Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00001
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: June 26, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

Full Text












.olumne 20, No. 26
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net

FIRST COLONY

*A: .BANK
Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
0-I,?" Member FDIC


Winter Park / Maitland




erver


Thursday, June 26,2008


Locally owned.

Locally produced.

Widely read.

www.WPMObserver.com


$0.35 + tax
Member FDIC
I- -t^ V^
'
COMMERCE NATIONAL
BANK & TRUST
On the corner of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
407-622-8181 www.CNBT-FL.com
i Cm it y i t 'it


Winter Park's Diamond Dawgs
beat Rats in a 9th-inning shocker.
Page A2


Beakman's World unveils a wild
Orlando Science Center exhibit.
Page A8


Winter Park's Third Thursday tra-
dition comes to Hannibal Square.
Page A4



A group of men who made it 50
years as lawyers get their due.
Page A4



Business Briefs .......... A6
City Talks ................A7
Community Bulletin ........A9
Play On! ................ A12
Legals ................ A13
Marketplace ............ A14
Games ................ A15
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School system sues county


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
The latest update On the
"Let Us Vote" Web site is a
happy one, but one that's
also three weeks old in a
fight that's changing nearly


by the day between the vot-
ers and the Orange County
School Board.
The Let Us Vote campaign
to allow Orange County
voters to elect their own
school board chairman had
already won public approv-


al June 4, thanks to more
than 51,000 signatures to
make it official as a referen-
dum item for August.
But after that things got
tougher for the campaign,
which is now embroiled
in a lawsuit with the Or-


ange County School Board,
which is trying to stop the
vote from happening. The
school board also named
Orange County Elections
Supervisor Bill Cowles in
see OCPS on page A2


Lizard or gecko? .


BANK


Banking The Way It Was Meant To Be


Kellie Ashton
Senior Vice President
Carlos A. Morell
Branch Manager
1211 S. Orange Avenue
Suite 101
Winter Park
407-622-1120


Tim Dunham
Senior Vice President
Richard Bryan
Branch Manager
100 E. Packwood
Avenue
Maitland
407-647-3164


Now serving Greater Orlando with 13 locations.


AMY K.D. TOBIK
OBSERVER STAFF
Just what are those crea-
tures crawling on the pa-
tio, scurrying up the side of
the house and darting from
bushes? These small, some-
what prehistoric-looking
reptiles vary from a tex-
tured lime-green exterior
to soft brown with exotic
triangular markings. Some
maintain a shiny black ap-
pearance with stripes and
snake-like tongue, while
others have striking metal-
lic blue bellies.
They are Central Flori-
da's wild collection of local
lizards.


Amy Raub, program co-
ordinator for the Seminole
County Natural Lands Pro-
gram in Geneva, said the
green anole pronounced
uh'no-lee six-lined race-
runner, five-lined skink
and Southeastern five-
lined skink are all native
to the area, along with
the broadhead skink and
Southern fence lizard.
The Cuban brown anole,
Indo-Pacific gecko and
the Mediterranean gecko,
Raub explained, are not
native to Florida and were
most likely brought here
in shipping materials.
see LIZARDS on page A3


Make the call.







Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Paoe 2 Thiursdav,. June 26, 2008


News


The Central Florida Kraze soccer
team split a series last weekend in
North Carolina 1-0-1, adding valu-
able championship points.
They dropped the Cary Railhawks
3-2 with comeback goals from
Carlos "Junior" Araujo and Dennis
Chin. Then they tied the Carolina
Dynamo 3-3, nearly winning but for
a goal in stoppage time
The Kraze now lead the divi-
sion with 28 points to% Carolina's
20. They return for their final home
game at 6 p.m. Wednesday, July 2.
-Isaac Babcock,
The Observer,

.


BUNGALOW I Six months of no buyers forced her to get creative


< continued from the front page
But she went a step beyond stick-
ing a "for sale" sign on her lawn.
She turned to the Internet, pur-
chasing Google AdWords, a service
that allows users to "buy" words relat-
ed to their business. Now when some-
one Google searches "Winter Park for
sale by owner," her ad appears in the
right margin of the results called an
"impression."
AdWords charges by how many
people click on the ad, not the amount
of impressions. In two weeks, Aballo's
words had netted more than 5,000
impressions, but just 12 people had
clicked through to her Web site. She
had been charged $15.
There are hundreds of thousands of
small businesses and individuals who
use this medium, Google AdWords
spokeswoman Deanna Yick wrote in
an e-mail, but Google does not keep
exact statistics.
"The great thing about Google Ad-
Words is that it is cost-efficient and
highly targeted so that anyone and
everyone can take advantage of it -
from single individuals, to small busi-


nesses to Fortune 1000s," Yick wrote.
In order to buy AdWords, a users
has to own a Web site. Aballo pur-
chased a $10-a-year domain name:
WinterParkBungalow.com. She also
paid for a hosting service and Web
site creation tools. In total, the site
cost her about $100.
This is one of a slew of creative
tactics homeowners have been using
to sell their homes in a sour market.
Some are "swapping" homes with
other sellers, while some are holding
auctions and essay contests.
Ocala author Clementina Marie
Giovannetti attempted to get rid of
her $1.25 million mansion with an
essay contest. A $200 entry fee was
required with each essay, and 6,250
people would have had to enter for
Giovannetti to reap her asking price.
But the public did not respond, and
the contest was canceled. The man-
sion is now listed with a Realtor.
About eight of 10 homebuyers and
sellers used a Realtor in 2007, accord-
ing to the National Association of Re-
altors.
Aballo said she plans to stick it out
alone and hopes her creative method


i T I ,ISAAC BABCOCK- THE. :..-.
With a little help from Google, Winter Park home
owner Lisa Aballo is trying to sell her house with its own
custom Web site, WinterParkBungalow.com.

will pay off before she gets married
Oct. 25. "I just need to find somebody
who will love it as much as I do," she
said.


OCPS I School Board says it should pick its chairman; residents disagree


< continued from the front page
the suit.
That's "a slap in the face,"
Let Us Vote campaign chair-
man Roger Chapin said, add-
ing that the School Board is
ignoring the will of the vot-
ers by attempting to block a
vote in August.
Florida Attorney General
Bill McCollum agreed with
Chapin, filing a formal brief


with the Orange County
School Board, telling them
they don't have the author-
ity to stop the vote.
Orange County's NAACP
branch director Randolph
BracyJr. questioned that as-
sertion, saying also that an
elected chairman would po-
liticize the School Board.
But the lawsuit between
the School Board and the
Let Us Vote campaign may


do enough to stop the vote
altogether, if the School
Board's lawyers can control
the clock.
Tuesday was the dead-
line for the board to give its
state-mandated OK to allow
voters to choose whether
they would elect the School
Board chairman in a special
vote in August. That's be-
cause Tuesday was the last
day the School Board would


meet before a cutoff date for
such a vote.
If they didn't give the OK
Tuesday, the vote wouldn't
be possible in August, and
no race for School Board
chairman would take place
during the regular election
season culminating in No-
vember.
So the School Board,
which voters were trying to
fight by giving themselves


the right to vote for their
own chairman, would have
to allow it before the citi-
zens could vote on the issue
themselves.
If the School Board said
no, the voters wouldn't have
a shot at electing their own
new chairman a position
up for selection this year -
until 2010.


Bats and footwork save Dawgs


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

It was the moment of cin-
ematic legend. Bottom of
the ninth inning, two outs,
the winning run standing
on third base. And then
Winter Park's Steve Sabins
swung his bat and blasted a
ball into the night under the
Diamond Dawgs' stadium
lights.
The Dawgs hadn't scored
a single run in the ninth in-
ning all season. But Satur-
day, they scored three.
A walk-off single by Sa-
bins put the finishing touch-
es on a two-inning vignette
Saturday night after the
Dawgs seemingly weren't
there for the first seven.
In the meantime, the
Sanford River Rats, desper-
ate for their third win in '08
after losing four of five one-
run games to start the sea-
son, had built a 3-0 lead.
But the Dawgs came
scrambling back in the final
two innings, sending fans
on their feet after seven in-
nings of sleep.
That excitement peaked
when in the ninth inning, af-
ter being called on to pinch
run at second base and be-
ing advanced to third, Colby


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Winter Park's Diamond Dawgs were cruising for a loss through the entire game Saturday night but a rally changed it all.


Gratton stole home plate
when ball four bounced in
front of Sanford catcher
Sam Kapacinskas and the
Rats were caught off guard.
Gratton was already at full
sprint by the time Kapacins-


kas raced to the ball to try to
toss it home, and it proved
too late to stop the wily run-
ner, who tied the game for
the Dawgs.
With Sabins' master
stroke, it was all over, end-


ing the Dawgs' third week
of a roller-coaster season on
a high note.
The Dawgs return home
at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June
25 against Clermont after
press time before going on a


two-game road trip to Lees-
burg and Belleview Thurs-
day and Friday. They'll be
back at home again to start
a three-game home-stand
at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 28
against Belleview.








Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, June 26, 2008 Page 3


LIZARDS I Competition for bugs pits natives against immigrants


< continued from the front page

Pat Burkett, president of
the Friends of the Environ-
mental Studies Center in
eastern Longwood, said the
non-native lizards are ag-
gressive and are killing the
green anoles. "Unfortunate-
ly, the invasives will take the
best display perches, put-
ting a hitch in the courtship
of the green anoles. In some
places, the green anoles are


entirely absent," Burkett
said.
While a bit creepy to
some, especially when
they're unexpected, these
insectivores have played an
important role for decades
with their large appetite for
insects and bugs.
"The benefits of all of
these lizards are that they
will help keep down the
pest population," Raub said.
"The negatives about the


non-native lizards are that
they could out-compete
our native lizards for food
and habitat and could have
a negative effect on. their
population."
One of the most unusual
characteristics of a lizard
is its survival mechanism.
Because of a single natural
weak point in the vertebrae,
a lizard's tail can break off
easily and will continue to
wiggle on the ground after


separation. It is believed the
movement of the detached
tail distracts predators.
Luckily, for the lizard, a new
tail will grow back within
several weeks as the result
of regeneration.
Burkett said people
sometimes mistaken the
green anoles for chame-
leons because they have the
ability to change from green
to brown to blend in with
the background.


"They are also not
geckos," Burkett likes to re-
mind people. "Geckos have
specialized toes that hang
on to things with molecular
forces, it has been discov-
ered. Our anoles have plain
toes, some with toenails."
Summer is an ideal time
to take a closer look around
the backyard and have some
fun identifying what may be
lurking in the crevices or in
the brush...


live GREEN ANOLE
.Anolis carolinensis
Description: The green anole is the only anole native to the United States. They can grow to 8 inches in length and have longer
S. snouts than the brown anole intruders. They can change color rapidly from green to brown.
The anole has different feet than most lizards. Each toe has adhesive pads called lamellae on its central portion, which allow
the anole to cling to vertical surfaces.
Food: Anoles eat only live prey such as insects and bugs, sometimes stalking and grabbing prey. They also may eat brown anole
.P*F '' hatchlings.
00p 0 Habitat The green anole prefers to live in bushes, in rock walls, patio plants, and trees below 15 feet.
S' Breeding: Female green anoles can lay single eggs every two weeks and breed from late March to early October. These small
and leathery eggs are buried in the soil.


SOUTHEASTERN FIVE-LINED SKINK
Eumeces inexpectatus
Description: This shiny creature is one of several species of skink in Florida, including the broadhead skink. It generally has short legs compared to other
lizards and grows to a maximum length of 8.5 inches. It is very fast and can flick its tongue similar to a snake. The younger sIknks are dark. bluish-black
with bright blue tails while adults are more brown in color. The males lose most of their lines with age.
Food: The skink prefers insects, spiders, snails and earthworms.
Habitat This ground dweller can be found in dry to damp woods, dead leaves, rotten logs, and
boardwalks of nature trails. 2 e-F lFRITZ GEF
Breeding: The skink lays nine to 12 eggs from May to July in rotten logs, stumps, or loose damp soil. ---G- R


? ~ SIX-LINED RACERUNNER
-41111. Cnemidophorus sexlineatus
Description: This very fast lizard can grow to a maximum length of 10.5 inches It is identiliable by three light-colored lines along each side
-- of its dark back, and a tail that is twice the length of its body. Male racerunners rha'e blue ,-olronrg .ind-idrnt a-,h ithe iead rd ithrat
Food: The i.h-lined racerunner prefers insects, spiders and snails.
Habitat: it is always found in natural dry habitats at around level and prefers sandy or rocky soil, short grass and dusty roadsides.
Breeding: Trie racerunrer lays betrveen one and si. eggs tiom June through August under rocks; or logs or in holes in sandy soil


SOUTHERN FENCE LIZARD
Seloporu. unduldtuS undulatuS
Description: The Soulhern lence I;l.ird. .l'io ILnwn a r |Ie FencP Sw' iri ,:in grow it ppro.. itel'y even ,-rin :". in linghl Ir: rough body is gray
and blact. witn zigzag pdatern.. aongq its b1iji:.
Adult rnale. mlay be very, dark iray in (Ilor jand ia ii r ienti -i be y tirir palchne: Lu mr -tjalil blu: .alng Ihe underides ,f ineir beiIir s ,and throals
Triyv li-.e 0o .rowv on tileir bn rili ,oi-oi. by doing: wh1v t I. .1e pujn-up to intr3ct ithe anenlion of te irnale or tro defend ineir territory
Food: Tre Sounlern iene lii rd ieP'- mainly in.ect. but l a ,is. ,ea oeiri:r invertebr[ e;
Habitat: Tnese izard., preie i o live in pine tiat-w-lood rninamimo: iand Lorngiet Pine ur Tur.ey 0c3 are .
Breeding: The Souhern Fernce Lizard :can iay about eight to nine egg, and will eviirier bury them in i0oo;e Sil or place them in a Cavity in a log
or under a rock


Non-native
inhabitants


BROWN ANOLE
S Anolis sagrei
Description: The brown anole, also called the Bahaman anole is native to Cuba and the Bahamas. It is said to have arrived In South
Florida and Mexico between 50 and 60 years ago. They are typically between 5 and 8 inches long, with the females a bit smaller One of
its most obvious features is its brightly-colored dewlap, or throat tan Male anoles display their dewlap when defending their territory and
to attract Ihe attention of female anoles, accompanied by a _eries of head bobs and what look like pushi-ups While the green anole prefers
to spend time on foliage, the brown anole prefers the ground
-. Food: Anoles eat only live prey such as insects and bugs. sometimes stalking and grabbing prey as big as they are They may also eat the green
anole and lizard eggs, along with their molted skin.
Habitat: While the green anule prefers to live in loliage, the brown anole is more of a ground-dweller
Breeding: The brown anoles breed in late spring to early summer. The eggs are laid under decaying vegetation on the ground.


Iis


INDO-PACIFIC GECKO
Hemidactylus garnoti
Description: This brown or gray gecko native to Southeast Asia with pale spots grows to
a maximum length of 5 inches. Its unusual toe pads and bulging eyes with vertical pupils
distinguish it from anoles. It's also capable of vocalizing by making a barking noise to protect
territory or ward off a predator.
Food: This gecko eats insects, spiders and other invertebrates.
Habitat: It is primarily nocturnal but said to be most active around dusk when rocks and walls
are still warm from the heat of day. They can frequently be found feeding near insect-attracting
lights.
Breeding: The Indo-Pacific gecko is unisexual. All individuals are self-fertilizing females, which
allows for large populations.


MEDITERRANEAN GECKO
Hemidactylus turcicus
Description: The Mediterranean gecko is most common in Southern Europe and Northern
Africa. It shares similar traits with the Indo-Pacific gecko and is most easily distinguished by its
bumpy or warty skin. Its unusual toe pads and bulging eyes with vertical pupils also distinguish
it from anoles. It's capable of vocalizing by making a barking noise to protect territory or ward
off a predator.
Food: This gecko eats insects, spiders and other invertebrates.
Habitat: The Mediterranean gecko is almost completely nocturnal and hides during the day in
cracks, crevices, and under tree bark.
Breeding: Female Mediterranean geckos lay several clutches of two eggs throughout the
summer. Instances of communal nesting have been reported, with several females laying their
eggs together under bark, in crevices, or in moist soil.
PAGE DESIGN BY LACY RUSHING -THE OBSERVER


Na


iT _:. .
LER-
RIMM


Thursday, June 26, 2008 Page 3


Winter Park / Maitland Observer







PIn 4lj UIO I V j.0Wnrak-Un Os


Longtime lI

CAROLE ARTHURS members of The Florida Bar
for the entire period, were
also recognized at the lun-
Fifteen attorneys from cheon.
the 9th Judicial Circuit were Russell Troutman, Winter
among 178 attorneys hon- Park, an honoree and for-
ored by The Florida Bar on mer Florida Bar president,
June 20, for 50 years of dedi- was the featured speaker.
cation to the practice of law. The attorneys recog-
Their service to the profes- nized from this area include
sion was acknowledged Lee Jay Colling from Mait-
during a luncheon at The land and Norman F. Burke,
Florida Bar's Annual Con- Kenneth F. Murrah, Rus-
vention. sell Troutman and Victor
To be recognized, at- E. Woodman from Winter
torneys must be members Park.
in good standing of The "I've seen some tremen-
Florida Bar and attain their dous changes over the.past
50th anniversary of ad- 50 years, both in private
mittance to the practice practice and in the Florida
of law in Florida in 2008. Bar," said Murrah, who is
Senior counselors, who've the founding partner of
practiced for 50 years or the Winter Park law firm of
more but have not been Murrah, Doyle and Wiggle,


iwyers hailed by Bar


PA. "For example, there
were five women admitted
to the bar in 1958 out of ap-
proximately 150 sworn in,
whereas today more than 50
percent in the law schools
in America are women."
"Another change within
the last 50 years is the pub-
lic defender's program in
which the state of Florida
now makes counsel avail-
able for citizens who have
been charged with a crime."
Murrah said a third
change is the "specializa-
tion of the profession, in
comparison with that of the
general practice of law 50
years ago." For more than
50 years, Murrah has con-
centrated his practice in the
areas of estate planning and
administration of estates


I 'ih
Murrah


and trusts.
"To be an
attorney in
Winter Park is
a wonderful
profession,"
Murrah said.
"Yol serve
clients and
solve matters


in their lives, which not
only affects them, but also
the other members of their
families."
Murrah graduated from
Winter Park High School in
1951 and was class valedic-
torian. While a student, he
was involved in many school
activities and organizations.
Today Murrah is also an ac-
complished public speaker
and travels around Central
Florida giving a talk on the


history of Winter Park. He
served as a Winter Park City
Commissioner in 2000.
Orlando attorneys
Richard Earl Batterson,
J. Charles Gray, John Foy
Lowndes, William George
Mateer, B.C. Pyle, James M.
Russ and William Floyd Si-
monet were also honored
Among those honored were
a former Florida Bar presi-
dent, a former Florida Su-
preme Court justice and for-
mer judges as well as former
corporate and university
general counsels, appellate
attorneys, civil trial attor-
neys and a former assistant
U.S. attorney.
The Florida Bar's Young
Lawyers Division sponsored
the luncheon.


Hannibal Square spectacle


CAROLE ARTHURS
CL'.SERVE STAFF

What an evening in Han-
nibal Square! The shops,
boutiques, and restaurants
were all open to offer re-
freshments, entertainment
and late night shopping
hours during Hannibal
Square Stroll, which is held
on the third Thursday of ev-
ery month.
Between the hours of 6
to 9 p.m., shoppers were
tempted by special dis-
counts, offers and gifts with
purchases, and each store
served refreshments. In ad-
dition to the food, bever-
age and shopping bargains,
folks, enjoyed the sounds of
"Caroline Drive" perform-
ing live acoustic guitar and
saxophone music.
There were lots of stores
and restaurants to visit, in-
cluding Bella, The Baraka
Collection, Coralia Leets
Boutique, DeVanes, Eyes
and Optics, Florida Frame
House, Ginger, Gray Fifth
Avenue, 'Hannibal's, Inner-


blue, Lavish Boutique, Lord
R. Colton, Michael Duval In-
teriors, Sultre, Tugboat and
the Bird, Winter Park Pho-
tography, and Winter Park
Bath and Hardware.
Participating restaurants
included Chez Vincent, Dex-
ter's, Hannibal's Lounge,
Hot Olives, and Kata Thai
Sushi.
The shops and boutiques
in Hannibal Square have ev-
erything to offer the discrim-
inate shopper. In addition to
quality women's boutiques,
two men's stores, Gray Fifth
Avenue and Lord R. Colton,
have recently opened their
doors. Moms can shop for
children's clothing and gifts
at Tugboat and the Bird,
and if you need to spruce up
your home interiors stores,
there's The Baraka Collec-
tion, DeVanes, or Michael
Duval Interiors.
For the most part, the
shops and restaurants in
Hannibal Square are inde-
pendently owned. "There
is not one chain store in
the bunch and many of the


stores are owned and oper-
ated by fellow Winter Park
residents," said Dr. Lisa Gib-
bons, owners of Eyes and
Optics, and spokeswoman
for The Hannibal Square
Merchants Association.
"This is a opportunity for
people to learn more about
Hannibal Square its shops
and restaurants and also
about the Heritage Center,"
said Peter Schreyer, execu-
tive director of
Crealde School of Art
and founder of the Heritage
Center at 642 W. New Eng-
land Ave. Staffed by com-
munity docents, the center
hosts art classes for children,
adults and seniors, traveling
exhibitions, family history
research and cultural pro-
grams with a focus on local
history, cultural preserva-
tion, and southern folklore.
"The shops and restau-
rants of Hannibal Square
are here to serve the local
community ... they offer
convenience, excellent cus-
tomer service, and a per-
sonal touch," said Baxter


Matthews, owner of Florida
Frame House in Hannibal
Square, and chairman of the
Hannibal Square Merchants and Pennsylvania avenues
Association. in Winter Park, just east of
Hannibal Square is lo- Park Avenue. Upcoming
cated on New England Av- Hannibal Square Strolls are
enue between New York on July 17 and Aug. 21.


O b s Winter Park / Maitland

server


Published Thursday, June 26, 2008


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


Volume 20, Issue Number 26


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-628-8500, ext. 302
kyle@observernewspapers.com

EDITOR
Alex Babcock
407-628-8500, ext. 304
alexb@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Lacy Rushin
407-628-8500, ext. 306
lacyr@observernewspapers.com


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-628-8500, ext. 311
jennya@observernewspapers.com
Carole Arthurs
407-628-8500, ext. 308
carole@observernewspapers.com
Isaac Babcock
407-902-8563
isaacb@observernewspapers.com


LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-628-8500, ext. 309
legal@observernewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us
Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com
Roger Franklin Williams
rfwradio@yahoo.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com
Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observernewspapers.com
ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-628-8500, ext. 303
tcraft@observernewspapers.com
BUSINESS MANAGER
Shelly Langston
407-628-8500, ext. 303


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 609 Executive Drive
Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Winter Park, FL 32789 USPS 00-6186
Maitland Area/ Winter Park/
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com ISSN 1064-3613
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer@ 2008
, --- "


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Pacie 4 Thursdav, June 26, 2008







Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, June 26, 2008 Page 5


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Thursday, June 26, 2008 Page 5


Winter Park / Maitland Observer







Page 6 Thursday, June 26, 2008


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IgI


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MOVING :
m[] u.AV.V.V'''.""


BACK

HOME

SALE!


Everything must go by July 1511
from current location
New Arrivals Excluded


Monday Saturday 10am 7pm
Sunday 11am 5pm


U
'UA

I.
U


216 N. Park Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
407.539.2528
www.jacobsons.com


Business


SchenkelShultz has designed
more than 37 million square feet
of K-12 education projects nation-
ally, including more than 28 million
square feet of K-12 projects in 28
Florida school districts. Further evi-
dencing its leadership, the firm de-
signs all K-12 schools in accordance
with green design principles at no
additional cost to school boards.
As a result, schools designed by
SchenkelShultz are achieving the
benefits of sustainable design, in-
cluding reduced operating costs
and improved environmental and
educational quality. SchenkelShultz
has also prominently served the
Greater Orlando Aviation Authority
as a general consultant since Janu-
ary 2004.
The Central Florida office of SIKON
Construction Corporation an-
nounced that senior executive
vice president Dale E. Scott, CDP,
served as moderator at the Interna-
tional Council of Shopping Centers,
which drew more than 50,000 at-
tendees at the Las Vegas Conven-
tion. Titled "The ICSC Experience,"
Scott also was the instructor for an
exam preparation class regarding
the prestigious Certified Develop-
ment, Design and Construction Pro-
fessional designation originated by
ICSC.
SIKON's Central Florida office is
located at 500 N. Maitland Ave., in
Maitland. Scott, who has more than
40 years of experience in the con-
struction and real estate industries,
is active in many industry organiza-
tions. In 2004, Scott was inducted
into the Retail Construction Hall of
Fame.
C.T. Hsu + Associates announced
that project manager Miguel Bo-
tello and intern architect Jennifer
Stencel have earned accreditation
by the U.S. Green Building Council's
Leadership in Energy and Environ-
mental Design program. "LEED Ac-
credited Professionals have dem-


onstrated a thorough understanding
of green building practices and prin-
ciples and the LEED Rating System,"
according to the U.S. Green Building
Council. More than 43,000 people
have earned the credential since the
accreditation program was launched
in 2001. Botello is a registered archi-
tect with six years experience in proj-
ect management. He earned his mas-
ter's of architecture and bachelor's of
environmental design degrees from
Texas A&M University. Stencel has
four years experience in all aspects of
project.design production and man-
agement. She received her master's
of architecture degree from the Uni-
versity of Florida.
NAI Realvest recently negotiated a
five-year lease agreement for 2,135
square feet of office space at 1300
Minnesota Ave. in Winter Park. Rich-
ard Leuner, director of corporate ser-
vices at NAI Realvest, negotiated the
lease*representing the tenant, Jack-
sonville-based Genesis Health Devel-
opment, Inc., d/b/a Brooks Develop-
ment. The landlord is Tiger Claw Inc.
based in Winter Park. This is a second
outpatient physical therapy clinic for
Brooks Health in Greater Orlando.
Brooks, a non-profit health system, is
anchored by a 143-bed acute physical
rehab hospital in Jacksonville, with
an extensive network of 23 outpatient
facilities located between Southern
Georgia and Central Florida.
Gary Miller, MD, FAAHPM, senior
medical director for VITAS Innova-
tive Hospice Care of Central Florida,
has been named a Fellow by the
American Academy of Hospice and
Palliative Medicine. This distinction
places Dr. Miller among an elite group
of physicians who have demonstrated
significant commitment to scholar-
ship in the field of hospice and pal-
liative medicine. Dr. Miller joined VI-
TAS in 1998 as a team physician in
Central Florida. He has been medical
director, then senior medical director
since 1999. Prior to joining VITAS in


1998 as a team physician, Dr. Miller
headed a family medical practice in
Orlando and served as medical direc-
tor for several geriatric and long-term
care facilities. He began his career as
major in the U.S. Air Force, serving
as chief of medicine in military hos-
pitals in Turkey and Florida. A diplo-
mat and fellow of the American Board
of Family Practice, Dr. Miller also is
board-certified in geriatric medicine.
Dr. Miller earned an undergraduate
degree from the University of Roches-
ter and a medical degree from Albany
Medical College of Union University,
both in New York.
Randy I. Anderson, Ph.D., has been
named the inaugural Howard Phil-
lips Eminent Scholar Chair in Real
Estate at the University of Central
Florida. He will direct the research
and education institute in the Dr. P.
Phillips School of Real Estate, which
is located in the College of Business
Administration at UCF. Anderson has
been active in the real estate business
since 1991 as a researcher, owner, in-
vestor and strategist. He is the owner
of 1776 Financial Services, a boutique
investment-banking firm in Winter
Park. Prior to forming 1776 Financial
Services, he served as president of
CNL Real Estate Advisors.
Before joining CNL,- he served as
the Ryder Eminent Scholar chair and
professor of Real Estate/Finance at
Florida International University. An-
derson has published more than 50
articles, many in premier real estate
journals. He also serves as a co-editor
of the "Journal of Real Estate Portfo-
lio Management" and the "Journal of
Real Estate Literature" and has been
featured as a distinguished lecturer at
Harvard University and Johns Hopkins
University.
Recently, the American Real Es-
tate Society awarded him with the
Kinnard Young Scholar Award, which
recognizes an outstanding young real
estate scholar younger than 40. An-
derson holds a Ph.D. in finance from
the University of Alabama.


Young Dawgs win Omaha title
The Winter Park Diamond Dawgs
S'. 14-and-younger team won the
'. Road to Omaha USSSA baseball
-S tournament last week, beating
.-- teams from Ohio, Nebraska and
Arizona to finish with a 4-0 record.
S From left to right are, in front:
Cody Conway, Marc Rudolph, Kyle
."-"" ;- Hamner, James Baker, Matt Rob-
_.. inson.
S. Back Row: Head Coach Vic Incenelli,
Tyler Homer, Coach Dwayne Ham-
S' ner, Carter Burns, Bob Qualters,
S", Austin Smith, Zach Burger, Luis
S.Nunez, Austin Tuttle and Coach
Mike Conway.
PHOTO COURTESY OF
MIKE GALAURA


University Club elects officers.


.L


"-
UN
K
m.


L J-- i T M
PHOTO BY CAROLE ARTHURS THE OBSERVER
The University Club of Winter Park recently installed its officers and directors for the 2008-2009 year. Pictured (front row,
left to right) are: "B.J." Cook, "Max" Reed, Thaddeus Seymour, Frank Barber (president), Carleta Wilson, Sharon Knapp and
Peter Hand. In the back row (left to right) are: Joseph Rizzo, Gordon Shepardson, Clayton Swain, Kenneth Rugh, Don Cain and
Robert Wilkinson. Not pictured: Robert Reed, who was absent due to illness.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer








W VInter Pl ICrkN/ IMaOItL-1dIObserver Thursday, June26,- 008-ageI


The Fourth of July has al-
ways been a joyous time for
our family. The colors and
presentation of displays
throughout Central Florida
are some of the best in the
country. My thanks to Bart
Wright for his thoughts on
keeping our families safe
during the Fourth.
-MayorDougKinson

Summer has arrived and
that means cookouts, fam-
ily fun and, of course, cel-


ebrating the Fourth of July.
This holiday can be full of
great times and new memo-
ries, but it can also become
tragic for some who choose
to use consumer fireworks.
The National Fire Protec-
tion Association confirms
that the majority of firework
injuries involve victims
younger than 15. Caution
and common sense work
hand in hand to protect
children, prevent injury and
safeguard property while


-


Maitland City Talk
by DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


Fireworks safety

and the law


celebrating the holidays.
Many of.us tend to think
of consumer fireworks "as
harmless entertainment
that adds enjoyment to our
backyard events, but each
year the injuries and prop-
erty damage can, and does,
change lives forever.
In 2004, fireworks start-
ed an estimated 1,600 struc-
ture fires and 600 vehicle
fires that were reported to
local fire departments.
These fires resulted in 20
civilian injuries and $21 mil-
lion in direct property dam-
age. There were no reported
civilian deaths.
In 2005, 10,800 people
were treated at hospital
emergency rooms for fire-
work-related injuries.
More than half (54 per-
cent) of 2005 firework inju-
ries were burns. Contusions
and lacerations were sec-
ond (29 percent), and were
twice as common as burns
when the injury was to any
part of the head or face, in-


cluding the eye. Hands or
fingers were injured in 30
percent of the incidents.
In 24 percent of the cases,
the eye was involved; other
parts of the face or head ac-
counted for 20 percent of
the injuries.
In the state of Florida, if
a device leaves the ground,
makes a loud noise or con-
tains more than 100 grams
of flammable compound, it
is illegal. There is a popular
misconception that any-
one willing to sign an "ag-
ricultural exception" can
legally purchase fireworks
that exceed the limitations
defined by state law for the
average consumer. There is
also the misconception that
if the roadside vendor sells
it, it must be legal. These as-
sumptions are both false.
Unfortunately, with the
temporary and often tran-
sient nature of fireworks
sales, it is difficult to police
those who are selling illegal
devices. The agricultural ex-


City Commission
meeting highlights
The Winter Park City Com-
mission met on June 23.
Below are a few highlights
from that meeting:
A request was approved
to continue raising electric
utility rates whenever Prog-
ress Energy Florida does the
same. The city had made a
three-year contract to do so,
and extended this contract
by a year on Monday.
A request was approved
to withdraw the Water Sup-
ply Plan comprehensive
plan amendment with the
understanding that it will
be incorporated into the
new 2008 Comprehensive
Plan was approved.
The request to adopt the
Comprehensive Plan Pub-
lic Participation Plan was
pulled from this agenda and
is expected to be heard on
Monday, July 14.
The request to approve
Central Park West Meadow
Rules and Standards for Use
was tabled for the Parks and
Recreation Commission to
review and revisit the pa-
rameters, taking the Com-
mission's and public's input
into consideration.
The City Commission ap-
proved conducting a resi-
dent survey for this fiscal
year, however, the method
of surveying will be deter-
mined at the Monday, July
14 City Commission meet-
ing.
The resolution regarding
the Central Florida Com-
muter Rail project was ap-
proved with modifications.
The resolution relating
to control of motorized wa-
tercraft and swimming on
Lake Bell was approved and
will go to the Orange Coun-
ty Commission for consid-


eration.
A full copy of the June 23
City Commission minutes
will be available on the city's
official Web site at www.cit-
yofwinterpark.org the week
of July 14, pending approval
by the City Commission.
2007 Fire Marshal of the
Year Award
On April 15, the gover-
nor and his cabinet award-
ed Capt. Randall A. Mells
the 2007 Fire Marshal of
the Year Award. This rec-
ognition is bestowed upon
a fire marshal who has
demonstrated outstanding
leadership abilities, innova-
tion, professional develop-
ment, integrity and service
to the citizens of Florida.
More than 600 fire mar-
shals statewide are eligible
for the Fire Marshal of the
Year Award, but according
to the Florida Fire Marshals
and Inspectors' Association,
Capt. Mells' diligence and
commitment to the protec-
tion of citizens earned him
the title.
Mells began his career
with Orange County Fire-
Rescue in Orlando and has
been employed with Win-
ter Park for 15 years, work-
ing his way up through the
ranks from firefighter-EMT
to fire inspector to his cur-
rent position of captain-fire
marshal. In his role as fire
marshal, Mells has directed
the activities of the office of
the fire marshal in a com-
_munity with opportunities
for development, redevel-
opment and annexations.
His leadership has resulted
in continued positive rela-
tionships with city, county
and state representatives.
In addition to his duties
as captain, Mells also leads
the Regional Juvenile Fire
Setter Program that specifi-


cally works with youth who
have been involved with
the curious and malicious
act of fire setting. He is also
affiliated with the Florida
Fire Chiefs Association, Fire
Marshal Association, Associ-
ation of Public Information
Officers, Association of Life
Safety Educators, Juvenile
Fire Setters Network for the
Ninth Judicial District, Cen-
tral Florida Drowning Pre-
vention Task Force, Orange
County Safe Kids Coalition,
and the National Informa-
tion Office Association.

Upcoming Planning
and Zoning meeting
A public hearing will be held
by the Planning and Zoning
Commission at 7 p.m. Tues-
day, July 1 and by the City
Commission at 3:30 p.m.
Monday, July 28 in the City
Hall Commission Cham-
bers at 401 Park Ave. South.
The following topics will be
heard:
Request of Camden
WP, LLC, to build a two-
story, 15,035-square- foot,
30-room, bed and break-
fast inn at 930, 950 and 960
Minnesota Ave.
Request of Trilogy Park,
Inc., to change the existing
zoning of low density resi-
dential (R-2) district to gen-
eral commercial (C-3) dis-
trict on the property at 421
West Morse Blvd.

Olde Fashioned Fourth
of July Celebration
Winter Park and Embarq
present the Olde Fashioned
Fourth of July Celebration
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Fri-
day, July 4 in Central Park.
Gather your family and
friends and wear your red,
white and blue to enjoy a
Winter Park tradition. Fes-
tivities will include live pa-
triotic music, horse-drawn
wagon rides, clowns, hot
dogs, watermelon and much
more. Children's activities
will include face painting,
games and prizes, and the
annual children's bicycle
parade.
Families and friends are


also invited to attend the
Independence Day Open
House at the Charles Hos-
mer Morse Museum of
American Art. The museum,
which houses the world's
most comprehensive col-
lection of work by American
artist Louis Comfort Tiffany,
will provide free admission
to its galleries from 9:30
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Please note that City Hall
will be closed on Friday, July
4, in observance of the holi-
day and will re-open at 8
a.m. on Monday, July 7.

Hannibal Square
home for sale
Of the four homes that
make up the new West Comn-
stock Development, only
one home is left for inter-
ested first-time homebuyers
through the Winter Park's
Hannibal Square Commu-
nity Land Trust.
The HSCLT is an initia-
tive to establish sustainable
affordable housing for Win-
ter Park's historic African-
American community, while
preserving the culture and
heritage of the neighbor-
hood. Although the median
home price in Winter Park
is approximately $450,000,
the West Comstock De-
velopment homes will be
priced at considerably low-
er affordable price because
the HSCLT holds the land
in a 99-year ground lease,
enabling area residents to
purchase quality homes at


much more affordable rates
than if they were also pur-
chasing land.
For about $145,000, po-
tential buyers can call a
1,067-square-foot, three-
bedroom, two-bath, energy-
efficient house their home.
For information regard-
ing West Comstock home-
ownership opportunities, or
general information regard-
ing the HSCLT, please call
407-643-9111 or visit www.
hannibalsquareclt.org.

Open positions in the
city of Winter Park
Wastewater Plant Operator
'B' or C' (Salary range $16.53
- $24.70/hour)
Water Plant Operator 'B'
or 'C' (Salary range $16.53 -
$24.70/hour)
SCADA Technician (Salary
range $22.15 $31.53/hour)
Construction Service Work-
er I (Salary range $11.97 -
$18.43/hour)
Code Analyst/Inspec-
tor (Salary range $20.48 -
$31.54/hour)
Equipment Operator I (Sal-
ary range $12.57 $19.35/
hour)
A complete job description
is available for review in the
Human Resources Division
at City Hall. Interested ap-
plicants can apply in person
or online at www.cityofwin-
terpark.org by clicking on
Employment.

Visit us at
cityofwinterpark.org


wg~t ta iz


FM 89.90 tAO


emption has its place but it
does not authorize the sell-
ing of firecrackers, bottle-
rockets, roman candles or
large fountain devices to
just anyone.
Fire department profes-
sionals across this country
have had the opportunity
to see the good and the bad
side of fireworks. We all love
to see the beautiful displays,
but the best way to prevent
firework injuries is to at-
tend a professional show.
Commercial displays are
highly regulated events that
are designed around safety
for those deploying the fire-
works and for spectators.
We encourage you to
leave the pyrotechnics to
the professionals and have
a safe and enjoyable Fourth
of July. If you have further
questions regarding fire-
works, please contact me at
407-539-0774.
-Bart Wright,
deputy fire chief,
Maitland Fire Department


Thursday, June 26, 2008 Page 7


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


*! .





CAROLE ARTHURS
C'I- i Li STAFF

"Guys rule" was the ex-
pression heard most often
during the Winter Park
Playhouse's new show "It's
a Guy Thing! A Cabaret" -
and the three male stars re-
ally did rule.
Patrick Brandt, Todd Al-
len Long and Mark Richard
Taylor all turned in spectac-
ular performances as they
sang, frolicked, joked and
read the "guy's rules." This
show, with musical direc-
tion/piano by Chris Leavy,
was spectacular from the
opening song to the finale.
The three guys' opening


medley "Standing on the
Corner" and "We Ain't Got
Dames" set the pace for
the entire show.
Taylor, as always, showed
off his amazing talent in
"I Wanna Talk About Me."
He broke up with laughter
in the middle of the song
when he missed some of
the fast-paced lyrics, but
quickly recovered and
finished with his usual
aplomb. Also Taylor's rendi-
tion of Jimmy Buffet tunes,
with Bill Schwartz on gui-
tar, was a great change of
pace for the show.
Each rule brought
chuckles and guffaws from
the audience, such as "Cry-


ing is blackmail," and "Co-
lumbus didn't need direc-
tions and neither do we,"
as well as groans from the
ladies in the audience at
the rule "You have enough
clothes." The rule "If we
itch, we scratch it it's a
man thing," brought lots of
chuckles from the men in
the audience.
A truly shining moment
in the show was Brandt's
rendition of "This is the
Moment." You could almost
here a pin drop during the
song, and when the last
note was sung, the audi-
ence showed their appre-
ciation with thundering
applause, many standing as


they voiced their apprecia-
tion.
Brandt, who often
played the clown in the vi-
gnettes, really shone in this
song, which he dedicated
to the Winter Park Play-
house staff. What a talent!
However, Brandt's comedic
talent was not lost on the
audience either. Overheard
was one woman who said,
"I can't take my eyes off of
Patrick. I love his comic ex-
pressions."
Long, as always, was
talented and in splendid
voice.
All three talented per-
formers are regulars at the
Winter Park Playhouse, and


all three perform on a regu-
lar basis at Disney, as well
as in many musical theatre
productions.
Coming up next at the
Winter Park Playhouse is a
chance for the gals to shine
during "Divine Divas A
Cabaret," as they pay trib-
ute to three of the great
divas of all time Billie
Holiday, Barbara Streisand
and Bette Midler.
"Divas" is coming to
the Playhouse theatre Aug.
15-17. Don't miss this one!
For reservations, directions
or more information, call
the Winter Park Playhouse
at 407-645-0145.


Science is interactive at OSC


CAROLE ARTHURS
OC 'R.,'ER STAFF

Hundreds of children converged
onto the four floors of the Orlando
Science Center on a recent Friday.
There were grade-school children,
kids in strollers, kids hanging onto
their grandparents' hands, and
whole classes of kids in match-
ing shirts. There were squeals of
joy, laughter and excitement. They
came, they saw, they explored.
They got their hands dirty, looked
for buried treasure, explored caves
and interacted with hands-on ex-
hibits. Their shouts of laughter and
excitement filled the air at the Sci-
ence Center.
They enjoyed the shows in the
CineDome and explored Beakman's
World while finding out how the
world works. At the Science Center,
families can search for aliens, visit
the rainforest and discover "mys-
tery" bugs, travel inside the human
body, and dig for fossils.
Children and parents alike will
.enjoy using scientific tools to ex-
plore four amazing worlds: the hu-
man body, space, dinosaurs and
rainforests. Learn about the won-


ders of science while playing with
bugs, digging up bones and burp-
ing as loudly as possible. Each
area has computer stations where
visitors participate in challenges
and demonstrations, including in-
structions for experiments to try
at home. Tour "Beakman's Home
Place" and "Darwin's Living Room"
or check out "Mount Beakmore" -
the shrine to Beakman's scientific
role models: Galileo, Isaac Newton,
Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein.
Kids can take a seat in "Art Burn's
Diner" the "lunch" counter that
serves up hands-on activities such
as "Chemistry in the Cabbage Patch"
and the "Floating Egg." A recipe for
"Beakman Slime" is the diner's top
item on its "to-go" menu.
Beakman's World on Tour is
based on the popular "Beakman's
World" TV series, which currently
runs in syndication. It is seen lo-
cally on WRBW-My65 on Monday
and Thursday mornings at 8:30 a.m.
The program stars actor and pup-
peteer Paul Zaloom as Beakman, an
eccentric who performs "comical"
experiments and demonstrations
in response to viewer mail, to il-
lustrate various scientific concepts


from density to electricity to flatu-
lence. This new interactive touring
exhibit will be on display at the Sci-
ence Center until Jan. 4, 2009.
Beakman will come to the Or-
lando Science Center on Saturday,
June 28, at 12:30 p.m. in the Science
Center's Darden Theater. Scien-
tist Beakman will bring his perfor-
mance to a liveshow for audiences
of all ages.
Admission to Be.ikmian'
World is included with thie full
experience to the Orlando
Science Center, which is 52 I
for adults and $18 for kids
ages 3-11. This ticket also
includes Titanic: The Experi-
ence, Rockwell's America, Giant
Worlds, and all the films
and exhibits current\
on display at the Sci-
ence Center. Sci-
ence Center annual
members receive
discounted admis-
sion to Titanic:
The Experience
and free admission .
to the other from -. :.
the award-winning ,.
children's television AM


series, Beakman's World, will con-
tinue though January 2009. The
Orlando Science Center is located
at 777 E. Princeton St., Loch Haven
Park, in Orlando. For more infor-
mation, please call 407-514-2000
or visit www.osc.org.
TV scientist Beakman
S *Slurdly, June
28

F COLUMBIA
PICTURES
TELEVISION


Clinic opens for autistic children


CAROLE ARTHURS
i-.-r'- F.'FE,' STAFF

The Threshold Center for
Autism has been helping au-
tistic children for more than
30 years. Now it has a new
health clinic in Goldenrod
where children can receive
medical care.
The clinic, located at
Threshold's 8.5-acre cam-
pus at 3550 N. Goldenrod
Road, is a full-service prima-
ry medical and dental clinic
for early intervention and
treatment of autistic chil-
dren.
Autism is a lifelong brain
disorder that begins in early
childhood. It can cause lan-
guage impairment, self-cen-
tered behavior, social with-


drawal, repetitive activities
and extreme reactions to
changes in the immediate
environment.
"The $1.5 million medi-
cal and dental clinic is the
first of its kind in Florida
and will also be open to
other Central Florida agen-
cies needing health care for
their special needs clients,"
said Dr. Bob Wright, CEO
of Threshold, at the grand
opening.
In addition, people who
are uninsured can go to the
health clinic thanks to the
sponsorship of Shepherd's
Hope,whichwill takeadvan-
tage of the clinic's services
in the evenings. "Shepherd's
Hope treats low-income
and the uninsured with ut-


most dignity and respect,
and we will be happy to call
this center our home," said
Cindi Kopelman, president
of Shepherd's Hope.
Wright was among those
who attended the grand
opening and ribbon cutting
of the new health clinic.
One of the clinic's founders,
Tina Willard, was also there.
What brought tears to
the eyes of those in atten-
dance was the unveiling of
the sign on the building,
which named the center the
"Ben C. Willard Primary Care
Clinic." The founders, Tina
Willard and her son Ben,
started the center 25 years
ago after Tina was con-

> turn to THRESHOLD on A10


PHOTO BY CAROLE ARTHURS THE OBSERVER
Pictured at the grand opening of Threshold's new primary health and dental clinic
(left to right) are Mark Terry, chairman, Threshold; Cindi Kopelman, president of
Shepherd's Hope; Tina Howard, founder of Threshold; Sarah Willard; and Dr. Bob
Wright.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 8 Thursday, June 26, 2008


Lifest les



'Guy Thing' engages W.P. Playhouse








Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, June 26, 2008 Page 9


Social, Volunteer & Business rILfL


The National Association of Indus-
trial and Office Properties, Central
Florida Chapter, will host a program
titled "Legislative Update" on Thurs-
day, June 26, at the Marriott Orlando
downtown, 400 W. Livingston St., Or-
lando. Moderator will be Terry Dela-
hunty, partner, Foley & Lardner. Panel-
ists will include state Rep. Andy Gar-
diner, District 40, executive director,
Apopka Area Chamber of Commerce;
Sen. Mike Haridopolos, District 26,
majority whip, college professor and
author; and Rep. Steve Precourt, Dis-
trict 41, consultant for Dyer Riddle
Mills and Precourt. Registration will
be from 11:30 a.m. to noon, and the
luncheon program will be from noon
to 1 p.m. The cost of the-program
is $45 for members, $60 for non-
members and $20 for students. For
additional information, call the NAIOP
office at 407-810-7324.
The Tarflower Chapter of the Flor-
ida Native Plant Society will meet
Tuesday, July 1, 7 p.m., at Leu Gar-
dens, 1920 N. Forest Ave., Orlando.
Dr. Bruce Stephenson, director of
the Environmental & Growth Man-
agement Studies Program at Rollins
College, will discuss the landscape
restoration of the Genius Reserve, a
50-acre parcel of Old Florida located
in the heart of Winter Park. The pro-
gram is free and open to the public.
Come early and enjoy refreshments
and lively conversation with other na-
tive plant enthusiasts. There will be a


follow-up field trip to the Genius Re-
serve in September.
Central Florida Employment Coun-
cil will hold its luncheon meeting on
July 8, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Or-
angewood, 1300 W. Maitland Blvd.,
Maitland. Program: 2008 Trends for
Recruiting Marketing and Behavioral
Interviewing. Fee: $20. RSVP required,
contact cfec@cfec.org. Employers,
human resource professionals, and
recruiters only please.
The National Association of Indus-
trial and Office Properties Central
Florida Chapter's Developing Lead-
ers will host a program titled "Selling,
Leasing and Appraising Real Estate"
on Wednesday, July 16, from 5:30
p.m. to 7 p.m. at the offices of Hunt-
onBrady Architects, 800 N. Magnolia
Ave., 18th and 19th floors of One Or-
lando Centre, Orlando. Speakers will
be: Appraisal, Steve Saunders, MAI,
CCIM, MRICS, Senior Director, Valua-
tion Services, Cushman & Wakefield,
Inc.; Leasing, Rick Solik, Senior Direc-
tor, Office Brokerage services, Cush-
man & Wakefield, Inc.; Sales, Caryn
Carreiro, Regional Vice President,
Eola Capital. There is no cost for the
event.
The Retired Enlisted Association,
TREA Sunshine Chapter 124, Or-
lando, will meet 1 p.m. Saturday, July
19, at Delaney Street Baptist Church,
Room D-103, 1919 S. Delaney Ave.,
Orlando. New members and spouses


are welcome. Please call Bill King,
membership, 407-765-0128, or e-
mail beabill7173@aol.com for de-
tails. All services enlisted retirees are
welcome. There will be refreshments
and great raffle prizes. Chapter 124
has a fine Ladies 124 Auxiliary meet-
ing at the same time and place.
AARP Mid-Florida Chapter 5046
will hold its general meeting at noon
on Sept. 3 at the Marks Street Se-
nior Recreation Center, Maple Room,
99 E. Marks St., downtown Orlando.
*Daughters of the American Revo-
lution Constitution Day, Sept. 13,
Dubsdread Golf and Country Club,
Orlando.
English-Speaking Union, Central
Florida Branch, will meet Sept. 15
at the University Club of Winter Park.
Program: a presentation by Quinn
Hawkesworth on "Pride of Place."
The Friends of the Orlando Philhar-
monic Orchestra meet every third
Wednesday of the month at 11:30
a.m. at the Orlando Philharmonic
Executive Offices, 812 E. Rollins St.,
across the parking lot from the Or-
lando Museum of Art. They promote
community awareness and apprecia-
tion of the Philharmonic. For further
information, please call Caroline
James at 407-647-6919 or Sigrid
Morris at 407-249-2484.
Maitland Rotary Club meets every
Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at the Maitland
Civic Center, 641 S. Maitland Ave.


Community illcHInr


"Sonnets for an Old Century," Mad
Cow Theatre, StageRight series, con-
tinues through July 6 on Thursdays,
Friday and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and
Sunday at 3 p.m. All seats are $22.
Special Wednesday night perfor-
mance on July 2, 8 p.m. Pay-What-
You-Wish, call for details or visit Mad-
CowTheatre.com. The theatre is at
105 S. Magnolia Ave., between Pine
and Church streets in Orlando.
On-Site Pet Adoption Dwell Apart-
ments is partnering with Pet Rescue
by Judy, one of the area's most in-
fluential rescuersto find homes for
needy animals. A pet adoption event
will take place at Dwell Apartments
on Saturday, June 28, from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. at 8700 Maitland Summit Blvd,
Orlando. Interviews with prospective
owners will be conducted on-site
with adoption fees beginning at $150
- a charge that covers the vet bill and
prior care for the adopted animal. For
more information about the event,
please contact the Dwell Apartments
leasing office at 407-667-1765.
Dinner Dates Monthly Singles Gala,
6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday, June 29, at
the Metro West Country Club. Three-
course progressive dinner, dancing,
events weekly, other casual events.
For reservations call 407-339-3283.
E-mail: DinnerDates@cfl.rr.com or
visit DinnerDates.org.
Winter Park Olde Fashioned July
Fourth Celebration, Central Park, 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, July 4. Hot dog
eating contest, children's bicycle pa-
rade, most patriotic hat contest and
more. Free.
Morse Museum Independence Day
Open House, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fri-
day, July 4, held in conjunction with
the Olde Fashioned July Fourth Cel-
ebration. Free.
Hold 'em for Hope Casino Night,
6 p.m. to 9 p.m. July 10, to benefit
New Hope for Kids, Winter Park Civic
Center, 1050 W. Morse Blvd., Winter
Park. Entry donation is only $10. Fea-


during: Texas Hold 'em tournament,
open casino table including black-
jack, roulette, craps, live local band,
silent auction, full cash bar and ca-
tered menu. Advanced registration is
required for the Texas Hold 'em tour-
nament. Entry is a $50 donation and
includes admission for one person,
two beverages and chips for play in
the tournament.
Party In The Park, 6 p.m. Saturday,
July 19, Lake Lily Park in Maitland,
corner of Highway 17-92 and Mait-
land Avenue. Presented by the city
of Maitland. There will be music, fun
and food for all with a special screen-
ing of "Horton Hears a Who!"
Big Band Concert, "A Tribute to
Artie Shaw," Sunday, July 20, with
the Altamonte Jazz Ensemble. Mati-
nee concert 3 p.m.; evening concert
7 p.m. at Altamonte Springs East-
monte Civic Center, 830 Magnolia
Drive (off Ronald Reagan Boulevard).
Admission is $5 at the door. Details
407-322-7528
The 16th Annual Celebrity Mascot
Games, Thursday, July 24, Stetson
University at 2 p.m., Friday, July 25,
Amway Arena at 12:30 p.m. and 2
p.m. Saturday, July 26, Amway Are-
na. More than 30 of the nation's top
professional and collegiate mascots
will battle their way through wacky,
zany games at the Amway Arena and
Stetson University. This family event
benefits New Hope for Kids' Grief and
Wish programs and is hosted by New
Hope for Kids' partner for the event,
the Central Florida Sports Com-
mission. Tickets are $6 in advance
through New Hope for Kids. For tick-
ets call 407-331-3059 x10.
Crealde Open House, Saturday, Aug.
9. Tour Crealde's studios and galler-
ies, stop at the Cup-a-thon sale, and
participate in hands-on workshops. It
is located at 600 St. Andrews Blvd.,
Winter Park.
16th annual March of Dimes Mud
Volleyball Tournament, Saturday,


Aug. 23, at the Lee Vista Center in
Orlando. Lee Vista Center is located
off Semoran Boulevard, just one mile
north of the airport. Registration is
$400 before Aug. 1 and $450 after
for a coed team of six to 10 players.
Featuring more than 150 corporate
teams wallowing in two to three feet
of mud.
To register a team or for more infor-
mation about the event, please con-
tact Jessica Hadelman at the March
of Dimes at 407-599-5077 ext. 24 or
e-mail jhadelman@marchofdimes.
com. Mud volleyball is still in its early
planning stages and there are spon-
sorship opportunities available.
Casino 21, benefiting Easter Seals
Central, 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Sat-
urday, Sept. 6, at Dubsdread Banquet
Hall in Orlando, 549 W. Par St., Orlan-
do. Come try your hand at blackjack,
Texas Hold 'em, craps and roulette.
Silent and live auctions, 50/50 raffle
and "Golden Ticket" raffle, and a "Fun
Money" auction at the end of the eve-
ning for high rollers to pick up some
great prizes.
Tickets are $50 per person ($55
the night of the event) and include
catered heavy hors d'oeuvres. A cash
bar and cocktail service will be avail-
able in the casino. Casino attire is
requested.
Signature Chefs Gourmet Gala &
Auction to benefit March of Dimes,
Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the Loews
Portofino Bay Hotel at Universal Or-
lando. Local media celebrities will
join 15 of Central Florida's most tal-
ented and celebrated chefs to cook
up a gourmet feast. Reception and
silent auction preview at 6 p.m. in-
cluding chefs' samplings, followed by
the live auction at 8:30 p.m.
Tickets are $175 for individu-
als. Corporate tables are $1,750 for
a table of 10. For. details call Kim-
berly Price at the March of Dimes
at 407-599-5077 x 33 or e-mail
kprice@marchofdimes.com.


Join us for a

Com~nWu/ity
ConA/ers ono


"Start with the End in Mind"



Wednesday, July 9, 2008 @ 6p.m.
Winter Park Community Center Annex
721 W. New England Avenue | Winter Park, FL


In order to continue building programs and activities
the community can benefit from, we need your input!

Get nvAwoved/ &

wpet wUothte'p grams!

For more information, please call 407.599.3695.

CRA Educational & Social programs are funded by
the City of Winter Park Community Redevelopment Agency








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Free Parking Lot Behind *


Thursday, June 26, 2008 Page 9


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Make summertime a study time


CAROLE ARTHURS
OBSERVER STAFF

It's summertime and the livin' is
easy! The kids are out of school, and
the days are getting longer; sum-
mertime storms come almost daily,
and the weather is hot, hot, hot.
Speaking of storms, did your
child's final report card mean storm
clouds at your home? If so, what
should you do to prepare your child
for next year?
"Parents know their own chil-
dren. If you believe your child
could be doing better than his or
her grades show, you owe it to your
child to remedy the situation. More
than current grades are at stake,"
said Sharon Bergin, operator of
Huntington Learning Center in
Winter Park. "If grades are medio-
cre or poor, it means your child is
not gaining valuable skills. This can
come back to haunt children later.
The skills children learn in school
are like building blocks. If a skill
is not learned adequately, future
skills will suffer. When a child tries


to build advanced skills on a shaky
foundation of knowledge, there is
likely to be trouble ahead."
Mediocre or poor grades can re-
sult from a variety of problems. Ber-
gin offers the following suggestions
for what to do when a child brings
home a poor report card:

Examine the situation realistically
It is important to remember that
every drop in grades indicates that
valuable skills are being missed. An
effort should be made to learn and
reinforce those missing skills. While
this is being done, it is also impor-
tant to identify and remedy the ba-
sic problem, so it does not continue
to hurt your child's education.

What is really the problem?
Is there a behavior problem? Some-
times, bright students get bad grades
for behavior-related activities. Does
your child hand in homework? Is it
correct and on time? Is your child
bored with schoolwork and not
paying enough attention? These are
not excuses; they are symptoms of


different problems. You must iden-
tify the problem before you can
remedy it.

Talk with your child.
Why does your child think he or
she got poor grades? Let your child
know that you are supportive and
that you believe in his or her abili-
ties.
"It is important to remember
that the difficulty that caused these
poor grades may be a serious prob-
lem. Your child may have missed
one or more important basic skills.
It is vital that you get help for your
child as soon as possible, before the
problem gets worse," Bergin said.
Huntington Learning Center
is the nation's longest-running
supplemental education services
provider; the center helps parents
identify the gaps in their children's
education to correct learning prob-
lems, as well as prepares students
for standardized testing.
The summer months can be lots
of fun for families, filled with things
to do, vacations, trips to the beach,


and get-togethers, but now may also
be the time to prepare your child
for the next school year. For addi-
tional information, or if you wish
to discuss a specific problem, call
the Huntington Learning Center in
Winter Park at 407-875-2300.


THRESHOLD I Autism can go undetected or misdiagnosed for years


< continued from page A8
cerned about what would
be available for her autistic
child and others like him.
Because autistic people
don't communicate well,
Ben had gone undiagnosed
for 42 years with Crohn's
disease, a painful, inflam-
matory bowel disease. After


-receiving treatment, Ben is
in less pain and has actu-
ally had some behavior im-
provement.
Wright thanked those
who had contributed to
the new clinic, including
the Edyth Bush Charitable
Foundation for its $175,000
grant. "The Edyth Bush
Foundation has been with


us since the start of Thresh-
old," Wright said.
Other donations includ-
ed $150,000 from Orange
County, $30,000 in-kind
donations from i.d.e.a.s,
a digital media company,
and $10,000 from William
Dupont IV. Also, CT Hsu &
Associates, PA., donated
the architectural services


on the project, as well as
$25,000. Other benefactors
included the Rotary Club of
East County whose mem-
bers donated "lots and lots
of labor."
Wright also thanked the
Winter Park Chamber and
the Goldenrod Chamber for
their help. "Also our thanks
to God. He did everything


that we had to do," he said.
"We invite you to act, to
get involved, and to make a
difference. With your help,
Threshold can make a dif-
ference. Please contact us in
whichever manner you feel
most comfortable," Wright
added.
The new clinic's phone
number is 407-671-6005.


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Page 10 Thursday, June 26, 2008







Winter Park / Maitland Observer


yadsruhT June 26 2008


Paae 11


Opin ion!/ QfiT]on


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* : **":--'. f.T^' f'^.y,^.z "^*- :.: ,--" ., --.-, ?:- -,*. ,. ^,j-.,i'-.'1-
.. . .: .. -,,,, ., ,, . ..-. ,:. , .


Mercantile Bank hosted the
Winter Park Chamber's Busi-
ness After Hours on Thursday,
June 19. The bank overflowed
with businessmen and women
for food, beverage and lots of
.. networking. Michael Painter,
.' 4 ,president, Mercantile Bank,
said he was delighted with
L the turnout. Pictured at the
-event: (I to r) Robert Pittman,
,-,. -Saundra Hester and Baxter
Matthews, chairman of the
/ AutumilArt Festival and own-
\er of Florida Frame House in
Hannibal Square.
PHOTO BY CAROLE ARTHURS
THE OBSERVER

The Winter Park
Autumn Art Festival
committee held its
Patron Party and Poster
%Unveiling recently at the
.Florida Frame House
S and Gallery in-Hannibal
Square. Owner Baxter
.Matthews welcomed
.'.' everyone and intro-
Sduced poster artist Pe-
)ter Pettegrew, pictured
holding his artwork. The
poster is a copy of his
40x30 oil "Ozello Eve,"
a Florida Landscape.

I-- At PHOTOBY
.CAROLE ARTHURS
THE OBSERVER


Orange County Sheriff
candidate John Tegg spoke
to the members of the Winter
Park Republican Women's
Club Federated on Tuesday,
June 24. Tegg currently
serves as chief of police in
Edgewood, following his
retirement as division chief
with the Orange County Sher-
iff's Office. He has served in
law enforcement for almost
30 years. The Winter Park
Republican Women's Club
meets the fourth Tuesday of
each month throughout the
year at the Mt. Vernon Best
Western Inn in Winter Park.
PHOTO BY CAROLE ARTHURS
- THE OBSERVER


Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) is
Rotary's leadership training program for young
people. The Maitland rotary Club sponsored two
RYLA students again this year. They gave a report
at a recent Rotary meeting.
Pictured (front row) are RYLA students Catherine
and Julia Felter with their parents John and Liz Felter
and Rotarian Russ Hale (second row, far right).
PHOTO BY CAROLE ARTHURS THE OBSERVER


o







Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Paae 12 Thirsdav .IJune 26. 20l08


Play On!



y--{


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
-,i.iiriguisil1d Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

GIVE ME PEACE!
In a past life, this commen-
tator sang on both sides of
the Atlantic about "cruel
Fate."
In Verdi's opera, "La
Forza del Destino" (The
Power ofDestiny), I play a
nice guy who kills his girl's
father by accident.
Her Spanish father, the
Marquis of Calatrava, also
a nice guy, though admit-
tedly unenlightened by
today's standards, objects
to me because of my South
American Inca origins.
I belong to Inca "roy-
alty," and sing loud (and
high) about it, but Pops
doesn't want me fathering
his grandkids.
And so it is that I come
to his pad one night to
elope with the apple of his
eye, a peach of a girl named
Leonora. We are almost out
the door when Pops comes
on the scene.
I have a Saturday-night
eloper'ss special" in my
belt. To show him I am no
threat to peace, I throw the
piece on the floor. It goes
off and shoots my gal's dad.


He dies right there, singing
negatively about me.
My effort to guarantee
pace (peace) backfires by
pure chance.
From then on, "Destiny,"
or "Fate," in the form of
coincidence raised to
the nth power, plagues
Leonora, me, and her
brother Don Carlos as we
roam all over the map.
Charley and I are.pals.
Then he learns that I am
responsible for his Pops'
death. We three keep run-
ning into each other, and
bringing each other lots of
luck all of it bad.
As a malevolent des-
tino relentlessly pursues
her, Leonora sings an aria
which is a Verdian gem:
"Pace, Pace, Mio Dio"
(Peace, Peace, My God).
Being a member in good
standing of these ridicu-
lous goings-on, whose
gorgeous music is all that
keeps the audience from
vamoosing, I am wonder-
ing why Leonora begs God
to change her fate.
God and destino would
seem to be two powers sep-
arated by theological light-
years. God seems to say, "Do
it the old-fashioned way,
earn it!" Fate seems to say,
"Cross your fingers, baby.
I'll be there before long."
Another, more mystical
power, the grace of God,
seems to be something
one cannot earn or count
on. In my younger, more
na've days, lots of mundane
problems seemed soluble
to me if people would only
stop throwing their pistols
on the floor, and daring the
"gods" in other stupid ways.
People can "influence
their own luck" by using
brains, foresight, logic,
imagination, courtesy, and
other positives. People can
also "lessen the odds" on


failure by eschewing avoid-
able stupidities.
Stupidity is often a ratio-
nalized process of asking
smart people for advice -
and then ignoring it.
The years 1942 to 1945,
when people were point-
ing weapons at me, proved
to me that Darwinian
"conflict" is the way of life,
whether we like it or not.
I was a gunnery officer. My
job was to point big guns at
people and say "fire!" I, and
those around me, could
have just sat around, wait-
ing for our Destiny.
Fate would have obliged
prnnto. Anyhow, who
wants to end up as a name
in a telegram?
Taking sides on issues,
and acting on convictions,
is as American as bagels,
turnip greens, chili and
pizza. Nowadays most of
us confront things that we
want neither to espouse
nor to oppose. "How do you
feel about ...?"
Well, I amjbr: my beauti-
ful wife, the United States
of America, honesty, great
music, trust, friendship, red
snapper, morning coffee,
generosity, privacy, non-
violence, high educational
standards, good restau-
rants, wit, forgiveness, ice
cream ... and other things.
I am against: being
judged on any of the above.
All the hot subjects peo-
ple used to keep in some
kind of closet can go right
back in the closet as far as I
am concerned.
I can introduce myself
to you without qualifying
myself beyond the word
"American."
You can see right off that
I'm "white," whatever that
means. Really, "pink" might
be more accurate, except in
summer, when I invest time
and money to swim in the


ocean, and pick up an eva-
nescent "tan."
A survey dared to
inquire, "What's your sexu-
al preference?" My answer
was, "Often." What other
adults do sexually in pri-
vate is not only none of my
business, but ho-hum.
Our local daily once ran
a long article with a big
headline, "Bible's Words on
Being Gay."
In the article, six theo-
logians, from Yale and
Harvard Divinity schools, as
well as prominent churches
and denominations, opined
as to whether the Bible is:
1) God's revealed Truth,
i.e.: His infallible Word, to
be taken literally, or
2) Poetry, folk art, pas-
sions and aspirations of
truth-seeking people, but
not to be taken word for
word.
Addressing passages
against homosexuality, sim-
ply-stated in the common
Bible which they teach,
these professional religion-
ists often come to diametri-
cally opposite conclusions.
These leaders seem
either to affirm, or to
attempt to "make peace
with," words of scripture
that won't go away.
An impartial person
might ask:
Question: If you are "the
Rev. Joe Blow, or Jane Doe,"
is it your responsibility to
"preach" the Bible or is it
your "calling" to interpret
the Bible in order to make
it palatable to every life-
style?
Question: In Miltonian
terms, does the church
exist in order "to justify the
ways of God to man," or to
"justify the ways of man to
God?"
Question: Is Biblical
law negotiable? Can an
honest religionist "make


a deal" as to the Ten
Commandments? E.g.: "I'll
buy 'em except for num-
bers Three and Seven."
Analogy: Can you "make
a deal" with the police
force regarding traffic laws?
E.g. "I'll buy 'em except
for the one on speeding."
Does theological
haranguing about Lot and
his daughters in Genesis
19:4-6 adjudicate the valid-
ity of modern-day argu-
ments for the "right" to
sexual preference?
Didn't Lot know full well
that his daughters would
be of no interest to the
Sodomite men shouting at
him, "Where are the men
who came to you tonight?
Bring them out so that we
may know them."
In the New Testament,
both Romans and
Corinthians openly con-
demn homosexuality. Does
Paul mean it when he says,
"Neither the immoral... nor
homosexuals ... will inherit
the kingdom of God?"
Do some preachers rou-
tinely deny precepts that
are part and parcel of their
religion's Constitution?
Are ministers preaching
"peace with the status quo"
to their gay parishioners as
socio-theological manifest
destiny?
Concomitantly, are
ministers constructing the
perception of peace in their
own lives by interpreting
the Bible preferentially?
Finally, isn't looking to
the Bible for all the answers
about homosexuality like
insisting that the Pope's
words support both sides of
the abortion issue?
Questions, questions...
Pace, Mio Dio. Peace, my
God.
Isn't this a prayer that
everyone sings to himself at
some time or another?


FALLEN APPLES NOT FAR FROM MY TREE #56


Is Barack Obama's con-
stant flip-flopping what he
meant by "change?"

Someone "up there" seems
surely to be directing
Democratic legislators,
who all vote together.

John McCain accuses
Obama of wanting to
renege on our trade agree-
ments with other countries,
actions which will punish
both us and our friends,
and could cost the Dems
the election. Will Barack
once again flip-flop?

Democrats repeat-
edly threaten to enact
the "Fairness Doctrine"
that can violate the First
Amendment's rights of
talk radio shows such as
Laura Ingraham and Rush
Limbaugh. If you can't beat
'em, silence 'em! AM radio
is the Right's most effective
weapon against the Marxist
influence in Democratic
propaganda, and operates
in an aura of free com-
petition. "Their weapon:
will require stations to air
divergent points of view; a
clever ruse that makes sta-


tion owners leery of airing
controversial talk-radio
hosts fearing law suits and
federal sanctions."

If Dick Morris is correct,
Democrats plan to exercise
quasi-control over radio
station boards and man-
agement, thereby dictating
what goes on the air.

I reiterate my erstwhile-
expressed opinion that
billionaire globalists are
preparing to use Marxism
to bring the U.S. down to
third-world status, ripe for
takeover.

The state of California is
installing filling-stations
on main highways that will
accommodate hydrogen-
driven cars, some of which
already exist.

Bill O'Reilly quips that the
Democrats are putting
Al Gore's mania global
warming above our
national interests. Bill says,
that, after all, we must get
to work in the morning.

If McCain keeps pressing
Obama about the latter's


"no drilling at all" stance,
McCain will have Obama in
every way "over the barrel!"

Charles Krauthammer
reminds us that the U.S.
today has oil-drilling tech-
niques that are virtually
without risk of damaging
the environment. He goes
on to point out that treat-
ing terrorists as criminals
requires that we open all
manner of secret info to
the eyes of our enemies.
After 9/11, we had to free
up the names of 200 terror-
ist-suspects on both sides
of the ocean. In World War
II, our 300,000 German
prisoners received no habe-
as corpus rights.

Obama's habeas corpus
would include Osama bin
Laden, natch.

In a recent photo-op,
Obama stopped and
removed from view two
women in Moslem cos-
tume. What if McCain had
done the same what hell
would have broken loose?

Obama's half-brother is
showing people old photos


of himself and Obama in
Moslem dress.

One hears that lots of kids
today think themselves
"above" obligations to serve
in our military. Without my
generation in World War
II, and my father's genera-
tion in World War I, these
kids would all be speaking
German!

Does John McCain have
good advisers, or is it that
he won't take advice from
anybody?

Michelle Obama has been
"declared" to be above any
criticism at all, despite the
fact that she openly cam-
paigns for her husband.
Since criticizing Obama
himself may make one a
racist suspect, the Obama
couple seems to be unique-
ly invulnerable to verbal
attack, First Amendment be
damned!

The Democrats are block-
ing every way to obtain
power sources including
nuclear, and even wind
power windmills off
Cape Cod would ruffle


the feathers of a high
Democrat.

Announcement that we are
drilling would likely cause
oil speculators to veer off
course in anticipation of
larger future supplies, and
spark lower gas prices.

Barack Obama's political
elitism puts the specter of
global warming above the
flesh-and-blood needs of
human beings.

The underground oil in
ANWAR would free us for.
60 years from our politi-
cally-dangerous reliance
on Saudi Arabia, a country
which enjoys our dollars,
but hates us fundamentally.

Had George W. been able
to get permission to drill
in ANWAR his first year in
office, we would now be
buying ANWAR gasoline at
the pump.


TARONEY

Louis Roney's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at LRoney@cfl.rr.com.


rayt; I f- I I I UIOUCIY) ou I lu f-U, f-VUL)









Winter Park / Maitland Observer


SNotices
- -i -.',


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, Probate
Division
Case No. 48-2008-CP-001396-0
IN Re: ESTATE OF
ALICE H. THORNTON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ALICE H.
THORNTON, deceased, whose date of death was
May 3, 2008, File Number 48-2008-CP-001396-0,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 North Orange Avenue, Room 340, Orlando, FL
32801. The names and addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal Representative's
attorney are set fortl below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) 'EARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
June 19, 2008. .

Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A.
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801

Personal Representative:
REBECCA T. VAN HEKLE
601 Gallery Drive
Apartment 10
Winter Park, Florida 32792
6/19, 6/26
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 48-2007-CP-2194-0
IN RE. ESTATE OF
JAMES MARVIN KING SR., aka JAMES M. KING,
SR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JAMES MAR-
VIN KING SR., aka JAMES M. KING, SR., deceased,
whose date of death was July 5, 2007, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 425 North Orange
Avenue, Room 340, Orlando, FI 32801. The names
and addresses of the Personal Representative and
the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having .claims or demands .,;.. i tdecedent's
estate, including unmatured, .,,....-..g-..i or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
06/19/08.
Personal Representative:
DELBAANN WINGO
329 Park Avenue North
P.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
NANCY S. FREEMAN
Attorney for Personal Representative
Flonda Bar No. 968293
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, PA.
329 Park Avenue North, P.O. Box 880, Winter Park,
FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
6/19,6/26

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR ORANGE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 48-2006-CP-0030170-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THOMAS R GILMARTIN,
Deceased.
JO ANN HENDRIX, as Personal Representative of
the Estate of THOMAS P GILMARTIN,
Petitioner,
vs.
ROSEMARY PALMITER and PATRICIA MASCARELLO,
by and through Kemp & Associates, Inc., as Agent
and Partial Assignee, ANGELINE SHAUL, PEARSON E.
BAKER, NORA B. COLLINS, MAXINE H. BAKER DOV-
EL, LEE ROY BAKER, RUTH BAKER GILMARTIN, ELVA
BAKER SHAUL, DOROTHY E. HARDY, ELLIOT CARL
GILMARTIN, GUY HUGH SHAUL, DARELL R. SHAUL,
THOMAS J. GILMARTIN, MARY MURPHY, BERNARDA.
GILMARTIN, THOMAS LAWRENCE GILMARTIN, HEL-
EN M. GILMARTIN LONGAUER, MARY MAGDALENE
FERGUSON, DOROTHY MARTIN REVELS, AND ANY
UNKNOWN OR UNASCERTAINED BENEFICIARIES,
CLAIMANTS, OR HEIRS OF OR OTHER PERSONS
HAVING AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF THOMAS
P GILMARTIN, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THEM,
Respondents,
NOTICE FACTION
TO: ROSEMARY PALMITER and PATRICIA MAS-
CARELLO, by and through Kemp & Associates,
Inc., as Agent and Partial Assignee, ANGELINE
SHAUL, PEARSON E. BAKER, NORA B. COLLINS,
MAXINE H. BAKER DOVEL, LEE ROY BAKER, RUTH
BAKER GILMARTIN, ELVA BAKER SHAUL, DOROTHY
E. HARDY, ELLIOT CARL GILMARTIN, GUY HUGH
SHAUL, DARELL R. SHAUL, THOMAS J. GILMARTIN,
MARY MURPHY, BERNARD A. GILMARTIN, THOMAS
LAWRENCE GILMARTIN, HELEN M. GILMARTIN
LONGAUER, MARY MAGDALENE FERGUSON, DORO-
THY MARTIN REVELS, AND ANY UNKNOWN OR
UNASCERTAINED BENEFICIARIES, CLAIMANTS, OR
HEIRS OF OR OTHER PERSONS HAVING AN INTER-
EST IN THE ESTATE OF THOMAS P. GILMARTIN, AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST THEM,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Determi-
nation of Beneficlaries and Shares has been filed
against you and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to it on JAMES P.
PANICO, ESQ., Petitioner's attorney, whose address
is 111 S. Maitland Ave., Suite 100, Maitland, FL
32751, on or before 35 days from first date of pub-
lication, and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Petitioner's attorney
for Immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
Dated this 17 day of April, 2008.
LYDIA GARDNER
As Clerk of the Court
By: Susan Wendt
As Deputy Clerk
6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.. 08-DR-413-02DW
Division: Family
Lamoya Barnett, Petitioner
and
Michael Barnett, Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
TO: (name of Respondent) Michael Loeontt
Barnett
(Respondent's last knoWn address) Address
Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that air action has beenri iled
against you and that you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on (name
of Petitioner) Lairoya Barnett, whose address is
802 Pine Ave, Sanford, FL 32771 on or before July
9, 2008, and file r ...i.. . 11. 11. clerk of this
Court at (clerk's i.,.. ,i r'..,,, Park Ave.,
Sanford, FL 32771 before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default
may be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You may file
Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court
1.i,,. ,1 1 r F,,i, ,. ,,,,,1 12.915.) Future papers
i, i., . ..'i'ii [.- ... filed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. FalPure to
comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings
Dated June 3, 2008.
Maryanne Morse,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Nancy R. Winter
Deputy Clerk
6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008-CP-000883-0
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
YVONNE EUNICE WILLACY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of WONNE
EUNICE WILLACY, deceased, whose date of death
was June 12, 2007, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, File
Number 48-2008-CP-000883-0, the address of
which is 425 N. Orange Ave., Suite 340, Orlando,
Florida 32801. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, and who have been served a copy
of this notice, must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is June 19, 2008.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Carolyn S. Crichton
Lewis & Crichton
Florida Bar No. 0980994
Post Office Box 1119
Winter Park, Florida 32790-1119
Tel: 407.647.3428

Personal Representative:
Edward James Barry Scott
c/o Lewis & Crichton
Post Office Box 1119
Winter Park, Florida 32790-1119
6/19, 6/26

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 07-CC-17690
THE REGISTRY AT MICHIGAN PARK CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
NIGEL NEWLAND,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 28, 2008, in
Case No.: 07-CC-17690, of the Circuit Court in and
for Orange County, Florida, in which THE REGISTRY
AT MICHIGAN PARK CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION,
INC., is the Plaintiff and NIGEL NEWLAND is the
Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at the Orange County Courthouse, 425
North Orange Avenue, Suite 350, Orlando, Florida,
at 11:00 a.m., on July 14. 2008, the following
described property set forth in the Order of Final
Judgment:
Unit 1226, THE REGISTRY AT MICHIGAN
PARK, according to the DECLARATION
OF CONDOMINIUM OF THE REGISTRY AT
MICHIGAN PARK CONDOMINIUM, as recorded
in Official Records Book 7941, Pages 2400
through 2456, of the Public Records of
Orange County, Florida .
Also described as:
Unit 1226, THE REGISTRY AT MICHIGAN
PARK, together with an undivided inter-
est in the common elements, according
to the Declaration of Condominium thereof
recorded in Official Record Book 7941, Page
2400, as amended from time to time, of the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida
as amended in Official Records Book 7957,
Page 4027, Public Records of Orange County,
Florida.
Any Person claiming an Interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Its pendens must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
DATED: JUN 24 2008.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of County Court
By KATHERINE BERNAL
CIVIL COURT SEAL
Deputy Clerk

Publication of this Notice on June 26, 2008, and
July 3, 2008 In the Winter Park-Maltland Observer.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU
ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT COURT ADMINISTRATION, 425 NORTH
ORANGE AVE., ROOM 2130, ORLANDO, FL 32801,
TELEPHONE (407) 836-2303 WITHIN 2 WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE;
IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL
1-800-955-8771.
CLAYTON & MCCULLOH
1065 Maitland Center Commons Blvd.
Maitland, Florida 32751
(407) 875-2655
6/26, 7/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, Probate
Division
Case No. 48-2008-CP-001454-0
IN Re' ESTATE OF
ULA G. CHURCH,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of LILA G.
CHURCH, deceased, whoso date of death was June
12, 2008, File Number 48-2008-CP-001454-0,
i,l..j ;, lie Circuit Court lot Orange County,
i..,, .i. Division, the address of which is
425 North Olange Avenue, Room 340, Orlando, FL
32801. The names and addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal Representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demari ...i I the
decedent's estate must file their i .... ...11. this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
June 26, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No : 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A.
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Flonda 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801


Personal Representative
MAYNARD 0. CHURCH
282 Greendale Road
York, Pennsylvania 17403


6/26, 7/3


IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.:07-CC-19020
SKY LAKE SOUTH HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VALLIE R. WEBB and SLOBHAN A WEBB.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated 5/22, 2008, in Case
No.: 07-CC-19020, of the Circuit Court in and for
Orange County, Florida, in which SKY LAKE SOUTH
HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCIATION, INC, is the Plaintiff
and VALUE R. WEBB and SLOBHAN A. WEBB are
the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the Orange County Courthouse,
425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 350, Orlando.
Florida, at 11:00 a m ; on July 10, 2008, the fol-
lowing descnbed property set forth in the Order of
Final Judgment:
Lot 651. SKY LAKE SOUTH, UNIT FIVE "A"
SECOND ADDITION, according to the plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 93,
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
a/k/a
Lot 651, SKY LAKE SOUTH. UNIT FIVE "A"
SECOND ADDITION, according to the plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9., Page
93, of the Public Records of Orange County,
Florida.
Any Person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the his pendens must file
a claim within 60 days after the sale.
DATED: JUN 19 2008.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of County Court
By KATHERINE BERNAL
CIVIL COURT SEAL
Deputy Clerk

Publication of thl Notice on June 26, 2008 and July
3.2008 in the Winter Park-Maitiand Observer.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU
ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT COURT ADMINISTRATION, 425 NORTH
ORANGE AVE., ROOM 2130, ORLANDO, FL 32801,
TELEPHONE (407) 836-2303 WITHIN 2 WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE;
IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL
1-800-955-8771.

CLAYTON & MCCULLOH
1065 Maitland Center Commons Blvd.
Maitland, Florida 32751
(407) 875-2655
6/26, 7/3



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2008-CP-1159
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Raymond 0. Holton, Jr. a/k/a Raymond 0. Holton.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Raymond
0. Holton, Jr. a/k/a Raymond 0. Holton, deceased,
whose date of death was April 10, 2008, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Seminmole County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is P.O. Box
8099, Sanford, FL 32772-8099. The names and ad-
dresses of the Personal Representative and the Per-
sonal Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.'
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice Is
June 26, 2008.
Personal Representative:
John Holton
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor
P.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
Attorney for Personal Representative
Nancy S. Freeman
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 968293
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor, RP.O. Box 880,
Winter Park, FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
6/26,7/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.:07-CC-10132
DIVISION: 70
PEBBLE CREEKAT MEADOWWOODS HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
ABRAHAM MURIEL RIVERA, CARMEN MEDINA
ROOUE, and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as unknown
tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a
Default Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered
in the above styled cause in the County Court
of Orange County, Florida, I will sell the property
located in Orange County, Florida, described as:
Lot 95, Pebble Creek, Phase 1, according to
the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 38
at Pages 97 and 98 of the Public Records of
Orange County, Florida,
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, in the Orange County Courthouse, 425 North
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, Room 350,
at ---11:00 a.m. on the ----9th day of July,. 2008.
Any person claiming an interest In the surplus from
the saleit any, other than tire property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
a default final judgment entered in this cause on
May 6, 2008.
Witness my hand and the seal of this Court on
the 6th day of May, 2008.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: CORINE HERRY
CIVIL COURT SEAL
as Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at 425 North Orange Avenue,
Suite 2130, Orlando, Flonda 32801, telephone
(407)836-2303, within 2 working days of your
receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing impaired,
call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice impaired,
call 1-800-955-8770.
6/26, 7/3
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Pursuant to Ch 713 585(6) FS. United American Lien
& Recovery as agent with power of attorney will sell
the following vehicles) to the highest bidder subject
to any liens; net proceeds deposited with the clerk
of court; owner/lienholder has right to hearing and
post bond; owner may redeem vehicle for cash sume
I of lien, all auctions held in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ hlenor facility; cash or ca-
shier check: 15% buyer prem; any person inter-
ested ph t954) 563-1999

Sale date July 18 2008 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
19215 2007 Pontiac vin#: 1G2ZG58N074143036
lienor automex group 11114 satellite blvd orlando
f 407-694-5438 lien amt S11645.95
19216 1998 Nissan vin#: JN1CA21D4WT607942
lienor: tom's Japanese auto specialists 6725
edgewater dr Orlando fl 407-298-6593 lien amt
$5109.84
19217 1991 Toyota vin#: JT2MA70M9M0157874
lienor: junior bracetti auto repair 953 merry dr #abc
Orlando if 407-578-0015 lien amt $4367.39
cal.rHito u-n-ct 1 1nn a in n am 3411 NW 9th

19270 1998 Audi vin# WAUCB28DOWA140303
lenor" rodis Mercedes & bomw sales 661 w Fair-
banks ave winter park II 407-644-0153 lien amt
$7552.82
19271 2004 GMC vin#: 1GKDS13S242190333
lienor toms Japanese auto specialist 6725 edge- I
water dr Orlando fl lien amt $8938.68

Licensed & bonded auctioneers tab422 flau 765
& 1911
&tgtl6/26

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2008 DR 008601
Division: 31
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
ROBERT SCOTT WRENN.
Husband,
and
MELANIE SANDY SCHIERLE WRENN,
Wife
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLICATION
TO: MELANIE SANDY SCHIERLE WRENN
Last Known address: 200 Story Pardn Rd,, Or-
lando, FL 32833
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution
of Marriage, including claims for dissolution of mar-
riage has been filed against you. You are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to this action on Betty A. Freeland,'Petitioner's at-
torney, whose mailing address is PO. Box 622887,
Oviedo, FL 32765, on or before July 17, 2008, and
tile the original with the clerk of this court at OR-
ANGE County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Flonrida 32801, either before service on
Petiboner's attorney or immediately thereafter; oth-
erwise a default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the petition.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can resulLin sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
DATED this 4th day of June, 2008.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By. Yadira Aguilar (circuit court seal)
Deputy Clerk
6/12. 6/19, 6/26, 7/3
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 48-2008-CP-001486-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN WHITE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of HELEN WHITE,
deceased, File Number 48-2008-CP-001486-0, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County, Flori-
da, Probate Division, the address of which is Orange
County Probate, Division, 425 North Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32802. The names and addresses
of tile personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate'on whom a copy of this notice has been served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their caimswith this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of thlie first publication of tils notice Is:
June 26, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Michael L. Marlowe
Florida Bar No, 157000
Marlowe & Weatherford, P.A.
1150 Louisiana Avenue, Ste. 4
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 629-5008

Personal Representative:
NANCY HARRIS
6/26.,7/3


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

NOTICE OF EQUALIZATION HEARINGS
,7 HOLT AVENUE
t el rir iamntlrnorar FRENCH AVENUE, LAKEVIEW DRIVE,
ALFRED J. HANNA WAY
TUSCANY PLACE
WINTER PARK, FLORIDA

Notice is hereby given that a public equalization hearing will be held on July 14, 2008, at 3:30 p.m., or
soon thereafter at the Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida,
by the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida, sitting as an equalizing board to hear any
and all complaints regarding the special assessments described in:
1) Resolution No. 1964-07 of the City Commission adopted on February 26, 2007 (the "Assessment
Resolution") related to the provision of certain street bricking along a portion of Holt Avenue, being
those properties abutting Holt Avenue, from Pennsylvania Avenue to Park Avenue, in the City of Winter
Park, Florida (the "Project");
2) Resolution No. 1988-08 of the City Commission adopted on February 25, 2008 (the "Assessment
Resolution") related to the provision of certain street bricking along a portion of French Avenue,
Lakeview Drive and Alfred J. Hannah Way, being those properties abutting French Avenue, Lakeview
Drive and Alfred J. Hannah Way, in the City of Winter Park, Florida (the "Project"); and
3) Resolution No. 1989-08 of the City Commission adopted on February 25, 2008 (the "Assessment
Resolution") related to the provision of certain street bricking along a portion of Tuscany Place, being
those properties abutting Tuscany Place, east of Via Tuscany, in the City of Winter Park, Florida (the
"Project").
All affected property owners have a right to appear at the hearing and to file written objections with the
City Commission within 20 days of the date of the first publication of this notice. The Project is more
particularly described in plans and specifications on file with the City,

It is proposed that the assessments for installation of the street bricking will be levied in the total
amount of:
1) Holt Avenue: $234,543.28 to be paid in 10 equal annual installments for Holt Avenue, commencing
with the tax bill for the calendar year 2008 or in full at the option of the property owner. Assessments
will be assessed on an estimated unit cost per foot per parcel among the respective parcels of land
on Holt Avenue, from Pennsylvania Avenue to Park Avenue, specially benefited thereby, all as more
particularly set forth in the Assessment Resolution;
2) French Avenue, Lakeview Drive, and Alfred J. Hanna Way: S126,581.01 to be paid in 10 equal annual
installments, commencing with the tax bill for the calendar year 2008 or in full at the option of the
property owner. Assessments will be assessed on an estimated unit cost per foot/per parcel among the
respective parcels of land abutting French Avenue, Lakeview Drive and Alfred J. Hannah Way, specially
benefited thereby, all as more particularly set forth in the Assessment Resolution; and
3) Tuscany Place: $132,283.86 to be paid in 10 equal annual installments, commencing with the
tax bill for the calendar year 2008 or in full at the option of the property owner. Assessments will be
assessed on an estimated unit cost of $6,962.30 per parcel among the respective parcels of land on
Tuscany Place, east of Via Tuscany, specially benefited thereby, all as more particularly set forth in the
Assessment Resolution.
All interested persons are advised that the description of each property to be assessed and the amount
to be assessed to each parcel or piece of property may be ascertained from the preliminary assess-
ment roll on file at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Winter Park, Flonda, at City Hall, 401 Park
Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida.

It is the intention of the City Commission to adjust and equalize all assessments on a basis of justice
and right, following the hearing, and adopt a final assessment roll to be recorded in the Official records
of Orange County, Florida, which shall constitute a lien on all property so assessed, coequal with
all state, county, district and municipal taxes, as provided in Section 170.09, Florida Statutes, and
pursuant to which the assessments will be collected by the Tax Collector of Orange County, Florida,
together with such taxes.
It a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and for such
purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office, (407) 599-3277, at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
Dated: June 19, 2008
CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA
By City Clerk Cynthia S. Bonham
6/26.7/3

CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that the Board of Adjustment of the City of Winter Park, Florida on Tuesday
July 15, 2008 will hold a Public Hearing at 5:00 PM. in the Commission Chambers of City Hall. At that
time, the following variances from Article III "Zoning" of the Winter Park Land Development Code will
be heard:
#1 Request of Sanjiv Gandhi for variances from Sec 58-66 "R-1AA and R-1A d. rrir ,. i i, ii,..1
the construction of a two story addition to be located 23.5 feet from the rea. i i i",- .I i ,, rri
required rear setback of 25 feet to the first floor wall and 35 feet to the second floor wall.
Property described as Greenview at Winter Pines, Plat Book 7, Page 31, Lot 27, BlockA as recorded in
the Public Records of Orange County, Florida
Located at 1349 Sawgrass Court. Zoned: R- 1A

#2 Request of Don Tatro for a variance from Section 58-82 "General provisions" paragraph (p) to allow
the construction of 7.5 foot masonry wall to be built to be built along the side and rear lot lines on each
side of the property in lieu of the maximum allowed height of 6 feet.
Property described as: Camwood Subdivision, Plat Book R, Page 61, Lot 3, Block C as recorded in the
Public Records of Orange County, FI
Located at 1401 Green Cove Road. Zoned: R-1AA

#3 Request of Winter Park Racquet Club for variances from Section 58-83 "Lakefront lots,..." para-
graph (c) to allow the reconstruction of an existing boat dock to be located 90 feet into Lake Maitland
with an area of 1,100 square feet in lieu of the maximum dock extension of 30 feet into a the lake and
a maximum area of 600 square feet.
Property described as: Parcel Id# 32-21-30-0000-00-021 as recorded in the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida
Located at 2111 Via Tuscany Zoned: PR

/S/ Stephanie J Edsall
Stephanie J, Edsall
Board Secretary
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by Jhe Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (F.S. 286.0105)"Persons with disabilities needing
assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact the Board of Adjustment Secretary
(407-599-3237) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting..
6/26


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

G i PUBLIC NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the Historic Preservation Commission of the
City of Winter Park, Florida on Wednesday, July 9, 2008 at 9:00 a.m. in the Commission Chambers of
City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Flonda, to consider the following PUBLIC HEARINGS:

COR 08-005 Request qof James Zboril on behalf of Renaissance Construction & Development LLC
for a Certificate of Review and variance request to allow a 1,115 square foot detached garage to
utilize a ten foot rear setback from the alley in lieu of the allowed 900 square foot maximum or 25 foot
rear setback. Contributing historic resource located within the College Quarter Historic District. Zoned
R1-AAA. Parcel ID. #30-22-07-1490-01-150.

COR 08-006 Request of Gaetano Oddi and Kate Gillett for a Certificate of Review to stucco
the exterior wall and replace the windows at their property located at 455 Huntington Avenue.
Contributing historic resource located within the College Quarter Historic District. Zoned R2. Parcel ID,
#07-22-30-8760-00-190.

COR 08-007 Request of Ann Juergens for a Certificate of Review for window replacement on a
portion of her property located at 407 Melrose Avenue. Listed on the Winter Park Register of Historic
Places as a historic landmark.Zoned R1-A. Parcel ID. #07-22-30-8919-02-211
All interested parties are Invited to attend and be heard. Additional information will be available in the
Planning and Community Development Department office so that citizens may acquaint themselves
with each issue and receive answers to any questions they may have prior to the meeting. (407)
599-3498.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
Includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (F.S. 286.0105)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate In any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's Office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
Is/: Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC
City Clerk
6/26






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FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 48-2007-CP-002557-0
IN RE. ESTATE OF
AIMEE H. MASON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate otAIMEE H. MA-
SON. deceased, whose date of death was Septem-
ber 22, 2007 and whose social security number is
XXX-XX-3933, is pending in tho Circuit Court for Or-
ange Coeunty, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is: P.O. Box 4994, Orlando, FL 32002. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below,
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-

THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of i'decedenl and uthllr per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER TIHE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
June 19, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative.
JOSEPH P. DUDLEY, ESQ.
Florida Bar No. 650293
403 Downing Street
New Smyrna Beach, Florida 32168
Telephone: (386) 428-2434
Personal Representative.
Janie Davis
604 Oakwood Avenue
New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169
6/19.6/26


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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY.
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No '48-2008-CP-1309-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBIN K. JULIAN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of thile estate of ROBIN K
JULIAN, deceased. File No., 48-2008-CP-1309-0,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County.
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
I .... .. ", 1 ,I h , I ir, I . .. .I ih '
and the Personal Representative's attorney are set
forth below
Ali interested persons are required to file with
the Court WITHIN THREE CALENDAR MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE (1) alt claims against the estate
and (2) any objection by an interested person
to whom notice was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue or jurisdiction of the Court,
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THE OBJECTING PERSON.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this notice of
administration* June 26. 2008.
W E Winderweedle, JR.
Attorney
219 W Comstock Avenue
Winter Park, Fl. 32790-2997
Telephone: (407) 628-4040
Florida Bar No. 0116626
GEORGE P JULIAN
Ancillary Personal Representative
6/26, 7/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 08-DR-2078-02D-W
Division. Family
Sharon Billerbeck, Petitioner
and
Hal C. Billerbeck, Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
TO: (name of Respondent) Hal C. Billerbeck
(Respondent's last known address) 531
Sundown Trail, Casselberry, Fl 32707
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed
against you and thai you are required to serve a

531 Sundown Tiall, ii.., i. 1 07 on or
before July 2, 2008, -.i ,i. i, ... i,,,,, ,I with the
cleik of this Court at (clerk's address) 301 North
Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 before service on
Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to

Copies of all court documents in this case,
,, i ,,,,, ,,,i . available at the Clerk ol the
S, , ,,,i T You ma ny review liese docu-
ments upon request.
You ust keep lei Clerk of tlie Circuit Court's
office nollfied of your current address (You may
file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme

on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information, Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings
Dated 5/13/2008.
Maryanne Morse,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: MIKELS
Deputy Clerk
6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
File No 2008-CP-1114
IN RE: ESTATE OF
KATHRYN M DWYER.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

10, 2008: File Number 2008-CP- C114, is pending
in tile Circurt Court for Seminole Counity, Florida,
Probate Division, the address o! which is 301 N,
Park Avenue. Sanford, Florida 32771 The names
and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth
below
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is June
26, 2008.


RICHARD A. LEIGH, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 119591
Swann & Hadley, PA
1031 W. Morse Boulevard, Suite 350
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: 407-647-2777
DOMINICK DIDONNA
Personal Representalive
711 Pheasant Run
Kennett Square, PA 19348
6/2


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY.
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 482008-CP-001353-0
IN RE ESTATE OF
ALICE VIVIAN JONES-STAMPS.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Alice Vivian
Jones-Stamps, deceased, whose date of death was
January 20, 2008, is pending in tile Cacuit Court

340, Odando, FL 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney atlie set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate oil whon a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is June
26, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney fr Caroine D, Stamps
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Mainland, FL 32794-1251,
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Caroline 0. Stamps
9858 Downey Cove Drive
Orlando, Florida 32825


6, 7/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No : 48-2008-CP-001370-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
dorothy p. stehli.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Dorothy P


which is 425 North Orange Avenue. Room 340, Or-
lando. FL 32801. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal represen-
lative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
* All other creditors ofthe decedent and other per-
sons having clainis or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is June
1, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Thomas E Kerney
Attorney for Brian L. Stehli
Florida Bar No. 266183
1420 E. Concord St.
Orlando, FL 32803
Telephone: (407) 898-5526
Personal Representative:
BRIAN L. STEHLI, A.K.A. Brian Lindsay Stehli
3002 Lando Lane
Orlando, Florida 32806
6/19.6/26


Pane 14 Thursday. June 26. 2008


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Paae 16 Thursday. June 26, 2008


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G.O






July 2008
Volume 2, No. 7

Publisher
Kyle Taylor

Editor
Alex Babcock

Designer
Lacy Rushin

Copy Editor
Jonathan Gallagher

Reporters
Carole Arthurs, Isaac
Babcock, Amy K.D. Tobik,
Karen M. Phillips

Contributing Writers
Jen Adams, Gina DiPaolo,
Suzanne Keezel

Intern
Justine Griffin


INDEX

G.O. KIDS!.......... B4
The Buzz .......... B4
Family Events..... B5
Day trips..........B6
Get Organized..... B7
Family Briefs..... .B7
Snap To It!........ B8


Cover image: Visitors engage in
Disney's newest ride-game expe-
rience, Toy Story Mania. Photo
courtesy of Walt Disney World.


Cancer in a kids' book


CAROLE ARTHURS
G.0. FAMILY
Local doctor and breast sur-
geon Shenin Sachedina recently
wrote a book to help children
deal with a mom who has breast
cancer.
In her book, "Metu and Lee
Learn About Breast Cancer,"
Sachedina helps children deal
with a disease that frightens
them. "It is my sincere belief that
this book will assist children,
ages 5 and above, to understand
the changes when their mom
has cancer and how to deal with
the challenges."
Sachedina explains about the
"good guys and the bad guys,"
noting that the "bad guys are
little bad cells that have been set
up in Mommy's breast." In kid's
terms, she explains about che-
motherapy, radiation, surgery
and even provides a to-do list
for kids and dads. The book was
written with the help of Michael
Winslow. Winslow is an actor
and comedian known as the
"Man of 10,000 Sound Effects"
for his ability to make realis-
tic sound effects using only his
voice. He attended the Lisa Maile
School of Acting, Modeling, and


Imaging. He is best known for
his role as Sgt. Larvelle "Motor
Mouth" Jones in the "Police
Academy" series of movies and
TV shows.
Sachedina is the founder
of The Central Florida Breast
Center in Winter Park. She has
been in practice as a breast sur-
geon for 10 years and is a board-
certified surgeon specializing in
breast disease.
She hopes that this book is the
front-runner for several more
books for kids, including "Metu
and Lee Learn About Diabetes"
and "Meta and Lee Learn about
Leukemia."
"It is my sincere hope that the
Metu and Lee series of books


will help children who are deal-
ing with different medical issues
gain knowledge, wisdom and
hope," Sachedina said. She can
be reached at 407-740-5127.


The big "Oh!"


A reminder
that laughter
is essential

GINA DiPAOLO
i ONTRiyI.ITING COLUMNIST
My brother-in-law sent me one
of those silly e-mail question-
naires. You know, the ones
where you read the responses
and think to yourself, "I didn't
know Liz's favorite cereal was
Captain Crunch. I should have
her over for breakfast soon so
we can enjoy our favorite cereal
together." Anyway, one of the
questions was "What is your
favorite sound?" My response
was "the sound of crashing
waves," but a very close sec-
ond was laughter. I love to hear
laughter. I love to laugh. I love
to be around people who make
me laugh. I get an unusual high
from making someone laugh.
It's a special talent to do this
and sometimes takes some
thought.
My children laugh a lot. They
also supply ample opportuni-
ties to laugh. In fact, they laugh
at most things, whether they
are funny or not. Sometimes I
hear myself repeat the mantra
of my mother when we would
be riding in the car. "This is no
time for silliness." Of course
you know the result of this,
right? Side-splitting laughter
from all children along for the
ride. My two older ones are
now employed as official baby-
laugh makers. They will try
anything to make their young-
est sibling giggle. As the baby
gets older she's much choosier,
but they still go to unusual


lengths to hear that sound
because I believe they are now
addicted to the sound of her
laughter. My son has found his
niche with the loud bangs and
pops he makes with his tongue;
my daughter's tool is her silly-
sounding words and crazy
faces.
Do you know that on aver-
age, preschool-age children
laugh up to 400 times a day?
Would you be shocked to learn
that the average adult laughs
only 17 times per day? I can
think of about 10 reasons right
off the top of my head why I
would only laugh 17 times per
day. And when I do laugh, I.
might have to admit that some
of those are sarcastic in nature
and sometimes forced laugh-
ter. Life does become serious
at some point. I remind my
husband of this at times. "Get
serious, dude, we have three
children now. Stop watching
college football and mow the
yard." But I guess the question
is, do we have to take life and
ourselves so seriously? Why not
laugh more than 17 times per
day?
Ever think about what makes
you laugh? I like comedians;
smart comedians, ones who
watch the news. Then there's
my husband's "giggle." When
he really thinks something is
funny, this giggle escapes from
this otherwise very tough man.
Just hearing it makes me laugh.
My sister is my true comedic
gift, though. Her observations
on the otherwise mundane
really do it for me. She and I can
be convulsed in laughter and
my husband will sit there look-
ing at us without even crack-
ing a smile. Go figure. Like the
time she described to me her


audition for a movie. After she
fell over out of a headstand,
the producer asked her to state,
into the microphone, her name
and a few other vital statistics.
She stood there motionless and
forgot her name. At the end, she
told me that if they wanted a
clumsy mute, she would get the
job hands-down.
So maybe the quasi-psycho-
babble isn't convincing you to
laugh more? Let me then share
some health benefits with you.
Here goes: Laughter reduces the
level of stress hormones and
increases the level of healthy
hormones. This means a stron-
ger immune system. A good
laugh exercises the diaphragm,
contracts the abs and works out
the shoulders. Laughter pro-
vides a physical and emotional
release. Laughter is a distraction
from guilt, anger and stress.
Laughter can give us a different
perspective on things; humor
gives us a more lighthearted
view. Laughter connects you
with others; it is contagious. Did
you know that scientists have
actually proven that fake laugh-
ter produces the same physical
results as real laughter and may
actually lead to more real laugh-
ter?
So there you go. Who doesn't
want a healthier immune sys-
tem? Do what you love, and
invest your time in activities
and others who bring a smile
to your face and a laugh to your
heart. For the record, my broth-
er-in-law's response to the ques-
tion was "the sound of children
laughing." He's single, hand-
some and smart. I sure could
use a sister-in-law to laugh with,
if you know anyone who's look-
ing.


G.O. Family, a production of Observer Newspapers


I Page B2


July 2008







THEME PARKS I Thrills added,
K>.. :. ".


colorful new rides hope to lure guests


I





yl
.' u~:.= ~


< continued from the front page

Universal Studios
Orlando, FL
UniversalOrlando.com
407-363-8000

Cost
Children 3-9 $60.00
Adults $71.00

Current discounts
For a limited time, Florida residents receive
a second day and second park free when
you purchase a one-day/one-park ticket or
one-day/two-park ticket.

Passes are also available with and with-
out blackout dates: Power Pass $139.99,
Preferred Pass $199.00, Premier Pass
$279.95. See Web site for more details.
What's new
This movie-TV production studio and park
recently added a new adventure ride based
on the animated series starring the notori-
ous Simpson family. The Simpsons Ride
sends visitors flying and floating through
Krustyland's kiddie attractions on a motion-
based simulator ride. The Blue Man Group
is also currently performing a new show
with their unique combination of music,
comedy and multimedia theatrics.

Islands of Adventure
Orlando, FL
UniversalOrlando.com
407-363-8000

Cost
Children 3-9 $60.00
Adults $71.00

Current discounts
For a limited time, Florida residents receive


a second day and second park free when to enjoy more flexibility.
you purchase a one-day/one-park ticket or See Web site for multiple offers.
one-day/two-parkticket.


Passes are also available with and with-
out blackout dates: Power Pass $139.99,
Preferred Pass $199.00, Premier Pass
$279.95. See Web site for more details.

What's new
Known for its 3-D adventures, roller
coasters and amusement rides, Islands
of Adventure attracts visitors of all ages.
Visitors can eat breakfast with animated
characters at Confisco Grille from Thursday
through Sunday morning from 9 a.m. to
10:30 a.m. The breakfast is $15.95 for
Adults and $9.95 for children, plus tax and
gratuity. Call 407-224-4012 for reserva-
tions.

Disney Parks
Buena Vista, FL
DisneyWorld.Disney.go.com
407-939-6244

Cost per park
Children 3-9 $60.00
Adults 10-59 $71.00

Florida residents
Children 3-9 $54.00
Adults 10-59 $63.90

Current discounts
Florida residents can purchase Magic Your
Way Base Tickets at discounted prices.
Several multi-day, multi-park ticket pack-
ages available.
For example: Florida resident pays $159
plus tax for a four-day Magic Your Way
Base Ticket, whereas a non-Florida resi-
dent would pay $202 plus tax for the same
ticket. And Florida residents can add the
Park Hopper Option, Water Park Fun and
More Option, and the No Expiration Option


Magic Kingdom
What little girl wouldn't like the chance to
spend the night in the Cinderella Suite atop
the infamous castle? As a part of "The Year
of a Million Dreams" program started in
2007, Disney guests are chosen at random
to stay in the impressive castle.

As temperatures rise this summer, cool
off in the new 400-seat theater located
in Tomorrowland and experience one of
the latest adventures at Magic Kingdom,
Monsters, Inc. Laugh Floor, an interactive
journey with one-eyed Mike Wazowski and
his buddies inspired by Pixar's "Monsters,
Inc."

Epcot
Originally named Experimental Prototype
Community of Tomorrow, EPCOT was the


second theme park at Walt Disney World
and opened in 1982. Journey around the
world and experience various cultures of
countries such as: Canada, Germany, Japan,
Italy, Switzerland, China and Mexico.
The Epcot International Food & Wine
Festival is held Sept. 26 through Nov. 9 and
gives guests the opportunity to try myriad
foods featured at more than 25 interna-
tional marketplaces.

For a little relaxation at the park, check
out the Sounds Like Summer concerts
beginning June 9 and continuing through
April 10. The concerts will feature bands
playing the music of Elton John, The Eagles,
The Supremes, Bon Jovi, U2, the Bee Gees
and many more.

Children of all ages can climb aboard
the refurbished ride once known as "Living

> turn to THEME PARKS on page B5


Disney World added a "Finding Nemo" theme to its EPCOT Living Seas exhibit, at top. Universal Orlando' .
has launched its Simpsons-themed simulator ride where "Back to the Future" once stood, above. At right, an '
animatronics engineer puts finishing touches on Mr. Potato Head on Disney's "Toy Story Mania" ride.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF WALT DISNEY WORLD AND UNIVERSAL ORLANDO RESORT _______-______________________


G.O. Family, a production of Observer Newspapers


July 2008


Page B3













jRs


oJ


This month's art comes from art students at
Dommerich Elementary School in Maitland.


Mask


Water color
on paper


Illustrated by
Sam Gakzak
fourth grade


Chinese Scroll

Water color
on paper

Illustrated by
Lily Aydt
Second grade


When I
grow up...

Crayon on paper

Illustrated by
Amanda Egan
Fourth grade


This month, we asked kids at Dommerich
Elementary School in Maitland:

"What are you doing this summer?"

Interested in getting your face on The Buzz? Call us at 407-628-8500 and
ask for Editor Alex Babcock to sign up for a visit to your school.


"I'm going to
South Carolina to
a log cabin with
my grandparents,
Bizkids, Boy Scout
camp and Rollins
summer camp."
-Will, age 11


"I'm going to Rollins
College summer
camp, tennis camp
and the Learning
Tree. I will play with
friends, have slee-
povers and stay up
late."
-Kaitlin, age 11


"I am going to
Michigan with
grandparents.
I'm going to the
Bahamas and North
Carolina for two .
weeks, the beach
and Gainesville."
--Jackson, age 10


"I'm going to visit
my friend in Texas
who used to go to
Dommerich with me.
It will be good to see
an old friend."
-Colin, age 11


"My family is going
to the Grand Canyon
and I will play with
friends and go to
camps."
-Caroline, age 10


Page B4 July2008 G.0. Family, a production of Observer Newspapers


Page B4


July 2008


G.O. Family, a production of Observer Newspapers







THEME PARKS I New name, new sights at 'Hollywood Studios'


< continued from page B3
Seas" to journey into a coral reef filled with Disney friends
Nemo, Dory, Crush and Mr. Ray in The Seas with Nemo &
Friends.

Hollywood Studios
Disney has renamed its former "Disney-MGM Studios," a
Hollywood-themed park which has grown to include mov-
ies, theater and television.
A new edition of "Playhouse Disney Live on Stage!"
opened in February and includes stars from "Mickey
Mouse Clubhouse," "Little Einsteins," "Handy Manny" and
more. Visitors can also party with the interactive traveling
show called Block Party Bash, as more than 20 Disney-
Pixar characters fill the theme park and dance and play.
Grab some 3-D glasses and shrink to the size of a toy in
Disney's newest ride-game experience, Toy Story Mania.
The game provides an ever-changing variety of targets and
is intended for all ages. "The Chronicles of Narnia" fans
will enjoy the Journey into Narnia: Prince Caspian, new
this month to the park. Visitors will have an opportunity
to see behind-the-scenes footage, storyboards, props and
costumes from the latest movie..

Animal Kingdom
Spend the day with more than 1,000 animals living at
the 500-acre theme park, catch a musical and enjoy the
adventurous rides.
Take an exhilarating ride on the new roller coaster com-
plete with hairpin turns called Expedition Everest that takes
guests on a high-speed train adventure along the treacher-
ous terrain of the towering Forbidden Mountain.
A 30-minute musical production called "Finding Nemo
-The Musical" in their newly enclosed Theater in the Wild
is sure to win the hearts of visitors of all ages with dancers,
aerialists and larger-than-life puppets.

Busch Gardens Tampa Bay
Tampa, FL
BuschGardens.'com
813-987-5082

Cost
Children 3-9 $54.95
Adults $64.95
Current discounts
Florida residents can purchase a 2008 Fun Card and come
back to the park all year for free. Discounts also given if
combined with Adventure Island and/or Sea World tickets.
See Web site for more details.
What's new
This African-themed park features a zoo, rides and wilder-
ness gardens. -
Recent additions include Jungula, a four-acre attraction set


in the Congo area filled with exotic creatures, multi-story
family play areas, rides and live entertainment. Experience
the thrill of the park's refurbished roller coaster, Sheikra,
with its exhilarating "floorless" cars. The Bird Gardens
Theater features an all-new animal show called Critter
Castaways. It features a menagerie of familiar pets, such
as dogs and cats, with more exotic creatures, such as
kangaroos.

Cypress Gardens
Winter Haven, FL
CypressGardens.com
863-324-2111

Cost
Children 3-9 $34.95
Adults 10-59 $39.95
Seniors 60+ $34.95
Current discounts
Buy any regular-priced one-day ticket and get a second
day free (must be used within six days). See Web site for
more details.

Gold Passports are also available for access to Cypress
Gardens all year
children 3-9 $59.95
Adults 10-59 $79.95
Seniors 60+ $69.95
What's new
This 72-year-old attraction was completely refurbished in
2005 and features more than 40 rides including six roller
coasters, the world's tallest spinning rapids ride, water ski
shows and historic botanical gardens.
Catch the amazing flips and tricks this summer at the
new nighttime ski show on Saturday evenings at 9 p.m.
through Labor Day. New elements include upbeat music,
pyrotechnics and powerful spotlights. Check the Web site
for the latest in live concert information.


Along with sprawling lush gardens, Cypress Gardens offers a
variety of traditional theme-park rides. Busch Gardens' new Jungala
attraction offers an up-close look at African wildlife.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF CYPRESS GARDENS, BUSCH GARDENS


events
Fa il ',"
., III .III.


Still time to join Eco Camp
Does your child enjoy learning about nature?
If so, there are still a couple of spots left in the
second session of Seminole County Natural
Lands' Eco Camp! The camp is for middle
school age students ages 10-13. This day camp
will run July 7-11 at the Ed Yarborough Nature
Center in Geneva. Students will get hands-on
learning about Central Florida's Ecosystems in
this interactive camp.
The cost for Seminole County Residents is
$135. Non-county residents pay $145. Call Amy
Raub at 407-349-0959 or e-mail at araub@
seminolecountyfl.gov for more information.

Mystic Dunes embraces
'daughter, to the course week*
Mystic Dunes Golf Club has announced plans to
participate in "Take Your Daughter to the Course
Week" being held July 7 13.
Mystic Dunes Golf Club will offer daughters
free golf when accompanied by a paying adult
during the week. In addition, a one-hour clinic
for girls will be held from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. on
Tuesday, July 8. The cost is $10.
Call the Mystic Dunes Golf Club Pro Shop at
407-787-5678 to book a tee time and for more
information.
Take Your Daughter to the Course Week, now
in its ninth year, was developed by the National
Golf Course Owners Association and is part


of Play Golf America an industry-wide effort
to grow the game. Take Your Daughter to the
Course Week is aimed at shrinking the gender
difference while promoting golf as a family
activity. Visit www.ngcoa.org and www.playgol-
famerica.com for more information.

Mud volleyball for
the March of Dimes
There are only two months until the March of
Dimes 16th Annual Mud Volleyball Tournament.
Enjoy a day of mud-slinging fun while helping a
worthy cause on Saturday, Aug. 23. Held at the
Lee Vista Center in Orlando, this Central Florida
event is the largest on the East Coast.
Lee Vista Center is located off Semoran
Boulevard, one mile north of Orlando International
Airport. Registration is $400 before August 1st
and $450 after for a co-ed team of six to 10
players.
Teams raising $1,500 or more receive special
perks as "Club Mud" teams. Swine in style with
premier event recognition and status including
mud servants provided by Hooters, complimen-
tary food and beverages, VIP restroom facilities
and much more.
Featuring more than 150 corporate teams
wallowing in two to three feet of mud, the tour-
nament raised more than $181,000 with more
than 2,000 participants and spectators in 2007.
Call Jessica Hadelman at the March of Dimes
at 407-599-5077, extension 24 or e-mail jhadel-


man@marchofdimes.com to register a team
and for more information. Mud volleyball is still
in its early planning stages and there are spon-
sor opportunities available. Visit mudvb.com for
more information.
The March of Dimes is a nonprofit organiza-
tion for pregnancy and baby health. Visit mar-
chofdimes.com/florida and nacersano.org for
more information.

Shands Arts in Medicine
featured in TV show
The filmmakers of "Healing Words: Poetry and
Medicine" discovered that the Shands Arts in
Medicine program was committed to that phi-
losophy when they came to Gainesville in 2004.
Four years later, the documentary, which high-
lights Shands AIM, is set to air on PBS stations
across the nation beginning July 1.
Director James Cavenaugh came to Shands
at the University of Florida medical center
after meeting Gail Ellison, Shands AIM writer-
in-residence, at a Duke University conference
on poetry and medicine. At the conference,
Cavenaugh and producers Dr. David Watts and
Joan Baranow, presented footage filmed in
other settings some of which featured John
Fox, a nationally recognized poet who had previ-
ously visited Shands at UF.
Local PBS affiliate WMFE will air the program.
Check local listings for times. Visit www.shands.
org for more information.


.' - 7: ^- - .
Send us your jkes t
work;, short t tOMOS an

- .-
-poems for'the ne)iie.

If yours Is featured: in O-! -
you will rec.ive.'a -:
free Carvel ice cream:copne
E-mail usIat.
family@observer,6ewspapers corn
You may be featured itn r next.
issue of G.O. Family' a ea
sweet,,treat',.

IfVOU .r artIork ..-d 1 z'
al V-". --,.. ,..


Page B5 July2008 6.0. Family, a produCtion 01 U~server Newspapers


G.O. Family, a production of Observer Newspapers


Page B5


July 2008









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G.O, F,'fl-i,, _
Seminole County isn't known as a tourist destination, despite having an international
airport that caters largely to tourist travelers. While Orange County offers up theme
parks such as Universal Orlando and SeaWorld, you'll find parks a little more relaxed and
easygoing on the north side of the county line. Here's a look at places to go all of them
budget-friendly in what's known as "Florida's Natural Choice," Seminole County.


Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center
201 S. Magnolia Ave.
Sanford, FL 32771
Contact: 407-321-8111
Hours: Showtimes Friday and Saturday 7:30
p.m.
Sunday 1 p.m.
Cost: Tickets range from $10 to $23
Description: This beautifully restored historic
Vaudeville Theatre hosts a wide range of perfor-
mances: plays, musicals, ballets, operas, recitals,
pageants and lectures. Currently showing: Disney's
"High School Musical" until June 1.
HelenStairsTheatre.com
Central Florida Zoological Park
3755 N.W. U.S. Highway 17-92
Sanford, FL 32771
Contact: 407-323-4450
Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Cost: $9.95 adults, $7.95 seniors, $5.95 children
Description: Stroll along winding pathways to
encounter 100s of mammals, reptiles and birds
close up. Weekend animal programs; a favorite for
kids of all ages.
CentralFloridaZoo.org
Lukas Butterfly Encounter
1909 Salvia Road
Oviedo, FL 32765
Contact: 407-365-6163
Hours: Monday-Saturday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Cost: $7 adults, $6 seniors, $5 children
Description: See butterflies hatch' right in front of
your eyes. Tour rooms full of butterflies in environ-
ments made to match their natural habitats.
LukasButterflyEncounter.com
Big Tree Park
761 General Hutchison Parkway
Longwood, Fl 32750
Hours: 8 a.m. to sunset
Closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas
Contact: 407-322-6567
Description: Big Tree Park is known for its natural
vegetation, its marshlands, and its beautiful board-
walk trail. "The Senator," the park's main attraction,
is a 3,500-year-old baldcypress. The property was
donated by Sen. M.O. Overstreet in 1929. Picnic
tables and restroom facilities are available.
Red Bug Lake Park
3600 Red Bug Lake Road
Castleberry, FL 32707
Hours: 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year's Eve"
Contact 407-695-7113
Description: Red Bug Lake Park is a 60-acre park
adjacent to Ihe 28-acre Red Bug Lake Red Bug
Lake Park offers picnicking, playgrounds, fishing,
boating, tennis, racquetball, wallyball, basketball,
sand volleyball, solball, flag football, soccer, log-
ging, walking, exercise trail, and pavilion rentals.
Restrooms are available throughout the park
Little Big Econ Canoe Launch
County Road 419 (Snow Hill Road)
Hours: Sunrise to sunset
Contact: 407-321-1693
Description: The canoe launch offers a perfect
place to enjoy the Econlockhatchee River. It is
designed solely as a canoe launch area. This site
includes parking.
Black Hammock Adventures
2536 Black Hammock Fish Road
Oviedo, FL 32765
Contact: 407-365-1244
Cost: $23.95 adults, $19.95 children 10 and
younger for a 30-minute ride. Reservations required
for longer rides
Description: Take an airboat ride across Lake
Jesup near Oviedo, which has the highest popula-
tion of alligators of any lake in Florida. Ten thou-
sand acres large, Lake Jesup flows directly into
the St. Johns River. See alligators, eagles and other
wildlife in their natural habitat.
TheBlackHammock.com/contact.htm
Soldier's Creek Park
2400 State Road 419
Longwood, FL 32750
Hours: 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Contact: 407-321-1693
Description: Soldier's Creek Park is a 315-acre
park adjacent to Spring Hammock Preserve. The
park has ball fields and soccer fields. Currently the
ball fields are used by community groups for youth
boys baseball and youth girls softball.


Mullet Lake Park
2368 Mullet Lake Park Road
Geneva, FL 32732
Hours: 24 hours (all day)
Contact: 407-321-1693
Description: The 151-acre park is next to 631 -acre
Mullet Lake. There is a restroom and pavilion avail-
able for public use along with fishing and camping
at this park. Boats can be launched from there into
the St. Johns River basin.
Fun World
4311 S. Orlando Drive
Sanford, FL 32773
Contact: 407-330-1792
Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Cost $8 for unlimited rides from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
(kids, summer only); free admission and parking
Description: Fun World is a family amusement
park featuring karts, bumper boats, bumper cars,
miniature golf, 15 adult rides and eight kiddie rides,
a 250-game arcade, a birthday party restaurant
and more.
Museum of Seminole County
300 Bush Blvd.
Sanford, FL 32773
Contact: 407-321-2489
Cost: Free
Hours: Wednesday to Friday noon to 4 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Description: The museum offers information about
Seminole County's agricultural history as well as a
glimpse of the past with a vast collection of period
antiques, historical photographs and exhibits of
early Florida agriculture and transportation.
SeminoleCountyFL.gov/lls/museum
Bradlee-Mclntyre House
130 W. Warren Ave.
Longwood, FL 32750
Contact: 407-'332-0225
Cost Free
Description: The Bradlee-Mclntyre House was
built about 1885 and is the only surviving '"cottage"
in Orange and Seminole counties. It's evocative of
the typical house seen during the Victorian Period.
Rock Springs Riding Stables
Springs Run State Reserve
P.O. Box 1544
Sorrento, FL 32776
Contact: 352-735-6266
Hours: Trails range from one hour to six hours
Cost: $37 to $157, depending on trail type
Description: Guided horseback tours on scenic
trails filled with Florida wildlife
RSRRanch.com
Congo River and Exploration Co.
531 W. State Road 436
Altamonle Springs, FL 32714
Contact. 407-682-4077
Call for hours and admission prices
Description. 18 holes of miniature golf course amid
a tropical environment with caves and waterfalls.
CongoRiver.com
Aiguille Rock Climbing Center
999 Charles St.
Longwood, FL 32750
Contact: 407-332-1430
Hours: Monday-Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Friday- 10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Sunday noon to 7 p.m.
Cost: $15 a day
Description: Aiguille Rock Climbing Center offers
rock climbing for all ages. The air-conditioned
facility offers a 7,500 square feet of climbing walls.
Aiguille.com
Wekiva Marina
1014 Miami Springs Drive
Longwood, FL 32779
Contact: 407-862-1500
Call for pricing and hours
Description: Wonderful, nature-filled canoeing and
fishing. Experience the true state of Florida.
Rivership Romance
433 North Palmetto Ave.
Sanford, FL 32771
Contact: 407-321-5091
Hours: Reservations required
Price: $43.34 adults
Description: Relax and dine while cruising the his-
toric St. Johns River. Entertainment, menu selec-
tion, unsurpassable hospitality. Climate controlled.
Reservations required. RivershipRomance.com


Page B6 July 2008 GO. Family, a production of Observer Newspapers


G.O. Family, a production of Observer Newspapers


Page B6


Er --e6m-


July 2008









Get


/yD(oej


Preparing for
an emergency

SUZANNE KEEZEL
PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZER
It's official hurricane season
is upon us, and there's no better
time than the present to pre-
pare for an emergency. Getting
organized before disaster strikes


can be done in a few quick steps
and will make a huge difference
when the lights go out!

Have a plan
Discuss with your family mem-
bers where you will meet if you,
should be evacuated or if disas-
ter strikes when not everyone
is home. Cell phone service
may cut out, so it's important
to decide on a meeting place
before the storm strikes. Have
a plan to connect with out-of-
the-area family members to let
them know you're safe. If a hur-
ricane is threatening your area,
fill your car up with gas so that
you are prepared in the event of
an evacuation.
Shop ahead
Stock your pantry with non-per-
ishable and ready-to-eat foods,
water 3 bottles per person
per day and pet food. For the
adventurous who like to cook
under emergency conditions,
stock up on the cooking fuel
of your choice Sterno, char-
coal or propane. Before a storm


starts looming on the coast, fill
necessary prescriptions for all
family members, and don't for-
get your pets!

Make two emergency kits
Make two kits: one for your
home and one for your car. In
each kit, include water for each
family member, a first aid kit,
toiletries including toilet
paper and meal-replacement
bars. Also, include a change of
clothes for each person, a radio,
a flashlight, lots of batteries and
a copy of your insurance poli-
cies, and you're all set.

Stash some cash
During the aftermath of
Hurricane Charlie, some stores
quickly reopened but were oper-
ating on a cash-only basis, as
debit and credit card machines
were down. So be sure to avoid
this dilemma by stashing a few
20s, or 50s if you're a high roller,
in your emergency kits.

Memory keepers
Store photos and home mov-


ies on a CD or DVD, stored in a
tote bag or plastic tub. This way
they take up less space, will be
easy to grab in case of an evac-
uation and can survive water
damage better than the origi-
nals. Consider an online storage
solution: I like to print and store
my digital photos at Walgreens.
com, where they stay safe and
dry!
Hopefully, you will .never
have to rely on these emergency
preparation tips, but it will sure
feel good just knowing that you
and your family are ready for
action. Here's hoping for a very
quiet and uneventful 2008 hur-
ricane season!
Suzanne Keezel is a professional orga-
nizer and owner of The Organized Planet
in Winter Park. She specializes in help-
ing clients overcome domestic chaos and
clutter.
Visit theorganizedplanet. com or call
407-5 79-9842 for more information.

The nized
rqanized


CFM


365,000 Florida homes
checked for wind safety
More than 365,000 Florida homeowners have
signed up for free wind inspections through
--Me-My-Safe Florida Home (MSFH) program,
only 35,000 inspections shy of the Florida
Legislature's goal of 400,000 free wind inspec-
tions by June 2009. The popular first-come,
first-served program will continue accepting
applications online and by phone until it meets
the 400,000 application goal.
Participating homeowners receive a free
wind inspection report, which suggests ways
homeowners can harden their homes against


storm damage and informs homeowners if
they are currently eligible to save money on
their wind insurance premiums. To date, 60
percent of homeowners who have received a
free wind inspection are eligible for discounts
on their wind insurance premiums averaging
$220 statewide.
Any Floridian who lives in a single-family,
site-built home is eligible for a free wind inspec-
tion through the MSFH program. Floridians
can apply online at www.MySafeFloridaHome.
corn or by calling the program toll-free at
1-866-513-6734. Homeowners who receive
free wind inspections through the MSFH pro-
gram will receive a detailed inspection report,


complete with additional information on esti-
mated insurance premium discounts, if the
homeowner is eligible.
Florida naturalist and TV host
launches 'Living with Alligators'
Living with Alligators, a private initiative intend-
ed to educate millions of residents and visi-
tors in the Southeastern United States on the
subject of alligator safety and public concern,
launched June 26 in Orlando, featuring founder
Israel Dupont.
Living with Alligators addresses the long-
standing and ever increasing public concern


over the sharing of habitat with the storied
swamp saurian that inhabits 14 million acres
of territory spanning 10 states, with nearly 140
million humans.
Dupont is producer and co-host of the new
ReptilesTV channel, and will share host duties
with wildlife TV star Nigel Marven (Animal
Planet, Discovery Channel, Prehistoric Park) in
a live television Webcast in July.
The educational awareness program includes
live presentations conducted by Dupont
throughout the state of Florida, for all manner
of groups and occasions, from a family party
to a state fair.


IN


G.O. Family, a production of Observer Newspapers


Page B7 July 2008


S


do


U I


Central Florida United Soccer Club

FALL 2008 REGISTRATION
at the Club ,t1ie at Aloma Bs' ess Center
6964 ATc- -a. Avc, Winter Park 32 92
(407) 695-4957

Office Hours: Mon & Thur 12:00PM-8:OOPM
Tues, Wed, Fri .10:OOAM-5:OOPM


or

Register on-line at


www. ,cf usC.accOm



~. 'i..~ t~o~i~e9 6e eat


M- M-


(a


July 2008


Page B7


I "o
, 0\









Snap TO II


JEN ADAMS
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER
Hope you are all keeping cool
and keeping your cameras cool
but in use! Don't leave them in
your car as the heat can damage
your equipment or degrade it.
This applies to even point-and-
shoot cameras, and really any
electrical gadget. Think of how
fast chocolate would melt...
It seems like the ballet recit-
al season was so long ago, and
I'm sure that those of you with
daughters in ballet took some
great shots of them. I thought
I would look back at pictures
I took from a recital at Trinity
Preparatory School in May.
Eleanor Furey of Winter Park
looked precious in this outfit. I


want to compare color with the
wildly popular black and white
in this month's article. The black
and white photograph tends to
have you look at the child. The
color picture helps you notice
the outfit, the child, and the
grass in the background, and
it's appealing on many levels,
which rewards repeat viewing.
The outfit, being a major focal
point, would compel most pho-
tographers to cast the picture
in color. On this exact picture, I
think I personally like the color
shot better. If someone really
didn't care for red that much,
then black and white would be
more appealing. As always, every
viewer has an opinion.
When you take a lot of pic-
tures, it is nice to turn some
of them into black and white.
Another bonus of black and
white: I find that if a picture is
not fully clear or sharp, turning
it to black and white helps it
look clearer. Because your eye
is not focusing on the colors, it
almost tricks the eye. It won't
make a blurry picture look clear,
but if you will take notice the
next time you have a slightly
"soft" picture, turn it black and
white, and notice that it does
look better.
I have noticed that the
"younger generations," let's say
under 50 years old, really like
black and white photographs as


young and life was simple. Those
older than 50 tend to like color
more, as at one point in their
lives, they only had black and
white to choose from.
Funny how perception can
be.


SrBernard S. Zeffren, MD
L LPi 'IEugene F. Schwartz, MD
Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-C
.Voted Best Doctors of Central FL,
S 'Orlando Magazine
for 6 consecutive years


OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
Diplomates American Board of t i
Allergy and Immunology


A407-366-7387
7560 Red Bug Lake Rd., Ste. 2064 Oviedo, FL 32765
www.orlandoallergy.com
Additional Offices in Altamonte, Waterford Lakes, Hunters Creek & Orange City


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Page B8 July2008 U.U. family, a production OT unserver i~ewspapers


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well as color. We younger adults
tend to think of black and white
as being more artistic and dif-
ferent from the usual color pho-
tographs. We also tend to think
they are more nostalgic and
remember times when we were


G.O. Family, a production of Observer Newspapers


A .l i. l" f l + + i, l . . ..


July 2008


Page B8


1 vo"


__e




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