Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00003
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Publication Date: July 10, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States of America -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

Full Text















Volume 20, No. 28
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net





Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitiand MebrF C


Shops helping troops
Local boutiques have united to get
care packages to soldiers -
Page A8

iBalls ff~nsm the Stsre
The Maitland Tire Company
donates $600 to youth soccer.
Page A8




Business Briefs . ... .. .. ..A6
City Talks ................A7
Community Bulletin .. .. .. .A9
Play On! ................A12

LMare .Ine ....... :2
Games ................A15


80.35 + tax
Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL
BANK de TRUST
On the corner of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
407-622-8181 www.CNBT-~FL.com


Kellie Ashton
Senior Vice Presidlent

Carlos A. Morell
Branch Manager
1211 S. Orange Avenue
Suite 101.
Winter Park
407-622-1120


11m Dunham
Senior Vice President

Richard Bryan
Branch Manager
100 E. Packwood
Avenue
Maitiand
407-647-3164


JENNY ANIDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF

It doesn't look good for a
Winter Park builder aiming
to bring a bed and break-
fast to his city.
Doug Trovillion's re-
quest to put three bed and
breakfast mnns on three
Minnesota Avenue lots was
rejected by the Planning
and Zoning Commission
on July 1..
The Commission also
directed staff to look into
firming up the definition
of a bed and breakfast in
the city code. The city code
currently onlyr defines a hoj-
tel a short-stay accom-
modation with 10 rooms
or mnore. .
Trovillion's lots are
zoned residential (R3) and
back up to a commercial
zone on two sides. He origi-
nally submitted a plan for
one 27-room structure, but
the city attorney opined
that it didn't meet the defi-
nition of a bed and break
fast, meaning it couldn't be
built in that zoning area.
Trovillion broke the project
into three separate bed and
breakfasts with nine rooms
apiece to comply with city
rules for that area '

See B&B on A4


IMU I U BYv 1AAs HABCUUK I Mit Ut~StMVtH
The Thurston House in Maitiand serves as an example of a typical bed-and-break-
fast-style inn, built from an old house. A Winter Park developer who asked to build
three such homes from the ground up was rejected Monday.


ter steeplechase final, so-
lidifying her spot in the
three-woman U.S. contin-
gent bound for Beijing in
August.
The former
Lady Lion and
current Colo-
rado track
star, who
had proven
nearly un-
beatable dur-
Barringer ing the 2007_
2008 tiollege
season as she chased the
American record, finally
met her match against
Anna Willard, who won
the race, setting an Ameri-
See OLYMPIAN an A3


ISAAC BABCOCK .
OBSERVER STAFF
With the same look of stern
determination on her face
that saw her win national
championships and chase
American records, Jenny
Barringer gave Oviedo
something to dream about
early Friday morning an
Oviedian in the Olympic
Games.
The 2008 Oviedo High
School graduate and track
and cross-country super-
star crossed the finish line
at the Eugene, Ore., Olym-
pic trials, bound for her first
Olympics.
She finished third place
in the women's 3,000-me-


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Now serving Greater Orlando with 13 locations. #


Winter Park / Maitland





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Gcamein t


at W.P. shop
JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF

An illegal gambling opera-
tion at a Winter Park conve-
nience store was squashed
July 1.
Winter Park police say the
Kwik Stop on South Lake-
mont Avenue was operating
two video poker machines
anid provided cash payouts
to its customers.
Florida Statute '849.15
makes it illegal to possess or
permit the operation of any
slot machine or device un-
less it is solely for entertain-
ment purposes, such as at an
arcade.
Between 2002 and 2007,
`there were 205 arrests made
under this statute, accord-
ing to the Florida Statistical
Analysis Center, a division of
the Florida Department of
Law Enforcement.

See GAMBLING on A2


W.P. resists big B&B


0010fS Of Amenica
Winter Park's old-fashioned Fourth
of July, captured in photographs.



W.R! close to a plan
City leaders are focused on the
height of buildings in revamping
the comprehensive growth plan.
Pagg A


Local qualifies


for Olympics


BA~N K


Banking The Way It Was: Meant To Be




















Comp plan close to conclusion


GAMBLING I Slot machines seized at Winter Park Kwik Stop


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


aP e 2 Thursda Jul 1 8


it'll be a situation of hurry-
up-and-wait, as the city
pores over the plan to as-
sure its legality before ap-
proving it.
That may be happening
after the city's first com-
mission meeting in August,
when it plans to have the
plan done and approved.
Before that can happen
though, Mayor David Strong
suggested sending a con-
tingent up to Tallahassee to
discuss potentially conten-
tious provisions personally
with state officials.
"We'll get up; there as
quickly as possible," Strong
said.
Briggs said h~e's confident
the city has gotten the plan
correct this time around.
"We~'re certainly not ex-
pecting, now that this is
draft No. 3, that we won't
have this almost 100 per-


cent right," he said.
If all goes well, by spring
of next year the new plan
should be in place, Briggs
said.
"We have realistically
until March before this is
all behind us," he said. "It
points out how crucial it is
for us to swing and get the
ball rolling."






*:~




Jeff Briggs, Winter Parit's Planning and
Community Development Director, is op-
timistic the city will have its comprehen-
sive plan approved t0i Y A BACOC
THE OBSERVER


S"It's definitely not the
comprehensive plan that
we've adopted," Br~iggs said.
"'Because we've changed so
many important things."
The plan, a long-term
document which is fieriodi-
cally amended, forms the
foundation for the architec-
ture and aesthetics of the
city, sometimes for decades
irito the future.
As has frequently been
the case during previous
meetings about the plan,
most of the discussion cen-
tered on fears of oversized
buildings towering over the
city, urban Frankenstein
monsters unleashed by un-
scrupulous developers.
Discussion changed rap-
idly between talk of build-
ing height maximums near
downtown, in the city in
general, along Fairbanks Av-
enue, and near the I-4 corri-


dor where an experimental
zone was suggested.
Nobody could agree on
specific height limits, which
delved into interminable
minutiae about feet versus
stories, peppered with occa-
sional worst-case scenarios
such as 40-foot-tall single-
story buildings.
The comp plan has been
in the rewrite phase since
the spring, with city staff
and officials scrambling to
complete it as soon as they
could. Experience in going
through the process before
has helped expedite the
process, Briggs said.
"We must go all the way
back to home plate, but
with the advantage of hav-
ing run the bases before, so
we know where we're go-
ing," he said.
When the city passes the
document off to the state,


ISAAC BABCOCK .
OBSERVER STAFF

Jeff Briggs spoke in frank,
measured words as he de-
scribed what he hoped to be
one of the last steps before
Winter Park finds out if the
third time is the charm. Its
proposed amended com-
prehensive plan, which was
rejected by the state last
year, is yet again close to be-
ing ready for inspection,
City officials and plan-
ning and development staff
met Tuesday to discuss final
changes to the plan before
sending it to the state for
approval.
The~city's planning and
community development
director said he's hoping
it'll bear little resemblance
to the previous plan, which
got the city sued over illegal
provisions within it.


a'.11 a


PHOTOS BY CAROLE ARTHURS -- THE OBSERVER
ne Acquaviva, 11, won the patriotic hat contest.
y Miller, director of Winter Park's Department of
and Recreation, at far right, emceed the stage
;. An Elvis impersonator shakes a leg along with
rs in poodle skirts at the Winter Park Fourth of July
ation in Central Park. Horse-drawn buggy rides
among the offerings at the event.


en casinos. But the Florida
Supreme Court threw out
the compact July 3, saying
Crist had overstepped his
bounds.
"The governor does not
have authority to legalize
in some parts of the state,
or for some persons, con-
duct that is otherwise illegal
throughout the state," the
opinion stated. The Legisla-
ture, however, does.


bling offenses, liquor viola-
tions and the sale of drug
paraphernalia, which he
sold to an undercover inves-
tigator, police said.
The customers played the
poker machines by insert-
ing money into it, and then
if they won, a receipt would
print, which was redeemed
for the cash prize, police
said.
Winter Park Police
spokesman Officer Jim


Whitman said this might be
the first illegal gambling op-
eration to be unearthed in
the city.
"For the most part this
was one of these rare things
that slid underneath the ra-
dar," he said. "Nobody can
recollect any arrests for
gambling."
The ABT is conducting
a follow-up investigation,
which may result in sanc-
tions against Chowdhury's


liquor license, a media re-
lease stated.
These kinds of machines
are allowed on native Sem-
inole Tribe lands, per an
agreement between the
tribe and the federal gov-
ernment.
Gov. Charlie Crist ex-
panded the tribe's gambling
rights through a compact
in November to include
card games such as bacca-
rat and blackjack at its sev-


< continued from front page

Winter Park Police and
the Division of Alcoholic
Beverages and Tobacco,
known as ABT, investigated
the Kwik Stop after receiv-
ing a complaint of the ille-
gal gambling.
They seized the machines
and arrested Azharul Islam
Chowdhury, the store's li-
quor licensee, and charged
him with a series of gam-


for love of country


A da

CAROLE ARTHURS
OBSERVER STAFF Cs,
Winter Park held its annual
Olde Fashioned Fourth.of July
Celebration on Friday, July 4,
with patriotic music, enter-
tainment, free hot dogs and
watermelon, and horse and
buggy rides and games for the
kids.
From the patriotic strains of
the "Star Spangled Banner" by
the Bach Festival Choir and Or-
chestra to an Elvis imperson;
ator, this event was a day for
all to enjoy. Several hundred
people attended the event in
Central Park. They stood, hats
in hand and hands over hearts,
during the "Star Spangled Ban-
ner," and cheered during and
after the Bach Festival Choir's
performance. The patriotic
songs touched all in atten-
dance. .
Kids lined up for the horse
and buggy rides, and the ev- Caroli
er-patient horses stood still Johnn
Parks
for petting. The fast-stepping events
' cloggers drew a big crowd, dance
and they cheered for Caroline celebr
Acquaviva, age 11, who deco- were
rated her own patriotic hat for
the hat contest.
'Also on July 4, the Morse
Museum of American Art held
its annual free open house.










OLYMPIAN I oviedo athlete to compete in Beijing Gas leak scare in South W.P.


i


___


Thursday, July 10, 2008 Page 3


Winter Park / Alaitland Observer


en barriers and a barrier
next to a water pit on every
lap.
Women have only recent-
ly competed in the event.
Since the first official world
record of 10:34.5 set in 1996
by American Sara Heeb, the
record time has plummeted
by more than a minute and
a half to 9:01.59. Barringer's
time beats Heeb's former
world record by more than
a minute.
Russians have typically
dominated the women's
race. The holder of the cur-
rent world record is Gulnara
.Galkina.
At 6:30 a.m. on Aug. 15,
Barringer will find out if
she's as good as gold.


State University's Lindsey
Anderson accelerated into
second place.
But as flashbulbs and fire-
works popped in the back-
ground, Barringer still held
that face of stone to the fin-'
ish line.
She would complete the
race in 9:33.11, about four
seconds shy of her career
best. Willard's 9:27.59 set
the new American record.
The event will be a first
at the Olymlpic games. Un-
til this year only men were
allowed to compete in the
3,000~-meter steeplechase.
In the event, athletes
race around a regulation
400-meter track, but leap
over four immovable wood-


< continued from front page

can record in the process.
Barringer had led the
Olympic trial race from
seconds into the opening
sprint, immediately setting
a very high pace in pursuit
of the record.
Her style of setting a bru-
tal pace to wear out other
runners worked well, but for
two competitors who stuck
with her until the final lap.
That's when the Univer-
sity of Michigan's Willard,
well known for a powerful
final kick, took command,
passing Barringer on the wa-
ter jump in the final stretch
of the penultimate lap.
In the process, Weber


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Firefighters found a natural gas leak in a home on Suffolk Road in South Winter
Park on Tuesday morning. The scare ended safely with a simple utility repair.


"A lot of the times it's right at peo-
ple," Assistant Coach Trev~or Ber~ry-
hill said of the Dawgs' propensity
for hammering hard shots into the
outfield, only to have them caught.
But the Dawgs have added their
own defensive flair. A long fly ball
during a game against Leesburg -
was hauled in over freshman Colby
Gratton's head as he leapt toward
the wall, followed by a quip, "That's
gonna be on SportsCenter tonight,"
11urled from the Leesburg dugout.
They'll hope to heat up their bats
on the road for most of the week,
then return home Sunday against
the league-leading Clermont May-
ericks, which has a 15-5 record.


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

The Winter Park Diamond Dawgs
took three steps forward last week.
But their four steps back didn't
help their overall standings, as they
dropped back to fifth in the Florida
Collegiate Summer League with a
10-14 record.
And with Sanford's River Rats nip-
ping at the Dawgs' heels, things are
getting nervous for Winter Park's
longtime home team.
Cool bats have sent the Dawgs'
record into a downward spiral
this week, with lots of contact, but
that's with opponents' gloves.


ISAAC BABCOCK -
OBSERVER STAFF

Lightning and a determined torrent
stopped the Kraze in their tracks
last Wednesday night, as they were
trying to spread the point gap be-
tween themselves and the Braden-
ton Academics.
The game was halted in the 34th
minute, when- a monsoon soaked
the field and ended the action with
no score on the board.
A rematch will take off where the
clock stopped, beginning at 6 p~m.
Thursday, July 10, at the Kraze's
home field in FSA stadium at the
Seminole Soccer Complex.


Rain didn't stop the Kraze in Palm
Beach on Monday, as they succeed-
ed in a four-game season sweep
of the Pumas, winning their final
game 3-1. That gave them valuable
championship points as they hold
onto the lead.


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Kraze in soggy match





Hang ing up a shingle
i''-:.-;--:.~1~Vl~slIPI~?IDEmmylu Spagnol and Brian
Lewis, CPAs, along with the
,Maitland Area Chamber of
t~i xCommerce recently hosted
I an open house and ribbon

~Jp~ ~iiebrtethei ree prt rshp
or Doug Kinson; Spagnol and
~i edLewis; Mary Hodge, execu-
tive director of the Maitland
~e~tB~I ~ E~iM -~C ~ -IM- IChamber; chamber members
and guests.

1. PHOTO COURTESY OF
~I MAITLAND CHAMBER OF
Fi: L ~COMMERCE


O Wi nter Park / Maitla nd
DbSefer


Member of:
P.O. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive
* Florida Press Association
*Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com ISSN 1064-3613
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/~or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitiand Observer@ 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


RENDERING COURTESY OF THE TROVILLION COMPANY
A three-building design for a bed-and-breakfast inn was rejected Monday by the Winter Park Planning and Zoning Commission.


guests and parents to either
the Park Plazzi or dowritown
SOrlando hotels. "It's ridicu-
lous that people who come
to visit WJinter Park can't al-
ways stay here," he said. "Bed
and breakfasts are the natu-
ral progression as the next
renaissance in this area."
But the six or seven neigh-
bors of the proposed bed-
and-breakfast in attendance
didn't want such a business
in their backyards, calling it
"commercial creep."
"'lied and breakfast' is
nice sounding, but it's com-
mercial," a Winter Park
resident who lives near the
proposed project said at
the meeting. "Having 29 to
46 transient people who
are not getting up to go to
work in the morning is go-
ing to disrupt-the peace and
tranquility of the neighbor-
hood."
But Trovillion said he con-
siders Minnesota Avenue to


be a cut-through for traffic,
not a "quaint little street."
The bed and breakfast re-
quest will still go before the
City Commission on July
28, but if that goes sour too,
Trovillion will have already
submitted a Plan B, one that
would prove more lucrative
to him in the long run: an
assisted-living facility.
He would take the con-
cept for the single-struc-
ture bed-and-breakfast and
add. a third floor to have 38
rooms. He said this is an-
other feature that the city
sorely needs, with the May-
flower and Winter Park
Towers completely filled up.
The Minnesota Avenue loca-
tion is even closer to Park
Avenue.
"If they don't like tour-
ists coming in and spend-
ing money on Park Avenue,
I can see where they'd be
against old people," he said
jokingly.


< continued from the front page


That did not appease the
Commission, which agreed
that it was still one project,
despite the separation into
smaller buildings. "It's a ho-
tel by another name," Com-
missioner Patrick Doyle
said, and hotels are not al-
lowed on R3 zoning.
Trovillion disagrees, cit-
ing that a bed and break-
fast could be four rooms or
it could be 100; the differ-
ence is it's a more intimate
setting because there isn't
a big corporate owner and
there's no restaurant or bar
in the building.
He said Winter Park
would benefit greatly from
more areas to lodge guests.
There are only two hotels in
the city* the Park Plaza on
Park Avenue and the Mt. Ver-
non Inn on Highway 17-92.
Rollins College refers


Page 4 Thursday, July 10, 2008







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Published Thursday, July 10, 2008


Volume 20, Issue Number 28


PUBLISHER
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must be relumned to DISH Network upon termination of qualifying service. Limit 4 tuners per account. Monthly package price includes an equipment rental fee of $5.00 or $6.00 for first receiver, based on selected model. A monthly equipment rental fee of $5.00 of $6.00 will be charged for each receiver beyond the
first, based on selete moelA$.00mo aditonl utlt roramin aces fe pplesfo eah ua-tuerreeivr eewil b wive mntly oreah schreeivr oninuusy onnctd o cstmes pon lne.HDprgramig equre H reeierandHDteeviio (oldseartel).Cutomr us
subscribeto qualifying HDprogramming or a$7.00/mo. HD-enabling fee will apply. Lease upgrade fee may apply for select receivers (based on model). DishDVrRAdvantage: Customer must be eligible to receive local channels. Discounted pricewillcontinue toapply after 24-month commitment unless customer
downgrades from qualifying programming (America s Top 100, Amelica s Top 200, DishLATINO Plus, DishLATINO Dos, DishLATINO Max) plus local channels or removes qualifying dual-tuner DVR receiver from account. Then-current prices will apply for all programming and equipment fees. DISH Network Is a
registered trademark of DISH Network L.L.C.@02008 Embarq Holdings Company LLC. All rights reserved. The name EMBARQ and the Jet iogo are trademarks of Embarq Holdings Company LLC EMB1-08-05920


Thursday, July 10, 2008 Page 5


Winter Park / Maitla r


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BUSinOSS ^
Frederick W. Jones and Howard S. counts 24/7, right in the palms of Local business leader and~ philan- A seasoned sales associate at Clas- owners, was recently named "Busi-
Marks, both partners at Graham,. their hands. CFE has launched mo- thropist Harvey L. Massey, CEO and sic Chevrolet in Altamonte Springs ness of the Year" by the Seminole
Builder, Jones, Pratt & Marks, bile.mycfe.com, its mobile banking founder of Orlando-based Massey beat out more than 25,000' Chev- County Regional Chamber of Com-
LLP, have been selected for inclu- solution powered by MShift. With Services Inc., is being inducted into rolet sales associates nationwide merce during the Chamber's recent
sion in Florida Super Lawyers 2008. mobile banking, members can ac- the Pest Management Professional in a challenging test of experience Chamber Choice Awards. The Cham-
Only about five percent of lawyers in cess their accounts from virtually any Hall of Fame. Nominees are selected and knowledge. Rocky Brown won ber's Business of the Year award rec-
the state are so named. Selection is Web-enabled handheld device. by peer vote with inductees chosen by Chevrolet's Malibu Show What ognizes businesses that demonstrate
based on a detailed process of due Members can securely log in to an anonymous committee impaneled You Know Challenge and a 2009 outstanding growth, sales and sig-
diligence involving research, polling check balances, transfer funds, make by Pest Management Professional. Malibu LTZ by correctly answering nificance in Seminole County. Chris-
and evaluation of more than a dozen bill payments and find a nearby ATM, Criteria for selection include industry in-depth questions about the Malibu, topher G. Hurn, president and chief
separate indicators of peer Tecogni- CFE branch or Shared Branch com- expertise and experience, leader- successfully squaring off with mys- executive officer of Mercantile Com-
tion and professional achievement. plete with maps and directions. The ship and innovation. Massey helped tery shoppers and keeping his cool in- mercial Capital, said the firm closed
Mr. Jones is listed under "Real Es- service is free to CFE members, re- to revolutionize the industry with front of cameras as he conducted a on 22 commercial loans that totaled
tate" and Mr. Marks under "General gardless of how often they connect to the development and introduction of "walk-around" tour of a new Malibu. more than $35.3 million since Janu-
Litigation." The law firm of Graham, mobile.mycfe.com. "pest prevention" as a service model, The contest involved sales associates ary of this year.
Builder, Jones, Pratt & Marks, LLP, Mobile banking is not yet avail- replacing traditional pest control. from throughout Chevrolet's network The firm's~ revenues are up more
celebrates its 40th year in Winter able to many consumers. In fact, CFE 'The business that -bears his name of 5,500 dealerships and began with than 8 percent over~the first half of
Park this year. Federal Credit Union is the first credit is one of the nation's largest and an online test of knowledge about 2007, while profits are up nearly 5
union in Central Florida to introduce most respected service companies, the Malibu. From that group, 500 as- percent ... even in this difficult econ-
Members of CFE Federal Credit the service. providing residential and commercial sociates were visited in person or by omy.
Union now have access to their ac- pest prevention, termite protection~ phone by mystery shoppers.
and landscape services to more than The field then was narrowed to just J. Thomas Chandler, AIA, presi-
181,000 customers from 61 service 50 associates, who did a walk-around dent and chief operating officer of
centers throughout Florida, Georgia sales presentation while being video- SchenkelShultz Architecture, Or-
AUTO ACCIDENTS and- Louisiana. In addition, Massey taped. Those tapes were judged by a lando, was prominently featured in
helped found the Professional Pest panel of experts at Chevrolet's head- an article titled -"Commercial Goes
MARK LANG & ASSOCIATES Management Alliance, an advocacy quarters and 10 finalists traveled to Green" in the June 23 edition of the
Attorneys 'and promotional organization de- Detroit to once again be put to the Orlando Sentinel Central Florida Busi-
signed to elevate the professional walk-around test -this time live be- ness. Chandler addressed a host of
III Beaut~ifulIDollewtortwr Whitrrl Parle status of the industry. Over the years, fore the judges. green design issues in the incisive
222 Wfest Comstock Avenue, Suite 210 Massey has received numerous Q&A format. One of Florida's leading
WiTnter Park,. Florida 32789-1615 industry-related awards and acco- Mercantile Commercial Capital, green design firms, SchenkelShultz
Telephone: (400' 599C)-4431 lades, culminating in selection to the LLC, the five-year-old firm that spe- has over 50 LEED Accredited Profes-
w-ww~.I anglaw.net Pest Management Professional Hall of cializes in U.S. Small Business Ad- sionals in six Florida offices plus four
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements. Fame. ministration 504 loans for business other offices nationally.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience."




Winter Park June 27 to July 3
Burqlary/theft hours of June 29, someone broke through an- smashed a passenger window of a vehicle and
Yorkshire Drive, 1900 block, during the ofc oradsoecs tl us
morning hours of June 27, someone broke West Fairbanks Avenue, 1700 block, during North Orlando Avenue, 500 block, during the
through a residence door and stole a television the afternoon hours of June 30, someone stole afternoon hours of July 1, someone smashed
and jewelry six chairs from the front of a business the passenger window of a vehicle and stole
North Park Avenue, 300 block, during the Auto theft/burglary P ui
afternoon hours of June 28, a female was ar- WsFarnkAvue40bocdr Criminal mischief
restd fo retil tefting the afternoon hours of June 28, someone South Denning Drive, 200 block, during the
West Fairbanks Avenue, 2100 block, during smashed the passenger window of a vehicle overnight hours of June 27, someone damaged
the early morning hours of June 29, someone and rummaged through the purse left inside the door of a public restroom ''
smashed a door on the front of a business and and stole loose change Wright Avenue, 2800 block, during the eve-
stole computer equipment West Fairbanks Avenue, 400 block, dur- ning hours of June 28, someone damaged a
Lee Road, 2100 block, during the overnight ing the evening hours of June 30, someone parked vehicle with paint



Cecntrall Florid~a United Soccler Club

4 -FiALL 2008 REiGISTRATION3

at ttie CIA~t on~ce a' Alarrmi3 9 ;s::e:s s C nte-

L i). (407) 695-495i7

Office Hours: Mon & Thur 1 2:00OPMFF- 8:00 P M
TFues: Wed~, Fri 10:00AM-5:00PM

or


Og Register on-line at


wwwN.cfusc.comr


Winter Park / Maitiand Observer


Page 6 Thursday, July 10, 2008





Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, July 10, 2008 Page 7


hot dogs, popcorn and cot-
ton candy will be available
for purchase.
Capping off this fes-
tive event, we are proud to
present the new "Horton
Hears a Who" movie on our
unique outdoor screen! If
you'll bring your chairs and
blankets, we'll bring you the
stars!

Maitland Farmers Market
The Maitland Farmers Mar-
ket will be kicking off an-
other addition to the mar-
ket. Every first Sunday of
each month, the market
will feature one of our local
chefs. He or she will be dem-
onstrating cooking with
products you would find at
our market. The demos will
begin at 11 a.m.
We also want to thank the
Orlando Brass Quintet who
appeared at the Maitland
Farmers Market on July 6.
Since the market began,. the
Performing Arts of Maitland
has generously provided the
Farmers Market with the
most wonderful array of tal-
ent each week. A big thanks


als in a manner dictated by
series of mathematical
patterns called "changes,"
rather than by the musical
melody.-
Since the practice of
change .ringing from a
church tower could not be
learned and practiced with-
out disturbing the entire
town, small bronze hand

abig uiians t r:ing i
privacy. Later, ringers were
organized to play musi-
cal selections as well as the
changes. WCe have our very
own group right here it
Maitland, and this is your
chance to see them so don't
miss out.
In addition, PJ the Clown
once again ~brings his bal-
loon artistry to life, creating
wonders and delights for
youngsters. Our face paint-
er can turn any frown up-
side down, all with the deft
brush of her magical face
paints.
Carnival games will chal-
lenge your skills with games
of luck for prizes! Sum-
mer eats and treats such as


The upcoming Party in the
Park is a classic example of
partnerships at work. From
key- sponsors to the con-
tributions of the Perform~-
ing Arts -of Maitland, our
dedicated Leisure Services
staff has once again out-
done themselves! As always,
thanks to Mari for her con-
tributions to this week's
City Talk. .
--MayorDougKinson

Come join us Saturday, July
19, at the annual Partyin the
Park, celebrating the found-
ing of our community. The
fun begins at 6 p.m. at the
beautiful Lake Lily Park.
There will- be entertainment


and beach-themed antics
aplenty with Volcano Joe's,
the hottest beach party
band around. Partygoers,
get your groove goin' to the
sounds of Jimmy Buffett,
the Beach Boys and other
Car~ibbean favorites, plus
all the great songs from the
'60s to the '9s! -
The Performing Arts of
Maitland Bell Ringers will
also be appearing in its first
outdoorperformatice.Hand
bell ringing was developed
in England nearly 300 years
ago as an- outgrowth of the
practice of "change ring-
ing" church bells. In change
ringing, a set of tower bells
is rung byr several individu-


~~ I
Maitiand Mayor Doug Kinson and his
wife, Barbara, enjoy a day in the park and
shopping at the Sunday Farmers Market.

MAITLAND CHAMBER OF C MME


to the Performing Arts of
Maitland and its many per-
formers!
--Mam' Smzith,
Maitland Leisure Services
community events
coordinator


interior layout and fagaide
plans. This session also pro-
vides you an opportunity to
comment about the various
plans for the new center.
If you are unable to at-
tend and would like a copy
of the information present-
ed, please e-mail Sgutch@
CityofV~interPark.org or call
407-599-3665.

City Commission
work session
There will be a City Commis-
sion work session at noon
Monday, July 21, in City
Hall Commission Chambers
to discuss the fiscal year
2008-2009 budget.
The public is invited to at-
tend, however, no public
comment will be taken at
this work session.

Recycling and Waste
Management information
In January the Winter Park
City Commission passed a
resolution to pursue mea-
sures to become a "green lo-
cal government."
Information regarding
recycling in Winter Park and
waste management services
can be found on the home
page of the city's Web site,
Cityof~linterPark~org, by
clicking on the "Recycling
& Waste Management" link
under "Info at Your Finger-
tips."

Water restriction
reminders
-Irrigation between 10 a.m.
and 4 p.m. is prohibited.
-Even-numbered homes, in_
cluding properties with no
addresses, may water lawns
on Thursday and Sunday
between the hours of 4 p.m.
and 10 a.m.
-Odd-numbered homes may
water lawns on Wednesday
and Saturday between the
hours of 4 p.m. and 10 a.m.
-Washing vehicles at resi-
dences must be done using
a handheld hose equipped
with an automatic shut-off
nozzle.
-Properties with new lawns
or landscaping are exempt


from the restriction for the
first 30 days.
-Residents using private
wells for irrigation must also
comply with the restriction
of no watering from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
For more information re-
gardingWater Conservation,
please visit the city's Web
site at CityofV~interPark.org
and click on Departments >
Water & Wastewater Utility
> Water Conservation Infor-
mation.

Receive utility bills
via e-mail
The City of Winter Park Util
ity Billing Division is offer-
ing Winter Park utility cus-
tomers the opportunity to
receive their utility bills via
e-mail instead of regular
mail.
Interested customers can
sign up for Ebill by e-mail-
ing Ebill@Ci~tyofJirnterPark.
org with your customer
name, account number and
e-mail address. If you would
like your bill sent to another
or an additional e-mail ad-
dress, please indicate that in
your e-mail as well.
Upon signing up, Ebill
customers will receive an
e-mail confirming their re-
quest to receive their util-
ity bill online. This new ser-
vice is free to Winter Park
utility customers and gives
each customer easy access
to their accounts 24 hours
a day from anywhere in the
world with Internet access.
It's easy and convenient to
use.


Ebill provides customers
with a payment amount and
due date. To view a detailed
listing of customer utility
bills or to make a payment
online with Visa, Master-
Card or American Express,
customers must set up their
account by logging on to
the city's Web site at Cityof-
WinterPark.org and clicking
on Online Services > Utility
Billing.
For more information
regarding Ebill or the util-
ity billing system, please call
407-599-3220.

Open" o it Prpositions in the
-Wastewater Plant Operator
'B' or 'C' (Salary range $16.53
- $24.70/hr.)
-SCADA Technician (Salary
range $ 22. 15 $ 3 1.5 3/hr.)
-Equipment Operator I (Sal-
ary range $12.57 $;19.35/
hr.
-School Crossing Guard
(Salary $g9.57/hr.)
-Keep Winter Park Beau-
tiful Board Liaison Part-
Time (Salary range $12.57
-$r19.35/hr.)
A complete job descrip-
tion is available for review
in the Human Resources Di-
vision at City Hall. Interest-
ed applicants can apply in
person or online at Cityof-
WinterPark.org, by clicking
on Employment.

Visit us at
Cityof7Ji'nterPark.org


City Commission
WOrk session
There will be a City Com-
mission work session noon
Monday, July 14, in the City
Hall Commission Chambers
to further discuss the Plan
the Possibilities project.
The public is invited to
attend, however, no public
comment will be taken at
this work session.

City Commission Meeting
topics of interest
There will be a City Com-
mission meeting held at
3:30 p.m. Monday, July 14,
in City Hall Commission
Chambers. Below are a few
topics of interest:
-Request for approval of the
purchase of three hybrid ve-
hicles
-Request for approval of the
Central Park West Meadow
Rules and Standards for Use
-Discussion regarding
Bright House Networks Inc.
pole attachments
-Presentation of Ethics
Board recommendations
-Discussion regarding city
employee health insurance
-Determine the survey
method to use to conduct
the 2008 Resident Survey .
-The Equalization Board
will hear the following reso-
lutions regarding a special
assessment for the installa-
tion and funding of street
brick at the following loca-
tions:
-Tuscany Place .
-French Avenue and Alfred
J. Hannah Way
-Portion of Holt Avenue
from Pennsylvania Avenue
to Park Avenue
-Resolution to amend a pre-
vious resolution that autho-
rized a change in the inter-
est rate mode of the Elec-


tric Revenue Bonds, Series
2005A and B, from auction
rate debt securities to vari-
able rate demand bonds
- Presentation regarding the
proposed residential park-
ing permit program
You can find the Com-
mission's full agenda and
more detailed information
on specific agenda items by
logging on to the city's offi-
cial Web site at CityofV~in-
terPark.org and clicking on
Government > City Com-
mission.

Planning and Zoning
Compr.Plan meeting
As of the date of this writing,
there will be a Planning &
Zoning Commission meet-
ing held at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
July 15, in City Hall Com-
mission Chambers to con-
sider the transmittal of the
new proposed Winter Park
Comprehensive Plan. The
date and time are subject to
change.

Community Center
Public Input Session
There will be a Community
Center Public Input Session
at 6p.m.Wednesday, Julyl16,
at the Winter Park Commu-
nity Center located at 721
W. New England Ave.
As part of the Commu-
nity Redevelopment Agen-
cy's goal-setting process, a
new community center was
identified as the No. 1 goal.
On March 12, the CRA held
its first Public Input Ses-
sion.
As a result of that session,
a survey was mailed to every
resident within the CRA. The
survey results have been tab-
ulated, and the city is ready
to share the survey results,
as well as the proposed site,


FM" 899owro W


Party in the park


~tKe~l~?





WUGF






e ay u Ilur y, yul ,v LV




Li OS leS


k


You are invited to attend the Opening Reception of

The Best and The Brightest
selected works from the School of Visual Arts, NYC
on Friday, July 18, from 7pm to 9pm


MILLENIA FINE ART
555 South Lake Destiny Drive, Orlando, FL 32810
407 304 8100 Icontact~milleniafineart.com MilleniaFineArt.com


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


P 8 Th sda Jul 10 2008


Boutiques un
CAROLE ARTHURS and delivered overseas via
OBSERVER STAFF Florida-based organization
Operation Shoebox.
g the month of July, "I was an Army brat, and
along Park Avenue I feel very strongly about
e collecting items for supporting our troops,"
>ops deployed outside Carbonell said. "Project Sole
United States. and Operation Shoebor~are
bbed Project Sole Sup- working together to show
:he stores will collect their support by sending
needed items, such as these much-needed items
drops, heat resistant to the troops."
Twizzlers, writing Carbonell has a box situ-
pens, envelopes for ated in the store where folks
pondence, eye drops, can drop off their supplies.
toothbrushes, tooth- "This is a month-long
hand lotion, nose event that will end with an
sunscreen, individual exclusive, invitation-only
ts of Tylenol, cross- summertime bash hosted by
puzzles and playing Shou'Thre, Lavish and Sultre
to name a few. at the house of G-ary Lam-
.ese items are needed bert, owner of Gary Lam-
greatly appreciated bert Salon in Winter Park,"
r soldiers," said Me- Carbonell said.
arbonell, co-owner of Tickets will be $30 in ad-
Ture: Designer Shoet- vance with 15 percent of
nd In-Store Nail Salon ticket sales going to Opera-
rk Avenue and coor- tion Shoe Box. There will
,r of Project Sole Sup- be food, drinks, a runway
show, a bachelor auction
,u'Ture, also owned and more. "Attendees will
allow Shambeck, will be asked to bring a care item
;isted in Project Sole for our troops to the event,"
Irt by Lavish Boutique Carbonell said.
Jennifer Freiburg- Items may be dropped
and Sultre Boutique off throughout the month
rTraci Kabran. All of July at Shou'Ture at 339
stores will be drop off S. Park Ave., Lavish Boutique
ons. at 444W. New England Blvd.
e packages will then Suite 1 18, or Sultre Boutique
ated with these items at 41 1 WNew England Blvd.


Durin~
shops
will be
our tro
of the
Dul
port, t
much-
throat
candy,
paper,
corres
floss,
paste,
spray,
packet
word
cards,
"Th
and .
by ou
lixa C;
Sho~u'
ique al
Son Pa
dinato
port.
Sho
by Wi
be ass
Suppo
owner
house
owner
three ~
locatic
Car
be cre


PHOTO BY CAROLE ARTHUR5 1Hf UB~tHVtH
Melixa Carbonell, co-owner of Shou'Ture, with a care package for Project Sole Support, destined for U.S. military personnel.


"founded in 2003 in an ef-
fort to send support, snacks
and much-needed personal
care items to our troops de-
ployed outside of the USA,"
its Web site states.
Currently Operation
Shoebox is in desperate
need of travel-size hygiene
items such as body wash,
deodorant, foot powder,
hand sanitizers and lo-
tions. Other items include


pre-paid phone cards, floss,
mouthwash, toothbrushes,
toothpaste, baby wipes, eye
drops, nose spray, dispos-
able razors, waterless hand
sanitizers, new and used
DVD's and CDs, and much-
more.
You can log onto Opera-
tionShoebox.com and click
on "requested items" to see
the much longer list.


Donors will receive a 15
percent off coupon toward
a purchase from the drop-
off location they go to.
All of the items will then
be sent to Operation Shoe-
box. Any monetary gifts will
be sent to Operation Shoe-
box to help with their ship-
ping expenses. "We have
already received some cash
donations," Carbonell said.
Operation Shoebox was


Hey,
Tire Company and Uniroyal
Tire as part of a longstand-
ing program designed by
Uniroyal to support youth
soccer across the nation.
Now in its ninth year as a
major sponsor of youth soc-
cer, Uniroyal and its dealers
have provided more than
818,000 free soccer balls
to soccer families across
America and have donated
nearly $11 minlion in funds
and equipment.
The Maitland Soccer Club,
a private, not-for-profit or-
ganization dedicated to the
deveocpment of yuah osa
nizes boys' and girls' soccer
programs in Maitland.
"Maitland Soccer Club
is dedicated to developing
players, first in character,
then teamwork, skill and
ability," the Web. site states.
"Wlinning is important
and encouraged, however,
player development is most
important. Winning is ac-
complished by emphasis on
character, team and individ-
ual development through
coaching leadership, prop-
er skill, team instruction at
practice, and by giving play-
ers the opportunity to put it
into play at games."
"The Uniroyal Soccer
Program has been a perfect
way for us to show our ap-
preciation to the commu-


CAROLE ARTHURS
OBSERVERi STAFF

It is a well-known fact that
sports are good for kids.
They teach discipline, fair
play, sportsmanship ~and
team building.
Quite often kids want to '
competein organizedsports,


and sports clubs want to de-
velop teams, but don't have
the funds or equipment.
Maitland Tire Company and
Uniroyal Tires have come to
their rescue!
The Maitland Soccer Club
is receiving a donation of
more than $600 in funds and
equipment from Maitland


PHOTO BY CAROLE ARTHURS i Mt Uotrst.Mvt
Rob Lesperance, owner of Maitland Tire Company, holds one of the soccer balls that
will be donated to the Maitland Soccer Club through a Uniroyal program.


nity," said Rob Lesperance
of Maitland Tire Company.
"LIt's been an honor to meet
the families connected with
the Maitland Soccer Club,
and we really enjoy the chil-
dren's smiles when they re-


ceive their free soccer ball."
Lesperance said his kids
play soccer, and he is happy
to do this for all soccer kids.
"We're proud to play a

> turn to SOCCER on page A10


ite to help the troops .


rick these.


Tire store:










Social, Volunteer and Business inhs


Thursday, July 10, 2008 Page 9


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


yahoo.com or call Fonda McGowan
407-363-9720.
The Tarflower Chapter of the Flor-
ida Native Plant Society will meet
Tuesday, Aug. 5, at 7 p.m. at Leu Gar
dens, 1920 N. Forest Ave., Orlan'do.
David Walker, of the St. Johns River
Water Management District, will give
a presentation highlighting the resto-
ration of Lake Apopka. Once a world-
class bass fishery, 50 years of abuse
tagged Lake Apopka with the infa-
mous tite of Florida's most polluted
large lake. David Walker will discuss
the progress made in the past 10
years by the District to improve the
lake's water quality. -
The public is cordially invited to
this free program. Come early and
enjoy the refreshments and visit with
other native plant enthusiasts.
National Association of Industrial
and Office Properties Central Flori~
da chapter will host a program titled
"Global to Local Economic Forecast"
on Thursday, Aug. 28, at the. Marriott
Orlando Downtown, 400 W. Livings-
ton St., Orlando. Speakers will be


Bill Owen, CRE, President/CEO, Real
Estate Research consultants, and Dr.
Sean Snaith, Director of the Institute
of Economic Competitiveness, UCF
College of Business Administration.
Registration will be from 11:30 a.m.
to noon and the luncheon program
will be from noon to 1 p.m. The cost
of the program is $45 for members,
$60 for non-members and $20 for
students. Details: NAIOP office at
407-227-7461.
AARP Mid-Florida Chapter 5046
will hold its general meeting at noon
on Sept. 3 at the Marks Street Senior
Recreation Center, Maple Room, 99 E.
Marks St., downtown Orlando.
Daughters of the American Revo-
lution Constitution Day, Sept. 13,
Dubsdread Golf and Country Club,
Orlando.
English-Speaking Union, Central
Florida Branch, will meet Sept. 15
at the University Club of Winter Park.
Program: a presentation by Quinn
Hawkesworth on "Pride of Place."
The Friends of the Orlando Philhar-


monic Orc~hestra meet every third
Wednesday of the months at 11:30
a.m. at the Orlando Philharmonic
Executive Offices, 812 E. Rollins St.,
across the parking lot from the Or-
Iando Museum of Art. They promote
community awareness and apprecia-
tion of the Philharmonic. For further
information, please call Caroline
James at 407-647-6919 or Sigrid
Morris at 407-249-2484.
Maitiand Rotary Club meets every
Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at the Maitland
Civic Center, 641 S. Maitland Ave.
Parents Without Partners: Activities
for single-parent families custo-
dial or noncustodial family and
adult events; free support group bi-
weekly on Park Avenue. Please call
407-888-0618 for more information.
Retired Officr Wie Club mets
the third Tusday af very moeneh,
September through May, for lunch
and mutual interests at the Elks Club,
H-owell Branch Road, Winter Park.


> turn to CLUBS on next page


The National Association of Indus-
trial and Office Properties Central
Florida Chapter's Developing Lead-
ers will host a program titled "Selling,
Leasing and Appraising Real Estate"
on Wednesday, July 16, from 5:30
p.m. to 7 p.m. at the offices-of Hunt-
onBrady Architects, 800 N. Magnolia
Ave., 18th and 19th floors of One Or-
lando Centre, Orlando.
Speakers will be: Appraisal -
Steve Saunders, MAI, COIM, MRICS,
Senior Director, Valuation Services,
Cushman & Wakefield, Inc.; Leas-
ing Rick Solik, Senior Director,
Office Brokerage services, Cushman
& Wakefield, Inc., Sales' Caryn
Carreiro, Reg onal Vice Pre ient,
El apitl Tere is no cos o te
event,
University Club of Winter~ Park Cur-
rent Evet mrup wi Io ~ lld e

Gusos uests 1ecoe 841 Park
cussionsWinter Park m0- 44-6149

University Club of Winter Park
Stock Market Analysis Group will
meet Wednesday, July 16, 10 a.m.


This is a working group that exam-
ines the stock market and its ex-
temal influences, which are used in
analyses of sectors and individual
stocks. 841 Park Ave. N., Winter Park.
407-644-61 49.
The Retired Enlisted Association,
TREA Sunshine Chapter 124, Or-
lando, will meet 1 p.m. Saturday, July
19, at Delaney Street Baptist Church,
Room D-103, 1919 S. Delaney Ave.,
Orlando. New members and spolises
are welcome. Please call Bill King,
membership, 407-765-0128, or e-
mail- beabill7173@aol.com for de-
tails. AII services enlisted retirees are
welcome. There will be refreshments
and great raffle prizes. Chapter 124
has a Ladies 124 Auxiliary meeting at
the same time and place.
The Winter Park Republican Womn-
en will meet Tuesday, July 22, at the
Mt. Vernon Inn. Speaker: District 37
State Rep. David Simmons. Program:
Legislative Update Lunch will be at
11:15 a.m. with speaker at noon.
Lunch is $14. Please contact Peggy
Miller for reservations: Pmillerl 814@


16th annual March of Dimes Mud
Volleyball Tournament, Saturday,
Aug. 23, at the Lee Vista Center in
Orlando. Lee Vista Center is located
off Semoran Boulevard, just one mile
north of the airport. Registration is
$400 before Aug. 1 and $450 after
for a coed team of six to 10 players.
Featuring) more than 150 corporate
teams wallowing in 2 to 3 feet of mud"
To register a team or for more infor-
mation about the event, please con-
tact Jessica Hadelman at the March
of Dimes at 407-599-5077 ext. 24 or
e-mail jhadelman@marchofdimes.
comn Mud Ioleybaal is still iarits ear y
plnnn stge an .h .r sp n
sorship opportunities available.
Casino 21, benefiting Easter Seals
Central, 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Sat-
urday, Sept. 6, at Dubsdread Banquet
Hall in Orlando, 549 W. Par St., Orlan-
do. Come try your hand at blackjack,
Texas Hold 'em, craps and roulette.
Silent and live auctions, 50/50 raffle
and "Golden Ticket" raffle, and a "Fun
Money" auction at the end of the eve~
ning for high rollers to pick up some
great prizes. Tickets are $50 per per-
son ($55 the night of the event) and
include catered heavy hors d'oeuvres.


A cash bar and cocktail service will
be available in the casino. Casino at-
tire is requested.
Signature Chefs Gourmet Gala &
Auction to benefit March of Dimes,
Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the Loews
Portofino Bay Hotel at Universal Or-
Iando. Local media celebrities will join
15 of Central Florida's most talented
and celebrated chefs to cook up a
gourmet feast. Reception and silent
auction preview at 6 -p.m. including
chefs' samplings, followed by the live
auction at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $175
for individuals. Corporate tables are
$1,750 for a table of 10. For details
call Kimberly Price at the March of
Dimes at 407-599-5077 x33 or e-
mail kprice@marchofdimes.com.
Orlando Shakes: Opening Gala, Sat-
urday, Sept. 13, at the John and Rita
Lowndes Shakespeare Center. Elegant
stationed dinner and silent auction 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Margeson Theater, live
auction 8 p.m. Dinner provided by:
Bubbalou's Bodacious BBQ, E-Brands
Restaurants, McCormick & Schmick's
Seafood Restaurant, Rosen Centre


> turn to COMMUNITY next page


Hold 'em for Hope Casino Night, 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. July 10, to benefit New
Hope for Kids, Winter Park Civic Cen-
ter, 1050 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park.
Entry donation is only $10. Featuring:
Texas Hold 'em tournament; open
casino table- including blackjack,
roulette and craps; live local band;
silent auction; full cash bar and ca-
tered menu. Advanced registration is
required for the Texas Hold 'em tour-
nament. Entry is a $50 donation and
includes admission for one person,
two beverages and chips for play in
the tournament.
Light Up your night! Classic
Rock 'N' Roll Laser Light Shows
return to the Orlando Science Cen-
ter's Dr. Phillips CineDome every
Friday and Saturday night, begin-
ning July 11. This summer relive the
excitement or make new memories
with classic rock hits! There will be
a family-friendly show, Cozmic Kidz
Lazer Jamz, at 6 p.m., followed by
legendary lineups from The Beatles
at 7 p.m., U2 at 8 p.m., Led Zeppelin
at 9 p.m., and Pink Floyd at 10 p.m.
("Dark Side of the Moon" on Fridays
and "The Wall" on Saturdays). Enjoy
unforgettable tunes accompanied


by a full-color Iaser light show from
LightWave Intemnational. Admission to
one laser light show is $12 for adults
and $7 for youth (ages 3-17). Addi-
tional laser light shows that evening
are $7 each (all ages). Orlando Sci-
ence Center, 777 E. Princeton Street,
Orlando, 407-514-2000.
Party In The Park, 6 p.m. Saturday,
July 19, Lake Lily Park in Maitiand,
corner of Highway 17-92 and Mait-
land Avenue. Presented by the city of
Maitland. There will be music, fun ~and
food for all with a special screening of
"Horton Hears a Who!"
Big Band Concert, "A Tribute to
Ati edhaow,t Sunday seul b0 M _
nee concert 3 p.m., evening concert
7 p.m. at Altamonte Springs East-
monte Civic Center, 830 Magnolia
Drive (off Ronald Reagan Boulevard).
Admission is $5 at the door. Details
407-322-7528.
The Winter Park Playhouse Youth
Theatre presents The Prince Street
Players' Musical adaptation of "A
Pocketful of Rhymes." July 24 through
Aug. 2. The Prince Street Players
high-energy musical adaptation of the


classic Mother Goose nursery rhymes,
featuring a cast of 14 talented young
people! Performances Thursdays, Fri-
days and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and
Sunday, July 27, at 2 p.m. Tickets:
$15, $12 for children 12 and under.
Reservations: 407-645-0145.
The 16th Annual Celebrity Mascot
Games, Thursday, July 24, Stetson
University at 2 p.m.; Friday, July 25,
Amway Arena at 1 2:30 p.m., and Sat-
urday, July 26, 2 p.m., Amway Arena.
More than 30 of the nation's top
professional and collegiate mascots
will battle their way through wacky,
zaby games at the Amway Arena and
Stetson University. This family event
benefits New Hope for Kids' Grief and
Wish programs and is hosted by New
Hope for Kids' partner for the event,
the Central Florida Sports Com-
mission. Tickets are $6 in advance
through New Hope for Kids. For tick-
ets call 407-331-3059 x10.
Crealde Open House, Saturday, Aug.
9. Tour Crealde's studios and galler-
ies, stop at the Cup-a-thon sale, and
participate in hands-on workshops. It
is located at 600 St. Andrews Blvd ,
Winter Park '


Com mun ity ~Buildi







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SOCCER I sis,Oooo balls donated by tire company I CLUBS I Upcoming events


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Pklase Corntct.


Winter Park Urology Associates, PA
Research Nurse: 407-992-2673


< continued from last page

Hotel and Rosen Shingle Creek. Wine
provided by: Focus Wine Distributors
supplied by Peter Brum~ (Germany).
Musical selections from Kiss Me
Kate featuring Michael Andrew of
Swingerhead, 8:30 p.m. Dessert and
cham pagne courtesy of Seasons 52, 9
p.m. Cocktaillattire. Tickets: $250 and
$200. Reservations: 407-447-1700.
Loch Haven Park, 812 E. Rollins St.
Orlando.
Dickens to Benton, Rare Books and
Works on Paper from the Morse Col-
lection on exhibit through Sept. 16.
The Morse Museum of American Art
will open the first comprehensive ex-
hibition of its seldom-seen collection
of rare books and works on paper'


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Students must be recommended by
their ecclesiastical leader, former math
and English teachers. Good students ac-
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due to lack of funding! Tour our Web site
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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


aP e 10 Thursday July 8


< continued from last page

Information: Diana Schoeppner 407-
696-5414.
Widow and Widowers Society of
Central Florida meets the first Friday
of each month at the Goldenrod Civic
Center, Aloma and Palmetto avenues.
Details: Christina 407-382-0607 or
Lori 407-948-9433.
Winter Park Breakfast Rotary Club
meets every Monday at 7:30 a.m.,
Best Western Mt. Vernon Inn, Morse
Boulevard and Highway 17-92, Winter
Park. Call Richard Baensch at 407-
644-8800 for more information.
The Wednesday Music Club of Or-
lando and Winter Park meets at the
St. Michael's Episcopal Church, 2499
N. Westmoreland Drive, College Park,
407-843-8448, October through May
on the second Wednesday of the


tmonth.hEsnchouragn young m scians
editions each year. For more info con-
tact Linda Bond, 407-862-6216.
Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion is a not-for-profit, non-political
service organization. Any woman old-
er than 18 years who can trace lineal
descent from a patriot of the Ameri-
can Revolution is eligible for member-
ship. DAR objectives are patriotism
- with particular emphasis on our
local veterans and our armed forces
_ historical preservation, community
service and promotion of education.
Call one of your area regents: Clare,
Orlando Chapter DAR, 407-647-3677,
meets in College Park at the College
Park Women's Civic Center first Satur-
day except in the summer. Winter Park
Chapter DAR, 407-733-1867, meets
in Winter Park on a weekday at Winter
Park Racquet Club, Winter Park.'


leagues through free ball
giveaways and fundraising
promotions teach league re-
ceives $2 for every Uniroyal
tire sold to the general pub-
lic during the 30-day pro-
motion). The program has
expanded each year and is
now being implemented in
hundreds of communities
across America. .
The children look for-
ward to beginning their soc-
cer season with a nice, new
~Uniroyal ball. The leagues
use the financial donations
to fund scholarships for un-
derprivileged children, new
field development and op-
erational expenses.
"This is really a tremen-
dous program because ev-
eryone benefits," Holley
said. ''The kids receive free
soccer balls, the leagues re-


ceive funds, and we have
the opportunity to provide
support to families in our
local communities."
The Maitland Soccer
League will have a fall reg-
istration day on Aug. .2
from 9 a.m. to noon at Mai-
tland Community Park,
1400 Mayo Ave., Maitland.
The fee is $100 plus a $60
uniform fee shorts, two
jerseys and socks. The faH l
2008 season begins for ages
15-18 on Aug. 16. .
Also on Aug. 2 is the Mai-
tland Soccer Club Semi-
Annual Soccer Skills Spec-
tacular. The soccer clinic
at Lake Destiny Soccer
Field includes skills train-
ing and fun games. Visit
MaitlandSoccer.com for
more information.


< continued from page A8

role in fostering the growth
of youth soccer," said Kaz
Holley, Uniroyal brand mar
keting director. "It's easy to
see why it has become one
of America's fastest grow-
ing youth sports. It's a game
that can be enjoyed by kids
of all ages and is such awon
derful family activity.
"Every year we have ex-
ceptional dealers such as
Maitland Tire Company
participating in our soccer
initiative, which helps orga.
nizations such as the Mait-
land Soccer Club provide
very worthwhile programs
for local children "
Uniroyal began working
with some of its dealers in
the fall of 2000 to support
their local youth soccer


'-ri
-i: xt .F r' -

'
"~


JI


showcasing more than 70 books and
more than 35 prints and drawings.
445 N. Park Ave., Winter Park. Mu-
seum hours are 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday
through Thursday and Saturday, and I
p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. All visitors re-
ceive free admission from 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. on Fridays.
Black Tie from the Waist High to
benefit the Alzheimer's Resource
Center, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, Sept.
26, Maison & Jardin Restaurant, Alta-
monte Springs. Silent and live auction,
delicious sit-down gourmet dinner,
and music to the harpist and violinists.
Tickets are $60 and corporate tables
start at $500. RSVP 407-843-1910.
"Respect: A Musical Journey of
Women," all-new cabaret version now
playing at The Rivership Romance,
433 N. Palmetto Ave., Sanford. Friday
evenings boarding at 7 p.m. and Sun-
day matinees boarding at 3:30 p.m.
Boarding, cruise, dinner and show
last approximately 2 1/2 hours. Enjoy
a hit musical cabaret, a delicious din-
ner and the beauty of the St. Johns
River. For reservations and available
dates or information, please call The
Rivership Romance, 407-321-5091,
or visit RivershipRomance.com.


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, July 10, 2008 Page 11


Don't you just love the
West? Skepticism in the
ranks of the evangelical
youth!?! Oh, happy, happy
day. The trajectory of West-
ern thought and philoso-
phy from Greece on has
been to empower the indi-
vidual to think for herself.
How novel. What a revolu-
tionary concept. As Ameri-
can philosopher Richard
Rorty so succinctly put it:
America is not about truth,
America is about freedom.
As America's Republi-
can evangelicals age and,
uh, move on, they will take
their divisive un-American
"truths" with them and the
United States will be a dif-
ferent nation. Less divisive.
Less dogmatic. More toler-
ant.
This fall's Republican
presidential campaign of
Guns, God and Gays may be
their last "hurrah." (Shall
we all pray for that? Ha!)
Yet. Once more into the
Godless breach!
But methinks, William,
that train has already left
the station.


of-tune banjos by the Re-
publican Party with such
unfortunate consequences
for the nation.
Godly values? You bet.
Hmmm? Let's see? Cut
taxes. Outlaw abortion.
Eliminate regulatory over-
sight. No stem cell research.
Eliminate unions and re-
strict plaintiff appeals. Pub-
licly stigmatize gays. Open
public lands for private de-
velopment. Save marriage
amendments. Deregulate -
whole industries. Publicly
finance churches. And on
and on and on. The real Re-
publican agenda is helping
those who have, achieved
by manipulating the "value"
voter into voting against
his own economic interests
- a modern-day three-card
monte that plays the faith-
ful for the political saps
they are.
You'd think if God were
actually talking to the faith-
ful, he'd clearly warn the
pious to avoid association
with the profane. My father
actually counseled against
associating with the pious
(of a certain ilk). Ha! Talk
about bass ackward.
SBut, the times they are
a changing Regardless of
one's beliefs, across the
broad spectrum of Ameri-
can culture, younger evan-
gelicals do not so much
care about another human


being's sexuality. What are
you like as a person? Are
you kind? Are you gentle?
Are you a good citizen?
Whether or not you are at-
tracted to men or women is
(has become) less an issue
when compared to rising
rates of poverty and pollu-
tion or issues of justice.
Younger Americans have
grown tired of fighting bat-
tles over whose "values" are
more sacrosanct while the
nation slips economically,
as our prospects diminish
and national leadership
and priorities are repeated-
ly compromised over frac-
tious, idiotic and infantile
disputes over science and
faith (stem cell research,
Darwinism, creationism,
etc.).
The following paragraph
is presented from a June 29,
2008, article in The Gazette
of Colorado Springs, Colo.
"Some polls show that
young born-again Chris-
tians are more tolerant
of gays and lesbians. Ac-
cording to a 2007 Barna
(an evangelical organiza-
tion that studies Christian
trends) study, 28 percent of
born-agains, of which evan-
gelicals are a subset, under
age 42 think it is morally
acceptable to have sex with
someone of the same gen-
der, compared with 13 per-
cent of older born-agains.',


Ihakespeare 's Henry I0 Act Ill

"Godly"! fight for gay intol-
erance? Are not stem cells
sacred? Is not a woman's
womb public property sub-
ject to righteous (religious)
control? Is marriage not
clearly scripted by God? For
only a man and a woman?
No matter that God is not
mentioned in the U.S. Con-
stitution, let us amend it
with Biblical certainty.
Sssssssssssss. Is that the
gas of relevance and inten-
sity seeping from the bal-
loon of religious authority?
One can only hope. I do. I
am so tired of "values" vot-
ers being played like out-


Can you hear the last train
leaving the station? Does
this presidential election
present the last opportuni-
ty for America's Republican
Party to rally the Christian
evangelical faithful around
the flag of Guns, God and
Gays? Or is the train of mo-
dernity finally leaving them
at the terminal, their tickets
punched through to the
18th century? Haire they
finally become religious
anachronisms in a secular-
ized 21Ist-century America?
Oh, what are the faithful
to do when their children
abandon the "good" and


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Ghris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper,
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


14d your

CHILD FALL


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Play On I"


2 1e gaP Thursday, u y ,


FALLEN APPLES NOT FAR FROM MY TREE #i~58


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


01lJ 2008


"It's different when it's
your own flesh and blood."
"Of course," I nodded,
"But, Charlie, who's been
the loser all these years?
Who's still losing?"
"'Yeah. Matt has missed a
world of fun with me. And
I used to care about him a
helluva lot."
"By the way," I asked,
"what was the important
advice Matt wanted from
you when he came to
Eur~ope?"
"He told me he was
on the verge of getting a
divorce. He was gomng to
take his two daughters and
run off with a good-looking
actress he was having an
affair with."
"Wrhat did he want you
to do?"
"He wanted to know if
P'd stand by him. "
'"What'd you say?" I asked
"I told him I thought he
was a damned fool. But he
was my brother. I'd always
stand by him come hell
or high water. I told him I
hoped he'd find a way to
stick with his wife."
"Did he?" I asked.
"Yes, he ended up stay-
ing married. They're still in
Charleston."
'"You ever meet the
actress?"
"No. But Matt was evi-
dently ready to grab up the
kids and move to Mexico
with this woman."
"Mexico? Why Mexico,
Charlie?"
"She told him she was
going there t~o make mov-
ies."
"What kind of movies?"
"X-rated, I believe hie
said."
'"You're kiddin' me!"
"I wish I were ... You
figure it. That's the God's
truth," he said. "And that's
all I know about it."
"What would happen to
good old Matt," I asked, "if
you blabbed that incredible
story to his fancy pals up in
the mountains?"
Charlie jumped up, tears
in his eyes. "Do you think
P'd do that to my own flesh
and blood?"
"Charlie, of course you
wouldn't," I said.


ested to see how a singer
works. We talked mainly
about him. He waited my
advice."
"Did you end up closer
to each other?"
"No. Since then, we have
nothing to do with each
other. His idea. Not mine."
"Does Matt come to see
you in New Orleans?" I
asked.
"His wife's a New
Orleans girl," Charlie said.
"Wealthy family. She inher-
ited big bucks in Louisiana.
Every now and then I hear
that she and Matt have
been in New Orleans. They
never contact me."
"How about the 'blood
and water' thing?" I asked.
"Strangely, it seems to
have broken down. Matt
often goes out of his way to
try to hurt my reputation."
"What the hell for?"
'"You see," Charlie said,
"I know well-heeled New
Orleans ~people who have
summer homes up in the
North Carolina mountains,
Matt has a house in that
area. He's there half the
year, socializing around,
playing golf. He doesn't
work at all anymore. His
wife is thaet loaded." ..
"You been up there
Charlie?" I asked,
"Wh~en I was young.
When Angela and I travel,
it's usually New York or
Europe."
"Wlhat's all this got-"
"Only this," he said.
"People from New Orleans
who pal around with Matt
in the mountains act dis-
tant the next time they see
me down here."
"What's he say about
you?"
"No idea. Probably not
the kind of things you'd
want your own family say-
ing behind your back."
"What do you do about
it?"
"What's to do? People
who don't verify gossip
about you are no friends
anyway.'.
"'Charlie," I said, "when
we were singing all over
Europe, do you remember
all the crap we heard that
people had said about us?"


finally maturing!" Charlie
set his beer can on the
floor, and squinted out -
across the water. "So what's
with bloodE?" I asked.
"Well, after I had sung
in Europe 25 years, I went
back home to New Orleans.
They offered ine a teach-
Sing job at Loyola. I tried it
for three years. It worked
out OK. They gave me
tenure and we bought a .
big old place out on Lake
Pontchartrain."
"Pretty section," I said.
'"Yeah. My family lived .
near there when I was
in grammar school and
high school. When I came
back, there were still some
people around that I went
through school with. They
had kept up with my career
through stuff in the Times
Picayune."
"That was a help ..."
"Up to a point," he said.
"And then ...?"
"'You know anything
about my brother?"
"Charlie, I didn't even
know you had a brother," I
said.
"LMatt's a couple' years
younger than me. After
Tulane, Matt got a job in
Charleston, S.C. He did
pretty good there in busi-
ness. In the golf and coun-
try club set too. He's loaded
by now"
"The social thing's not
Smy bag."
"Mine either ... Matt's
good at it. Plays the game
well. Soft-voiced. He's
always careful not to step
on anybody's toes who can
help him." .
"And? ..."
"WJell, all his life, Matt's
dabbled around in arty
things. He's a pretty good
weekend painter. He's writ-
ten some fair stuff. He has
modest talents. Not enough
to ever take a chance on."
"Not crazy like you and
me." '
"You said it, pal!': he
laughed.
Charlie looked right
straight at me,
"People tell me Mlatt's
always been jealous of me
maybe because he didn't
have guts enough to take a


chance on his own talents.
He may not see it that way,
but that's the way I believe

"Does he know the risks
it took to do what you did?"
"Theoretically maybe,"
he said. "Not at a gut level.
How could he? He wanted a
conventional life." '
"Most people do," I said.
"And that's OK," Charlie
said. "But after I got sing-
ing jobs in places like New
York and San Francisco, he
changed."
S"What way?" I asked.
"It's hard to put your
finger on. I guess Matt just
seemed colder to me from
then on. He wanted me
around only when my sing-
ing could show him off. He
rarely wrote me. After a
few years, he stopped being
my little brother and best
friend."
"But Charlie, what about
when you moved up north
with your apartment in
New York and your house
in Connecticut? Didn't he
come to see you then?" -
"'That was before I went
to Europe. Those days Matt
would phone when he was ~
in New York on business."
"But you didn't see each
other then?"
"No," he said. "I invited
him plenty of times."
"iWhat would Matt say?"
"That he was at La
Guardia on his way back
home to Charleston."
"How long had he been
in New York?" I asked.
"Oh, maybe a week."
"Did Matt go anywhere
to hear you sing?"
"Hardly ever," Charlie
said. "He wouldn't go out of
his way. He did come to see
me once in Europe though.
He was in a big quandary.
Said he needed to talk to
me."
"Matt went with me for
five days," Charlie went
on. "I sang in Frankfurt,
Stuttgart and Monte
Carlo 'Aida,' 'Ballo,' and
'Fidelio' in less than a
week. We drove it all in my
Porsche. "
"Did he enjoy being with
you?"
'"I guess he was inter-


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

HelI or High Water
(O igi nal short story)

You take this friend of
mine, "Charlie."
Recently he drove
over from New Orleans
to Winter Park to see me
for a weekend. I hadn't
seen him since we sang
six "LCarmenls" together
in Bordeaux many a lune
ago. We were the only ones
in the cast who weren't
French,
Charlie's as Irish as
Paddy's pig. But his New
Orleans patois made
French easy for him. He
was a damn good Escamillo
and we became pals the
way tenors and baritones
often do.
Charlie has a way with
the women. He used to kid
me, "You get the girls in the
opera. But they're waiting
for me at the stage door."
Charlie and I were sit-
ting out on my porch by
the lake. He was drinking a
beer, talking extravagantly.
He can be very funny in an
outrageously flamboyant
way.
Suddenly he said, "You
know that old saying,
'Blood is thicker than
water'?"
"Yeah, my family
believed that.'"
"It ain't always true," he
said.
"Charles, I am pleased
as punch at this sign you're


not get past the internal
view of her own feelings."
Could one apply such a
description to Hillary?

Obama has decided to
"court" Evangelicals and
his base is getting evermnore
furious at his tactics.

The U.S. is insanely watch-
ing the Chinese sucking
up oil from areas in the
Caribbean where drilling
rights belong to us.

W3lhen the world knows we
are drilling, oil prices will
begin to drop!





Louis Roney's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at LRoney@cfl.rr.com.


It is now known that Dubai
- where Bill Clinton stows
his millions is becom-
ing the depository for bil-
lions of oil dollars gouged
out of American motorists.
Sharia law in Dubai gov-
erns all transactions and
sets a stage for the kind of
Catliphates with which the
Islamic world wishes to
replace democratic consti-
tutions. Our own dollars
are paying for the under-
mining of our proudest
institutions,

George W. seems to be a
decent man whose lack
of perspicacity keeps him
from seeing the evil that
surrounds him, despite his
array of secret agents.

The credulous young
American public wants
to see Obama as a Prince


Charming who sinigs
"Somewhere Over the
Rainbow." They may not
like the surprise ending.

Eighty-four percent of
Americans are against
tax hikes on the rich.
Americans do not believe
in Marxist redistribution of
wealth to fix the economy.

Obama has no "story." For
every subject brought up,
he invents a new story and
is prepared to flip-flop on it
at any future time.

MoveOn.Org told Obama
to '"take off that flag pin or
you won't receive a cent
from us." How long before
the pin disappeared?

Gustave Flaubert wrote of
Madame Bovary that "on a
tour of Europe, she could


Life is short and we never
have enough time for the
hearts of those who travel
the way with us. O, be swift
to love! Make haste to be
kind. HenriFwderic .
Amiel

I thought the American
people could never be such
fools again after electing
Jimmy Carter. Now there
seems to be a love affair
with this man Barack
Obama. Of course, the
media are solidly behind
Obama but can the
dumbed-down public
be far behind? WJe know
nothing about this man,
but, worse still, he seems
to know for sure little or
nothing about himself.

Obama backers are nervous
that he is moving to the
middle. They think to the


Left viould be better. A true
leader does the things he
believes in, and along the
way, convinces his follow-
ers they are on the right
path,

Obama's weakness is that
he never stood for any-
th7ing. After his frequent
flip-flopping and shilly-
shallying, people want him
to tell them who the real
Obama is,

"Pleasing everybody" is
Obama's idea of a change
that will win him the presi-
dency.

This three-year Beltway
denizen, without military
experience, is familiar only
with the crime milieu of
South Chicago, and not the
workings of Real Politik.






















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Dee adminis0aio oE CRED eto of Wes ey E.
Ho lis dece sd, wose dale of euath wa0 Mr h







NOE t c trsofa thedeceentai and otherpersn rpen-

sols awdir ofem decdn aid ute per

T LTIOR OCT M NOH AFIED WifHIN 1ME PERI-
ODRSSTFORLCTHIONSEC THIS ON73.02TEFLR O

ORMOE FER THE DECEDENT'S DAFE OF DET C O I
ISl ateRd~ of first ulcto of this dcen a oticer is ly
sn Atto amey for Personal Representative: '




TION ~ Od e:HI NTC
Winte Park,-N FIl ordaW f 3278 7/3, 7/10
INS STH ClRT ea 4ETO -3.0 00000 -0



IS~OR BAR
The dadme nf fCrs pu estao tei nof FREDA JL
STA, deeseFleN. 4-08-P01160


entatiey and personal representative satmy

basing e clisor dnemad Hagainstdcdns
esat o wo a copy of Sthi oieI e rd



THS OIC NE THEM.
AII ot er c aredior of hedecdn and pe

d tssttmutfile thirca ims with this court6
LN RESA3 NORE EDAEO HEFRT

BAREDA SED
NOWIHTANING TH CE TM PRIOS E

The adate ofthfrstpbiation of th is noticet REA
isTE July sed 10, e 2008. 208CPW15
Attoriley forat Peisional Repadresentatwive: i
4 N rn Aeu Oln Florida BarN. 2620
Infaesantin a ndrse Bfth erma n a rp


se~ieadtePersonal Representatve:s atre
9797 Lake Georgi Drive.
bsn li Orldeando, FL ans 32817 n
estate~ ~~~~~7/0 7/17 acp f hsnoiei rqie





ri T in tn)IN TH Ia u 1110a nR [EMlrr L riUMTl


0CNG IAKE PARK HOME WES ASCTION IREET TE OLE
Plaintiff Deceased.

dMDREU JN ul)ONoNA JONES and JOHN DOE Dol denstao thesa e~o f e set Jas 2e
DeednsNOTICE OF SALE 2X396 is penn in ae Crut eor or S m-






Oranged Avnu Orlande oun Florida380, dsRoomd 350, AeFTR THE DTEO F EVC O OYFTI
a otW essm aong L e sco ela, urito NO El cre~ditrs of thedecedent and their per-o
th e 2 7 d ay g of J u ne 2 0 8 C Lre f Fs 0eo r e s Sain F Tim urd m n s a a n T e d n t

Recrd o Orng CuBy:C CRUM d E S eve TI0 t FC MNi FIED wihti orWITHIN TETM El

ath prolceding, you are hgentitled, at nodr cost to R OE ATER O NTHE DECEDENT'S DAE OFDETHE
casi tae trneCu Courthume 4so ceoda sIS e.0PAIO eas TIS NeTdCa of fis pulctino ti otc s J
OrneAvenue Sie23, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele 35 2008.EDT F EVCEOACW FTI
ot ec:0 p~on mh 3s;21fy Tork ari, Attome forIC Peoa Rereenatve
mp res my ;a yn esa fti ouare voi A oh R ceiorid B rCe deedn 2801 he p

ab he 2 a Jn dctofu fr n ad in Peeim R demns gis edentave
cYI on st Sc185 Longt Potfl Dhe rcA m IM Fsca L 327 3971


ATEKFOUT OFMSFERH uAEFH y 3 2008CA


itemsOUR tools huyle Chrsty #394 HouseholdHEIM PAI
items;s YailtReea 46 thes Tyero AD GetFOT loc newsIO from70 OTLa-
Denson Sre #43 Fumonitur & Houseblt hod Items; BnanTADN HETM WID
Mdny 3comdln o e & er k tems Fredickptei FOcal sBource RN LI Iec W 2 eiv
Auctioheer pvStorae Pmection Aucitionce Servies ThReOsrerwel
cnato be undrt ad b irteoftestrai atue 42 of the Statge m aeo is ulcto fmsntc s
of Forid, Sine suchase madeando pro vid 381 ed. 320
phone (407editor03observernewspapersdaycom

7/10, 7/17 26 e od ut 2


PulC neli eebr ie ate Julye asRerat o and PakMot

Fr e 6e pitdbeoark entryin tom all Floridal Staeete arks










Witr akR379,t S otats f e Parksin


gods r et F ohr hrge fo whc4ale .r


C~m@o~e~3n8


~n~ ~~V~ g0~9~~3


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


l ia HE rincRI~ rol1.1aT iilR ORANICE C[uin ll

IN RE: ESTA E umO P00560
MA CIAdSHILLING,


Th Sleadmini~ta e f ,0 estaea ofM
May 21 208, an wose Coia Srtyumbe





0AYrSs AFT THEc Dif OF5 SER CE OF A COPY ROF

THIN Cr edi srs of the decedent and father pesn
oavns h eins o r d ema agais dc en'

PUBUCN Tll0 TE TOF D WimlN FT THE TIME

BF H RELOTD PROBLATEO ODE WILL BOIE OREVER
R OREDAFTER THE DCDN' DATE OF DEATHC O C F
Th ae other feitrst ulcto of th is dceN a otice s
Julyon 3, in 2008. s o ead gis c
Aet'setomey emrso R e Mereaisenita tive co
FloridaN O BarS NoTC. 0994






IN O W T S A D N TH E CIM UE I D 0 /3 7 10

DeceHased. ANOTCICE TOCEDffR TW 2 E

The dadistrio of mefrte estlateo of LEOsNARDc H.
AuLPHN, deesdFl Nme 00-P056 s


tativse e fbt Prsonal representative'satmy


esaeicuding unmatued contigent or nlq
uiae libs, Pand, wh hav ben ered cpy
of07 thsnoie ms il hircaiswthti cut



INTICE OiR (30) THRTYFO DASAER TLE DAUTE OF
SEVIEOFDA, CPY OF THI NOTICON TE.
All the crditrs f te dcdntand 20-persons

TH RE: SAE MOTS()FE H AOF TEFRT
PUBUCATIO OF THISNOTC,
AL LISNOTC SO FILED WLLBEFOEVR
AHNOTWITHaSTADIN H TINMbEr 20-PERIODS SET
FORTHn ABVE ANYCrci CLAIM FoLE TWmiOl (2)tYEAS
FORia M rORaE AFTER on THE DECEDENTS DAT OFc DET


tAtiv nftmey frPersonal Representative:s atre

Wl eintor fm eeetadoer Sprngs F 3208

Perso ncudng nal Rrese cnttivge: orulq
9412d lams Priat Rho ad 9892 sevdac
WfMs oie mst Plas MOi 657754755 wihti o
Wr~~~~~~lN7/0 7/17 LAE FTRE()MNH F


1IN m lrd! ,:Illrsi O INr AND FOR 04AwraE

INE:SAS 0 .: 4-W-CP-0030170-0
THOMAS P GILMARTlN,

JON EDRC, P isona Rpresentative of
Pet tioner








ROSEMARY PALMifR and PATRICIA MAS- ELO
CAR 0A n ad IruhKm K gnocaee, Ic a gn
SALPEROE.BAKER, NORA B. COLLINS, MXN BK OV
MAIEH AE OEL, LEE ROY BAKER, RUTH BAE IMRIEV
HAKR 0HUL CMLTH G. 11DY U C
GLAiN U U SHAUI., DARELL R. SHAUL, HMSJ GLATN

ENM IM~NLNGAU R N MARY DMME R S N, R
UNNW RUNASCERTAINED BENERCIARIES, LIANS R
HBIANS O ERS OF OR OTHER PERSONSHAIGAITE-
OAIGA NTH EAETI H SAE OMG T ANND





Re de a ts


TO:~ ~ ~~~~y SusanAR WendtTE an ARCA
Inc.,~ ~ ~~626 a gn n ata sigeepl, 1 GU
SHNL THE CRCUTOUR FOAKR, ORANGE COUNTY,
MAINRE ESTBATE OELE OFY BKR
BAESSI G.CUNNIINGHELAMa/a BAE SSIEL GLOVR


N011CEC GLATON CRLEDIOR M IAR
ThGAeR Madministratin o the etaeofBSSIE G.
* UNNSETINGHMall BENCUSSI LOE CUNNING- O

ing inHE he Crcuit Cour fo ORNGE Couty FlRorda, U
tee ADE NOision, add ssdtio whr sD25Nerm
natnd drse of thne pnersanal representatvs en nd
the persvo nal represrentaives atomseyrve se forth

All cred. itors o the. decedet and othrd pesns
avi1,ng clim beor dem ands against deceents sb-
tiateo, ond whom acop of thisnotice ise lequre tof be
seurvdmst file ter claims wer ith thisn cout WIHIN

Allothe rediatol mrsat ofthe decedt and other per-
son havng lamso dmad against y f M ei decanedeint

esttemut il teirclim wthths clourth WIuTHN3


ALLH CLIMSUI NOUT FILE WITHN TE CUTIM EY
FD P OBAT CDE WILLBAE MSOREEARE.

OR MRE: AFTER TH EEEN'AE FDAH

NOSC BARED CRDT
The adat o irst pbiation of meetthi noti BSis Jly
3,2008. FieNme 820-P011,i ed


Attme fo personal Representatives atre e t oh
Flria a N.0015
SWAN &rdtr HALEPA t dcdn d he rss
Paigclisor ead gst Officet' Bo 181


4019Awomacoyofmsntch Way rqie b
Linvda Ann fie Cunninghlaims Mihturdock I

INTHE CTRCUIT3 COURTH AFOR ORANGIMECOUNTY,
FLORID P R08ATONOFTISNTE C O DMS10N


NTC NOTICE T RDIOS
Thcer ardmiistrato of the deseet at ofhe Mary .
Wo alter, dcased wose deates ofan death wats My
XXX-XX-0787, file umber 48-2008-h hisCP-00150HI30,


425 NT FOrang Avnue RToom 73470, Orland FLORida




Th ate on ho ais cpybiat of this notice is reuiedtobe



NOTICE ON THEM. Y P
sohist asic ddx ep
esaems ietheir claims woith ths out ITIN3


OMA L rlObFIE IT ResnEFTIMEE
IDA PDBAFECODEWIL EFOEE BRE




AtmyfrPersonal Representative:
Frlaod .lrd 321



7/3, 7/10


IN T~HE I: 1.irIT1 II DiJi OFrn T F Iramli 10CIA L

THE CACH OMESAT MIRINRS\IL A
CONDOMINIUM ASSOCITION, INC.,

RBR RAVAN,
NO ICE OF SLEP WSU rsO nCH E nal






Uo rnit 2001, y Su oiding 20, hi THE COACH HMS
HM a MARI ERS VILG Condominium




PorhauseVI, 42 accordingtote Dvneclaratio 30
of CndaFominium ille April 25, 198 andy 30 O


ppe eolw nan dsrbdi petasset forth in m
Any ersofn claidmin antestntesr-
pusfroth sale, BIfdn any, oterhne pmperl HO
DATED JulyER 1, 2008. Ce a mn u ,



blge 12 throg 30, I 400 ,eeand July


AmeDMINITRA110Ne, 425NORTH ORANEAVE. ROOM
0rng C2Ety R OFiA U NC8
VOCEIMPAIRD AL1809587

CO MRNitl& MdCC GE e Com ons Blvd.
Mhaitland, Florida n 3275 th elrt
(407 875-2655i fl Ar 2 18 n


FLOdens hRIDA, POBAT DMSIO Pbi eo


meDecaased. NOTIT CREDoITORS
Thy ero adaministatin o the estanthe ofJSE M.
pLAUENE de e ase.Fle ay umber 2008-ChePr1268,
Fonridas Pob h ate Dvson, thI e adesns of whch is
The nms aihn d addess of ethe pesoalreprse

All rediorsof te dcedet a di oth r p eros,
estateincludig unmatred contingnty Cour ui

Pubidated o lims, andwo hve bee served 00 an copy
of, this Inoi mus filer the-Mir laims wih hs court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THRE (3 MONTS AFTER H
THED DATE ACOF HEFRS UBATION N OF THIS
NORTICE OR (30) THIRTY AS AFTCERN THE DATEOF
SF ERVAICE OA COP OFTHINTCE PES ON ATHEM.


THRE MONTHS (3)FTR THE DAfE OF TH E FIRST
PULCAIN THIS NOTICE OFSL;IYUAEHAIG
ALLC ClPAIMSD NO S FLE WILL BE FOREVER


FORTH ABOV, ANYid CLI FLD W ()YER

ORMOEAFE THE DECUTCEDENT S DATINOE COFDETH
ISl BARED 20-P16
TH E: DSATE OFTHFRSPULCTOOFHI
NOTICE T IS Jly 0, 008
meAtmnrto o ef OE pr entatie: o O M
1340NTE Tuceskawl Road Suiter 20-P106
Wspnigin VeCrute Cutfr Springs, FL 32708
Foia rbTe Dephsone: (407 699-1110 hic
Ps Fie orid B09anfr N Fo.:d 350605 99
ttv n t Personal Representative:satre
NORM 0JEDAhbeow





WTIR :EE 8T TER F TR ( MNH FE

NE~lE OTI CEP OTO CREDTICEORSTE
Thoae cadminstrationof the destaeofDle E.Besat-,
is pending In thred circuit Cot for Ornge Cundty,
Florida, Probt ie Dhiv ims onthe adres coftwhich is
425E MN.H Orang AvTe.Roo 340,AT Olando FloRida



sevd ut fl hi liswt hscutWITHINNDN T TM EID T
TH AERO MONTH AFTER THE DEEETIMDAE OF THE H
T DT T FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NTC R3 AS
NOTICE ONJuy0 THEM .
Allothrcredtor esofth edreeentandthverpr

M AE sON THAIN Rc APUL

ODS te SET ng FORT INSCTO 73.02 FTE L



ISRM BARRED
The daeoffrstpbadtion ofthsnotc s uy


3,l 2008. 4-086130


T Adisbttome ofo Mchel 8esatty o a E e


4 N rn Ae Ro 4 Orlando, FL 32803

Persnaiv n h personal R representative: s a

736 paking Lliso dmnsakens Recd. ~ e
tt w o rla ndoy Ro r t ida 32819e 7/3 7/10ed to


-5~i .4i`1F*" i '


ON)E STOP SHOP FOR CENTRAL FLORIDA LEGALS
As the publishers oI th Winter Park-Maitnd O~bserver lOrange Co~unty FL)
and th Oviedo-Wimarl Springs Voltes (5eminae Courty FL) We are your 1 stop
$11PI fo Cntral FloridB legal reolke advertising

;1 -,luPROVED CASE MANAGEMENT
St~art.hs 5taluory "clock" quIKklY Send~ us yOUr nobe Dy Monday and we'll
Spubfleh I on Thursday Obserrver NBwsDapere Im~roves your case management
by sending out the notarize affidavit Immentately following me ea run
hiWs lsEs you fil II with te court quickly and avold me costly delays many
:8(llishers Impose by holding Dack me affdevil willa wapnag for invoicing and
I1- pgment processing.

~'WCE GUIDE.
PblotllPieNtcPublic Salae 59;co.l. nch
Notnr etoCeditors S42 50/wreek
Notice ofSalel 556t~elek
Olsseolution ofMarrage S125



k. PLACE YOUR AD
No Acceptin g emall suomital Just mailusa
.a tet le of the notkH t 10 published and wNe's do
the rBSL Upon com~Pletn of the auvrtiing w~e
Simmediately send you 1 norarirea alffiavit
E -MAIL Legal~abservernewspapears om
FAX 407-628-4053
t PHOUNE 407-628-85100
MAIL 609 Execuve Dnre.
Wintr Park,. FL 32789


TITLE 6. CML PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (Chs. 45-88)
CHAPTER 50) LEGAL AND OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENTS

g 50 031 Newspapers in rvnch legal nionce s ad proess~ may be
puD11hB(Il

Nir nobl:6 or publicanonl required to be publlsnea in a newspaper
In hp nature JI of m IIEu 01l procssa of any knr natre, citeracer
or aestrhpoon pinviaed for under any Ian at the state uvnzethr
nerelofore or nerearter enacted, and wnetner pertaining to
consbtrucav service, or mal Inittian assuming rewawivng
enerrsirrg or enforcilng lursdletion or powaer Dy any court In this
scare, or any nodre of sale of property, real or personal, for taxes
s~tate county or municipal.or slierifs. guardian 5 or adminustrator a
or any sae made pursudnt To anly ul
any other publicatin a oa~r nutsni to any affalts of Ine state
clr any county munilcry or allir polrtical sun0divison thereof
snail be deemed epve been published in accordianc win tne
jstautes prod g for such public~aton, unless ine same strall have
Deen putlIJ for the prescrItea pened of tme reuered for such
pbca a newuspapr wrhlic e aime of such puntication
snall huart~eau ln~~~ 1 .r ear at all usve Pean entered
odcas mratter a pota inem*rp BylhL
o ns hc~ja 8mnws ek c successor of a newspaper
weren logether have been so Duoithed. Dreardea nlwevere. dial
nothing 6erein contained hall apply where lnrny county there shanl
be no newspaper In erisefnce whicn shall have been puoilsned
lor tne lengi of time above presclord No legal publication of
ally Kin0. nature or descnoion ats herein define, enati be valid
of Dinding or nrin to be In colmpilance witn ine statutes providing
tor juch Du~licairon unless the same snall nave. been altllisheo


permnd #008-093 Ir.'
pgym

.~0n~)~


Thursday, July 10, 2008 Page 13


vu~.1. F r.ilndult~ i lU sn x glsveanwUul

b Cl VCI meets all statutory requirements















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d


Miscellaneous
AIRLINES ARE HIRING r Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance Career. FMA approved
program. Financial aid if qualified Job
placement assistance. CALL Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Comput-
ers, *Criminal Justice. Job placement as-
sistance. Computer available. Financial Aid
if qualified. Call (866)858-2121, www.Cen-
tura0nline.com.

NOW AVAILABLE! 2008 POST OFFICE JOBS.
$18-$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE, PAID TRAIN-
ING, FED BENEFITS, VACATIONS. CALL
(800)91 0-9941 TODAY! REF #FLO8.

Notices
DIVORCE without Children $95.00, DIVORCE
with Children $95.00. With FREE name
change documents (wife only) and marital
settlement agreement. Fast, easy and pro-
fessional. Call (888)789-01 98.

Real Estate
North Georgia Mountain Properties Vist:
www.ASDover.com, www.Falling~nater-
sClub.com, or www.TranquilityatCarter-
sLake.com (800)200-7458.

LAKE PROPERTIES FROM JUST $39,900
Lake Guntersville, Scottsboro AL. Ma-
rina, gated entrance, u/g utilities. Buy now,
build later! Excellent financing available!
(877)917-5253 x 4270 www.seegpi.com.

Colorado Ranch Foreclosures 100 Acres just
$59,900 Other ranches available Year-round
roads, access to utilities. Excellent Financ-
ing Available. (866)696-5263 X.4289 www.
FLlovesCO.com. .

How about TENNESSEE? For a list of avail-
able lake & mountain homes & properties
call Lakeside Realty toll free @ (888)291-
5253 or visit www.Iakesiderealty-tn.com .

NEW ARIZONA LAND RUSH! 1 or 2-1/2
"Football Field" Sized Lots! $0 Down.$0 In-
terest. $159-$208 per month! Money Back
Guarantee! (877)466-2104 or www.sunsite-
slandrashccom.

LAKE HOMESITES from $24,900 Clarks Hill
Lake on GA/SC Border. Excellent financ-
ing available. Call Today! (877)426-2326 x
4352.

.Steel Buildings
BUILDINGS FOR SALE! "BEAT NEXT IN-
CREASE!" 20x30xi2 $4900. 25x40x14
$7900. 30x50xi4 $9085. 35x56x16
$13,200. 40x60x16 $16,900. 50x140X19
$47,600. 60x100x18 $37,000. Pioneer
since l980...(800)668-5422.

Vacation Rentals
RV sites from $199/wk and rental units
from $750/wk on private island resort in the
Florida Keys. Call Sunshine Key at (305)872-
2217 or visit www.RVontheGo.com.

Getaway to Paradise Now Make it an island
resort vacation. Save gas & 50% on Suites
& Gulffront Parlors $135. Limited time offer
details (888)791-0066. JustLetGo.com/NP








Orange County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.com
where you can enter the Job Title in the
"Search For Jobs" box to see more infor-
mation on these jobs and search thousands
of additional openings throughout Central
Florida, at NO COST. Apply by following the
directions listed. For further help visit the
WORKFORCE CENTRAL FLORIDA Orange
County Office at 5166 East Colonial Drive or
call (407) 531-1227.

Painter
Job Description: Responsible for applying
a variety of different paints and coatings.
Sands and prepares aluminum truck bod-
ies to be painted. Work Monday-Friday,
6:00am-2:30pm.
Pay Rate: $11.00-$16.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9348211

Service Agent
Job Descripeio Re pni lev iclhe ipnri

to rental. Insures vehicles are properly in-
spected and made ready for the customer.
Work days and hours may vary
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9348383

Cook
Job Description: Responsible for preparing
menu items, using daily worksheets, and
standardized recipes. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.50-$10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9348488


liliIii__lII___________ ------


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Customer Support Representative
Job Description: Responsible for files, mail,
phone support, order follow up, and some
light accounting. Work Monday-Thursday,
7:00am-6:00pm. .
Pay Rate: $12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9349085

Station Manager
Job Description: Responsible for ensuring
that there is a full line of ready, clean cars.
Manages specialty cars. Minimizes line
waits and promotes fast, friendly service.
Delivers functions to brand specifications.
Maintains brand identity throughout the
operation. Ensures all marketing programs
are delivered completely and effectively
throughout the location. Maintains a neat,
clean and efficient work environment at all
times. Work days and hours may vary. -
Pay Rate: $28,000.00-$30,000.00 per year
Job Order Number:9340883

Alarm Installer
Job Description: Responsible for drilling and
wiring new homes for low voltage systems
during home construction. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:00am-4:30pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9348191

Driver
Job Description: Responsible for deliver-
ing products to jobsites. Helps unload or
load products. Helps in the plant when not
making deliveries. Work Monday-Friday,
7:00am-3:30pm.
Pay Rate: $13.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9344610

Project Manager
Job Description: Responsible for conducting
market research and analyzing to identify
potential market opportunities. Translates
user requirements into program objectives.
Identifies/estimates program resource
requirements and allocates across time/
schedule in fulfilling program objectives.
Builds and leads project teams) in the exe-
cution of program plans. Provides leadership
skills to plan projects, estimate resources,
motivate team members, direct subcontrac-
tors, manage budgets and deliver products
on time within budget. Work days and hours
may vary
Pay Rate: $56,000.00-$87,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9348554

Public Relations Manager
Job Description: Responsible for oversee-
ing media relations and internal commu-
nications. Serves as a strategic partner to
studio and marketing. Creates breakthrough
campaigns, shapes global public relation
planning, and attains approval for public
relations. Acts as a spokesperson. Crafts
and executes public relation programs that
publicize the studio, franchise, and titles.
Plans and organizes event activities at
trade shows and media events. Maintains
key media relationships and sources top-
tier speaking opportunities. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $68,800.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9348646

Shuttle Driver
Job Description: Responsible for operating a
van to transport passengers. Performs other
related duties as assigned. Work days and
hours may vary. .
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9349025

Housekeeper Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for supervis-
ing, directing, and assuring the completion
of all housekeeping tasks assigned to room
attendants and housekeepers. Performs
other related-duties as assigned. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9343441

Housekeeping Manager
Job Description: Responsible for maintaining
the highest possible cleanliness standards


for guest rooms within budgeted guidelines.
Develops and maintains staff and depart-
ment morale. Motivates and trains others
as well as handles numerous tasks concur-
rently.Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $28,000.00-$30,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9345028

Controller
Job Description: Responsible for ensuring
that daily bank deposits are made and for
auditing operations regularly to ensure com- ~
pliance to company policies and procedures.
Ensures all laws and franchise rules and
regulations are abided by. Controls cash
and maintains the highest level of customer
service, cash flow and company profits.
Develops and maintains a fully trained and
motivated accounting staff to achieve goals.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $45,000.00-$60,000.00 per year
Job Order Nuinber: 9343599

Dancer Teacher
Job Description: Responsible for teaching
ballet, tap, jazz and hip hop. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number:9344570

Janitor
Job Description: Responsible for general
janitorial tasks including dusting, mopping,
sweeping and vacuuming. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.50-$8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9342176 .

Marketing Manager
Job Description: Responsible for coordinat-
ing, developing, and managing advertising
budget. Directs website design. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $60,000.00-$90,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9347743

Administrative Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for daily oper-
ations of medical office including computer
system, accounts receivable and payrolls,
and financial planning.Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9349544

Accounting Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for entering
weekly timesheets, paying all payroll related
taxes, workers compensation administra-
tion, garnishments, and 401(k) administra-
tion. Performs additional job related duties
as assistant to Controller. Work Monday-
Friday, 7:30am-4:30pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9349252

Construction Helper
Job Description: Responsible for assisting
with gutter installations. Work Monday-
Saturday, 7:30am-5:30pm.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9348996

Financial Analyst
Job Description: Responsible for providing
senior staff with relevant financial infor-
mation. Researches, collects, interprets,
and reports financial data to management.
Makes financial recommendations for man-
agement. Serves as a liaison to department
directors in financial matters. Reviews fi-
nancial statements and analyzes financial
data to determine the company's value and
projects future earnings. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9348953

Customer Service Representative
Job Description: Responsible for providing
a range of services to clients beginning
with traditional answering services to full
call center support. Answers inbound calls
on our state of the art equipment. Work
3:00pm-12:00am, days may vary
Pay Rate: $9.00-$10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9349388


Dental Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for assisting .
dentist, setting up patient and equipment,
and keeping records. Work days and hours
may vary
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9349499

Receptionist
Job Description: Responsibip for answering
phones for three lawyers, greeting c~lents,
filing, typing, billing, and computer word
processing.0Opens and closes files and dis-
tributes mail. Work 8:30am-5:00pm, days
may vary.
Pay Rate:$9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9349487

Patient Care Coordinator
Job Description: Responsible for handling
customer service inquiries from members,
providers; physicians, and internal and ex-
ternatclients related to pharmacy benefits.
Works to research and resolve problems in
a timely manner. Assists members in under-
standing and maximizing the use of their
pharmacy distribution program. Uses com-
puterized system to gather information and
responds to questions. Documents issues
and resolutions. Handle inbound and out-
bound member, provider and physician calls.
Work Monday-Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $10.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9349779

Seminole County
Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.com
She recyo~urca bente xthe Jb Title in tohe
nation on these jobs and search thousands
of addit ona op~e ig throughout Central
directions listed. For further help visit the
WORKFORCE CENTRAL FLORIDA Seminole
County Office at 1097 Sand Pond Rd., Suite
1001, Lake Mary, or call (407) 531-1225.

Production Manager
Job Description: Responsible for coordinat-
ing and supervising production and manu-
fc urngD dplrmns dumplement qlty

request. Writes and reviews reports. Work
Monday-Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm.

J Odr N~umnb~e: 934 47

Computer Numerical Control Machinist
Job Description: Responsible for managing
and assisting in the production process.
Schedules machining and manufactur-
ing needs. Monitors, reviews, and designs
quality assurance procedures and systems.
Aids in some small manufacturing. Rec-
ommends additional computer numerical
control e uiment or other e uiment. Sets
up, progr r and runs compqut numerical
control dual spindle with live tooling. Work
Monday-Friday, 7:30am-4:00pm.
Pay Rate: $45,000.00-$55,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9348085

Laborer/Sander
Job Description: Responsible for sand-
ing wood designs. Work Monday-Friday,
7:00am-3:30pm.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9322064

Driver
Job Description: Responsible for transport-
ing special needs children to and from nurs-
ing centers. Work Monday-Friday, 7:00am-
9:30pm and 3:00pm-5:30pm
Pay Rate: $10.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9349682

Drapery Sewing Machine Operator
Job Description: Responsible for the fab-
rication of curtains and draperies using
sewing equipment. Work Monday-Thursday,
7:30am-4:00pm.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$10.00 per hour-
Job Order Number: 9349572


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals need-
ing to earn additional income. Become
a part time or full time loan officer. Con-
trol your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

DRIVERS
Local. Home nightly. More exp more $$$,
Benefits. Transport and Set UP mobile of-
fices, some lifting. 407-459-4333. E0E







NEW SMYRNA BEACH VACATION RENTALS
Ocean view, brand-new units. Weekly or
monthly. Beautifullyfurnished with all ame-
nities. Great summer prices. With laundry
and pool. Pet OK. 305-608-552)


rr r
FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 st available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.

WINTER PARK CONDO
Winter Park condo. 1 bedroom, 1 bath,
Ground floor. Four Seasons Condominium.
$850/month.321-217-5688

MAITAND EFFICIENCY
Efficiency in 1927 Maitiand home. 500
square feet. Walking distance to public
transportation and shopping centers. Park
view from patio. 650 a month + 300 secu-
rity.407-461-5884

OVIEDO OFFICES
New offices available, 1 or 2 (10x12) plus
shared reception, conference, kitchen areas-
Flexible terms. Great marquee location at
2441 SR426. Contact Eddie 407-222-8911

MOBILE HOME -
2/1, on canal to Lake Jesup. Private lot, one
mile to 417.$650. 407-365-1586

APT FOR RENT
Cheerful, spacious, & serene 1BR/18A:
$700/mo. cathedral ceilings, bonus loft,WID,
carport. No kids, no dogs, no smoking. Email
kjanisz@gmail.com for infolpics 407-716-
8649





PAINT AND SUPPLIES
Sherwin Williams new exterior paint & sup-
plies for residential/commercial use; asking
$2,800. Call 407-359-9926




I111 S I


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY .
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt. Af-
fordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

.KITCHEN/BATHR00M SURFACES
Repair and- resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets,
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensedlinsured/
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0062

LAWN CARE
David Cameron Maintenance lawn care..
Tired of spending your free time on lawn
work? Affordable, reliable service. Call 321-
276-2472

PRESSURE WASH
Houses, Driveways/Walks, Pool Decks, Out-
door Fumniture, Exterior Windows, Gutters.
Call for Estimate 352-214-8409(Tim) or
407-592-5524(Erin). Owned and Operated
by Firefighters


Licensed, ins red Ee ren e~savailable. For
an estimate, call 407-953-2454.





~HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural herbal patches, overnight detoxifica-
tion, pain relief: knees, back, foot, gout, sci-
atic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer treat-
ment..Attach to foot ---great night's sleep.
http://www.ebook-detox-patches.com
(407) 970-1483


Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one wth anassigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanion for more
information, 407-365-7585.








S ell Your Home "
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-Is" with NO Repairs!

Call NOW

407-297-8749







0188sified




Advertise in

Te Marketplace



$1 5/week) *





407-628-8500








Attorneys
ARRESTED? ACCUSED ACCIDENT VIC-
TIM? HURT? Talk to a Lawyer Now! State.
"wide....24 Hours Personal Injury Criminal
Defense Attorney Referral Service (800)733-
5342 Protect Your Rights.

Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800
in a day? 30 Local Machines and Candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 802000033. CALL
US: We will not be undersold!

Employment Services -
Post Office Now Hiring! Avg Pay $20/hr or
$57K/yr Incl. Fed. Ben, OT. Offer placed by
Exam Services, not aff w/USPS which does
hiring. Call (866)713-4492.

Health
Do you Experience Anxiety? There are an-
swers in this book. Buy and read Self Analy-
sis by L. Ron Hubbard. Price $15.00. Hub-
bard Dianetics Foundation (813)872-0722 -
E-mail cofstampa@gmail.com.

Help Wianted
Guaranteed Weekly Settlement Check. Join
Wil-Trans Lease Operator Program. Get the
Benefits of Being a Lease Operator without
any of the Risk. (866)906-2982. Must be
23.

Drivers: 13 DRIVERS NEEDED Sign-On Bo.
nus 25-42cpm Earn over $1000 weekly Ex-
cellent Benefits Need CDL-A&8 3 mos recent
OTR (800)635-8669.

Wanna COOL Job??? Start a New Career
as a Nationally Certified HVAC Technician!
3.5wk program. No Experience. Local
job placement assistance. Call it's HOT!
(877)994-9904.

CDL-A DRIVERS: Expanding Fleet offering
Regional/0TR runs. Outstanding Pay Pack-
age. Excellent Benefits. Generous Home-
time. Lease Purchase on '07 Peterbilts.
NATIONAL CARRIERS (888)707-7729 www.
nationalcarriers.com.

Driver- CDL-A. The Grass is Greener at
PTL. Students with COL Welcome excel-
lent training Co. Drivers Earn up to 460:pm
Owner Operators Earn 1.410pm 22yrs of
agie,12mos0 )84 NoFoe 5N h~epastt os
call: (877)774-3533 www ptl-inc.com.

BEEN OUT of luck? Been out of a job? We
can help. 3 weeks CDL training, New class-
es starting weekly. Sponsorships available.
Call (866)577-2369.


Page 14 Thursday, July 10, 2008


COpyrighted Material


~ Syn dicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers








Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, July 10, 2008 Page 15


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,~--~~--- I----


ereenberg
Traurag


The rissues Te Questions The Discussion The People
.....------- ..---- ... ........................................_...- s---it's the place to be~!

"Where Shall We Ga... How Shall We Lead?"
Friday, July 11 I ***************************.
7:6WAM-8:1541r:1 Norking : MLEMBERS ONLY :
8:15 AM: Program .
Com10~plimnn~~nient Coni enalds ****************************
Winter Park< Chamber members are invited to a roundtable
discussion to share ideas and seek input about the Chamber's position
on govemment issues that directly affect local businesses and
economic climate.
DISCUSSION TOPICS INCLUDE:
Cormuer Ra i
Ecoonomnic Development
Amendment 5 (Proposed property tax reduction)
Planning~the Possibilities (City property development plans)
Comprwehensive Plan
Winner Park Health Foundation Community Room
Winter Park Welcome Center / Chamber of Commerce
15r West Lyman Ave, Winter Park
RSVP: 407 644-8281 or kmcdonald~d~winterpark.orq
For informalion about upcoming Chamber events, please visit our website at www ~winterpark.ara.

600B~I~IIY HORNM & #WHIR PARK


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


6 1e gaP Thursday Jul 8


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