
property but was denied
because his 27-room struc-
ture didn't meet the city's
definition of a bed-and-
breakfast. According to city
code, such a business must
have nine rooms or fewer.
City leaders also balked at
a revised plan splitting the
bed-and-breakfast between
three buildings.
The assisted living facility
will be a three-story struc-
ture just less than 25,000
square feet.
Trovillion was surprised
his new project .didn't get
the full support of the Com-


mission.
"I'm thinking it was a no-
brainer to have an assisted
living facility but there are
real anti-development peo-
ple on that board," he said.
Lucky for Trovillion, Com-
missioner Phil. Anderson
was on his side. Anderson
worked in the assisted liv-
ing industry for more than
20 years.
But Trovillion's dream
of bringing a bed-and-
breakfast to the city is not
squashed. He said he will
submit a plan to build one
with nine rooms at Penn-
sylvania Avenue and Min-
nesota.


LI


Page 2 ThrdySetme4,20


News


Winter -Park / Maitland Observer





Winter Park / Maitand Observer Thur~day, Septeriiber 4, 2~O8 Page 3


$140K


could


clinch it


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Newly selected City Man-
ager Jim Williams will take
his place on the Maitland
Council dais at Monday's
meeting Sept. 8 if his
employment
contract is ap-
proved, Mayor
mn *Doug Kinson
said Thesday.
Williams will
earn $140,000
Sa year, 20 per-
Williams cent less than
he earned in
his, 13th year
as Winter Park's city manag-
er. He already works for Mai-
tland as its interim public,
works director so the transi-
tion will be "truly seamless,"
Kinson said.
Maitland requires its city
manager to live within the
city unless otherwise ap-
proved. Williams lives in
Winter Park, but Kinson said
he doesn't think that will be
an issue. "We're not going to
force him to move."


-I


'Cats fought the odds


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF


Big plays led to a big loss for
the Winter Park Wildcats
in their 2008 kickoff game
against Dr. Phillips Friday.
The Wildcats fell 21-7 in
the unofficial season open-
er, with some long yardage
by the Panthers to blame.
"We gave up too many
big plays defensively and
had too many breakdowns
on offense," Coach Tim
Shifflet said.
An unresponsive offense
was brutalized by the Pan-
thers for much of the game,
but miscues by the Cats led
to some botched plays.
Standing over his team
at Tuesday's practice after
more than two hours on the
field, he had simple words
to prepare his team for
Friday's game one against
Ocoee put last week be-
hind you.
"We're making our ad-
justments," he said. "We're
looking past last week.
That's over now. It's time to
move forward."
And adjusting coverage
is something he's hoping
will bring a win for his team
after struggling against Dr.
Phillips, especially to pre-
vent the big plays that bit
his team in the kickoff.
"We absolutely must get
a 'W' this weekend," Shiff-
let said. "It's game one. It all
starts now."
But he still wants to
know how to get that first
"W." Despite Ocoee being
predicted as a district bot-
tom-dweller this season,
Shifflet sees the Knights
having a size advantage
that could prove intimidat-
ing.
"Ocoee is a good foot-
ball team. They've got some
good athletes and they're
bigger than we are," he
said.
The Knights also went
3-7 last year and field an in-
experienced group of play-
ers this time around.
That doesn't stop Shiff-
let from keeping his players
focused, despite the short-


PHOTOS BY ALEX BABCOCK
AND ABIGAIL GEIGER THE OBSERVER
Encouragement from the Winter Park
High School band, middle, with Jenni-
fer Thompson at right, and from cheer-
leaders, including Paige Mitchell, center,.
wasn't enough to help the Wildcats foot-
ball team top Dr. Phillips on Friday.

ened week that only allows
two days of official practice
before Friday night's game.
"We play one of the most
brutal schedules in Central
Florida," he said. "There're
no off-weeks for us."
The Cats kick off at 7:30
p.m. Friday at Showalter
Field.


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Winter Park /Maitland Observer


Thursday, Sei~ttrr~be 4, 9do "-Pae


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-!










Jacobson's returns to its roots


KYLE TAYLOR
OBSERVER STAFF

The success formula for any retail
store is location, location and loca-
tion. When Tammy Giaimo sought
to start her Winter Park boutique,
she had one location in mind the
original site where the Jacobson's
department store had once stood
for more than 30 years. There was
just one problem: the original site
at the north end of Winter Park's
Park Avenue was soon to be rede-
veloped.
Giaimo found another loca-
tion fronting Park Avenue that she
used as a launch pad to resurrect
the once-national brand. Now, with
lease space available in the Park
Place Building, Jacobson Stores Inc.
has found a new home in its origi-
nal location.
The original Jacobson's was an
upscale department store chain
whose Winter Park location was
just one of 23 in five states across
the U.S. Established in the late
1800s, the Michigan-based chain
was founded byAbramJacobson. By
1939 the then three-store chain was
acquired by an experienced retailer
and Wharton School of Business
graduate Nathan Rosenfeld.
The entrepreneurial Rosenfeld
went to work expanding Jacobson's
throughout the Midwest and South.
The department store offerings
included apparel, fine jewelry and
home furnishings. Rosenfeld served
as chairman of the 'company until
his death in 1982. Furniture sales
were phased out in the late 80s, and
declining sales plagued the chain
throughout the 90s. Due to chang--
ing buyer trends and an economic
downturn following
Sept. 11, Jacobson's
entered bankruptcy
in early 2002 after
134 years of service. An Observe
By 2004 another 'an interview
aspiring entrepre- Giaimo and
neur, Giaimo, had her Visit WPMO
sights set on making
a mark in the retail
world. An experi-
enced software consultant, she
always had a dream of opening a
fashion boutique. She searched for
both a name and a location. One
idea kept coming back to her -
Jacobson's. As a loyal customer for


manyyears, Giaimo began research-
ing the Jacobson's chain. Research
revealed that the name and other
intangible assets might be available
through the bankruptcy proceed-
ings. Giaimo and her attorney spent
more than. a year and a half negoti-
ating rights to the name, logo and
other intangible assets.
Giaimo first opened the new-
ly organized Jacobson Stores Inc.
on Park Avenue in October 2004.
The 11,000-square-foot boutique
focused on high-end ladies' fashion
apparel, accessories and couture
from leading design-
|- ers such as St. John,
Escada, Apriori and
Badgley Mischka.
video extra With business pick-
with Tammy ing up on the -north
a store tour. end and lease space
bserver.com. available in the Park
Place Building the
original Jacobson's
site Giaimo jumped
at the chance to return home.
The Elizabeth Morse Genius
Foundation,which had acquired the
southwest block of Park Avenue and
Canton Avenue, redeveloped the
site as Park Place, a 53,000-square-


'PH',i:' LR ISAAC BABCOCK THE OE.,'.EER"Er
Tammy Giaimo resurrected the Jacobson's name to open her own store, above, and now the upscale
fashion boutique stands in the original Winter Park location where it once did business for more than 30 years.
The retail chain had originally opened'its first store in the 1800s, but fell into bankruptcy in 2002.


foot retail and commercial office
building. Current tenants include
Panera Bread and the law offices of
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward and
Woodman, PA.
The recently completed move
allowed Giaimo to downsize to just
more than 3,000 square feet an


important change creating a more
intimate buying experience for her
clientele. Jacobson's has a third of
the store devoted to dressing and
fitting rooms. With a seamstress on
site, Giaimo focuses on her clients'
exacting needs the formula she
claims is the reason for her success.


WinterPark Maitand
Observer


Published Thursday, September 4,2008


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-628-8500,-ext. 302
kyle@observernewspapers.com

EDITOR
Alex Babcock
407-628-8500, ext. 304
alexb@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Lacy Rushin
407-628-8500, ext. 306
lacyr@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-628-8500, ext. 31'1
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-902-8563
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan. Gallagher
407-628-8500, ext. 309
legal@observernewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observemewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observernewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us


Volume 20, Issue Number 36


ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-628-8500, ext. 303
tcraft@observernewspapers.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Shelly Langston
407-628-8500, ext. 303
slangston@observemewspapers.com


Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790: Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2008


I
I

|


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 4 TusaSpebr4 08






Winter Park I Maitland Observer Thursday, September 4, 2008 Patie 5


WEST I With no formal leader, black Winter Park looks to churches, elders


< continued from the front page


from the city. The de-annexation
also meant that Simpson and Isra-
el were no longer a part of the City
Commission.
No black resident has been
elected to the Commission- since
then, despite the west side having
been re-annexed in 1925 when
Winter Park needed a population
boost to meet state requirements
for becoming an incorporated
city.
Peter Schreyer, director of the
Hannibal Square Heritage Center,
said that the historical tension be-
tween the two sides
of Winter Park has "For one, I'
built up over time, tried to en
causing political
frustration and dis- the commu
interest.
"I get the feeling totally invol
that people can feel process an
alienated and taken
advantage of, and on to their
this is not reflect- because I g
ing current govern-
ment," Schreyer the comn
said. "I think histor-
ically there has been
a real deep mistrust assistants
between the local Parks a
government and Depart
the .community. "Unofficial h
There's a lot of bad
history there."
Other 'historical-
ly black areas of Central Florida,
such as parts of Sanford and Win-
ter Garden, have shared the same
disenfranchisement, but have
broken through to political rep-
resentation, Schreyer said. That is
something that Hannibal Square
has not done.
"Maybe in some communities
that history has empowered peo-
ple to fight back but it just hasn't
had that impact here," Schreyer
said.
Since 1893, only one person
from West Winter Park has cam-
paigned for a spot on the City
Commission. That was Mary How-
ard-Allen, who ran for Seat 4 in
1986. One of Howard-Allen's cam-
paign promises was to save the va-
cant library building in Hannibal
Square.
Although there are no Hanni-


IE

1C

In

id
h


bal Square residents on the City
Commission, there are people in
other City Hall positions.
Ron Moore, assistant director
of the Parks and Recreation De-
partment, has another title that
some know him by.
Schreyer, among others, calls
Moore the "Unofficial Mayor of
West Winter Park."
Moore said he has heard the ti-
tle many times before, but doesn't
want it to sound like he is under-
mining the actual mayor of Win-
ter Park.
Moore's connections with West
Winter Park go further than sim-
ply working on projects that take
place in the area.
e always "My family is a long-
time resident of West
couragee Winter Park, so there's
ity to be been years and years of
direct tie-in, which is
ed in the passed down through
I to hold generations, to me,
so that just enhances
heritage. the involvement in it,"


trpw ui in


Moore said.


... Growing up in West
unityy" Winter Park has taught
Ron Moore Moore to try his best
S to make sure that the
director of the community reflects the
nd Recreation bond and unity that
tment and the he got a chance to be
Vlayor of West a part of when grow-
Winter Park" ing up. Moore said he
tries to maintain that
unity in a generation
in which unity has begun to fade,
by giving direction and support.
"For one, I've always tried to en-
courage the community to be to-
tally involved in the process and
to hold on to their heritage be-
cause I grew up in the communi-
ty," Moore said. "We're finding that
the younger generation doesn't
take on the value and importance
of the heritage and what it stands
for, and how to carry it on."
Growing up, Moore saw people
around him who he considered
to be the leaders of the commu-
nity. They included police officers,
preachers and educators. They
were the informal structure that
made up the web of support for
Hannibal Square.
This informal leadership, as
opposed to an officially elected
body, has been the binding tie and


the catalyst for change in the
. area, said Rebekah McCloud,
a researcher who has stud-
ied Hannibal Square.
McCloud said that the
1893 de-annexation of the
area gave birth to the tight-
ly woven informal system.
"If you look at the way
Hannibal Square was
structured, and then
when they were kicked
out for political reasons,
it started a real organic
sort of growth," Mc-
Cloud said. -
Churches continue
to be one of the main
sources of leader-
ship in the area, with
many churches hav-
ing outreach pro-
grams to help with
children and the
elderly, as well as
donation centers and
socialization clubs.
The Community Re-
development Agency
has changed the area
and brought in an influx
of people from the east
that only a few decades
ago would have never
crossed the train tracks.
This change is bringing
about a time where the
Hannibal Square com-
munity will need leaders.
most, McCloud said.
"Developers are put-
ting the squeeze on the
area, and without political
protection from City Hall,
there is no telling what
could happen," McCloud
said. "You have to develop
people who have that politi-
cal savvy."
As the eastern area of Win-
ter Park begins to overflow
and West Winter Park erodes,
the area might see an increase
in political influence; however,
history has shown that it will need
to be a groundbreaking change,
McCloud said.
"West Winter Park was for so"
long not a part of the city, not a
part of the political system, that if
you really look at it, you can't miss
what you haven't had," McCloud
said.


PHOTOS BY PETER SCHREYER
Standing behind her childhood home, Carol An-
derson, top, remains a fixture of the Winter Park
community. She moved away for college and a brief
teaching position in her 36-year career, but returned to
her hometown where she still lives. Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church, above, formed in 1911.


Winter Park


Burglary/theft
Orange Avenue, 700 block, on Aug. 23, a female
shoplifted several items of clothing.
North Orlando Avenue, 500 block, on Aug. 23, a fe-
male was arrested for theft of jewelry and merchan-
dise.
North Orlando Avenue, 500 block, on Aug. 26,
persons) entered a business from a rooftop and stole
cash.
Auto theft/burglary
Clay Street, 700 block, on Aug. 22, a laptop computer
was stolen from an unlocked vehicle.
Osceola Avenue, 1200 block, on Aug. 22, a 2003 Hon-
da Accord was stolen while parked at a residence.
Criminal mischief
Glenridge Way, 300 block, on Aug. 24, persons) dam-
aged multiple mailboxes.
West New England Avenue, 300 block, on Aug. 25,


August 22 to August 28


persons) threw a rock through the passenger side and
driver's side windows of a vehicle.
North Lakemont Avenue, 200 block, on Aug. 26,
persons) scratched the sides of a vehicle and broke
a taillight.
Battery
Shoreview Avenue, 500 block, on Aug. 28, a male
was arrested for battery.
Robbery
North Orlando Avenue, 500 block, on Aug. 23, a male
robbed a female of cash and a cell phone at gunpoint.
Drugs
Aloma Avenue, 3000 block, on Aug. 22, two males
were arrested for possession of marijuana and drug
paraphernalia.
Greens Avenue, 800 block, on Aug. 24, a male was'
arrested for possession of marijuana and drug para-
phernalia.


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'" : i,, ir,, ,v ,il .

Thimble Works Grace Clinic
Christian Counseling
A Ier31ion;, hur o 311 ul ,i ,,. H,:,,,: n ,. ,,,,, ,.,,,
Sn ti r P ar jrl ,. ,, ,, '


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Thusda, Spteber4, 008 Page 5


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1


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Pai 6 hrdy etme ,20 itrPr atadOsre


Social, Volunteer


and Business :IL)L


The Orlando Area Historical Rose
Society resumes its Sunday after-
,noon monthly meetings at Leu Gar-
dens on Sunday, Sept. 7. Traci Ander-
sen, owner of Seminole Spring Herb
and Antique Roses in Eustis, will give
a talk entitled "Everything is Com-
ing Up Roses." Traci will show how.
to grow companion plants, such as
herbs, with antique roses.
The program begins at 2:30 p.m.
The doors to the meeting room open
at 2 p.m. The program is free and
visitors are welcome.

The American Association of Uni-
versity Women will host a tea for
prospective members from 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 13, at
the First Congregational Church at
225 S. Interlachen Ave. at New
England Avenue in Winter Park.
Join educated women from a variety
of professions and hear about the
scholarships, interest groups and-
community service of the organiza-
tion. Visit AAUWOrlando.org or call
407-333-3948 for more information.
AAUW Orlando-Winter Park was
founded in 1928, and now includes
members from throughout Central
Florida. The branch has been grow-
ing at more than 20 percent per year
since 2000.

Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion hosts Constitution Day on Sept.
13 at Dubsdread Golf and Country
Club in Orlando.

The English-Speaking Union, Cen-
tral Florida Branch, will meet Sept.
15 at the University Club of Winter
Park. The program is a presentation
by Quinn Hawkesworth on "Pride of
Place."


The Belles and Beaus Dance Club
invites you to a "Mama Mia That's
Italian" theme dance from 8 p.m. to
10:15 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 17, at
the Marks Street Recreation Complex
at 99 E. Marks St. in Orlando.
The event is a festive evening of
dancing and fellowship. Music by the
Soft Touch and an assortment of re-
freshments will be provided. Singles
and couples are welcome. Admission
is $5. Call 407-277-7008 for more
information.

Parents Without Partners: Activi-
ties for single-parent families -
custodial or noncustodial family
and adult events; free support group
biweekly o0' Park Avenue. Please call
407-888-0618 for more information.

Retired Officers Wives Club meets
the third Tuesday of every month,
September through May, for lunch
and mutual interests at the Elks Club,
Howell Branch Road, Winter Park.
Information: Diana Schoeppner 407-
696-5414.

Widow and Widowers Society of
Central Florida meets the first and
third Friday of each month at the
Goldenrod Civic Center, Aloma and
Palmetto avenues. Details: Chris-
tina 407-382-0607 or Lori 407-948-
9433.

Winter Park Breakfast Rotary Club
meets every Monday at 7:30 a.m.,
Best Western Mt. Vernon Inn, Morse
Boulevard and Highway 17-92 in
Winter Park. Call Richard Baensch at
407-644-8800 for more information.


HOMES I Condos saw hardest fall in recent study


-- PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
As homeowners hold onto properties in-a buyer's market, flexibility has become the norm. Winter Park's home sales are beating
the Orlando metro average, though. Condominium sales have fared far worse, delaying planned new condo buildings.


< continued from front page

are selling very slowly, he
added.
In Winter Park, the
number of condos sold de-
creased 36 percent, and in
Maitland, the amount sold
decreased a whopping 61'
percent. College Park saw
the biggest decrease with
78 percent.
This is the reason some
projects in Maitland that
were supposed to contain
condos will now contain
apartments instead. One


such project is the Village
at Lake Lily, slated to have
200 condos and 250 apart-
ments, which will now have
all apartments at least at
first.
"For a bank to give mon-
ey for condos right now is
like a bank writing an in-
surance policy in the mid-
dle of a hurricane," said Jon-
Wood, regional viGe presi-
dent of The Morgan Group,
in April to the Maitland City
Council.
The Council agreed to
allow apartments at Lake


Lily but made it clear they
wanted them converted to
condos once the market re-
vived itself. But that could
take 10 to 15 years, Morgan
said..
Nowadays single-family
homes are selling, but most-
ly in desperate situations.
Hillman said if a person
needs to sell their home,
that client shouldn't expect
much of a return. "The ones
that have to sell are getting
the price where it needs to
be."


New Store Hours
Monday Saturday
10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Sunday 10 a.m. 5 p.m.


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Suite 101
(next to Panera Bread)
Winter Park, FL 32789


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We've moved back home!

Come visit our new boutique!


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Page 6 ThrdySetme4,20


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


P





Thursday, September 4, 2008 Page 7


Business


The American Marketing Associa-
tion Central Florida (AMA-CFL)
will kick off its 2000-09 season with
Zynergy founder and executive con-
sultant James Zimbardi on Wednes-
day Sept. 10 at the Citrus Club in
downtown Orlando. The meeting be-
gins at 11:30 a.m., and lunch will be
served at noon.
As president of Zynergy and a part-
ner in AlIgen Financial Services, Inc.,
Zimbardi has been serving publicly-
traded and Fortune 500 companies for
more than 10 years with commercial-
ization of new companies, products,
and services. He has done extensive
research and training in innovation
and global markets as an MIT Sloan
Fellow. His presentation will focus on
how to market in a tough economy
and is titled "How to Create a Degree
of Separation" exposing the audience
to views on extraordinary versus ordi-
nary concepts and community-based
marketing and innovation:
Zimbardi has served clients includ-
ing The Walt Disney Company, Na-
tional Cancer Institute, World Vision,
Science Application International
Corporation (SAIC), Florida Hospital,


SmartCity, and Select Information Ex-
change (SIE). He can be reached via
www.allgenfinancial.com or www.
zynergy.com.

The Board of Directors of the Winter
Park Chamber of Commerce ap-
proved the formation of a political ac-
tion committee at their Aug. 28 board
meeting. The new committee will al-
low the chamber to better support its
mission of promoting a thriving busi-
ness climate and enhancing the eco-
nomic well being of the area.
Earlier in the year, the chamber
conducted a survey of the member-
ship that clearly indicated a desire
for the chamber to play a more sig-
nificant role with local (Winter Park,
Orange County, Central Florida) is-
sues. In addition, the chamber hosted
a "members only meeting," multiple
focus groups and several discussions
with the volunteer leadership boards
within the chamber.
Efforts to form the committee will be-
gin immediately but there is no estab-
lished timetable. The Board of Direc-
tors of the chamber will continue to
monitor the progress of forming the


PAC, but a new volunteer leadership
board will be named at a later date.

Inwood Consulting Engineers, Inc.
has moved into its new corporate of-
fice building in Oviedo. Doster Con-
struction Company broke ground on
the project in October. Inwood opened
its doors for business at the new lo-
cation on Tuesday, Sept. 2.
The building, designed by Hunton,
Brady Architects, is 30,000 square
feet and just minutes from Inwood's
previous location. The facility offers
the space needed to achieve the
long-term goals of the firm. It cur-
rently houses 62 employees and
has the capability to accommodate
approximately 130 employees and
expand to 45,000 square feet in the
future.
The new facility is on the forefront
of technology with automated light-
ing, heating and air conditioning,
security systems, Wi-Fi access, con-
verged data and voice networks and
a video distribution network with vari-
ous monitors throughout the build-
ing. In addition, the facility features
several upgrades including a larger,


caf6 style break room, fully equipped
conference rooms and an expanded
video production office with a sound
booth for recording voice-overs.
In addition, Inwood is implementing
green initiatives in order to become a
more environmentally conscious firm.
These initiatives include a recycling
plan, improved energy management,
server and workstation virtualiza-
tion techniques, and waste reduction
measures.
Visit www.inwoodinc.com for more
information.

International law
firm Greenberg
Traurig is eager to
welcome Stephen.
Leahu to the Orlan-
do office's steadily
growing Intellectual
Leahu Property and Tech-
nology practice.
In law firms na-
tionwide, Intellectual Property prac-
tices have become one of the hottest
and most rapidly growing practice ar-
eas. Greenberg Traurig is not only rid-
ing this wave of growth nationally, but


right here in their Orlando office. In
addition to the substantial trademark
and copyright capabilities, GT Or-
lando's intellectual property practice,
spearheaded by Adam Landa, Grego-
ry Herbert, and Rick Kurtz, has added
patent prosecution, patent litigation,
eDiscovery and a host of additional
intellectual property capabilities.
Stephen Leahu is a patent attorney
with experience in software, elec-
tronics, telecommunications, busi-
ness methods, medical devices, and
biotechnology. He graduated with a
B.S. degree in Biochemistry and an
M.S. degree in Computer Science, in
addition to earning an M.B.A. degree
and a law degree with a certificate in
Intellectual Property Law. Currently
completing a Masters of Law degree
in Intellectual Property Law, Stephen
has developed the specialized skills.
in all aspects' of intellectual property
law that are necessary to success-
fully counsel clients in this distinctive
practice.
Visit www.gtlaw.com for more in-
formation.


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RSVP by 9-12-08
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- CHILDREN'S ISSUES


CONTESTED DIVORCE


I


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Page 8 Thursday, September 4, 2008


, 4


Maitland City Talk
by DOUGLAS T. KINSON


Every morning, my golden
retriever treks out to the
end of the driveway and
retrieves the newspaper for
me. Her only problem has
been that the Sunday pa-
per was just too bulky and
heavy for her to carry in.
This Sunday was different.
To my surprise, she had no


problem retrieving it.
The reason she could car-
ry this one is the Orlando
Sentinel has recently gone
on a diet. A few months
ago, the Orlando Sentinel
changed their format to a
new, more modern, color-
ful style. But along with this
facelift, they did a tummy


tuck and major surgery to
remove the unwanted fat.
Unfortunately they took
a little bone and muscle
along with it.
For years I have de-
pended on the Sentinel as
my primary source of infor-
mation. I was particularly
interested in the in-depth
local news and the editori-
als on the topics of the day.
The articles were interest-
ing and engaging and were
written on varied topics
such that you wanted to
read the paper from cover'
to cover it was a real
page-turner.
Today, the paper is a skel-
eton of what it once was.
Articles, engaging or oth-
erwise, are few and far be-
tween. Entire sections have
been gutted or removed, be-
ing replaced with sections
covering topics such as law
and technology informa-
tion that anybody can look


Sept. 8 City Commission
Meeting Topics Of Interest
There will be a City Com-
mission meeting held at
3:30 p.m. Monday, Sept.' 8,
in City Hall Commission
Chambers. Below are a few
topics of interest:
-City manager annual
evaluation.
-Request. to accept the
commuter rail canopies
conceptual architectural
style as prepared by HHCP
Design and reviewed by the
three selected local Winter
Park architects, Jack Rog-
ers, Drew Krecicki and Steve
Feller
-Request to approve the
award of IFB-28-2008, On-
line Resident Survey to Kerr
& Downs Research, $13,200
-Request to approve the
two residential parking
districts for the residential'
parking permit program.
-Request for confirma-
tion of Sherry Gutch as di-
rector of community rede-
velopment
-Second reading of the
ordinance to allow a trip
surcharge in taxicab rates
-Resolution to establish
an emergency surcharge for
taxicabs
-Second reading of the
ordinance to authorize the
issuance of up to $60 mil-
lion Electric Refunding Rev-
enue Bonds, Series 2008 for
the purpose of refunding
the- currently outstanding
Electric Revenue Bonds, Se-
ries 2005A and 2005B
-Appeal of DI Partners,
LLLP relating to the denial
by the city for the use of the
"Holler Chevrolet" property
at 860 W. .Fairbanks Ave. for
the sale and service of rec-
reational vehicles as applies
to the provisions of the code
regarding nonconforming


uses.-
-Resolution regarding
the St. Johns River Water,
Management District's in-
tent to approve issuance of
a consumptive use permit
for 484,000 gallons per day
of ground water to Niagara
Bottling Inc.
-Presentation to intro-
duce the "Our Whole Com-
munity" initiative
Budget Public Hearings
at 5:01 p.m.
-First reading of the ordi-
nance to adopt the millage
rate
-First reading of the or-
dinance to adopt the fiscal
year 2009 annual budget
You can find the Com-
mission's full agenda and
more detailed information
on specific agenda items by
logging on to the city's offi-
cial Web site at CityofWin-
terPark.org and clicking on
Government > City Com-
mission.

Palmer Avenue
is now open
In July, the city began work
on Palmer Avenue from Park
Avenue to Alabama Drive
East. This road construction
process involved milling
(removal) of the top 2" of
asphalt from Alabama Drive
to Park Avenue, demolition
and reinstallation of more
than 400 feet of concrete
storm pipe, demolition and
reinstallation of six storm
inlets and manholes, de-
molition and reinstallation
of more than 1,500 feet of
curbing, complete rebuild-
ing of all bridge surface
structure.
Additionally, Winter Park
Electric installed more than
3,000 feet of electric conduit
while the road was closed to
be ready for under-ground-


ing the power lines in the
near future. This prevents
future traffic tie-ups when
the under-grounding be-
gins as well as prevents the
need to make more asphalt
cuts into a recently repaved
street.
As of Thursday, Sept.
4, Palmer Avenue has re-
opened to thru traffic and is
ready for travel. Thank you
for your patience during
this construction process.

Coffee Talk with
Commissioner Anderson
Come join Commissioner
Phil Anderson for coffee
from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
Friday, Sept. 5, at the Winter
Park Country Club, located
at 761 Old England Ave.
This is the third year of
the Coffee Talk series where
the community is invited to
talk with their city leaders
in an informal setting. For
more information, please
call 407-599-3428. .

Blood drive at
Winter Park City Hall
Winter Park partners with
Florida's Blood Centers to
provide several blood drives
each year. Our next blood
drive will be held from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Sept.
8, in front of City Hall lo-
cated at 401 S. Park Ave.
Donating blood is a won-
derful way to give back and
help others in their time of
need. Please join us to help
support Florida Blood Cen-
ters.
To donate blood, you
must be at least 16 years old,
weigh 110 pounds and be
in good health. All donors
must bring a photo ID. It is
safe to donate blood every
eight weeks.

Art In Chambers features
the works of Dr. Boswell
The city of Winter Park
Public Art Advisory Board
is proud to announce the
newest "Art in Chambers"
exhibition featuring the
works of Dr. Robert B. Bo-
swell. The exhibition is cur-
rently open for public view-


ing from 8 a.m. to 5 -p.m.
Monday through Friday, in
the Commission Chambers
and Room 200 in City Hall
located at 401 S. Park Ave.,
and will remain on display
through the middle of Oc-
tober 2008. There will be a
reception for Dr. Boswell
from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 11, in the
Commission Chambers.
Dr. Boswell is a Winter
Park cardiologist who en-
joys getting out into nature
to unwind from his busy
medical practice. The ex-
hibition features his color
photographs of Lake Rose,
better known as the Winter
Park sinkhole. The exhibi-
tion also features a look
back at the historical events
of May 1981 when the Win-
ter Park sinkhole opened.
up, swallowing a city swim-
ming pool, several Porsches,
and the home of Mrs. Rose.
Williams for whom the lake
is named.

Winter Park Police
win state award
On Aug. 15, the Florida De-
partment of Transportation
and the Florida Association
of Chiefs of Police awarded
the Winter Park Police De-


apartment the 2008 Tech-
nology Award at the Annual
Florida Law Enforcement
Conference in Orlando.
Winter Park Police was
chosen out of 308 law en-
forcement agencies in the
state of Florida to receive
the award in recognition of
their cutting-edge technol-
ogy related to traffic-safety
enforcement. The Interna-
tional Association of Chiefs
of Police who judges the
nominations considered
Winter Park to be the very
best in the state.
The 2008 Technology
Award recognizes the use
of technology such as mes-
sage boards, solar-powered
crosswalk signs, DUI camer-
as, arid equipment to locate
stolen vehicles.
In addition to this year's
state award, Winter Park has
previously been recognized
by the International Asso-
ciation of Chiefs of Police
as the National First Place
Winner for Technology in
2006 and 2004. They are the
only agency in the United
States to receive this award
on two occasions.

Visit us at
CityofWinterPark.org


Susrb todeg.


FM 89.9 OLAO


up on the Internet without
having to pay for a newspa-
per.
Orange Extra was always,
the first section I sought out
on Thursday and Sundays
because it was an additional
section that gave me insight
on what was happening in
the county and in my com-
munity. I wonder now why
they have the section at
all since few of the topics I
used to read about are even
published anymore. In fact,
in the Orange Extra section
on Aug. 10 and Aug. 31, not
one single written article
was published pushed
out by advertising and pub-
lic records.
The Orlando Sentinel
rightly identified the prob-
lem with our newspapers,
wherein the July 21 publi-
cation, an article com-
piled from wire reports no
less identified a 'broken
revenue model' as the root


Winter Park / Maitland Observer

cause of our paper's demise.
As costs rise, advertisers
are following the readers
to the Internet, and fewer
are recognizing the value
of reading the daily printed
word. Lower revenues mean
fewer journalists, which
translates to fewer articles
published. Without jour-
nalists, the newspaper will
become merely a repetition
of what is already avail-
able online. Why wait until
morning when you can
have your computer beep.
you when an article that
is of interest can be made
available immediately?
Frankly, without jour-
nalists, there is no reason
for a newspaper. Without
a newspaper, I will be less
prepared for my next busi-
ness or political meeting,
and my golden retriever
will become lazy and un-
skilled. Pray tell, what is this
world coming to?


SIVMAYOR



The future of


print media


Winter Park City Talk
by RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER







Winter Park / Maitand Observer Thursday, September 4, 2008 Page 9


Lifestyles



Florida's rare few



deadly serpents
rats.


Seminole b

Gardening abou
BYAL FERRER comI
SEMINOLE COUNTY URBAN or wback
HORTICULTURIST and:
the n


Contrary to their unde-
served reputation, of the
67 species and sub-species
of snakes in Florida, only
six are venomous. They live
in just about any conceiv-
able habitat, from coastal
mangroves to freshwater
wetlands and dry uplands;
therefore, it is probable
that you will encounter
them occasionally.
Snakes are reptiles, just
like lizards, turtles and al-
ligators, but many people
fear them more than other
animals. Snakes are strictly
carnivores and play an im-
portant ecological role, es-
pecially because they keep
in check rodents, which
destroy crops and carry
diseases that affect humans.
About half of our snakes are
born alive; the others lay
eggs. Baby snakes usually
appear by late summer.
There are two types of
venomous snakes in Florida
- the pit vipers, which in-
cludes the diamondback
rattlesnake, canebrake
rattlesnake, pygmy rattle-
snake, cottonmouth, and
the copperhead; the other
group is represented by the


coral snake. The pit vipers
are identified by the facial
pits, one located between
the eye and nostril on each
side of the head. They also
have an elliptical eye pu-
pil and a broad, V-shaped
head. Their venom is hae-
motoxic, which destroys
the red blood cells and
walls of the blood vessels of
the victim. The coral snake
has a neurotoxic venom,
which acts on the nervous
system, causing paralysis.

Diamondback rattlesnake
The largest and deadlier
poisonous snake in North
America can be recognized
by the yellow-bordered,
diamond-shaped markings
on the back, and rattles on
the end of its tail. When
disturbed, the rattler as-
sumes a defensive position
with the body coiled upon
itself, and head and neck
raised in an S-position from
which it will strike its en-
emy. The head is wider than
the neck, and the mouth
has the typical fangs, lying
folded inside the roof of the
mouth. Their food is mostly
wild rabbits and cotton


Pygmy rattlesnake
Also called ground rattler,
this snake is fairly common
in Florida. It is gray in color
and marked with rounded,
dusky spots. Reddish spots
alternate with the black
along the middle of the
back, starting at the base of
the head all the way to the
tail. It feeds on frogs and
small rodents and can mea-
sure up to 2 feet in length.
Cottonmouth moccasin
Also called water moccasin,
this snake can be found.
in every county of Florida,
usually around stream
banks, in swamps, and mar-
gins of lakes. Their color
varies from olive-brown to
black, with or without dark
cross-bands on the body.
Their head is wider than
their neck with a dark band
extending from the eye
to the rear of the jaw; the
tail does not have rattles.
When disturbed, it cocks its
head upward and opens its


mouth U
wide to
reveal the
whitish interior
lining, which gives
this snake its name. It feeds
on fish, frogs, snakes, liz-
ards and small mammals.
It averages about 3 1/2 feet
in length. Several kinds of
harmless water snakes are
often mistaken for cotton-
mouths.

Copperhead
The copperhead is a medi-
um-sized snake, pinkish tan
with reddish-brown cross-
bands. These bands are
wide along the sides and
narrow along the back to
form a shape resembling an
hourglass. It's found only
in the Apalachicola River
drainage of Gadsen, Liberty,


Calhoun and Jackson
Counties. It lives in fields '
and hammocks, and is fair-
ly rare within its range. The
average length is 2 1/2 feet.

Coral snake:
A fairly small snake, usually
less than two feet in length,
with patterns of red, yel-
low and black rings. The
characteristic black nose is
used to identify this snake
from the red nose of the
non-poisonous scarlet king
snake and northern scarlet
snake. The red rings of the
coral snake border the yel-
low, while the red rings of
the king snake border the
black.


Marriage secrets from the source
rrath ouc


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF

Every few years, Heather
Walsh goes to Vegas and gets .
married. It's become one of
her favorite traditions.
Walsh and her husband,
David Sigalow, are currently
planning their next visit to
Las Vegas for their 20th an-
niversary, when they renew
their vows for the fifth time.
Once again, the Maitland
couple will celebrate with
their closest friends and
family.
"When we go back, we
are remembering the past
- we're having a great time
in the present and sharing
that with people we love -


and we are thinking about
our future," Heather said.
"We have a good marriage,
so it is not that we feel that
we have to re-
new, we enjoy
the renewing
and it's some-




book "Ever-
lasting Matrimony: Pearls
of Wisdom From Couples
Married 50 Years or More,"
it's marriage traditions like
Heather and David's that
keep a couple joined for
life.
"It's important because


we are all running through
our busy daily schedules and
you start taking for granted
the most special relation-
ship 'in your life. Having a
tradition between you and
your mate keeps you con-
nected," Kurland said.
"Everlasting Matrimony,"
published three years ago
and now in its fourth print-
ing, focuses on the magic
between couples who have
been married for 50 years
or more. The devoted and
insightful couples she in-
terviewed in the process in-
spired the Longwood writer
to begin research on a new
book, called "101 Marriage
Traditions."
"In going over the ma-


trial (for the book) I real-
ized there were traditions
between the two of them,"
Kurland said. Much to her
surprise,. when Kurland
asked younger couples to


share their marriage tradi-
tions, they could only name
family traditions. "They
were stumped. That's when

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Thursday, Septemrber 4, 2008 Pg







Page 10 Thursday, September 4, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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< continued from page A9
I realized there was a need
for a book," she said.
While the search for
couples with traditions has
proved more difficult than
anticipated, Kurland ex-
pects her book, 'which will
be designed to look like a
handbook, will be ready to
publish within a year. "It has
been a challenge, but I want
to do it because the fact that
it is so difficult shows there
is a need for it."


We CAN help!


With divorce rates hov-
ering around 50 percent,
Kurland said she' is con-
cerned that couples are
not maintaining their vital
connection and friendship.
"Divorces crumble the fam-
ily and the people around
them, and my life passion is
to help people get it right,"
Kurland said. "Having some-
one special in your life adds
a whole new dimension to
your life."
Traditions keep that
bond going, Kurland said.:


Page 10 Thursday, September 4, 2008


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer:


"It shows you still love each
other unconditionally.
And it makes your relation-
ship different from anyone
else's. It is a sense of identi-
fication that your relation-
ship is unique," she said.
Kurland said she always
gets excited when a couple
calls her to share one of their
special traditions. "I can
hear in their voice the ela-
tion and the happiness that
doing their tradition brings
them, no matter what it is.
It's their thing. It provides
continuity in the relation-
ship," she said.
One couple, Kurland said,
lights a special candle from
their 1977 wedding the first
day of every month to ex-
press their gratitude. Anoth-
er husband and wife made it
a tradition to bring home a
rock from their travels and
write the date and origin on
the back and add it to their
expansive rock garden. A
man who has worked as
a painter and set designer
for the past 35 years told
Kurland that he has always
included a special love mes-
sage to his wife in an incon-
spicuous spot in his work.
Kurland proudly shared that
her husband of 19 years,
Steve, has caught on to her
love for hearts and gives her
beautiful handmade anni-
versary cards with hearts,
which she frames.
"What people don't re-
alize is that it's not rocket
science. It's based on basic
principles of showing you
care that makes the rela-
tionship work or not work."
It's the effort that makes
it special, Kurland said; it
doesn't have to cost a lot of
money.
Couples can create spe-
cial traditions at any tinie in
their relationship, Kurland
added. "Instead of looking
at what is wrong," she said,
"do things that makes things
right."






Sheryl Kurland's new book
project explores marriage
traditions of those in long-
term relationships. Share
your own marriage tradition
at EverlastingMatFimony.com
or call 407-786-7747.




F

-Ubsc ,iil






Winter Park / Maitand Observer Thursday, SeDtember 4. 2008 Paae 11


Carrying a healthy


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF
*


C choosing just the right
backpack can be the
highlight of back-to-
school shopping. The pack not
only shuttles books and home-
work to and from school, it also
represents a child's personality
- a fashion statement of sorts.
As the homework levels in-
crease during this first month of
school, so will the weight of the
backpack, posing a greater risk
for strained muscles and pain.
Chiropractor John Tenpenny
of Access Healthcare in Oviedo
said he treats many children
with what he classifies as back-
pack injuries. "Children can
suffer from long-term postural
problems like excessive forward
head tilt. They can also suffer
from improper spinal align-
ment as well as spinal disk inju-
ries," Tenpenny said.
Generally, he said, injuries
occur early in the school year
when a child is not yet familiar
with the backpack. "Children
can suffer from sprains and
strains of the shoulders, neck
and back as well as bruises from.
backpacks that are too heavy
or don't fit properly," Tenpenny
added.


If a backpack is too heavy for
a student, the child is more like-
ly to try to compensate for that
weight and bend forward at the
hips or arch the back, which
can compresses the spine. If the
backpack is worn incorrectly,
the child may end up leaning to
one side to offset the unequal
weight, which could lead to bad
posture, lower and upper back
as well as shoulder pain.
"Children will generally carry
a backpack on their dominant
side. This can cause an imbal-
ance of shoulder and spinal
muscle strength. It is important
for children to carry a backpack
evenly on both shoulders with
the contents of the backpack
evenly distributed within and
compact to the body," Tenpen-
ny said.
It is recommended that chil-
dren carryno more than 10 to 15
percent of their body weight.
As some schools move away
from having hallway lockers,
students are forced to carry ev-
erything they may need during
the school day on their backs
and shoulders. Despite the ef-
fort to lighten the load by al-
lowing students to keep a set of
textbooks at home, the back-
pack is quickly filled with thick
notebooks, binders, accessories,


and sometimes even a lunch.
The American Academy
of Pediatrics recommends
parents help at child
choose a lightweight
pack, so as to not add to
the overall weight. Two
wide, padded shoulder
straps help stabilize
the weight and prevent
the pack from digging
into the shoulders. A
waist belt will also help
distribute the weight
more evenly across the
body, especially when
walking a distance.
In order to light-
en the load, students
should be encouraged to
eliminate any unneces-
sary items from the back-
pack on a regular basis.
Clean out old homework
and unneeded -materials
and remember to always
place heavier items, such
as textbooks, at the back of
the pack so the. weight is carrie
closest to the body.


Heavy bookbags ca
will minimize back s
worm healthy.


an be packed in a way that
tress and keep your book-
PHOTO COURTESY OF
WWW.iSTOCKPHOTO.COM


The big 'OH!


Crazy

parental reflex

GINA DiPAOLO
CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

What a great day. We'd left
the Sierra National Forest
where we'd taken the chil-
dren to see the largest tree
in the world: The General
Sherman. This majestic
sequoia is something to
behold. And after descend-
ing a half mile down well-
maintained trails, you.
wonder how anyone ever
found it. Our drive back to
Los Angeles went through
some amazing farmland.
Do you know how much of
our nation's food is grown
in California? Neither do I,
but I know this much after
driving down the "food cor-
ridor" otherwise known as
the 5 freeway: a lot.
We returned to my sis-
ter's home and unpacked
the car. Several days in a
cabin and car tended to
make everyone want to find
their inner peace: alone.
We were spread out over
the backyard and driveway
just doing our own thing.
My thing was sweeping
the pool deck. The mo-


notony of it allows your
mind to wander. My son
and daughter were skate-
boarding with their uncle
in the front. The baby was
enjoying her freedom from
the car seat and exploring
the backyard. I heard the
crew from the front come
through the gate and could
feel their presence as the
"calm" in the backyard
quickly disappeared.
Sweep. Sweep. Sweep. I
took another stroke with
the broom, took note of a
scream and heard a splash.
In an instant, I whirled
around to see my 2-year-
old baby slowly sinking to
the bottom of the deep end
of the pool. I saw my son
standing at the lip of the
pool looking down at his
sister, saying, "Oh my good-
ness." I slung the broom
aside and made what
seemed like a super-human
leap to cross the shallow
end of the pool to get to my
child. And during this slow-
motion, unbelievable leap, I
distinctly remember having
two thoughts: I don't think
I remember CPR and why
on Earth was my boy stand-
ing at the lip of the pool '
looking at his sister as she
sunk?
I landed in the water and
quickly reached my target,


grabbed it and hauled it to
the surface. I realized some-
thing in the two seconds it
took me to do this. My head
popped above the water, I
looked at my son, who said
"Congratulations, Mama,
you just saved the skate-
board."
I looked past my boy
only to realize that my
brother is holding my
daughter and the baby is
standing next to her sister,
trying to console her. Ap-
parently, my daughter had
a mishap while riding the
skateboard; she fell and it
ended'up careening into
the pool. I got out of the
water with the skateboard
and I am shaking. I am
,soaked and I am scared.
I'm snapped back to re-
ality by my brother's voice.
"Hey, dough-dee, (an af-
fectionate name for silly
sisters) what are you doing?
Your daughter is hurt over
here."
"Oh my gosh, I thought
the baby fell in the pool!"
"OK, once again, your
daughter is hurt, the baby's
fine... a little help here."
I got my daughter ban-
daged, loved and then went
to change my clothes. I fi-
nally stopped shaking. I re-
turned and the questions/
teasing began. Questions


were OK right then, but
the teasing had to wait for
about an hour. I was over-
whelmed at the thought of
what could have happened.
"Iwatched you fly into


the water and I could not
understand why you would
go after the skateboard
when your daughter was

> turn to BIG OH! on next page


Private Turing
SAT/PSAJYng o
-CT


SAT prep for students seeking dramatic
score improvements.

Huntington
LEARNING"CENTER
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Assesin Nees. ncrasin Scres


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thusda, Spteber4, 008 Page 11


INN


A






Page 12 Thursday, September 4, 2008 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


This week's art comes from art students
at Layer Elementary in Winter Springs.


Portrait


Watercolor
on paper


Illustrated by
Kemar Simpson
3rd .grade


Hands


Watercolor and
crayon on paper


Illustrated by

Brandon Taft

3rd grade


Life and Art


Mixed photo
and drawing


Illustrated by
Bennett Miller
5th-grade


Fa_ yBrie s
_- '. : ,.. .'i..': -...-. .- .- -


Passing the hat in style
for children with cancer
Hats and martinis and hope, combine them and
Central Florida children with cancer will have the
chance at a cure. So ladies, on Saturday, Sept.
6 don your finest hat and slip on your dancing
shoes for a cause that will give life back to chil-
dren battling cancer. Gentlemen, slip on your
tux and take your favorite lady to a fun evening
for a great cause.
The theme of Kids Beating Cancer's Fourth


Annual Hats and Martinis for Hope gala is Cary
Grant's most romantic movie, "An Affair to Re-
member." The party, a fantasy cruise to the top
of the Empire State Building, because, according
to the movie "It's the closest thing to heaven."
The event at Rosen Plaza hotel, at 9700 In-
ternatiohal Drive in Orlando, will take place
aboard a replica of the USS Constitution where -
guests arrayed in their most fabulous hats will
be served gourmet hors d'oeuvres and desserts,
sip pink champagne and a variety of martinis
while dancing to Central Florida's coolest croon-


er, Michael Andrew, and his 18-piece Atomic Big
Band.
Visit KidsBeatingCancer.com for tickets and
more information.

Jazz, a picnic and honors for
police and firefighters
The Second Annual Honor the Badge Festivities
will be held Saturday, Sept. 6, (rain or shine) at
the Asbury United Methodist Church at 220 W.
Horatio Blvd. in Maitland.


Organized as an event to celebrate the dedi-
cation and service of the Maitland Police and
Fire Departments, Honor the Badge is free to
the community and includes a jazz concert by
the lake, picnic lunch provided by the Maitland
Men's Club, a ceremony featuring the Police and
Fire Chiefs as well as the mayor of Maitland, and
activities for the kids.
Honor the Badge is a non-denominational
program open to the community. The festivities
begin at 11 a.m. and conclude at 3 p.m. Call Keri
Burns at 407-256-7660 for more information.


a- lyCalendar


Bring a friend and join
Clover Kids 4-H Club
Youth ages 5 through 12 are invited to the Clover
Kids 4-H Club. Enrollment and the first meeting
will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Monday,
Sept. 22, at the Extension Auditorium at 250 W.
County Home Road in Sanford.
* Clover Kids 4-H meetings will be held twice a


month from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday. This
year's club projects will include photography,
ecology, and foods and nutrition. Youth can work
on additional projects on their own.
Club dues are $20 per year for the first child,
which includes a club T-shirt and project sup-
plies, and $15 for each additional child.
Call 407-665-5560 for more information.


Aquatic Adventure promised
in Geneva wilderness
Join an aquatic expert as he takes you through
the world underwater on an Aquatic Adventures
hike! Meet at 8 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 27 at Lake
Proctor Wilderness Area at 920 E. State Road 46
in Geneva. This is an interactive hike where you
have the chance to learn what is found in the


waters of Seminole County!
You do not have to go in the water to partici-
pate in this hike. Reservations are required!
Call Amy Raub at 407-349-0959 or e-mail
araub@seminolecountyfl.gov to sign up and for
more information.


BIG OH! I In an instant, skateboards and little girls can look the same ... sorta


< continued from the last page
hurt," queried my brother.
"I saw this shape in the
water and I thought it was
the baby."
"How does the baby re-
semble a skateboard?" he
pondered.
You know, I really didn't
know. I just knew I had to
make a split-second deci-.
sion. I had to jump.
So, I had a wakeup call.
I jumped, but I didn't have
the knowledge.to save a life.
Did you know that about
seven million adults and
children suffer disabling


injuries in their own homes
and backyard each year,
things such as heart at-
tacks, drowning, allergic
reactions, lightening strikes
and suffocation. Accidental
injuries, including choking
and drowning, are the lead-
ing cause of death among
children. Often, these acci-
dents require CPR. Statistics
show that the earlier CPR
is initiated, the greater the
chances of survival. When
a person stops breathing
or the heart stops beating,
they typically can survive
four to six minutes before
a lack of oxygen can result


in brain damage or death. If
you can artificially circulate
oxygen to the brain until
professional help arrives,
you can buy the victim
precious time. There are
two Web sites that can help
you to find a class in the
area. You can also take the
course online. Check out
the American Red Cross
Web site at RedCross.org
and The American Heart
Association at American-
Heart.org.
I've always liked the say-
ing, "better safe than sorry."
I can safely assume that I,
will be teased mercilessly


about my heroic leap at ev-
ery family gathering from
now until eternity. "Hey,
Gina's here, safe to use the


skateboards by the pool
now." But I'm not sorry I
jumped into that pool.


FLORIDA LEARNING ADVENTURE
ANNE VANDENBULCK, ED.S.
Licensed School Psychologist SS660
Counseling, Assessments & Consultations
*With schools & parents *For individuals or families
Testing & Reevaluation for:
*Learning Problems *ADHD/ADD *Dyslexia @Social Skills
*Early Learning Readiness *Gifted
407-475-1185 www.FloridaLeat ningAAdventure.com


Page 12 ThrdySetme4,20


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Winter Park / Maitand Observer Thursday, September 4, 2008 Page 13


Cinema


..s...moviegtims fo FidySept.


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510 N Orlando Ave.
Winter Park
407-628-0035
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qw 0 woi


Community DD Q r
The Florida Department of Trans- are $2. Call 407-539-2181 or visit
portation (FDOT) and the Florida As- www.maitlandartcenter.org for more
sociation of Chiefs of Police awarded information.
the Winter Park Police Department the
2008 Technology Award at the Annual American poet Billy Collins will
Florida Law Enforcement Conference read from his new book, "Ballistics,"
on Aug. 15 in Orlando. Winter Park which will be released the day of the
was chosen out of 308 law enforce- reading, at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9 at
ment agencies in the state of Florida Tiedtke Concert Hall on the Rollins
to receive the award in recognition of College campus at Chase and Holt
their cutting-edge technology related avenues.
to traffic-safety enforcement. A book signing will take place fol-
The award recognizes traffic-safe- lowing the reading. Collins' books
ty measures which include the use of will be available for purchase at the
high visibility signs, message boards, event. This event is free and open to
solar-powered cross walk signs, traf- the public.
fic counters, speed trailers, radar and Collins' last three collections have
laser guns, detector cameras, lighting broken poetry sales records, and his
on rear of school zone lights, portable work has appeared in various pub-
breath testers, automatic external locations including The New Yorker,
defibrillators, DUI cameras and equip- The Paris Review and The American
ment to locate stolen vehicles. Scholar. He has also been a recipient
Visit www.cityofwinterpark.org for of a multitude of awards from Poetry
more information, magazine, as well published over
eight collections of poetry. He was
The Maitland Art Center will kick the guest editor for The Best Ameri-
off the 2008-2009 exhibition season can Poetry 2006, a Guggenheim fel-
with Mascaras in conjunction with low and a New York Public Library
Hispanic Heritage Month. The exhi- "Literary Lion."
bition opens on Friday, Sept. 12 and Visit www.winterparkinstitute.org
runs through Sunday, Oct. 26. or call 407-691-1995 for more infor-
The opening night .celebration on mation.
Friday, Sept. 12 will be a fun-filled
evening and feature a typical carnival A Florida-friendly landscape class
atmosphere with contagious, rhyth- will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
mic sounds of folkloric dance compa- p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11 at the UF/
ny "Bomba y Plena Lanz6", flavorful IFAS Extension Auditorium at 240 W.
food and drink. This special evening County Home Road in Sanford. Flor-
is open to the public with an admis- ida-friendly landscapes incorporate
sion charge of $5 per person, low maintenance plants to save mon-
Gallery hours for the Maitland ey, extra work and water. Learn about
Art Center are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Florida yards and neighborhoods and
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. receive UF/IFAS handouts. The class
to 4:30 p.m. and noon to 4:30 p.m. is free. Register at 407-665-5575 or
Saturday and Sunday. Admission to fyn@seminolecountyfl.gov.
the galleries is free for members, not-
yet-members $3; Maitland residents, Join Summerville at Oviedo in cel-
seniors (65+), and students (12-22) ebration of National Assisted Living


Week from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thurs-
day, Sept. 11.
Summerville's ninth-annual Health
Fair will be held then. Summerville is
at 1725 Pine Bark Point in Oviedo.
Call 407-977-5250 for more infor-
mation.

Kmart is sponsoring an event for
the community to get a free diabetes
screening. The event will be held from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11
to Saturday, Sept. 13. and is at the
Kmart on 501 N. Orlando Ave. in Win-
ter Park. There is no appointment
necessary. Call 1-800-713-3301 for
more information.

Toxic Audio brings two days of a-
cappella sensations to their home-
town of Orlando. The event is at 7:30
p.m. Friday, Sept. 12 and at 2:30 p.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13 at
the Plaza Theatre, at 425 N. Bumby
Ave. Tickets cost $25-$30.
Toxic Audio features five vocalists
who use no other instruments other
than the human voice to create com-
plex sonic textures, rhythmic drum-
beat, thumping bass lines and sear-
ing guitar-like solos and have been
hailed by critics as "a musical experi-
ence unlike any other."
Call 407-228-1220 for tickets or
visit www.toxicaudio.com for more
information.

The Goldenrod Area Chamber of
Commerce will host a golf tourna-
ment on .Friday, Sept. 19. The event is
at the North Shore Golf Club on Moss
Park Road off Narcoossee Road and
will begin at 1 p.m. The entry fee is
$75 per person, which includes green
fees, cart and lunch. The cost of a hole
sponsorship is $100. The tournament
will be-a four person scramble and
sign-in will start at noon. Call 407-
677-5980 for information.

Prime Outlets International Orlan-


do, the largest outlet shopping center
in the southern U.S. and second larg-
est in the nation, announced today
Debbie Bornstein of Maitland was the
grand prize winner of Prime Outlets'
$10,000 Ultimate Shopping Spree
Sweepstakes launched by the shop-
ping destination to celebrate its grand
opening in May. In addition to the
shopping spree sponsored by Coca-
Cola, Bornstein's grand prize package
also includes a three day, two night
stay at The Peabody Orlando Hotel.
Contest entries were accepted May
15 to July 5.
Pictured from Left to Right: Special-
ty Leasing Manager Robin Bessinger;
Marketing Assistant Sara Steffes;
Grand Prize Winner Debbie Bornstein;
General Manager Debby LaMotte and
Marketing Manager Brooke Smith.

Florida Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson today reminded state
residents that his department's price-
gouging hotline, which was activated
two weeks ago for Tropical Storm Fay,
remains operational for the approach-
ing Tropical Storm.Hanna.
Under Florida law, it is unlawful
to charge exorbitant or excessive
prices for essential items includ-
ing shelter, gasoline, food, water, ice,
generators or lumber -following the
declaration of an emergency, unless
the increases in the amount charged
are attributable to additional costs in-
curred by retailers.
Bronson is asking residents.who
have any evidence that price-gouging
has occurred or is occurring to report
it at once to his department's toll-free
hotline at 1-800-435-7352.

Love, comedy and confusion thrive
behind the scenes of a Broadway-.
bound musical version of William
Shakespeare's The Taming of the
Shrew. In Cole Porter's musical mas-
terpiece "Kiss Me, Kate!" quarrelling


couples swat and swoon as they
navigate through the satiric, witty,
and sensual score with such classics
as "Too Darn Hot," "So in Love" and
"Brush Up Your Shakespeare!" Fea--
turing local singing talent Michael
Andrew.
The play runs Friday, Sept. 19
through Sunday, Oct. 12. Times are
7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursdays,
8 p.m. Friday and Saturdays and 2
p.m. Saturday and Sundays. A senior
matinee will be held Sept. 24.
The show is at the Ken and Trisha
Margeson Theater at the John and
Rita Lowndes Shakespeare Center at
Loch Haven Park at 812 E. Rollins St.
in Orlando.
Tickets are $24-$40. The senior
matinee costs $16.
Call 407-447-1700 or visit www.
orlandoshakes.org for more informa-
tion.

The Central Florida Zoo in Sanford
hosts "Mission Possible: Going Green"
from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
20. It's a "black tie on the wild side
event." Enjoy a silent and live auction,
dinner and dancing all to benefit the
Central Florida Zoo.
Call Jayna Fox, director of guest,
services at 407-323-4450 ext. 136
for more information.

A major storm can have devastat-
ing effects, changing your commu-
nity in an instant. Buildings may be
damaged or destroyed, power lines
down, and trees broken and torn. In
the wake of this loss, neighborhoods
and an entire community may ex-
perience a sense of devastation not
known before.
Information is available from the
Arbor Day Foundation for residents
who want to become more informed
about tree care and storm recovery.
The Arbor Day Foundation's Web
site, arborday.org offers a free Storm
Recovery Kit.


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Thursday, September 4, 2008 Pae1


OL


q 0 .10MIMM










Letters to the EdcQor


Using public money
to create jobs
Good jobs are simply the
backbone of what keeps a
society running. They pay
for houses, food, education,
recreation, transportation
and government. As jobs
evaporate, the huge engine
of our economy sputters
and slows, so it's no wonder
we are so protective of any
project that creates or pro-
tects good jobs.
This atmosphere of pro-
tection wraps itself around
the elements of the federal
budget that create jobs and
affects our federal spending
priorities more than most
of us can imagine.
The biggest sector of that
economy is the military. It
eats up more than half of
our federal discretionary
budget pie, leaving crumbs


tary base they have to
consider how many jobs
will be lost. Losing jobs
means losing votes; defying
the military, means losing
support.
How, then, can we begin
to scale back the enormous
military machine that our
country has built since
World War II? It's a daunt-
ing, yet hardly impossible
task. In fact, it's almost
simple: we can create jobs
in other areas, which has
proven to provide more
employment opportunities
per dollar spent.
In late 2007, economists
at the University of Massa-
chusetts published a report
that compares the number
of jobs generated by invest-
ing $1 billion in different
sectors. Here is what they
found:


"The bottom line is that investing public

dollars in areas other than the military

creates significantly more jobs than investing

that same amount in the military. "


for human and environ-
mental needs. But chang-
ing those budget slices has
proven nearly impossible
during the years since Presi-
dent Dwight Eisenhower
warned after World War II
that the "conjunction of an
immense military establish-
ment and a large arms in-'
dustry is new in the Ameri-
can experience."
Almost every debate
about cutting the military
budget circles back to the
issue of jobs. The military
establishment is good at
creating jobs and at educat-
ing Congress about how
those jobs are central to our
economy. This means that
every member of Congress
who guards the jobs in a
district ends up protecting
the military projects that
generate these jobs.
When Congress consid-
ers the prospect of cutting
a military project e.g., a
weapons system or a mili-


1) Investing $1 billion in
the military creates 8,500
jobs.
2) Allocating $1 billion
of tax revenue to tax cuts
for personal consumption
generates about 10,800
jobs.
3) Investing $1 billion
generates either 12,800
construction for home
weatherization and in-
frastructure jobs, 12,900
health care jobs, 17,700
education jobs, or 19,800
mass transit jobs.
The bottom line is that
investing public dollars in
areas other than the mili-
tary creates significantly
more jobs than investing
that same amount in the
military. Investing in educa-
tion and mass transit cre-
ates twice as many jobs as
investing in the military.
So what's holding us
back? A lot of people and
corporations have hugely
vested interests in keeping


BURNHAM RESEARCH BRIEFINGS
COMMUNITY FORUM
Stuart Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the Del E. Webb Neuroscience, Aging, and Stem Cell
Research Center and Professor of Neurodegenerative Diseases
"New Drug Treatments and the Future of Stem Cells for the Aging Brain"
Dr. Upton will explain the Center's focus on efforts to lay the foundation of knowledge necessaryior eventual
development of new drugs and cell replacement therapies for neurodegenerative diseases
(Alzheimer's), stroke, heart attack, diabetes and other ailments where cells.are damaged or lost.
This is a free event that is open to the public.
-..------- t.pCAT1IO N ...---
THE SOROSIS OF ORLANDO
501 E. LIVINGSTON STREET
ORLANDO, FL 32803
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2008
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that money where it is.
The numbers say a lot. In
2007, 27 cents of each tax
dollar went to the military.
In that year, the defense
sector spent $127,514,836
on lobbying activities.
One corporation spent
more than $10 million. By
contrast, a group that ad-
vocates for rational arms
control and nuclear disar-
mament spent $80,000. In
2006, defense corporations
spent $18 million in cam-
paign contributions. A top
defense contractor contrib-
uted more than $2 million.
It's time to rethink how
we spend our tax dollars.
The truth is, when we invest
federal funds in projects
that are not military-relat-
ed, we generate substan-
tially more jobs.
Susan Shaer
Executive director of
Women's Action for New Directions

Let's coordinate preschool.
and grade school
For teachers, parents, and
most youngsters, it's back
to school time.
But for 400,000 children,
it's an even more important
occasion starting school
for the first time. Most of
them are ready for school,
and, years later, most of -
them and their parents will
look back fondly on their
first few weeks.
Sadly, about a third of
the children who are start-
ing school aren't ready.
Many of these youngsters
will still be behind by the
third grade. Many may nev-
er catch up with what their
schools and our society
- expect them to learn and
be able to do.
This is a problem and
there is a solution. Taking
the long view from early
childhood to young adult-
hood, there is increasing
interest in creating a more
"seamless" system of learn-
ing that begins early and
assures that students can
successfully finish school
and move on to higher
education or job train-
ing and, eventually, into


the workforce. In the New
Economy, where Americans
must compete with work-
ers from throughout the
world and keep adapting
to changing technologies,
"seamless learning" and,
indeed lifelong learning -
is essential for everyone.
Looking at the early


ents support learning at
home, children succeed.
When kindergarten and
early-education teachers
can exchange information
or visit each other's class-
rooms, they are better able
to coordinate children's
experiences across the two
systems and children do


"When children come to school

regularly and parents support learning

at home, children succeed. "


years of education from
age three through third
grade our preschools and
elementary schools need to
address four fundamental
realities.
Reality #1: The early
years before children start
kindergarten are crucial.
for student achievement.
The brain's development
is nearly 90 percent com-
plete by the time a child is 5
years old, and from birth to
age 3 represents the most
rapid brain development.
Economists tell us that
investments made in the
early years will bring large
returns in the form of fewer
drop-outs and grade reten-
tions, increased graduation
rates and ultimately in-
creased adult productivity.
Educational research shows
us that children who have
opportunities to participate
in quality early care and ed-
ucation programs are well
prepared for school and do
better when they get there.
Reality #2: The transition
from early learning into
kindergarten is important
and can impact later school
success. What's needed:
Communication and co-
operation among schools,
communities and families.
When children feel safe and
prepared for. kindergarten
and families understand
and value what happens
in school, then issues like
persistent absence and lack
of parental involvement are
not problems.
When children come to
school regularly and par-


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better.
Reality #3: The positive
effects of high-quality early
care and education may
dissipate for some children
unless they are followed by
consistent and high-quality
teaching in kindergarten
through third grade. These
early elementary grades are
critical for later school suc-
cess because the founda-
tion skills that children will
need to have in place in or-
der to meet school expecta-
tions going forward must
be established by grade 3.
Reality #4: When chil-
dren's learning experiences
before and after they start
school are coordinated -
or aligned then the first
component of a "seamless"
learning system is in place.
Children will succeed when
what they experience, how
they are taught, and what
they are expected to know
is high quality and linked
across the early grades.
Creating these links is
not easy. It will require two
groups of people who usu-
ally aren't used to working
together early childhood
educators and K- 12 educa-
tors to find ways to con-
nect their two systems.
Because this is a vitally
important but challeng-
ing task, the W.K Kellogg
Foundation and the Edu-
cation Commission of the
States are teaming up with
Governors in five states
to convene meetings that
bring together education
leaders -and policy makers
to explore ways that states
can create more coherent
and connected systems of
learning across early learn-
ing and the early grades.
The "Iinking Ready Kids
and Ready Schools" Gov-
ernor's state forums are
raising awareness of these
issues and will jumpstart
efforts to link early care
and education and the
early grades so all children
will be ready to succeed by
grade 3.
By working together;
leaders from pre-school
education, elementary edu-
cation, and public policy-
making can make sure that
more children will be well
on their way to completing
a successful educational
journey.
Mimi Howard.
Early learning program director for the
Education Commission of the States


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 14 ThrdySetme4,20




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Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

Sermons in

Stones...
When I was a small
boy, the "Walk of
Fame" at Rollins
College fascinated me.
President Hamilton Holt
had collected stones from
historic sites, and from
the hearths and houses of
famous people, and had
buried them in the ground
alongside a great "horse-
shoe walk" on campus.
On the top of each stone
was carved the name of the
place from where it came.
A large upright stone at
the walk's beginning bore
the inscription: "... sermons
in stones, and good in
everything."
I looked for the source
of those words, and found
it in the "Sweet are the uses
of adversity" speech in "As
You Like It" by William
Shakespeare.
'And this our life,
exempt from public haunt,
finds tongues in trees,
books in the running
brooks, sermons in stones,
and good in everything."
I believe that this
quote from Shakespeare
influenced me as a lad to


become comfortably inti-
mate with books to see
them as mankind's stream
of consciousness, read-
ily available to our every
desire.
Recently, good friends
sent me a list of things that
various people have said
or written about books.
I added a few of my own
favorites, and offer them
for your enlightenment
and amusement:
"Wherever books will
be burned, men also, in the
end, are burned."
Heinrich Heine
"The proper study of
mankind is books."
Aldous Huxley
"There is no such thing
as a moral or an immoral
book. Books are well-writ-
ten, or badly written."
Oscar Wilde
"I never read books I
write them."
Benjamin Disraeli
"My only books were
women's looks, and folly's
all they've taught me."
Thomas Moore
"I am part of all I have
read."
-John Kieran
"A real book is not one
that's read, but one that
reads us."
WH. Auden
"Many a book is like a
key to unknown chambers
within the castle of one's
own self."
Franz Kafka
"Every story is complet-.
ed by the reader."
Grace Paley
"This is an important
book, the critic assumes,
because it deals with war.
This is an insignificant
book, because it deals with
the feelings of women in a
drawing-room."
Virginia Woolf
"I divide all readers into
two classes: those who read
to remember and those
who read to forget."
William Lyon Phelps


"Lists of books we re-
read and books we can't
finish tell more about us
than the relative worth of
the books themselves."
Russell Banks
"All books are either
dreams or swords."
Amy Lowell
"A book is like a piece of
rope; it takes on meaning
only in connection with
the things it holds togeth-
er."
T Norman Cousins
"The book should be a
ball of light in one's hand."
Ezra Pound
"The closest you will
ever come in this life to an
orderly universe is a good
library."
Ashleigh Brilliant
"Books must be read as
deliberately and reservedly
as they were written."
Henry David Thoreau
"A man ought to read
just as inclination leads
him."
Samuel Johnson
"Always read stuff that
will make you look good if
you die in the middle of it."
-- PJ. O'Rourke
"The great gift is the pas-
sion for reading." .
Elizabeth Hardwick
"There are some people
who read too much: the
bibliobibuli."
S H.L. Mencken
"The only end of writing
is to enable readers better
to enjoy life or better to
endure it."
Samuel Johnson
"The most technologi-
cally efficient machine that
man has ever invented is
the book."
Northrop Frye
"Let my temptation be
a book, which I shall pur-
chase, hold and keep."
Eugene Field
"No entertainment is so
cheap as reading, nor any
-pleasure so lasting."
Lady Montagu
"Reading, you grow


more gentle."
Victor Hugo
"Book lovers are thought
by unbookish people to be
gentle and unworldly and
perhaps a few of them are
so."
Robertson Davies
"After you've finished it,
the book enters on its real
career."
Anatole Broyard
"A classic is a book that
has never finished saying.
what it has to say."
Italo Calvino
"If reading becomes a
bore, mental death is on
the way."
-Joan Aiken
"Some books are unde-
servedly forgotten; none
are undeservedly remem-
bered."
WH. Auden
"No book is so bad but
some good might be got
out of it."
Pliny the Elder
"All books are divisible
into two classes: the books
of the hour, and the books
of all time."
John Ruskin
"All good books have one
thing in common: They are
truer than if they had really
happened."
S Ernest Hemingway
"Literature adds to
reality, it does not simply
describe it."
C.S. Lewis
"Books make sense of
life. The only problem is
that the lives they make
sense of are... never your
own."
-Julian Barnes
"I live for books."
Thomas Jefferson
"The only books that
influence us are those for
which we are ready."
E.M Forster
"Take the book, my
friend, and read your eyes
out, andyou will never find
there what I find."
Ralph Waldo Emerson
"In literature, as in love, ,


we are astonished at what
is chosen by others."
AndrdMaurois
"Without books, history
is silent, literature is dumb,
science crippled, thought
and speculation at a stand-
still."
Barbara Tuchman
"To read a book properly
is to wake up and live."
Henry Miller
"I have sought for happi-
ness everywhere, but I have
found it nowhere except in
a little corner with a little
book."
Thomas a Kempis
"Literature is my Utopia.
No barrier of the senses
shuts me out from the
sweet, gracious discourse of
my book friends. They talk
to me without embarrass-
ment or awkwardness."
Helen Keller
"The books we think we
ought to read are pokey,
dull and dry; the books
that we would like to read,
we are ashamed to buy;
the books that people talk
about we never can recall;
and books that people give
us, oh, they're the worst of
all!"
Carolyn Wells
"I would never read a
book if it were possible
for me to talk half an hour
with the person who wrote
it."
Woodrow Wilson
"There are books of
which the backs and covers
are by far the best parts."
Charles Dickens
"An apology for the
Devil: It must be remem-
bered that we have only
heard one side of the case.
God has written all the
books."
.- SamuelButler
"The true University of '
these days is a Collection of
Books."
Thomas Carlyle
'"Tis the good reader that
makes the good book."
Ralph Waldo Emerson


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'Page 16 Niiusday, September 4, 2008






Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday. September 4. 2008 Paae 17


y4IQt~:iNootices


il H II F _A14 l,' IT I IllI.0eT Hi 1 JIln411 Iii fi r, ,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008-CP-1881-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WO-YEN LEE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of WO-YEN LEE,
deceased, whose date of death was May 29, 2008,
File Number 2008-CP-1881-0 is pending in Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Room 340, Orlando, FL 32801.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their.claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate must file their claims with this Court-WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. "
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
the 28th day of August 2008.
Chun-te Wu, Esq.
Attorney for Personal Representative
802 E. Colonial Drive
Orlando, FL 32803
Telephone: (407) 244-0088
Florida Bar No. 0064998
Angela Lee Chen
Personal Representative
.111 AltaAve,
Yonkers, NY 10705
8/28,9/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN ANOTOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
File No. 48-2008-CP-001402-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RUTH M.TAYLOR,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of RUTH M. TAY-
LOR, deceased, whose date of death was December
28, 2007; File Number 48-2008-CP-001402-0, is
Spending in the Circuit Court for Orange County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 425 N.
ORANGE AVENUE, ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedeht's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is:
August 28, 2008.
RICHARD A. LEIGH, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 119591
Swann & Hadley, PA
1031 W. Morse Blvd., Suite 350
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: 407-647-2777
DAWN DORAN, Trust Officer for WACHOVIA BANK,
N.A.
Personal Representative
PO Box 612007
Pompano Beach, Florida 33061
8/28,9/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2008-CP-1576
IN RE: Estate of
WILLIAM M, DUKE, .
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of WILLIAM
M. DUKE, deceased, whose date of death was
February 19, 2008, File Number 2008-CP-1576, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
is Seminole County Courthouse, 301 North Park
Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The names and
addresses of the Personal Representative and
the Personal Representative's attorney are set
forth below. '
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is:
. August 28, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle & Wigle, P.A.
RO. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone (407) 644-9801
Personal Representative:
JOHN R. DUKE
317 East Crystal Drive
Sanford, Florida 32773
8/28, 9/4
PUBLIC NOTICE
In accordance with Section 6.06 of the City Char-
ter, the City Council of the City of Maitland, Florida,
will hold Public Hearings on the proposed Fiscal Year
2008-2009 Budget on Monday, September 8, 2008,
at 7:00 P.M. and Monday, September 22, 2008, at
7:00 P.RM., in the City Hall Council Chambers, 1776
Independence Lane, Maitland, Florida.
Copies of the Budget Message are available for
Inspection by the public at Maitland City Hall, Mon-
day through Friday, from 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
CITY OF MAITLAND
Maria T.Waldrop, CMC
City Clerk
8/21,9/4


rj THIE ImlC ill i r i lllrT : Flf ,'A, rjiA 1E ir. fi i,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2008 CP 001 952-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CHRIS CLAUSEN,.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION;
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CHRIS
CLAUSEN deceased, File Number: 2008 CP 001
952-0, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is PO BOX 4994, ORLANDO, FL. 32804-4994.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below. The decedent died Intestate.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, or persons who have objections that
challenge these proceedings, the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the Personal Representative,
venue or the jurisdiction of this Court, on whom a
copy of this notice is served, must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS 'AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or
- unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS,
DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is:
Set. 4. 200.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
BELFORD S. LESTER, Florida Bar No. 128186
Belford S. Lester, PA.
224 Annie St. Suite A
Orlando, Florida 32806
407-841-5353
Personal Representative:
YVETTE CLAUSEN
843 Golf Valley Dr.
Apopka, FL 32712
9/4, 9/11
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Public notice is hereby given that, on the date and
a t th e ti. ,. i. i. i. : L.- i, .,. ,',. i ,. i.. ,-.j;,-, ,. T ,in
to day ui' -t ,',,',1" .- :d:, o. v, 1 :.; ,....
auction, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the ware-
house of United Stor-All, at 965 S. Semoran Blvd.,
Winter Park, FL 32792, the contents of the following
storage units containing household and/or business
goods, for rent and other charges for which a lien
on same is claimed, to wit.
DATE OF.SALE: September 25, 2008
TIME OF SALE: 12:00 PM or thereafter
Salaam Alnur #44, Household Items;- Mark Harris
#63 Household goods & Furniture; Thomas J Dybas
#104 Soda Machines, Building Supplies; Maria A
Von Schmeling #231 Household items; Jose Abel
Henriquez #351 House items.
Auctioneer: Storage Protection Auction Services
-license 593. The above notice is to be published
once a week for two consecutive weeks. Said sale
to be under and by virtue of the statues of the State
of Florida, in such cases made and provided.
Thank you -
JORGE HITSCHFELD PROPERTY MANAGER
9/4, 9/11
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
SALE BY CASH AUCTION
THE FOLLOWING UNITS
On September 16, 2008, at Assured Self-Storage,
Inc. to the highest bidder for cash, items contained
in the following units:
C1048 Jose Pinero Household Items
TO BE HELD AT
510 DOUGLAS AVENUE
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL
ON September 16, 2008
AT 10:00 A.M.
ASSURED SELF-STORAGE, INC.
Assured Self-Storage, Inc. reserves the right to bid
and to refuse or reject any and all bids.
8/28, 9/4
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Pursuant F.S. 328.17, United American Lien & Re-
covery as agent w/ power of attorney will sell the
following vessels) to the highest bidder
Inspect 1 week prior @ marina; cash or cashier
check;15% buyer prem; all auctions are held w/ re-
serve; any persons interested ph 954-563-1999
Sale Date August 15 2008 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
V11091 1994 BYQ1 FLO5712KC hull id#: BYOB34F-
FA494 outboard pleasure gas white fiberglass L 20ft
r/o walter j Longman lienor: Monroe harbour marina
531 n palmetto ave Sanford fl.
Licensed & Bonded Auctioneers & Surveyors
FLAB422 FLAU765 & 1911
9/4,9/11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
Case No.: 2008-CP-001700-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SALVATORE J. FIGLUIZZI,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Salvatore
J. Figluizzi, Deceased, whose date of death was
May 17, 2006, and whose social security number
is XXX-XX-2323 is pending in the Circuit Court for
Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Room 340,
Orlando, Florida 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice Is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice Is Sep-
tember 4,2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative
Joseph E. Boatwright, Esq.
399 CarolinaAve., Suite 100
Winter Park, FL 32789
Fla. Bar No. 512753
407/679-9900
Personal Representative:
CHRISTY S. FIGLUIZZI
9/4,9/11






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and the Oviedo-Winter Spnrngs voie ere ISeririle Counry FLI we are your 1 pITop
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IMPROVED CASE MANAGEMENT
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Public NAice.'Public Sale $9.co.:l Inch
Notce to Credi'ors $42 5.'week
Notice ot Sale 555 week
Dlteolutln of Marriage $125
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PLACE YOUR AD
Now A:eepting e-mail submiftals Just emal usC a
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the rest Upon complelihon 01 he advertising we
immediately send you a notanzed affidaviL
E-MAIL Legal JbEervrnemwspapers.com
r. FAX 407.628-4053
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TITLE 6. CIVIL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (Chs. 45-88)
CHAPTER 510 LEGAL AND OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENTS

1 511 131 Newspapers in which legai noble and proce', rmayy be
pu blshed
Nio nonc or opuDii:allon required I,: be published in a newspaper
in Ine njtur ui or in lieuP i process or any kint. nature. character
ror ddes.:riion provided ,r unr, de any law ir [he Slate wihet-i,.r
rereeilo're or hereahlir enartua. and wunefl'rr pernainirg Io
Cln'arruLthie 'ervic' o the inia.irlg assuming reviewing,
eeiciirng 0o en.ir:ming jurisidctic r poinei by any courl in tis
slae, or any notice o sl31e of proierrTy. real or per-sonal, f':,r taf':
tale. county or municipal, or sheriff s. guardian'5 or admirnistator s
or any sale made Dur5Uan 1an0 any udi
any otrier pubiI :lion or no I ining ii any allairs 01 the state,
or any ounry,, iunic- o r er DePlitical subddivision rnereol
shall be deemed 1 ne been DPublihed on accordance W lti the
sEtatiuWte provil g for such puDlicapin.y unless Ine same snall have
been publims for the prescribed period of time required for such
puDlc31 na newspaper whih at he time of such Dubhlication
Shall hao r I year a all nave been entered

or in a news R successor of a newspaper
which together have Dbean so published provided, however, trial
nothing, nerein contained snail apply where in any country there Lhall
be no newspaper in existence which shall nave been publisnea
for the length ato nine above prescribed No legal publicalion of
any kind. nature or description, as nerein defined. shall be valid
or Dining or held to be in compliance wth the statutes prOviding
for such, publicanon unless the eame shall nave been published
in accordanrce witr me provisions ofl I l stion Profi of sucr
cublicalion shall be maclebv unrrn atidacla '


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Page 18 Th'ursday, September 4, 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


TheMarketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

SPRAY TECHNICIAN/TURN MGR.
Mature, experienced to work on athletic
fields in C.F. Must have FLA Applicators
License & pass Level 2 screening/finger
print. Bermuda Turf experience required.
Year round work, competitive salary, benefits
available. Email amiller4879@gmail.com or
call 407-468-3088.

CAREGIVER
Caregiver F/T or Live-In Energetic &
responsible person to care for residents at
Faith House Assisted Living 407-366-9961

SECRETARY/CLERK/SALES REP
Raymond World seeking an individual
to work as secretary/clerk and sales
representative. Qualifications verbal/
written communication skills, extremely
organized, legal background helpful.
Interested candidate should contact
pphotocopy@gmail.com







LAKEFRONT APARTMENT
Quiet area,, private road, historic building.
Very clean 1B/1B. Central A/C. Utilities and
Cable included. Laundry. $750./mo. NS, NP.
407-971-4052.

OVIEDO HOUSE FOR RENT
4BR/1BA two-story house with a large
remodelled kitchen, wood flooring and
spacious screened porches. Located 1"
block from N. Lake Jesup Ave and SR 426.
Contact Kellyn at 407-716-8649.



FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.

OVIEDO OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
500 square feet space. $677 per month.
Freshly. painted and tiled..Unit 1513 West
Broadway Professional Building, Oviedo.
407-365-5696. Available immediately.

COMMERCIAL SPACE IN OVIEDO
1,300 sq. ft. brand-netw commercial space
available. Located within the beautiful
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community is part of the new Oviedo on the
Park major mixed-use development. This
space can be used for: hair salon, nail salon,
or other personal service. Please contact
Denisse at 407-741-8600.




Reading' volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are-
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00,a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlbn for more
information, 407-365-7585.




HOW TO DETOX FOR
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KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
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PERSONAL ASSISTANT
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BUILD YOUR OWN STEEL BUILDING
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AFRICAN PYGMY GOATS
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Pregnant? Considering adoption? A
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Announcements
Run your ad STATEWIDE! Run your classified
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over 4 MILLION readers. Call this newspaper
or (866)742-1373 for more details or visit:
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Auctions
AUCTION 144_ Acres Divided Cherokee
County, NC Tues., Sept. 9 6:00 p.m. This
bank owned property is 'surrounded by
national forest and conservation lands.
Two tracts totaling 144 acres, just off U.S.
Hwys. 74,19,129. Access roads have been
added for development. Bid online or at
the auction. Sale Site: Holiday Inn Express,
Murphy, NC, Terms: Pay 10% down, 10%
buyer's premium. For detailed Information,
call (800)479-1763 or go online to www.
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Associates Auctions-Marketing.

GIGANTIC 3-DAY Auction September
10,11,12,2008. Montgomery, Alabama.


Single, Tandem &Tri-Axle Dumps, Mack Roll
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Graders & Scrapers, Backhoes, Rubber Tired
Loaders, Articulating Dumps. Compactors
Grinders, Forklifts, Paving, Skidders, Feller
Bunchers, Log Loaders, Farm Tractors. J.M.
Wood Auction Co., Inc. (334)264-3265.
Bryant Wood AL LIC #1137.

REAL ESTATE AUCTION Waterfront
Lots on Kerr Scott Lake, Wilkes County,.
NC. September 11 at 6 p.m. Iron Horse
Auction, (800)997-2248. NCAL3936. www.
ironhorseauction.com.

Auto Donations
DONATE VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY
COUPON NOAH'S ARC SUPPORT NO KILL
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Building Supplies
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manufacturer. Over 20 colors in
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Employment Services
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Learn to Operate a Crane or Bull Dozer Heavy
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Financial & Placement Assistance. Georgia
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Use code "FLCNH" or call (866)218-2763.

Health
Do you Experience Anxiety? There are
answers in this book. Buy and read Self
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Hubbard Dianetics Foundation (813)872-
0722 ~ E-mail cofstampa@gmail.com.

Help Wanted
Guaranteed Weekly Settlement Check. Join
Wil-Trans Lease Operator Prodgam. Get the
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Industrial / Commercial Telemarketing Work
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buildingpro.com billh@buildingpro.com.

DRIVERS: CALL ASAP! $$ Sign-On Bonus
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meltontruck.com.

Homes For Rent
Venice New 1 and 2 bedroom homes
from $900 per month in active lifestyle
community with waterfront sites, resort
amenities, on-site activities and events.
(866)823-9860.

Homes For Sale
Bank Special! 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
large lot! Make offer! Gracious Living Realty.
www.graciousliving.org e-mail: william@
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says "Sell, Sell, Sell!"

Legal Services
ARRESTED? NEED A LAWYER? Felonies...
Misdemeanors State/Federal All. Criminal
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Referral Service Statewide 24 Hours
(800)733-5342.

Miscellaneous
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
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approved program. Financial aid if qualified
Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121, www.CenturaOnline.
com.

NOW AVAILABLE! 2008 .POST OFFICE
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TRAINING, FED BENEFITS, VACATIONS. CALL
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Real Estate
East Tennessee affordable lake lots and
homes minutes from the Great Smoky


Mountains on pristine Norris Lake. Call
Lakeside Realty @(888)291-5253 or visit
www.lakesiderealty-tn.com.

STEAL MY MARSHFRONT Owner sacrifice!!!
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paid $389,900. I'll sell mine for less than the
bank repo's. My six figure loss is your gain.
$229,900. Call: (877)913-5253.

VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS 2 acres on mountain
top near New River State Park, great fishing,
view, private. $29,500 must sell, call owner
(866)789-8535.

Rocky Mountain Log Cabin 35+ Acres w/
Log cabin $289,900 Access to 1,000's
acres of Federal Rec. Land. Private setting
w/ Ponderosa Pines. Minutes to world- class
fishing & hunting. 1 Hour to skiing. Call (866)
OWN-LAND x4264.

Real Estate Auctions
FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION FLORIDA
STATEWIDE 600+ Homes MUST BE
SOLD! Free Catalog (800)616-6716
USHomeAuction.com.






Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
corn where you can enter the. Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Maintenance Technician
Job Description: Responsible for operating
power tools and hand tools. Performs
plumbing, electrical, carpentry, painting,
and appliance repairs. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9239337

Residential Manager
Job Description: Responsible for overseeing
operation of group home serving 6
developmentally disabled individuals. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $13.38 per hour
Job Order Number: 9354289

Showroom Sales Manager
Job Description: Responsible for managing
all showroom designers and creating and
closing sales leads. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $32,000.00 per year plus
commission
Job Order Number: 9357541 r

Service Writer
Job Description: Responsible for managing
an auto repair and transmission shop.
Makes sales and writes up repair orders.
Manages production bays and mechanics
parts ordering, quality and price control.
Enforces policies and procedures. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:00am-6:00pmr .
Pay Rate: $400.00 per week plus
commission
Job Order Number: 9357905 I

Personal and Home Care Aide
Job Description: Responsible for assisting
person in living independently. Spends time
with the consumer. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$16.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9357969

Receptionist
Job Description: Responsible for answering
multiple phone lines, managing patient
requests, and scheduling appointments.
Performs some data entry activities. Calls
insurance company to verify patient's
eligibility. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$11.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9357973

Short Order Cook
Job Description: Responsible for working


in a medium size kitchen and supervising
two part-time cook assistants. Prepares
and cooks to order a variety of foods that
require only a short preparation time. Takes
orders from customers and serves patrons
at counters or tables. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $20,000.00-$27,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9359015

Vacation Consultant
Job Description: Responsible for conducting
simple vacation surveys with potential
clients and explaining the basics of
vacation memberships. Assists clients with
paperwork and shows resorts on company's
website. Work Tuesday-Saturday, 5:00pm-
10:00pm.
Pay Rlate: $6.79 per hour
Job Order Number: 9359130

Podium Speaker
Job Description: Responsible for conducting
one- hour motivational podium presentations
to guests. Promotes vacation plans to
persuade persons to become members and
vacation in deluxe condos world-wide. Work
Tuesday-Saturday, 5:00pm-10:00pm.
Pay Rate: $6.79 per hour
Job Order Number! 9359133

Senior Database Marketing Analyst
Job Description: Responsible for providing
support for the information and analytical
needs of the Database Management &"
Services (DMS) team. Performs data mining
and other strategic ad hoc analysis. Utilizes
modeling software, works with clients to
import and export files including customer,
demographics and transactional data.
Works with campaign managers to apply
customer model and segmentation scores
and performs ad hoc analysis of marketing
efforts using campaign results, demographic
data, model scores and additional sources.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $47,500.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9359678

Business Event Planner
Job Description: Responsible for planning
events, making arrangements, and
managing group meetings for conventions,
conferences or other business events. Work
Monday-Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $48,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9360148

Benefits Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for
administering medical, dental and vision
group insurance plans including open
enrollment. Acts as a liaison between benefit
question resolutions and consolidates billing
and administration. Work Monday-Friday,
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9360410

Security/Night Audit,
Job Description: Responsible for perform
night audit and security duties. Interacts
with hotel guests. Work Friday-Thursday,
11:00pm-7:00am.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9360517

Maintenance Technician
Job Description: Responsible for making
sure vacant apartments are ready to rent.
Performs minor plumbing, drywall and small
appliance repairs. Work Monday-Friday,
S9:00am-3:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9360002

Front Desk Receptionist
Job DeScription: Responsible for answering
phones, scheduling patients' appointments,
and verifying insurance coverage. Work
Monday-Thursday, 7:00am-4:00pm.
Pay Rate: $11.00-$14.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9360255

Outpatient Substance Counselor
Job Description: Responsible for counseling
individuals on substance abuse. Completes
and maintains accurate records of cases
on file. Work Monday-Saturday, hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$11.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9360469


Order Clerk
Job .Description: Responsible for picking
and packing orders and shipping and/
or receiving orders. Provides inventory
control and inventory organization. Uses
a computer to input and track orders both
for shipment and receipt. Works in a group
environment where deadlines must be met.
Work Monday- Friday, 8:00am to 5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9360460

Project Manager
Job Description: Responsible for providing
administrative support and issue resolution
on projects. Prepares and conducts all in
house preconstruction meetings. Attends
project meetingsto assist in issue resolutions.
Communicates with subcontractors to assist
in completion of work changes to projects
and with clients for issue resolution. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $40,000.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9360519

Accounting Manager
Job Description: Responsible for fiscal
management of the agency. Maintains
standard methods of accounting in
accordance with agency policies and
uphold general ledger. Manages cash flow,
facilitates preparation of annual budget,
prepares monthly financial statements and
cash. flow reports, and prepares monthly
grant invoices and budgets for grant
requests. Provides support for annual audit,
monitors and adjusts department budgets,
and examines daily incident reports. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9360511

Secretary
Job Description: Responsible for performing
routine clerical and administrative functions
such as drafting correspondence, scheduling
appointments, organizing and maintaining
paper and electronic files, and providing
information to callers. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $18,242.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9360767

Bookkeeping, Accounting,
and Auditing Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for computing,
classifying, and recording numerical data to
keep financial records complete. Performs
any combination of routine calculating,
posting, and verifying duties to obtain
primary financial data for use in maintaining
accounting records. Checks the accuracy of
figures, calculations, and postings pertaining
to business transactions recorded by other
workers. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $15.00-$18.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9360988

Landscaping and
Grounds Keeping Worker
Job Description: Responsible for performing
general landscaping maintenance to
maintain an attractive and appealing
landscaped facility according to established
standards. Performs planting, transplanting,
irrigating, detecting plant, annual, tree or
shrub diseases or insect infestation, cutting
and laying sod, mowing, hedge trimming,
and helping to keep campus-free of debris.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $11.44 per hour
Job Order Number: 9361500

Documentation Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for filing
drawings and documents. Work Monday-
Friday, 7:00am-4:30pm.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$13.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9361305

Transportation Street Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for planning
logistics of work assignments and bus
schedules. Communicates with, tour
operators the company policies and tariff
regulations. Work 9:00am-5:00pm, days
may vary.
Pay Rate: $20.51 per hour
Job Order Number: 9361593


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Thursday, September 4, 2008 Pae1




Page 20 Thursday, September 4, 2008


Copyrighted


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Available rom Commercial News Providers


A diagnostic scan becomes a walk in the park


It's no secret medical tests can make you anxious, but at Winter Park Memonal Hospital. you'll experience a unique environment designed with your comfort in mind.
Our Philips Panorama High-Field Open MRI eliminates the confined spaces of traditional closed MRIs without compromising image quality. And, the ambient lighting
environment including the use of sounds, music and imagery all work together to help you relax. Imagine a stroll on the beach for you or an underwater adventure
for your child, while the high-field quality provides the images your doctor needs to give an accurate diagnosis.


For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 407-646-7798.
*Winter Park Memorial Hospital offers dedicated parking t
and valet service at the Jim and Alexis Pugh MRI Center.


SFLORIDA HOSPITAL
Imaging Services
The skill to heal. The spirit to care.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer:








SeniorOserver


Volume 18, No. 9


Est. 1990


Croquet lives on in Winter Park


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK SENIOR OBSERVER
Jim Spoonhour of the Winter Park Croquet Club lines up a shot through a.wicket on the croquet lawn near Casa Feliz in downtown Winter Park. The club boasts 40 members and hopes to grow with younger players.


AMYK.D. TOBIK
THE OBSERVER
As the humidity steadily
rises on the manicured
grass by historic Casa
Feliz, four men, each dressed in
crisp white linens, carefully mas-
termind their upcoming moves.
- Croquet mallets in hand, they
quietly move from side to side,
checking out all possible angles.


When the 16-ounce ball effort-
lessly glides through the wicket,
they all share in the good fun,
.despite the heat.
The tranquil Winter Park
scene is reminiscent of anoth-
er place in time, when athletes
didn't have six-figure contracts,
and the pleasure of the game
was found in peaceful surround-
ings and a good challenge.
Members of the Winter


Park Croquet Club spend their
Saturday mornings immersed
in nature while sharpening
their minds. Club president Jim
Spoonhour, who has been play-
ing croquet for 15 years, said
American six-wicket is not like
the typical game of nine-wicket
backyard croquet- most people
remember playing as children.
The American regulations
differ somewhat from the


International, Golf and Backyard
versions of the game. The six-
wicket game has two teams, the
blue and black balls versus the
red and yellow balls, according
to the. United States. Csoquet
Association. Using a mallet, play-
ers maneuver the balls through
the course of iron wickets clock-
wise and then again counter-
see CROQUET on page B5


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September 2008


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nirObserver
NEWS SENIORS CAN USE, SINCE 1990

Kyle P. Taylor
Publisher
kyle@observernewspapers.com
Alex Babcock
Editor
alexb@observernewspapers.com


Lacy Rushin
Designer
lacyr@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
Reporter
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
Reporter
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

609 Executive Drive, Winter Park, FL 32789
Observer Newspapers is a member of:
*Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
*Maitland Chamber of Commerce
*The Florida Press Association
eCentral Florida Press Club


Jonathan Gallagher
Copy Editor.
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Tracy Craft
Advertising Sales
tcraft@observernewspapers.com

Pat Lovaglio
Advertising Sales
plovaglio@observernewspapers.com

i 407-628-8500 I WPMObserver.com
Published monthly by Observer Newspapers,
publishers of the:
*Winter Park/Maitland Observer
*Oviedo/Winter Springs Voice


The publisher reserves the right to refuse or. edit advertisements, its content or.
letters to the editor for reasons of libel or I: a a, i ,biiir,.
All material is subject to copyright the SenirilObserver
All material is subject to copyright the Senior Observer.


Freuenly se
Phone umber
I foSe ior


Beardall Senior Center
800 S. Delaney Ave.
Orlando
407-246-2637


St. Cloud Senior Center
Indiana Ave. & 8th St.
St. Cloud
407-892-2533


Marks Street Senior Center Osceola Senior Center
99 E. Marks St. 1099 Shady Lane
Orlando Kissimmee
407-245-0921 407-846-8532
Maitland Senior Center Sanford Senior Center
345 S. Maitland Ave. 401 E. Seminole Blvd.
Maitland Sanford
407-539-6251 407-302-1010
RSVP Senior Volunteers Senior Resource Alliance
407-422-1535 407-228-1800
Alzheimer Resource Center Seminole County
407-843-1910 Better Living. for Seniors
407-228-1800


SeniorObserver






September 2008


SeniorObserver


Rar cold allergy puts life on hold


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If you answered yes to these questions,
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For more information, please visit
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407-236-9997 407-302*-4138
License #30211313 License #30211302


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I-~--~~-------.-I~"II-----~'-'-----"-` .


September 2008


SenioarObserver


.........


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Setme 208SnoIsre


CROQUET I Simple game harkens to a time before sporting was a business


< continued from the front page

clockwise before reaching the
multi-colored stake placed at
the center.
Points are earned by hitting
the balls through the wicket
in the correct direction and
sequence. Colored clips that
correspond with the balls are
used to show which wicket the
ball needs to go through next.
Each wicket is worth one point,
and extra strokes are earned
when the striker ball, the player
whose turn it is, hits another
ball. The first team to reach 26
points wins, unless a time limit
has been set.
"We play a 75-minute game
and at the end of the time, each
ball has one more turn and at the
end of that turn, we see who has
the most wickets and the lead-
er wins the game," Spoonhour
said. The real challenge begins
when a player, during play, hits
an opponent's ball further away
from a wicket, making it more
difficult for the other team to
earn points. Balls can be hit out
of bounds and removed from
play, adding to the challenge.
"It's not really a strength sport
by and large it's kind of like
billiards and chess on a lawn.
You are always thinking several
moves ahead like chess, but like,
billiards, you are trying to hit
balls where you can use them,"
Spoonhour said. "It's very defen-
sive and mental."
What makes the l
sport of croquet
unique, Spoonhour
explained, is both The club meet
men and women and Whipple av
,, Feliz in W
play together; there Call Jim SpoonW
are no separate 6300 for moi
leagues like in other
sports such as golf.
Players at all levels can play with
each other using the handicap
system.
The sport of croquet, which
many historians date back to the
mid-1800s in the British Isles,
opened the doors for women
to participate in the Olympics.
In 1900, seven men and three
women competed in the Paris
games according to Sports-
Reference.com.
Some historians say its origins
can be linked to the French game
of paille-maille, meaning "ball-.


I

en

ho
re


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCUOK SENIOH UBSbKVtE
Playing croquet requires little in the way of equipment just a mallet, a few balls and six "wickets"
which can be made from plastic, wire or more substantial materials. It's a defensive, tactical game.


mallet." The game evolved over
the years as adaptations were
made in Ireland and Britain, and
eventually America.
The Winter Park Croquet Club
formed more than 20 years ago
and currently has close to 40
active members. Membership
runs $12 5 year and the club pro-
vides all the equipment except
the mallet. The croquet lawn,
also known as the greensward,
is one of only six publicly owned
croquet spaces in the country.
The standard green measures
105 feet by 84 feet, although the
Winter Park club
is currently scaled
down to two-
thirds' size because.
at North Park of current summer
nues near Casa
nues near Casa turf conditions.
rter Park.
iur at 407-418- When the meticu-
information. lously manicured
Bermuda grass
needs replacing,
club members proudly chip in,
Spoonhour said.
Spoonhour said the cama-
raderie between fellow players
at. different venues makes the
sport most pleasurable. "When
you go play tournaments, you
usually stay at someone's house
- you make friends all over,"
he said.
Lee Thomas of Eustis said
he always looks forward to his
Saturday croquet games. "My
grandmother taught me how
to play backyard croquet when


I was a little kid in 1969 and I
played for 65 years. I have been
playing this type of croquet (six-
wicket) for about 12 years."
The exercise and the strat-
egy, Thomas said, helps keep his
mind sharp. "You have to think
about three turns ahead all of
the time. I have to think what
would happen if I left a ball in
one place," he said.
Thomas said he hopes the
club will continue to grow in
the coming years and the next
generation will keep it-going.
"People just don't understand
croquet and should try to-play
it," Thomas. said, adding with a
hearty laugh, "Right now I am
enjoying getting -whooped."


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SenaiorObserver


Septtember 2008


-- i




SeniorObserver


September 2008


Mnbk b VA budget under a
d^ohm"M AMP 4W ~q- -
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"Change Is Inevitable, But You Can
Manage It To Your Advantage."


As an experienced financial planner,
Elizabeth Brothers understands the
importance of anticipating change
and taking control wherever you
can. That's why she moved to
The Mayflower. "In financial
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you have some control over medical
costs," she says. "A continuing
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S ^, ... ..*-
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Winter Park, Florida 32"92
(40") 6"2-1620
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---------- ----------


SeniorObserver


September 2008


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CoM lNIT BULLETIN


~-


Emergency Meals on Wheels
wins award
On Aug. 14, Seniors First won a state
award for its Meals on Wheels program.
The Florida Association of Aging Services
Providers, Which supports organizations
that provide services for elders, present-
ed its Most Innovative Program award to
Seniors First Emergency Meals on Wheels.
The program provides immediate home
delivered meals and case management
assistance for older adults who may be
returning home from a hospital or nurs-
ing facility, receiving hospice care, have a
sudden loss of a caregiver, or experiencing
other high-risk conditions.
In 2007, the Emergency Meals on Wheels
program served more than 14,000 meals to
'seniors in crisis and received the National
Association of Nutrition and Aging Services
Program 2007 Star Award presented to
innovative programs.

Help needed caring for
the most Vulnerable
Samaritan Care Hospice nonprofit organi-
zation is looking for caring, loving and com-
mitted volunteers who can assist terminally
ill patients and their caregivers. Volunteers
can assist in various ways: respite (adult-
sitting while the caregiver runs errands,
doctors' appointments, etc.), reading books,
writing letters, providing emotional support
and companionship, and more.
Volunteer positions are in direct patient care,


indirect care and administrative roles.
There is a great need for volunteers in
Orlando, Winter Park, Oviedo, Maitland,
Apopka, Ocoee, Winter Haven and Zellwood.
Call Damaris Johnson-Santos at 407-514-
1320 or e-mail damaris.johnson@samari-
tancarehospice.com for more information.

Oviedo offers
S.E.N.I.O.R. bracelet program
The Oviedo Police Department would like
to invite you to participate in its S.E.N.I.O.R.
Bracelet Program. S.E.N.I.O.R. is an acro-
nym for Senior Emergency Notification
Information. On Record.
This program is designed to provide
first responders immediate access to your
important medical information as well as
your emergency contacts at no cost.
How to get started: Complete an enroll-
ment form; get issued a bracelet with
an engraved access number; informa-
tion is maintained at the Oviedo Police
Communications Center 24 hours a day,
every day.
In emergency situations, the first respond-
er contacts the Oviedo Police Department
and provides the bracelet access number,
and your information is immediately avail-
able. This program is available to any
citizen of Oviedo including children with
special needs that may benefit.
Call Betty Kelly at 407-971-5703 or
e-mail at ekelly@cityofoviedo.net for more
information.


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SenioarObserver


September 2008




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