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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Forms and procedures for annual evaluation of doctoral students
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Doctoral qualifying examination policy
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Avoiding plagiarism
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Academic integrity in graduate studies
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Doctoral degree plan
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Highlights in the history of the college
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
Full Text

JF UNIVERSE
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Division i








Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009




TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. INTRODUCTION------------------------ -------------------------------------- 1

II. PURPOSE OF THE DOCTORAL PROGRAM--------------------------- --------------- 1

III. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS---------------------------------------------- 1
A. Curriculum---------------------------------------------------------------- 2
1. Approaches and Emphases----------------------------------- -------------- 2
2. Distribution Requirements and transfer of credits information---------------------- 2
a. Core Courses------------------------------------------------------- 3
b. Specialization Courses------------------------------ ----------------- 3
c. Methodological Courses----------------------------- ----------------- 4
d. Supporting Courses------------------------------ ------------------- 4
e. Dissertation Research-------------------------------- --------------- 4
f. Advanced-level Courses------------------------------------------ 4
g. Languages------------------------------------------------------ 4
h. Teaching-------------------------------------------------------------- 5

B. Degree Plan----------------------------------------------------------------- 5
C. Supervisory Committee----------------------------- ---------- --------------- 5
D. Annual Evaluation------------------------------------------------------------ 5
E. Academic Progress---------------------------------------------------------- 6
Unsatisfactory Progress---------------------------------------------------- 6
Computing the GPA------------------------------------------------------ 6
Grades of Incomplete or Unsatisfactory-------------------------------------------- 6
Probation-------------------------- ---------------------------------- 6
Suspension------------------------- ---------- ------------------------ 7
F. Residency---------------------------------------------------------------------- 7
G. Academic Honesty ----------------------------------- ---------- ---------------- 7
H. Behavioral Expectations------------------------------ ----------------------- 8
I. Qualifying Examination ---------------------------------------- ------------------------ 8
J. Dissertation -------------------------------------------------------------- 8
K. Final Oral Examination -------------------------------------------------- 9
L. Participation in Graduation Ceremonies------------------------- ---------------- 9

IV. FINANCIAL AID---------------------------------- --------------- ----------------- 9
A. Assistantships and Fellowships---- -------------------------------------------- 9
B. Teaching and Research Experience---------------------------- ------------------- 10
C. Tuition Wavers------------------------------------------------------------- 10
D. Loans------------------------------------------------------------------ 10
E. Travel Grants------------------------------------------------------------------ 10

V. FACULTY------------------------------------------------------------ 12

Appendix A Forms and Procedures for Annual Evaluation of Doctoral Students--------------------- 19
Appendix B Doctoral Qualifying Examination Policy--------------------------------- ----- 22
Appendix C Avoiding Plagiarism------------------------------------------------- 27
Appendix D Academic Integrity in Graduate Studies--------------------------- --------------- 32
Appendix E Doctoral Degree Plan--------------------------------------------------------- 34
Appendix F Highlights in the History of the College------------------------------- -------------- 39










I. INTRODUCTION
The University of Florida is dedicated to excellence in its Ph.D. program in mass communication. The program
offers a course of study in an ideal setting for a quality educational experience.
The College of Journalism and Communications, proud of its award-winning student body and faculty,
boasts the variety made possible by one of the largest enrollments in the country. More than 200 students
engage in graduate and advanced studies, joining more than 2,800 undergraduates. More than 50 faculty
members in the college teach, conduct research, and provide service.
The University of Florida, with 20 colleges and schools on a single campus, ranks as one of the nation's
most comprehensive research institutions. External funding for research support totals more than a
quarter of a billion dollars per year, placing the university among the top 10 public institutions. The
university enrolls some 48,000 students, including over 7,000 graduate students. They come to the
university from every state in the union and more than 100 foreign countries.
Supporting programs have great strength in law, history, psychology, political science, economics, and
area studies, among others. The Latin American Studies Center and African Studies Center rank among
the best in the nation.
Gainesville (http://www.state.fl.us/gvl/) offers excellent theatre, dance, art, and music. Yet it remains
small enough at a population of 120,000 to provide a suitable environment for concentrated study.
Graduates of the public schools rank high on national tests. For recreation, the sandy beaches of the
Atlantic may be reached in an hour-and-a-half drive, while the top-rated fishing and seafood of the Gulf
Coast lie only an hour west. The major theme parks and metropolitan areas of Orlando and Tampa are
only two hours away.
As one of the fastest-growing states in the nation, Florida offers unmatched opportunities. The state has
emerged as a high-technology center, with communications as a leading field. Florida has 10 state-
supported universities, 28 community colleges, and more than three dozen private institutions of higher
education.


II. PURPOSE OF THE DOCTORAL PROGRAM
The Ph.D. degree is a research degree. The Florida program is designed to develop knowledge, attitudes and skills so
graduates can make important contributions to understanding mass communication. Faculty members help students
lay the foundation for a lifetime of significant, creative work.
The doctoral program prepares students for a variety of opportunities in mass communication. Graduates are
expected to teach at colleges and universities; conduct research for organizations in advertising, journalism, public
relations, telecommunication, and other mass communication fields; do consulting; and conduct research and
contribute to policy in government and private organizations. Doctoral students in the College of Journalism and
Communications gain valuable experience in both teaching and research. Assistantships help prepare students for
academic and other research positions. Students in the program have consistently been among the nation's leaders in
winning top-paper awards at national and regional scholarly meetings.


III. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The doctoral degree requires 90 credit hours past the Bachelor's degree, completion of oral and written
examinations, and successful oral defense of a doctoral dissertation. Doctoral students, fitting together their goals
and the college's Ph.D. curriculum, prepare a degree plan during their first year. As part of the plan, they name a
supervisory committee to assist them in their studies. Students have an annual evaluation to help them assess their
progress. A residency requirement must be fulfilled while taking courses. When courses have been completed,
students take a qualifying examination and become, on passing the examination, formal candidates for the doctoral
degree. Students then complete the dissertation and have a final oral examination. Each requirement is discussed
below. Additional information on requirements is given in the Graduate Catalog http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu .






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


A. Curriculum

A student's Ph.D. program of study is tailored to serve the individual. Within broad general distribution
requirements, the student's program is constructed to provide preparation for lifelong contributions to the
field of mass communication.

1. Approaches and Emphases
The program is built around the following concentrations:
1. Media Law

2. International and Cross-Cultural Communication

3. Public Relations

4. Advertising

5. New Technology and Policy

6. Political Communication and Public Opinion

7. Media Economics and Policy

8. Science/Health Communication

9. Mass Communication



2. Distribution Requirements
Distribution requirements are designed to encourage depth and breadth of knowledge. Five types of
courses are required: (a) mass communication core courses, (b) specialization courses, (c)
methodological courses, (d) supporting courses, and (e) dissertation research. Of these courses, at least
five must qualify as advanced courses, which are those that require the completion of an original
scholarly paper (academic conference quality) that advances knowledge in the field. No more than two
of these courses may be taken as independent study, and at least three must be taken in the college.
Core courses and dissertation research cannot qualify as advanced courses.
Core courses provide an intellectual foundation upon which advanced courses may build.
Specialization courses provide expertise in the student's mass communication concentration area.
Methodological courses provide the tools with which students will undertake future mass
communications research, including statistics. Supporting studies provide both further groundwork for
advanced study and actual experience in advanced study outside the college. In the dissertation, the
student makes an original contribution to knowledge.
Credit requirements may be met through a combination of master's and doctoral study. The Graduate
School of the university requires, for the doctoral degree, a minimum of 90 semester credits beyond
the bachelor's (or the equivalent of the U.S. bachelor's). No more than 30 hours of a master's degree
from another institution will be transferred to a doctoral program. These credits must reflect current or
recent knowledge in the field or a supporting studies field. These courses also must have been
completed recently enough so that material remains timely. In any case, the courses must have been
completed within the seven years immediately prior to approval of the degree plan. The block of 30
credits, as well as any credits transferred in from beyond the master's degree (up to 15 credits), must
be approved by your academic advisor and transferred into the program using the appropriate
paperwork. All courses beyond the master's degree taken at another university, to be applied to the
PhD degree must be taken at an institution offering the doctoral degree. The Transfer of Credit form
is available in the Graduate Division and at http://www.jou.ufl.edu/grad/forms/.
The faculty recognizes that departures from credits listed in the various categories may be required in
individual cases. The distribution requirements provide a general model for planning a program that
2






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


combines the necessary depth for original contributions to understanding mass communication with
the breadth that will enhance the student's personal life and professional activities. Departures from the
model must be approved by the student's supervisory committee and the associate dean for graduate
studies.

A doctoral student cannot receive credit toward his/her degree for an undergraduate class. Doctoral
students are required to take any undergraduate courses needed for their program of study as an audit
or for credit that does not count in the total required credits for the Ph.D. Formal appeals to this
policy must be made in writing to the Graduate Committee.


MINIMUM MINIMUM TOTAL
DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS COURSES CREDITS CREDITS

CORE COURSES (inside the college)
Mass Communication Perspectives 1 4
Communication Colloquium 2 2

Totall ass Communication Core Credits 6
SPECIALIZATION COURSES
Mass Communication Specialty Courses 3 12
(usually taken within the College)

Total Specialization Credits 12-20
METHODOLOGICAL COURSES
Methods Courses (inside the College) 2 6
Other Methods Courses, including Statistics 2 6

Total Methodological Credits 12-20
SUPPORTING COURSES
Supporting Courses (outside the College) 3 9
Other Supporting Courses 5 17

Total Specialization Credits 26
DISSERTATION RESEARCH
Before the Qualifying Examination, MMC7979
After the Qualifying Examination, MMC 7980
Total Dissertation Research Credits 18-24
GRAND TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS 90


a. Core Courses

Core courses provide students with a foundation for teaching and conducting research in mass
communication. Two semesters of Communication Colloquium are required and must be taken
in the student's first fall and spring semesters. Mass Communication Perspectives is also
required and must be taken in the student's first fall semester.

To achieve the depth and breadth of background required for exemplary research and teaching,
students work with their advisors and committees to determine the need for any additional core
courses.

b. Specialization Courses

Specialization Courses consist most commonly of the College of Journalism and
Communications' specialized content courses and research seminars. Students, in consultation
with their advisors and committee members, will determine the specialization courses
appropriate to each individual degree plan.

In addition, all students are strongly encouraged to take MMC 6400--Mass Communication
Theory if they have not completed an equivalent course in the recent past. The course
emphasizes social science theoretical conceptualizations of mass communication.

Specific course numbers, titles, and credits for some of the possible specialization courses
offered by the College are listed online at http://www.jou.ufl.edu/grad/courses.asp As the






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


program develops, additional fixed-subject courses will be added to supplement or replace the
rotating-topics courses. Prerequisites for all courses are described in the Graduate Catalog
http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu

c. Methodological Courses
The Ph.D. is a research degree. As such, a thorough knowledge of the appropriate methods of
inquiry in the pursuit of answers to mass communications questions is essential. At least two
methodology courses must be taken within the College of Journalism and Communications.
Additionally, knowledge of descriptive and inferential statistics, at least through regression, can
be an important tool for doctoral students. As appropriate, this knowledge can be acquired
through coursework previously taken at the undergraduate or master's level. The student's
advisor and supervisory committee will assist the student in selecting appropriate coursework
in statistics.

d. Supporting Courses
The interdisciplinary nature of mass communication suggests that a student may need to
complete courses in disciplines outside the College of Journalism and Communications. The
supporting studies strengthen understanding of ideas and methodology important to the
student's dissertation research. Courses taken will vary depending on students' research
interests and intellectual preparation. Some courses may come from master's study. A
minimum of 9 credit hours of coursework must be taken outside the college.
Students who need greater depth of knowledge to pursue their research interests will take
articulation courses in preparation for advanced supporting studies. For example, a student with
an interest in probing psychological questions in research will need a firm grounding in the
basics of psychology, a student who intends to write a dissertation in history of mass
communication must have a broad acquaintance with history, and so forth. But some
departments offer special introductory graduate-level survey courses more suited to meet the
needs of new doctoral students. Check with faculty and other students.
Students are expected to complete at least one research seminar in their supporting studies. The
seminar will add perspective to understanding of research substance and method.

e. Dissertation Research
At least 18 credits of dissertation research are required. Students begin work on the dissertation
before the qualifying examination. One segment of the examination focuses on the dissertation,
for which students have written a prospectus. Students must be registered in MMC 7979 during
the term they take the qualifying exam. After passing the examination, students register for
dissertation research under MMC 7980--Research for Doctoral Dissertation

f. Advanced-Level Courses

Advanced level courses are those that require the completion of a scholarly paper of academic
conference quality that advances knowledge in the field. Students must complete at least five
advanced-level courses. The Graduate Committee and the associate dean for graduate studies
determine which courses in the College of Journalism and Communications qualify as
advanced-level courses prior to each semester, based on faculty syllabi. A list of advanced-
level offerings within the college is available in the Graduate Division each semester. Courses
outside the College may also be considered advanced-level, based on course syllabi, with
approval of the student's committee chair.

g. Languages
Students emphasizing international communication may need to demonstrate proficiency in at
least one, and possibly two, languages other than English. Other students may be required by
their supervisory committees to demonstrate a reading knowledge of at least one foreign
language, depending on their research interests.






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


h. Teaching
Students are encouraged to complete a course in teaching. Supervisory committees may grant
exemptions based on student interests. The college offers an outstanding course that has
received excellent evaluations from students. See section on Assistantships below.

B. Degree Plan
A program of study, the heart of the degree plan, is determined individually for each student under the
guidance and with the approval of a supervisory committee chaired by the student's academic adviser.
Graduate coordinators and course instructors from supporting departments are consulted during development
of the degree plan. Specific goals of the student are considered in developing the program. Students' degree
plans must be approved by the advisor prior to pre-registration for your second semester of coursework. The
final degree plan, signed by all members of the supervisory committee from the college, should be submitted
to the associate dean for graduate studies in the College of Journalism and Communications by the end of the
second term of study.
The original copy of the final degree plan will be placed in the student's file, and subsequent changes to the
degree plan must be approved by the supervisory committee chair and indicated on the original copy.

C. Supervisory Committee
The supervisory committee plays a crucial role in doctoral studies. The committee assists the student in
developing and carrying out a program of study and executing the dissertation. Proposed committee members
must approve the complete degree plan, as noted above. After reviewing the student's qualifications and
program of study, committee members indicate their approval by their signature on the degree plan.
The committee has at least four members, at least two of whom come from inside the college (including the
chair) and at least one from outside. If an outside member of the committee has not been identified prior to
the second semester of coursework, students must submit the names of three potential outside committee
members with the degree plan. If the committee consists of only two members from inside the college, both
must be full-time, active graduate faculty members. With the possible exception of medical school and law
school faculty members, all outside members must be graduate faculty members.
The committee is not "official" until the supervisory committee form, complete with all signatures, has been
submitted to the Graduate Division and processed.
The committee also conducts the qualifying examination and passes judgment on dissertation topic, progress,
and completed work. The committee chair will serve as the student's academic adviser. The entire
supervisory committee must attend the doctoral oral qualifying exam and the oral final examination. When
necessary, there may be one graduate faculty substitute, but not for the chair or the external member.

D. Annual Evaluation
Each doctoral student is reviewed annually at the conclusion of the spring semester. This review is conducted
by the student's adviser and shared with the student for comment. To facilitate this evaluation, the student
will submit to the adviser evaluation materials as requested and a current curriculum vitae. This evaluation
will include the student's coursework completions, research accomplishments, teaching or research
assignment performance, dissertation progress, and overall level of progress toward the doctoral degree.
After the student has a chance to see and comment on the evaluation, a copy is also placed in the Division of
Graduate Studies and is available for review by the entire graduate faculty of the College of Journalism and
Communications.
A copy of the review form used by the faculty for this annual review process and a copy of the material
requested of the student for its completion are contained in Appendix A of this handbook.
The Division of Graduate Studies is advised of potential problem evaluations. Students who seem unlikely to
complete the program or who appear to hold little promise of contributing to the field will be advised on
alternatives to studying in the doctoral program. Students who fail to remain in good academic standing will
be suspended from the program.






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


E. Academic Progress

Unsatisfactory Progress
Any student may be denied further registration in the university or in a graduate major if progress toward the
completion of the planned program becomes unsatisfactory to the College or the dean of the Graduate School.
The Graduate School defines unsatisfactory progress as failure to maintain a cumulative overall GPA of 3.0
(B) or a cumulative major GPA of 3.0 (B). Students who declare a minor must maintain a 3.0 GPA in the
minor. Grades of incomplete may well lead to a GPA problem.

The College has defined unsatisfactory progress more severely than the Graduate School. Beyond considering
a GPA of less than 3.0 as unsatisfactory, the College also considers as unsatisfactory progress receipt of
grades below C+. The University is expected to allow grades of B- in the near future. At that time our
minimum grade requirement will change from C+ to B-.

See probation and suspension, below.

Computing the GPA
The Graduate School computes two GPAs for all students, overall and major. For students with a minor, the
Graduate School also computes a minor GPA. The major GPA includes only graduate courses in the College.
In computing the overall GPA, the Graduate School counts all courses at the 5000 level or above and
3000/4000 level outside the major taken while the student has been classified as a 7, 8, or 9. Students may
repeat courses in which they earn failing grades. The grade points from both the first and second attempts will
be included in the computation of the GPA, but the student will receive credits only for the second attempt.
When computing the GPA, the Graduate School does not round up fractions. Thus, a 2.99 GPA fails to meet
the 3.0 requirement.

Courses receiving grades of satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) are excluded in GPA computation, as are
correspondence courses and courses at the freshman and sophomore (1000/2000) levels. The Graduate
School also excludes any courses at the junior and senior ( 11'" 1 41 11 '1) levels if in a student's major. Hours at
the 1000/2000 level may not count toward residency or toward the total credits required for a degree. Courses
designated with a grade of H (used only in special situations when the work is expected to be developed over
a period of time greater than a single term) are excluded until such time as grade changes are processed. All H
grades must be cleared prior to graduation. The grade of H is not a substitute for a grade of S, U, or I.
Courses for which H grades are appropriate are noted in their catalog descriptions and must be approved by
the Graduate Curriculum Committee and the Graduate School.

The I (incomplete) grade cannot be given for courses taken as S/U.

Grades of Incomplete or Unsatisfactory
Grades of I (incomplete) or U (unsatisfactory) must be removed by the deadline stated in The University
Calendar. If a grade of I has not been changed to an A-E letter grade by the end of the term following the one
in which the grade was assigned, it will be retained on the record with a notation on the transcript that the
grade will be computed as an E when calculating the grade point average. An I or U grade constitutes
violation of probation or conditional status.

Courses in which students receive grades of U do not meet the Graduate Council's standard of satisfactory
performance. Accordingly, such grades either must be changed or the Graduate School must approve a
petition setting forth the reasons why the student should be allowed to graduate with the U grade on the
record.

Probation
Students may be placed on probation if their progress becomes unsatisfactory. The associate dean for
graduate studies will attempt to contact any student whose grade point has fallen below 3.0. However, the
student bears the responsibility of determining whether the grade point average is sufficient to remain on
regular status. If it is not, the student must confer with the associate dean for graduate studies at the
start of the first term during which the GPA stands below 3.0.






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


The University is expected to allow grades of B- in the near future. At that time our minimum grade
requirement will change from C+ to B-, see below.
Any student who receives one grade below C+ (until the new policy takes effect) will be placed on probation,
with the exception of courses taken from the Levin College of Law. For these courses, any student receiving
one grade below C in any course from the Levin College of Law will be placed on probation.

The student will be required to achieve or maintain a cumulative major GPA and overall GPA of 3.0 or
higher and earn no further grades lower than C+ (until the new policy takes effect), with the exception of
courses taken from the Levin College of Law, for which the C will apply, by the end of the next academic
term in residence and to gain approval of a plan to improve grades prepared by the student. A student who
fails to satisfy the requirements will be suspended from graduate studies.

Suspension
The official University definition of suspension is, "The student is required to leave the University for a given
or indefinite period of time, the termination of which shall depend upon specified acts of the student's own
volition related to mitigation of the offense committed. The student must comply with all sanctions prior to
re-admission."

Any student who accumulates two grades below C+ (until the new policy takes effect and with the exclusion
of courses taken from the Levin College of Law) during his or her graduate studies will be suspended, as will
any student who receives one grade of D+ or lower at any time during his or her graduate studies. The
College may suspend students who violate academic norms, as for example through plagiarizing, or who are
found to have misrepresented themselves in applying for admission or financial aid.

The Graduate Committee will assign probationary status to a student who has made unsatisfactory progress. If
a student fails to meet the conditions of probation, the student will be suspended. That is, the student's records
will be flagged and future registration will be forbidden until the Graduate Committee approves lifting the
flag. The student must petition the Graduate Committee in writing for reinstatement to good standing.

F. Residency
The University of Florida requires a period of concentrated study during a doctoral program. Students must
complete on the Gainesville campus at least 30 credits in one calendar year or 36 credits in no more than four
semesters within a period of two calendar years. A doctoral student who will not be registered at the
university for a period of more than one semester must request written permission from the academic adviser
for a leave of absence for a designated period of time.

G. Academic Honesty
All graduate students in the College of Journalism and Communications are expected to conduct themselves
with the highest degree of integrity. It is the students' responsibility to ensure that they know and understand
the requirements of every assignment. At a minimum, this includes avoiding the following:

Plagiarism: Plagiarism occurs when an individual presents the ideas or expressions of another as his or her
own. Students must always credit others' ideas with accurate citations and must use quotation marks and
citations when presenting the words of others. A thorough understanding of plagiarism is a precondition for
admittance to graduate studies in the college.

Cheating: Cheating occurs when a student circumvents or ignores the rules that govern an academic
assignment such as an exam or class paper. It can include using notes, in physical or electronic form, in an
exam, submitting the work of another as one's own, or reusing a paper a student has composed for one class
in another class. If a student is not sure about the rules that govern an assignment, it is the student's
responsibility to ask for clarification from his instructor.

Research integrity: The integrity of data in mass communication research is a paramount issue for
advancing knowledge and the credibility of our professions. For this reason any intentional misrepresentation
of data, or misrepresentation of the conditions or circumstances of data collection, is considered a violation of
academic integrity.






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Misrepresenting data reported in a thesis or dissertation is a clear violation of the rules and requirements of
academic integrity and honesty. Any violation of the above stated conditions is grounds for immediate
dismissal from the program and will result in revocation of the degree if the degree previously has been
awarded.


H. Behavioral Expectations
As stated in the UF Student Code of Conduct, "Students enjoy the rights and privileges that accrue to
membership in a University community and are subject to the responsibilities which accompany that
membership. In order to have a system of effective campus governance, it is incumbent upon all members of
the campus community to notify appropriate officials of any violations of regulations and to assist in their
enforcement. All conduct regulations of the University are printed and made available to all students as part
of the Florida Administrative Code (Chapter 6C1-4) and are applicable upon publication in the Independent
Florida Alligator, the University Catalog, or any reasonable means of notification."
http://www.dso.ufl.edu/studentguide/studentconductcode.php

I. Qualifying Examination
At the conclusion of courses in the Ph.D. program, each student must pass a comprehensive qualifying
examination. The examination covers mass communication, both the field as broadly conceived and the
specific approach followed by the student. It also covers the supporting studies. Finally, the dissertation
prospectus serves as the focus for one part of the examination. The written part of the examination is followed
by orals. The supervisory committee has the responsibility at this time of deciding whether the student is
qualified to continue work toward the Ph.D. degree.
All members of the supervisory committee must be present at the oral portion. Only with advance notification
and permission of the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research can a graduate faculty member
substitute for another committee member. Justification for the substitution must be made in writing to the
Associate Dean and contain a reasonable timeframe for the substitute to review and prepare for the oral
portion. Only in extraordinary situations would a substitution be approved less than one month prior to the
oral portion of the examination. No substitutions are permitted for the committee chair or the external
member. If a substitution is denied, the oral portion must be cancelled and rescheduled when all committee
members are present.

Telephone participation or participation via videoconference is allowed only in special situations.
Justification for the request to have a member of the supervisory committee participate by telephone must be
made in advance and in writing to the Associate Dean. Advance permission is necessary to estimate the costs
of the call and to reserve a room. The Division of Graduate Studies will not reimburse telephone expenses
directly to students. Therefore, approval to pay for telephone expenses must be made in advance with the
division. The College will accept responsibility for the cost of the call only if the student has followed all
procedures properly.

Upon passing the qualifying examination, the student is admitted to candidacy for the doctorate. Between the
oral portion of the qualifying examination and the date of the degree there must be a minimum of two
semesters. The semester in which the qualifying examination is passed is counted, provided that the
examination occurs before the midpoint of the term. All work for the doctorate must be completed within five
calendar years after the qualifying examination, or this examination must be repeated.

A full description of the policies governing the Qualifying Examination is contained in Appendix B of this
Handbook.

J. Dissertation
The dissertation contributes to mass communication knowledge. It conveys results of original research on a
topic approved by the supervisory committee. All students entering the University of Florida doctoral
programs in Fall 2001 and after are required to submit dissertations in electronic form. Please see the
following web sites for complete details on electronic dissertation workshops, submission procedures, and






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


deadline dates. http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/index.html and http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-
dissertation.pdf. Electronic dissertations may be viewed at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html

K. Final Oral Examination
In the final oral examination, the supervisory committee assesses the dissertation for originality and
contribution to knowledge. The entire supervisory committee must participate in the final oral exam. When
necessary, there may be one graduate faculty substitute, but not for the chair or the external member. See also
"Supervisory Committee" on the previous page. The examination is open to the public. All work for the
doctorate must be completed within five calendar years after the qualifying examination, or this examination
must be repeated.

L. Participation in Graduation Ceremonies
When a student has completed the dissertation and passed the oral examination, the student is eligible to
participate in the College and University graduation ceremonies and to be "hooded" by a member of the
student's supervisory committee as a part of the formal process for conferring the doctoral degree. A student
may not participate in the graduation ceremony in a semester prior to the completion of the dissertation. Only
after the student has defended the dissertation successfully in the oral portion of the examination process and
filed the degree officially with the Graduate School is the student eligible to participate in the graduation
process and degree conferring ceremonies.


IV. FINANCIAL AID
Many students admitted to the doctoral program have a good chance to receive three years of financial aid. Annual
renewal of aid is contingent upon favorable term-by-term evaluation of performance of assigned duties and
responsibilities, the needs of the college's departments, and availability of funds. Good academic standing is
required. Likelihood of support is enhanced by the size of the college's endowment, which now ranks among the very
largest forjournalism and mass communication programs. Student aid often takes the form of an assistantship with
accompanying tuition waiver.
Students may compete for many types of financial aid, among them fellowships, loans, and grants for research and
travel. Additional funding sources may be available for applicants with particular qualifications. Applicants should
stay in contact with the Graduate Division of the College and also with the University of Florida Graduate School
and Office of Financial Aid, to check for new financial aid programs
All applicants who qualify for Florida residency status must make sure residency is established prior to registration.
All others, excluding international students, must apply for residency as soon they are eligible. Funding may be
withdrawn if the eligible student failed to apply for residency. Instructions may be found at
http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/students/faqs-residency.html, Further details on programs listed below are available
from the unit offering the aid.

A. ASSISTANTSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Most fellowships carry application (to the program)deadlines in February, by which time applicants must
have been admitted to the program or at least be under serious consideration. All application papers should
be in by early January to be sure of consideration for the full range of fellowships. Most assistantships and
fellowships carry in-state and out-of-state tuition waivers. Some fellowships prohibit simultaneous
assistantships.
The University of Florida Office of Research and Graduate Programs funds highly qualified applicants. The
amounts of the fellowships vary according to the nature of the award. The Graduate School also awards
research assistantships for Grinter Fellowships, named after a former dean of the Graduate School, which pay
up to $4,000 a year for as many as three years. The College of Journalism and Communications uses the
Grinter Fellowships to supplement doctoral teaching and research assistantship stipends.
The college offers the Dolgoff and Flanagan Assistantships, which provide financial aid for students with
strong backgrounds in radio. These assistantships require that you work with the college radio stations,
usually conducting research.
Many doctoral students also receive either Grinter or other types of fellowships including those listed below:






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Lowenstein Assistantships -- Created in honor of Dean Emeritus Ralph Lowenstein, former dean
of the college. The Lowenstein Assistantship program offers doctoral students an additional annual
stipend.
Bateman Assistantships -- Created in honor of J. Carroll Bateman, the amount of Bateman
Assistantships varies. Some students receive only Bateman Assistantships which carry an annual
stipend of $7,000 and a tuition waiver. Others receive supplements of varying amounts.
University of Florida Alumni Fellowships The Alumni Fellowships are offered to top
applicants and carry a $20,000 annual stipend plus tuition waiver.


B. Teaching and Research Experience
Duties vary. Teaching assistants typically instruct students in labs, for example in writing, reporting, or
production, although some teaching assistants may assume responsibility for entire courses. The university
requires students holding teaching assistantships to attend a teaching workshop and meet minimum language
requirements. Research assistantships involve a progression of duties up through supervising entire small-
scale studies.
Faculty and staff make every effort to assist students in locating summer funding. Summer support cannot be
guaranteed, however, because of budget limitations. Students are urged to gain additional experience during
summers in the fields in which they will teach or work.
The college also offers Joseph L. Brechner Freedom of Information Graduate Assistantships. Brechner
assistants conduct research in legal issues and edit the newsletter of the Brechner Center, housed in the
college.

C. Tuition Waivers
For doctoral students on assistantships more than quarter time, all or most tuition is waived with a 9 credit
limit in fall and spring. Tuition is generally waived on fellowships over $3,150 per semester. The percentage
waived depends on graduate student union negotiations and funding levels. Students are responsible for
miscellaneous fees (building, capital improvement trust fund, student financial aid, activity and service,
athletic, and health [limited service]).

D. Loans
Doctoral students may be eligible under one of a variety of loan programs. Check with the Office of Financial
Aid http://www.sfa.ufl.edu/101/gradstudents2.html

E. Travel Grants
Travel grants are awarded by the college for students whose research papers are accepted for presentation at refereed
sessions of mass communication scholarly conferences. These funds are available for use on a fiscal year basis, July
1 to June 30, each year, and student allocations of travel funding are based on the fiscal year in which a conference
falls. Additional travel funding is offered by the Graduate School and Graduate Student Council. Research and
travel funding also may be available through the University of Florida's Latin American Studies Center, African
Studies, or Asian Studies, for research projects involving those areas. Forms and specific requirements and rules are
available in the wall files located in the Graduate Division.
The following policies were developed and approved by the GSMCA and the Graduate Committee:
1. Both masters and Ph.D. students will be eligible equally for conference funding. Students must be
registered and in residence as full-time graduate students in the college at the time the paper is
presented.
2. One student on an accepted paper will be funded as long as funds are available.
3. In the case of a multi-authored paper, the student authors must decide which author will request
college funding to attend the conference. In the case that the authors disagree about who should be
funded, authors may appeal to the Graduate Committee.
4. $400 per fiscal year to support travel to a national conference, $150 per fiscal year to support
travel to a regional conference.






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Also, you must:

submit a Grant Award Request Form to the Graduate Division at least 30 days before the travel
dates.
submit a copy of your acceptance letter/ email with your Travel Grant Award Request Form.
submit all original itemized receipts. Reimbursement will be made for things such as lodging, airfare, and
your own meals.
include the original air fare receipt and/or rental car invoice and your hotel bill, even if neither of these is
being used as the basis for reimbursement. Evidence of extravagant expenditure will nullify this award.
turn in receipts by the dates posted each semester.
submit a copy of the conference program. Copy should include cover page and schedule of the
conference. Please highlight or notate your presentation on the schedule.
follow University of Florida's travel procedures and policies.

We are committed to supporting graduate student success by supporting travel to the maximum extent the budget
allows. We feel it is important to you as well as to the College, to continue funding your conference travel to present
your research to national audiences. Hopefully, these guidelines will enable us to support the broadest range of
student work possible during the present budget limitations.

Please remember that some conferences try to help with graduate student travel and offer small grants for that
purpose. GSA and the Graduate School offer travel money as well.






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


V. FACULTY

Many of the college's Graduate Faculty members are listed below, along with the undergraduate departments in
which they hold appointment. Selected publications are given to illustrate research approaches. Students must
conduct dissertation research within the boundaries set by faculty expertise. For more information please see the
Graduate Faculty website at: http://www.jou.ufl.edu/grad/gradfac.asp
Alexander, Laurence B. Journalism. Research interests in media law and policy. Former chair of the Department of
Journalism (1994-98). Since coming to UF in 1991, he has taught courses in mass media law and newspaper editing. He has
written extensively on media law issues. Published in various communication journals and law reviews, including
Communications and the Law, Editor & Publisher, Free Speech Yearbook, Journalism & Mass Communication Educator,
National Trial Lawyer, Newspaper Research Journal, Notre Dame Journal ofLegislation, Visual Communication Quarterly, and
Yale Law & Policy Review. A native of New Orleans, he received a bachelor's degree from the University of New Orleans, a
master's degree from UF, and a Juris Doctor from Tulane University. Also taught at Temple University and the University of New
Orleans. Professional journalism experience: The Houma Daily Courier, The Times-Picayune and The Philadelphia Inquirer. He
is the Chairman of the Board of Directors of The Independent Florida Alligator.

Armstrong Cory L. Journalism. A former public affairs reporter in Ohio and Pennsylvania, Armstrong's research interests are in
gender representations, news content and credibility. She received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and
joined the UF faculty in 2004. In 2003, she won the Mary Gardner Award for Graduate Student Research from the AEJMC
Commission on the Status of Women and she was awarded a Top 3 faculty paper in the newspaper division at the 2006 AEJMC
annual conference. She teaches graduate courses in Race, Class, Gender and Media and Issues in the Press, along with
undergraduate courses in Reporting and News Writing and Applied Fact Finding. She has been published in Journalism & Mass
Communication Quarterly, Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media; Journal of Communication, Mass Communication &
Society, and Newspaper Research Journal. Armstrong is a faculty affiliate with the Center for Women's Studies and Gender
Research at the University of Florida.

Brown, Justin. Telecommunication. Brown specializes in telecommunication law and regulation. His research addresses the
application of the First Amendment and regulatory constructs to the Internet as well as policy concerning broadband access and
theoretical implications of new media. Research has appeared in Communication Research, Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law
Journal, and Communication Law & Policy. Brown also wrote a chapter on Internet culture for UNESCO's Encyclopedia ofLife
Support Systems as well as a study guide to Don Pember's Mass Media Law. He has made numerous peer-reviewed presentations
at conferences organized by the International Communications Association (ICA), American Educators in Journalism & Mass
Communication (AEJMC), Broadcast Education Association (BEA) and the Telecommunication Policy Research Conference
(TPRC). Brown currently serves on the editorial review board of Journalism and Mass Communication Educator. His
dissertation, "Free Expression Implications of Broadband Open Access Policies" was awarded grant recognition from the Cable
Center's Magness Institute.

Chance, Sandra F. Journalism. Executive Director, Brechner Center for Freedom of Information at www.brechner.org.
Research interests include First Amendment and media law issues. She has written extensively on freedom of information issues,
the media and the judiciary, and the role and responsibilities of the press. She is an Associate Professor in the Journalism
Department and teaches media law at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Chance is developing an expertise in
international FOI issues, and has traveled to Brazil, Jamaica, Peru and Chile to work with journalists and government officials in
these emerging democracies and promote the principals of freedom of information This past summer, she taught a special course,
"Media and the Courts," for judges from around the country at the National Judicial College, in the University of Nevada's
Judicial Studies Program. Chance graduated with honors from the University of Florida's College of Law in 1990 and was
named to the Order of the Coif. She practiced media law with the law firm of Holland & Knight in Tampa, Florida. There she
handled litigation concerning access to public records and judicial proceedings, reporter subpoenas and Florida's Government in
the Sunshine Law. Chance also served as an Assistant General Counsel at the University of Florida. Chance has published in
numerous academic and professional journals and newspapers, including Journalism & Mass Communication Educator,
Communication Law and Policy, Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Arkansas Law Review, Journal ofLaw and
Public Policy, Quill and Editor & Publisher. She has authored several chapters in Communications and the Law, a widely used
textbook, and the Reporters' Handbook. She's also contributor to the Oxford Companion to American Law. She is on the
editorial board of the Communication Law and Policy journal and the advisory board of UF's College of Law's Journal ofLaw
and Public Policy.

Chan-Olmsted, Sylvia. Telecommunication. Chan-Olmsted specializes in media economics, strategic competition and
new media, and media brand management. Her recent research includes international strategies for dealing with
telecommunications and media convergence, mobile content ventures, alliances concerning cable television and
telephony industries, Internet business models for traditional media, and branding issues involving television and the
Internet. Chan-Olmsted is the author of the book, Competitive Strategy for Media Firms, and co-editor of the
books, Handbook of ledia Management and Economics and Global Media Economics, and author of numerous book






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


chapters and articles published in refereed journals such as the Journal ofBroadcasting and Electronic Media,
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, International Journal on Media Management, and the Journal of
Media Economics. She is affiliated with the Communications Competitiveness Research Initiative of Public Utility
Research Center (PURC) at the University of Florida and has received research grants from institutions such as the
National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), Magness Institute at Cable Center, and Center for International Business
Education and Research (CIBER).

Choi, Youjin. Public Relations. Her research interests include public health campaign, health communication and gender study.
She has taught "Public Health Campaign," "Public Relations Research," and "Health and Risk Public Relations." Her articles
have appeared in Journal ofPublic Relations Research, Public Relations Review, and Corporate Communication: An
international journal. She is working with College of Dentistry faculty on a 5-year project, "Reducing Oral Cancer Disparities in
Florida," granted by NIH. Dr. Choi has professional experiences in advertising, media relations and internal communication.

Cleary, Johanna. Telecommunication. Prior to earning her doctorate from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in
2004, Cleary was a news director, reporter/producer and marketing director for Alabama Public Television. Her teaching interests
include ethics and the role of mass communication in society, arts journalism and broadcast and political reporting. Her research
has focused in newsroom management issues, entertainment coverage and broadcast journalism history. Publications include
"From the Classroom to the Newsroom: Professional Development in Broadcast Journalism" Journalism and Mass
Communication Educator, (forthcoming); "The Parity Paradox: Reader Response to Minority Newsroom Staffing," Mass
Communication and Society; "Creating 'America's Storyteller': The Early Radio Career of Charles Kuralt," Journal of
Radio Studies; and "Shaping Mexican Journalists: The Role of University and On-the-Job Training," Journalism andMass
Communication Educator, Summer 2003. She is also a co-author of The Best ofPulitzer Prize News 'm,, i an ill..l..
issued by Publishing Horizons, Inc., Columbus, Ohio.

Coffey, Amy Jo. Telecommunication. Coffey received her Ph.D. from the University of Georgia. Her research interests
include media and audience economics and foreign language programming.

Dickson, Sandra. Professor and Co-Director, The Documentary Institute. As Co-Director of The Documentary Institute, she
coordinates the graduate program in documentary production and co-produces, directs and writes television documentaries
dealing with civil rights and political/social issues. Dickson co-directed and wrote the script for the Institute's recent
documentary, Negroes with Guns, winner of the 2006 Erik Barnouw Award for Outstanding Historical Documentary. The film's
broadcast premiere was February 7, 2006 on Independent Lens, a PBS national series. The film also screened in New York,
March 2004, at the Walter Reade Theatre, The Lincoln Center and at film festivals around the country, including the Los Angeles
Film Festival in June 2004. Along with her Institute colleagues, she has received grants from the National Endowment for the
Humanities, The National Endowment for the Arts, The Freedom Forum and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Her works
include Freedom Never Dies: The Legacy ofHarry T. Moore, winner of the 2001 Erik Barnouw Award for Outstanding
Historical Documentary, Giving Up the Canal, Campaign for Cuba and Last Days of the Revolution.

Dodd, Julie E. Journalism. Research interests include effective teaching -- teaching media writing and teaching and technology;
high school journalism; and sports media. Her articles have appeared in Newspaper Research Journal, Journalism & Mass
Communication Educator, Editor & Publisher, Quill and Scroll and Communication: Journalism Education Today. She was
editor of Scholastic Journalism in the Sunshine State (1996) and wrote four chapters for the textbook Mass Media Writing: An
Introduction (1997).

Duke Cornell, Lisa. Advertising. A former advertising copywriter, Lisa teaches creative courses and a graduate course in
qualitative research. Her research interests include advertising creative, gender studies, reception studies, direct
response/interactive advertising, pedagogy, racial identity, and social learning. Publications include "Olympic athletes and
heroism in advertising: Gendered concepts of valor?" by R. Goodman, L. Duke and J. Sutherland, Journalism and Mass
Communication Quarterly, Summer 2002 and sole-authored articles in 2001 and 2002: "Get real!: Cultural relevance and
resistance to the mediated feminine ideal," Psychology and ; I,, ,, -.. "Like an idea, only better: How do advertising educators
and practitioners define and use the creative concept?" Journal ofAdvertising Education; "Black in a blonde world: Race and
girls' interpretations of teen magazines, "Journalism and Mass Communication. Earlier articles include "Negotiating femininity:
Adolescent girls read teen magazines, Journal of Communication Inquiry and "Beyond educational and informational needs:
What is quality children's television?" in The Annals .r il, American Academy ofPolitical and Social Science. Book chapters
include "Reading in Black and White: Girls, Race, and the Mediated Feminine Ideal." Accepted/in press. Greenwood Press
series on multicultural media. This article will appear in book five of the series, Analysis ofAudiences. She also wrote "Creative
Spots," inA.J. Jewler (Ed.), Creative Strategy in .I ri in.. 1993, Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Ferguson, Mary Ann. Public Relations. "Direct Response Advertising: The Contributions of Price, Information, Artwork, and
Individual Differences to Purchase Consideration of a Personal Computer, "Journal ofDirect / I.,, i. -.. 6 (1992), 32-39 (with
M. F. Weigold & S. Flusser). "Communicating with Environmental and Health Risk Takers: An Individual Differences
Perspective," Health Education Quarterly, 18, (1991), 303-318 (with J. M. Valenti). "Communicating with Risk Takers: A
Public Relations Perspective," Public Relations Research Annual, 3, (1991), 195-224 (with J. M. Valenti & G. Melwani). "Using
Persuasion Models to Identify Givers, "Public Relations Review, 12, (1986), 43-50 (with L. Doner & L. Carson).






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Freeman, John. Journalism. John Freeman has headed the photojournalism program at the University of Florida since joining
the faculty in 1991. His research interest focuses on successful photojournalists and has been published in Visual
Communications Quarterly and News Photographer magazine.
Goodman, Robyn. Advertising. Goodman's teaching and research interests include health communications, visual
communications, and gender, race, and media. Publications include, "Flabless is Fabulous: How Latina and Anglo Women Read,
Negotiate, and Incorporate the Excessively Thin, Mediated Body Ideal Into their Everyday Experience," "Sculpting the Female
Breast: How College Women Negotiate the Media's Ideal Breast Image, and "Olympic Athletes and Heroism in Advertising:
Gendered Concepts of Valor? all in Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly. Dr. Goodman has worked as a sports
reporter, advertising graphic designer and a freelance graphic designer. She has been recognized and received top paper awards
for her research.

Hon, Linda. Public Relations. Hon's teaching areas include public relations theory, research methods, strategy, and campaigns.
Her research interests include public relations evaluation, relationship management, and gender and diversity issues in public
relations. Women in Public Relations: How Gender Influences Practice (with Larissa A. Grunig and Elizabeth L. Toth), 2001,
Guilford; Measuring Public Relationships Among Students and Administrators at the University of Florida (with Brigitta
Brunner), Journal of Communication Management, Vol. 6, No. 3, 2002, pp. 227-238. The Influence of Gender Composition in
Powerful Positions on Public Relations Practitioners' Gender-Related Perceptions (with Youjin Choi), Journal ofPublic
Relations Research, Vol. 14, Number 3, 2002, pp. 229-363; Public Relations in South Korea: Applying Theories and Exploring
Opportunities, Journal ofAsian Pa itc Communication, Volume 11, Issue 2, 2001, pp. 263-286; Diversity Issues and Public
Relations (with Brigitta Brunner), Journal ofPublic Relations Research, Vol. 12, Number 4, 2000, pp. 309-340; Measuring
Relationships in Public Relations (with James E. Grunig), 2000, monograph available from Institute for Public Relations;
Demonstrating Effectiveness in Public Relations: Goals, Objectives, and Evaluation, Journal ofPublic Relations Research,
Volume 10, Number 2, 1998, pp. 103-136; Craft and Professional Models of Public Relations and Their Relation to Job
Satisfaction Among Korean Public Relations Practitioners, Journal ofPublic Relations Research, Volume 10, Number 3, 1998,
155-176; What Have You Done for Me Lately? Exploring Effectiveness in Public Relations, Journal ofPublic Relations
Research, Volume 9, Number 1, 1997, pp. 1-30; "To Redeem the Soul of America": Public Relations and the Civil Rights
Movement, Journal ofPublic Relations Research, Volume 9, Number 3, 1997, pp. 163-212.


Kaid, Lynda Lee. Telecommunication. Kaid's teaching and research specialization is political communication, especially
political advertising and news coverage of political events. She has published over 20 books, including The Handbook of
Political Communication Research; Videostyle in Presidential Campaigns: Style and Content in Political 1. h,, r i.in, The
Electronic Election: Perspectives on the 1996 Campaign Communication; Civic Dialogue in the 1996 Presidential Campaign:
Candidate, Media, and Public Voices; and Political Advertising in Western Democracies. Kaid has also written over 100 book
chapters and articles for professional journals. A two-time Fulbright Scholar, she has done extensive research on international
political communication issues and has received funding for her research from the National Science Foundation, the federal
Election Assistance Commission, the U.S. Department of Education, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and numerous
other federal and private agencies.
Kaplan, John. Journalism. Research and creative activities/interests include international journalism, societal displacement and
civil rights. Since coming to UF in 1999, he has taught courses in international journalism, foreign correspondence,
photojournalism and design. He is the author of Photo F.-, i- 1I Success, 2003 (Cincinnati: Writer's Digest.) Published in
journals including Viscom and Journalism History. Solo exhibits include Four Nations, Vanishing Heritage, Surviving Torture.
Group exhibits include The Pulitzer Prize Photographs: Capture the Moment. Mass media publication credits include Life,
Fortune and the New York Times. Awards include Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography, Overseas Press Club Award, Robert F.
Kennedy Award, AEJMC Best of the Web, Harry Chapin Media Award, National Newspaper Photographer of the Year. He is a
member of the ACEJMC Accreditation Council. A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Kaplan received bachelors and master's
degrees from Ohio University. Also taught for Syracuse University, Ball State University and Ohio University.
Kelly, Kathleen S. Public Relations. Specializes in fund raising, public relations theory, and nonprofit management.
Publications include I r r,, .* Fund-Raising Management, 1998 (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates); Fund Raising and Public
Relations: A Critical Analysis, 1991 (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates); "Teaching Fund Raising," Learning to Teach: What You
Need to Know to Develop a Successful Career as a Public Relations Educator (3rd ed., L. M. Sallot & B. J. DeSanto, Eds.),
2003; "The State of Fund-Raising Theory and Research," New Strategies for Educational Fund Raising (M. J. Worth, Ed.),
2002; "ROPES: A Model of the Fund-Raising Process," The ouprofitHandbook: Fund raising (3rd ed., J. M. Greenfield, Ed.),
2001a; "Stewardship: The Fifth Step in the Public Relations Process," Handbook ofPublic Relations (R. L. Heath, Ed.), 2001b;
"From Motivation to Mutual Understanding: Shifting the Domain of Donor Research," Major Issues Facing Fund Raising (D. F.
Burlingame, Ed.), 1997; "Public Relations Expertise and Organizational Effectiveness: A Study of U.S. Hospitals" (with C. G.
Gordon), Journal ofPublic Relations Research, 11(2), 1999; "Utilizing Public Relations Theory to Conceptualize and Test
Models of Fund Raising," Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 72(1), 1995.
Kim, Hyojin. Advertising. Kim's research interest is in the application of advertising theories and strategies for health
communication and promotion. Her research particularly focuses on consumer processing of health information and persuasion
through interactive communication. Her dissertation was entitled, "The Effects of Interactivity on Learning: Implications for
Stereotype Change." Kim received the Master of Health Science in International Health with a focus of Applied Medical
Anthropology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Master of Arts and the Ph.D. in Advertising at






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


University of Texas at Austin. Before she joined the advertising faculty in 2005, she worked at Korean Institute for Health and
Social Affairs (KIHASA) and UNICEF Philippines among other places. She has been recognized and received numerous awards
for her scholastic work, including a university continuing fellowship that is awarded to the top 5 continuing doctoral students at
the University of Texas ($20,000). Her work has been published in Human Communication Research, Health Education
Research, Journal oflnteractive AI ,, r si and LBJ Journal ofPublic A tt lir%
Kiousis, Spiro K, Ph.D., APR. Public Relations. Kiousis' teaching areas include public relations strategy, public relations
writing, mass communication theory, and persuasion. His research interests include political communication, online
communication, agenda setting, framing, and persuasion. He has had articles published in several leading journals, including
Communication Research, Mass Communication & Society, Communication Yearbook, Journalism Studies, and New Media &
Society. He has also presented papers to the International Communication Association, Association for Education in Journalism
and Mass Communication, World Association for Public Opinion Research, and Southwest Education Council for Journalism
and Mass Communication. Dr. Kiousis has professional experience in public relations, marketing, online journalism, and media
production. He also has his APR credential from the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA).
Leslie, Michael. Ph.D., International Communication. Leslie's teaching/research areas include Communications/information
technologies and national development, images of women and minorities in media, international/ intercultural communication.
Martin-Kratzer, Renee. Journalism. Her research focuses on media effects, visual communication and magazines. Current
interests include newspaper credibility, anonymous sourcing and the decline in newspaper readership among young adults.
Martin-Kratzer's research has been published in Newspaper Research Journal, and she co-authored a book chapter in Media and
Sept. 11, 2001: E, ri, il -. on an American Tragedy. She teaches feature writing and magazine courses. Her professional
experience includes working as a magazine managing editor, a newspaper design editor, a freelance designer and an online
editor. She earned her doctorate and master's degrees from the University of Missouri. She graduated summa cum laude from
Kansas State University with a bachelor's degree in journalism and a bachelor's degree in secondary education.
Martinez, Belio. Public Relations. Martinez holds a Ph.D. in mass communication from the University of Florida, an M.A.
degree in communication studies from the State University of New York at Albany and a B.A. degree in cultural studies from
Empire State College in Saratoga Springs, New York. Dr. Martinez also earned an A.A.S. degree in visual communication
technology at Fulton-Montgomery Community College in Johnstown, New York. His current research interests include political
communication, public relations strategies for nation building, communication for development, communication and culture and
public relations targeting minority groups in the United States. He has presented papers to the International Communication
Association, the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, the National Communication Association
and the New York State Communication Association. Dr. Martinez's teaching areas include communication theory, public
relations writing, public relations research, international and ethnic public relations and visual communication.
McAdams, Melinda J. ("Mindy"). Journalism. Knight Chair in Journalism Technologies and the Democratic Process.
Specializes in online journalism, online content structures and the relationship between democratic societies and communication
systems. Publications include Flash Journalism: How to Create Multimedia News Packages, Focal Press, 2005; The Internet
Handbookfor Writers, Researchers, and Journalists, 3rd. ed. (co-author), Guilford, 2002; "Hypertext" (with S. Berger), Journal
ofElectronic Publishing 6(3), March 2001; "Information Design and the New Media," Interactions (a joural of the Association
for Computing Machinery), October 1995. Education: M.A. in media studies from The New School for Social Research, New
York, 1993. B.A. in journalism from Penn State University, 1981. Professional journalism experience includes The Washington
Post (1993-95); Time magazine (1988-93).
McKeen, William. Journalism. Professor and chair of the department. Earned a bachelor's degree in history and a master's
degree in journalism from Indiana University and a Ph.D. in higher education administration from the University of Oklahoma.
Teaching areas include journalism history, literary journalism, popular culture, writing, and editing. Books include the memoir
Highway 61 (W.W. Norton, 2003), Rock and Roll is Here to Stay (W.W. Norton, 2000), Literary Journalism (Wadsworth,
2000), Tom '[-. d.r; (Simon and Schuster, 1995) and earlier books on journalism, history and popular music. Working on a
biography of Hunter S. Thompson for W.W. Norton, to be published in 2008. Also working on a book about music called Rip
This Joint, scheduled for 2008 publication by MBI Publishing. Articles have appeared in academic journals such as Studies in
Popular Culture, Journalism Educator and Southwestern Mass Communication Journal as well as in popular magazines such as
Gourmet, Maxim and Holiday. Before beginning his academic career, he worked as a newspaper reporter and copy editor and
was associate editor of The American Spectator and The Saturday Evening Post.

Mitrook, Michael A. Public Relations. Mitrook's teaching areas include undergraduate classes in media effects, mass
communication research, principles of public relations, and public relations writing in addition to graduate classes in quantitative
mass media research methods, media effects and audience analysis, and seminars in new media. His research interests are in
media impact on opinion formation, sports media, sports public relations, news content and viewer perceptions, and the
contingency theory of accommodation in public relations. He has published numerous articles and authored or co-authored many
national refereed conference papers. Mitrook has a wide variety of experience in professional communication including radio
broadcasting, both as an on air personality and as public affairs director, media relations for the federal government, sales and
marketing for BASF information systems and UARCO, and media research project director for J.R. Smith & Associates.

Molleda, Juan-Carlos. Public Relations. His research interest is in international corporate public relations-especially
management and internal communication aspects-and public relations practices and education in Latin America. His main
teaching subjects are: principles, campaigns, research, international perspective, and communication management. Recent






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


publications and conferences include: "Descripci6n de un modelo de dialogo con los medios" [Description of a model of
dialogue with the media], (2002), in J. Duarte (Ed.), Manual de Assessoria de Imprensa e Relacionamento cor a Midia [Manual
ofPress Training and Relationship with the Media], Brazil: Atlas; "Convergencia entire relaciones publicas y diplomacia
public" [Convergence between public relations and public diplomacy], (2002), Espacio 8, pp. 25-36 (Cuba); "International
Paradigms: The Latin American School of Public Relations," (2001), Journalism Studies, 2(4), pp. 513-530; "Cross-national
conflict shifting: A conceptualization and expansion in an international public relations context," with Colleen Connolly-Ahem,
a referred paper presented at the 85th Convention of AEJMC (Top four joint student- faculty paper), Aug. 2002; "International
paradigms: The social role of the Brazilian public relations practitioners," a referred paper presented at the 85h Convention of
AEJMC, Aug. 2002; "Exploratory research about integration of the international corporate public relations function," a refereed
paper presented at the 51st Conference of ICA, May 2001.

Morris, Jon. Advertising. Teaches advertising communications and conducts research in emotional responses to
communications. Previously, he worked for several advertising agencies, including Nicholson-Morris, in Louisville, KY. and
Doyle Dane Berbach and Dancer Fitzgerald Sample, New York City. His research has appeared in the Journal ofAdvertising
Research, Educational Technology, International Journal ofInstructional Media, and in the Proceedings of the American
Academy ofAdvertising and The Association for Consumer Research, Journal of Current Issues and Research in 1. h, lr i,.
Journal of T,, ,,1, 1 Measurement and Analysis for 1[ ,l, i ,,, Advances in Consumer Research, Fitfor the Global Future,
and The Electronic Election, among others. He developed a model, called AdSAM, for analyzing emotional response to
marketing communications.

Morton, Cynthia. Advertising. Morton's teaching interests are in advertising management, research, and strategic planning. Her
current research interests are in source credibility and message effects, social communication, issue advertising, and product
placement. Her work has been published in Journal of Current Issues and Research in .'. 1 i" i.. Journal ofPromotion
Management, Journal oJ *, and Public Sector\ II ;,,, Proceedings of the American Academy of IA.1. h i and The
Annals <. iil, American Academy ofPolitical and Social Science. She has presented papers at conferences sponsored by the
American Academy of Advertising, the American Marketing Association, and the Association for Education in Journalism and
Mass Communication. In 2002, she was awarded the American Academy of Advertising's Research Fellowship Competition
Award with collaborator and colleague Dr. Jorge Villegas. Morton has four years of professional experience in advertising and
three years of experience in the not-for-profit sector. She holds degrees from The University of Georgia (A.B.J., M.B.A.) and
from the University of Texas at Austin (Ph.D.).

Ostroff, David H. Telecommunication. Publications include: "The U.S. Electronic Media System and Policy," in Leen
d'Haenens and Frieda Saeys (eds.) Western Broadcasting at the Dawn of the 21st Century Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter Publishers,
2001; Perspectives on Radio and Television 4th ed. (with F. Leslie Smith and John W. Wright, II) (1998). "The Business
Environment, Demographics and Technology: A Case Study of Florida power and Light's Electronic Employee Communication
Services," in Michael Goodman, (ed.), Corporate Communications for Executives, Albany: SUNY Press, 1998 (with Dawn
Donnelly and Alan Fried) "U.S. Media Policy," in Frieda Saeys and Leen d'Haenens (eds.) Media Industry Dynamics and
Regulatory Concerns in the Digital Age (London: John Wiley and Sons, 1998). "The World Wide Web and Corporate
Communication," IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication (March, 1996) (with Gary Ritzenthaler). The I n r, ii... .
of Video in Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography (Irving, TX: ITVA Education and Research Foundation, 1995) (with
Amall Downs and Pamela Franklin). "The Environment for Corporate Video in Single Market Europe," ITVA International
Conference, Phoenix, May 1993 (Top 3 paper).

Roberts, Churchill. Documentary. Co-director of the Documentary Institute. He received his BA from the University of
Tennessee, MA from Memphis State University, and Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. He is the author of numerous articles
on communication which have appeared in such journals as Broadcasting and Electronic Media, Journalism and Mass
Communication Quarterly, Communication Monographs, and the International Communication Bulletin. He is co-author of
Discovering Mass Communication (1992). Dr. Roberts has been the recipient of grants from the Corporation for Public
Broadcasting, the Florida Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Freedom Forum, Florida
Department of Education, and the United States Agency for International Development. He served as executive producer of
several PBS documentaries, including Giving Up the Canal (1990), Campaign for Cuba (1992), and Last Days of the Revolution
(1994). The most recent Documentary Institute project, Freedom Never Dies, was completed in 2000 and aired on PBS in the
spring of 2001. Dr. Roberts' research interests are documentary film and the impact of media on society.
Roberts, Marilyn. Advertising. Research and interests focus in the areas of media agenda setting, framing and intermedia influence,
political communications, international and cross-cultural advertising. Marilyn Roberts and Wayne Wanta, "Agenda-Setting and
Issue Salience Online," Communication Research, Pamela Shoemaker, editor, August 2002, pp. 452-465. Marilyn Roberts and Guy
Golan, "Issues, Inclusion and Illusion: The 2000 Republican National Convention Reaches Out," in Lynda Lee Kaid, Dianne
Bystrom, Diana Carlin, and Mitchell McKinney (Eds). Communicating Politics: Engaging the Public in Democratic Life, New
York: Peter Lang Publishers, forthcoming 2002Marilyn Roberts, "Global Issues in Branding, Communication and Corporate
Structure," in Philip J. Kitchen and Don E. Schultz, editors, Raising the Corporate Umbrella:Corporate Communications in the 21st
Century, New York, NY: PALGRAVE, 2001, pp. 149-171. Marilyn Roberts and Hanjun Ko, "Global Interactive Advertising:
Defining What We Mean and Using What We Have Learned," Journal oflnteractive A. i.'.. Vol. 1,Num. 2, Spring 2001. Jon
Morris, Marilyn Roberts and Gail Baker Woods, "Emotional Responses of African-American Voters to Ad Messages," in Lynda Lee
Kaid and Diane Bystrom, editors, The Electronic Election: Perspectives on the 1996 Campaign Communication, Hillsdale, NJ:






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. 1999, pp. 257-276. In addition, her work has appeared in Political Communication, Journalism
Quarterly, Harvard International Journal ofPress/Politics, Mass Communication Review, and Journal ofAdvertising Education.
Robinson, Judy L. Journalism. Robinson is the Executive Director of the Florida Scholastic Press Association. She received her
MAMC and Ph.D. in Mass Communications from the University of Florida. She currently teaches Developing Digital Online
Learning.
Rodgers, Ronald. Journalism. Rodgers has more than 20 years of experience in the newspaper business working overseas in
Japan and South Korea, and in California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, and Alaska as a reporter, editorial writer, copy editor,
slot editor, assigning editor and page designer. His research agenda is driven by his professional experience, and topics that
interest him largely revolve around media history, especially the formation of normative standards and media ethics, and,
concomitantly, the historical and contemporary agents of influence on media content and their effect on democracy and the
marketplace of ideas. His publications include: Rodgers, R.R. (2004). From a boon to a threat: Print media coverage of Project
Chariot, 1958-1962. Journalism History, 30(1), 11-19. Rodgers, R.R., Hallock S., Gennaria, M., & Wei, F. (2004). Two papers
in joint operating agreement publish meaningful editorial diversity, Newspaper Research Journal, 25(4), 104-109. Rodgers, R.R.
(Summer, 2006, in press). Book review of Journalism: The democratic craft, Newspaper Research Journal. His professional
conference presentations of refereed papers include: Rodgers, R.R. (2006, August). 'The newspaper with a conscience':
Discourse on journalism's responsibility to society and civic life in the late 19th and early 20th century. Rodgers, R.R. (2005,
August). OhmyNews and its citizen journalists as avatars of a post-modem marketplace of ideas. Rodgers, R.R. (2005, August).
'Keeping step to the music of the drums': Editor & Publisher and the problems ofjoumalism in the war years and beyond, 1914-
1923. Rodgers, R.R. (2005, August). 'Journalism is a loose-jointed thing': A content analysis of Editor & Publisher's discussion
of journalistic conduct prior to the Canons of Journalism, 1901-1922. Rodgers, R.R. (2004, August). Tainting of the stream of
pure news: Collier's criticism of the newspaper press during the Norman Hapgood years, 1902-1913. Rodgers, R.R. (2004,
August). Double crossing democracy? The civic vision vs. vertical integration in the debate over the cross-ownership ban.
Rodgers, R.R. (2004, August). The genteel magazines' criticism of the daily newspaper press, 1890-1910. Rodgers, R.R. (2004,
August). Technology outruns the law: Newspapers and the e-mail public records quagmire.

Spiker, Ted. Journalism. Creative activities: Writing for national consumer magazines. Specializes in health, fitness, narrative
and essays. Contributing editor to Men's Health magazine, editor-at-large of Women's Health magazine, and work has also
appeared in Outside; Fortune; O, The Oprah Magazine; Runner's World; Prevention; In Style; Sports Illustrated Women; St.
Petersburg Times; Writer's Digest; The Philadelphia Inquirer Sunday Magazine and more. Co-author of two national bestselling
health books, including YOU: The Owner's Manual. Former articles editor for Men's Health magazine. Also interested in
research about the magazine industry with special emphasis on the effects and trends in magazine covers. Scholarly paper about
the images portrayed in 9/11 magazine covers appeared in the Journal ofMagazine and New Media Research (Spring 2003).
Courses taught include Magazine & Feature Writing, Advanced Magazine & Feature Writing, Applied Magazines, Magazine
Management, and Journalism as Literature.

Sutherland, John. Advertising. A research and strategic planning consultant, Sutherland teaches research, planning and sales
management. His research interests include market intelligence, brand personality and creative concepts. Example publications
include Geason, J. and Sutherland, J. Developing an I in ic Marketing Plan: A Working Guide for Radio Broadcasters,
Washington, D.C., National Association of Broadcasters, 1989; "A Model of Marketing Information Flow," by J. Sutherland, L.
Duke and A. Abemethy, Journal ofl, r ihn, Winter 2004; "Olympic athletes and heroism in advertising: Gendered concepts
of valor?" by R. Goodman, L. Duke and J. Sutherland, Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Summer 2002; and
"Briefing the big winners: an analysis of creative briefs from Clio-winning agencies," a presentation at the American Academy of
Advertising conference, by Z. Ghanimi, Z., L. Duke Comell, J. Sutherland, J. and A, Abemethy, Spring 2006.

Treise, Debbie. Advertising. A specialist in science and health communication, Treise has received funding for her research in
science journalism from the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) and the Kaiser Family Foundation. Her
publications include: Weigold, M. and Treise, D. Invited book chapter, Sage: Handbook on Communicating and Disseminating
Behavioral Science (Chapter 3. The State of Science Communication Theory, Research and Best Practices), to be published
Spring, 2007; Treise, D. & Rausch, P (2007). "The prescription pill paradox: Nurse practitioners' perceptions about direct-to-
consumer advertising." Journal ofPharmaceutical Marketing and Management (scheduled for printing, 17(2), 2006.); Weigold,
M. & Treise, D. (2004). Attracting Teen Surfers to Science Web Sites. Public Understanding ofScience, 13, 229-248; Treise, D.,
Walsh-Childers, K., Weigold, M. & Friedman, M. (2003). Cultivating the Science Internet Audience: Impact of Brand and
Domain on Source Credibility for Science Information. Science Communication, 24, 309-332; Treise, D., and Weigold, M.
(March, 2002). Advancing science communication: A survey of science communicators. Science Communication, 23(3), 310-322.
Treise, D., and Weigold, M. (2001). AIDS public service announcements: Effects of fear and repetition on predictors or condom
use. Health Marketing Quarterly, 18(3/4), 39-61. Treise is a member of NASW, AAAS, AHCJ and regularly reviews for NIH
and NSF panels.

Tripp, Bernell. Journalism. Specializes in sports writing and has won several awards for her spot sports coverage and sports
writing. Before joining the College of Journalism and Communications, Tripp was a sports writer for the Pensacola News and
freelanced for the Orlando Sentinel, Florida Times-Union and the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

Villegas, Jorge. Advertising. Villegas' teaching interest is in advertising courses that deal with strategy, international and theory
issues. Previous to his studies at the University of Texas at Austin where he obtained his PhD in advertising, he was an assistant






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


professor at ITESM (Mexico), as well as the partner of a market/advertising research company. Villegas' main research interest is
the influence of affect in commercial or health-related messages communicated via traditional or interactive media. His work has
been published in Health Education Research, Schizophrenia Bulletin, Proceedings of the American Academy of. l, ri / is h
and a chapter in the book Advertising and Consumer Psychology Book Series. He has received research awards from
organizations like the American Academy ofAdvertising as well as participated as a member of research teams sponsored by the
National Institute of Mental Health and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. His professional service includes participation in
NIMH's sponsored conferences on Stigma and Mass Media, reviewer forjourals like Marketing Theory, and co-chair of the
Pre-Conference of the 2003 American Academy ofAdvertising Conference.
Wagner, Elaine. Advertising. Wagner specializes in design, graphic production, and issues related to teaching creative
classes. Her research addresses teaching with "mastery learning" techniques, and accommodations for learning disabled students.
Research has appeared in Journal ofAdvertising Education and Journalism and Mass Communication Educator. Wagner has
made numerous peer-reviewed presentations at conferences organized by the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass
Communication (AEJMC) and the American Academy of Advertising (AAA). She also presents workshops related to computer
production and design; and she is in the process of completing a book: Why do they do it that way? Q&A about print production
and media insertion. Wagner's creative activity has been acknowledged by the Library of Congress; published in Creativity 33
and Step Inside Design magazine; and she has received numerous Addy awards. She also has received awards for teaching and
service at the local and national level. Wagner currently serves on the editorial advisory board of Journal ofAdvertising
Education.
Walsh-Childers, Kim. Journalism Specializes in health communication, particularly news coverage of health issues.
Publications include Sexual Teens, Sexual Media, 2002 (Edited with Jane Brown & Jeanne Steele.); "Effects of Media on
Personal and Public Health" (with Jane Brown), Media rrI i, Advances in Theory and Research (J. Bryant and D. Zillman,
Eds), 2002; "Mass Media and Health Issues" (with Debbie Treise), History of the Mass Media in the United States: An
Encyclopedia (Margaret Blanchard, Ed.), 1998; "Victims and Villains: The Framing of Health Care System Issues in Daily
Newspaper Stories" (with C. Lepre & J. ( lii. "c I newspaper Research Journal, in press; "Daily Newspaper Coverage of the
Organization, Delivery and Financing of Health Care" (with J. Chance & K. S i .i 1 Newspaper Research Journal, Spring, 1993;
"Women Journalists Report Discrimination in Newspapers" (with J. Chance and K. Herzog), Newspaper Research Journal, 1996;
"Images of Women as Sex Partners," Images that Injure: Pictorial Stereotypes in the Media (Paul Lester, ed.), 1996. "Finding
health and AIDS Information in the Mass Media: An Exploratory Study Among Chinese College Students" (with D. Treise, K.
Swain, and S. Dai), AIDS Education and Prevention, 1997; "Sexual Harassment of Women Journalists" (with J. Chance and K.
Herzog), Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 1996.

Weigold, Michael F. Advertising. "Endorser ideology and image: The moderating role of need for cognition in candidate
evaluation," (1996) in L. Reid (ed.), Proceedings of the 1996American Academy ofAdvert-.. .. .li!c GA: American
Academy of Advertising. "Managing threats to identity: The accountability triangle and strategic accounting," (with V. Sheer)
(1995) Communication Research, 22, pp. 592-611. "Ethics in advertising: Ideological correlates of consumer
perceptions,"(1992) (with D. Treise, J. Conna, and H. Garrison) Journal of, !./1, r .isin 23. "Negative Political Advertising:
Effects of target Response and party-Based Expectancies," (1992) in L. Reid (ed.), Proceedings of the 193 American Academy of
Advert' .r- .u!c GA: American Academy of Advertising. "Negative Political Advertising: Individual differences in response
to image versus issue ads," (1992) in L. Reid (ed.), Proceedings of the 1992 American Academy of, ., r ifi'.-, (pp. 144-149),
Athens, GA: American Academy of Advertising.
Wright, John W., II Dean Telecommunication. Perspectives on Radio and Television: Telecommunication in the United States,
4th ed. (New York: Erlbaum, 1998) (with F. Les Smith and David H. Ostroff).. "Trial by Media: Reliance on Newspapers and
Television and Perceptions of a Criminal Defendant," Communication Law and Policy, (Fall 1997, in press) (with Susan Ross).
Electronic Media and Government: The Regulation of Wired and Wireless Communication. (White Plains: Longman, 1995)
(with F. Les Smith and Milan Meeske). "A Longitudinal Study of Perceptions of the Deregulation of Television,"
Communication Studies Journal, 14 (Fall 1990), pp. 1-15 (with Lawrence A. Hosman). "The Effects of Hedges and Intensifiers
on Impression Formation in a simulated Courtroom Context," Western Speech Communication Journal, 51 (Spring 1987), pp.
173-178 (with Lawrence A. Hosman).





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Appendix A

Forms and Procedures for Annual Evaluation of Doctoral Students





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Annual Evaluation of Doctoral Students
College of Journalism and Communications
University of Florida

INFORMATION REQUESTED FROM STUDENTS
Each year the College of Journalism and Communications evaluates the progress of all
doctoral students. A copy of the form used for this evaluation is attached. In order to
facilitate this process, please provide your advisor with the following information by
(date). You may use these instructions as a format to fill in the categories.

1. Coursework: A copy of your degree plan. Include the grade for each course. If you
received lower than a B in any course, explain the deficiency in this area and what you
plan to do to redress it. If you have an "I" in a course, please explain your progress
toward completion of this course.
2. Progress Evaluation: Statement evaluating your progress toward your degree
schedule. List date you entered doctoral program, evaluate your progress toward
requirements, give date you plan to complete coursework, take exams, complete
degree.
Please address specifically in your statement the following:
(1) formation of a committee, including outside/external member; list names.
Has the paperwork been submitted to the Graduate Division?
(2) timeline for preparation or completion of qualifying exams, including oral
defense of exam.
(3) work on identifying dissertation topic and completing prospectus.
(4) current GPA, any incomplete? If so, plans for completing.

3. Research. Using a standard citation format, such as APA or Chicago. Please list:
(1) papers you have submitted to conferences in the past year.
(2) papers you have presented to conferences in the past year.
(3) publications submitted to scholarly or professional journals.
(4) status of those publications .
(5) creative activities submitted.
(6) creative activities that were juried or presented.
4. Assistantships/Fellowships/Scholarships: If you have been receiving financial
assistance for which you have been doing teaching, research, or other assigned duties,
please list these in detail for at least the current and previous two semesters. If you
have been teaching courses, please provide copies of the summary student teaching
evaluations and copies of evaluations received from the supervisor of your work. If you
are not teaching a course directly, please submit your supervisor's evaluation of your
work (assisting in a course, assisting with research, other assignment).
5. Service: If you have provided service to the department, college, university or
profession, please discuss.
6. Job Search: Describe any activities you have been undertaking in your job search, if
applicable.
7. Curriculum Vitae: Please provide a current copy of your curriculum vitae.
8. Degree Plan: Please include your degree plan.

Please also provide an electronic copy of your vitae in Microsoft WORD to the
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies dtreise()iou.ufl.edu
20






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


ANNUAL EVALUATION OF DOCTORAL STUDENTS (DATE)
FACULTY REPORT

Student's Name:

Beginning Date of Ph.D. Studies: Anticipated Completion:
Please comment on student's progress on each item that is relevant to student progress at this point in the degree. Use
back if necessary to provide details.
1. Overall Progress toward the Degree:
a. Core Courses Completed: Yes No
If no, is adequate progress being made? Yes No
b. Specialization Courses Completed: Yes No
If no, is adequate progress being made? Yes No
c. Methodological Courses Completed: Yes No
If no, is adequate progress being made? Yes No
d. Number of Advanced Courses completed
Is adequate progress being made? Yes No
e. Supporting Courses Completed: Yes No
If no, is adequate progress being made? Yes No
f. Degree Plan Completed: Yes No
If no, is adequate progress being made? Yes No
g. Committee Formed by Submitting Paperwork to Graduate Division: Yes No
h. Comprehensive Exams Completed: Yes No
i. Dissertation Progress: Satisfactory__ Unsatisfactory_

2. Academic Work: Satisfactory__ Unsatisfactory_

GPA: _Incompletes?
3. Research Accomplishments: Satisfactory Unsatisfactory
Number of conference papers submitted __ number presented
Number of articles submitted number published
Number of creative activities submitted number presented or exhibited
4. Assistantships/Fellowships/Scholarships: Satisfactory__ Unsatisfactory_ N/A

Courses Taught? Assisted with?

Research or Other Assignment:
5. Service to the Department, University, and/or Profession:
Satisfactory_ Unsatisfactory_ Not able to judge_
Summary Evaluation Comments:
Overall, how would you rate the progress of this doctoral student?

Excellent__ Good__ Average__ Below Average__ Unsatisfactory

Additional Comments: (use back of page)

Advisor: Name Signature Date
I have seen this evaluation and had the opportunity to respond. (Please use the back or additional pages to
comment or respond.)

Student: Name Signature Date





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Appendix B
Doctoral Qualifying Examination Policy






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


DOCTORAL QUALIFYING EXAMINATION POLICY


COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Approved by the Graduate Committee February 26, 1988; approved by the Doctoral Program Group March 11, 1988; edited for clarity by
assistant dean for graduate studies on April 11, 1988; approved by Graduate Faculty on April 15, 1988. Revision approved by the Doctoral
Program Group on July 31, 1989, and the Graduate Committee on September 21, 1990. Further edited on July 19, 1991 to reflect Graduate
School policy changes. With input from the Graduate Faculty, the Graduate Committee approved revisions to reflect Graduate School and
College policy changes on March 11, 2002.
Further edited and approved by the Graduate Committee on April 8, 2005



Introduction
The purpose of this document is to introduce students to the College of Journalism and Communications'
doctoral qualifying examination and its procedures.


Purpose of Doctoral Qualifying Examination and Admission to Candidacy
The purpose of the qualifying exam is to test a student's knowledge of core competency areas. Each
student must answer qualifying exam questions from memory. No external aids of any kind (including
electronic or written notes, books or references, external memory devices, cell phones or study aids of any
kind) are allowed during the exam. Any exceptions must be approved by a petition to the associate dean
of graduate studies one month prior to taking the qualifying exam.
Only one automatic exception, which does not require a petition, will be made for the legal methodology
question, which tests the student's ability to use the law library, legal research databases and occasionally
the Internet. Resources must be approved by the student's committee.
Any violation of the above rules will result in immediate dismissal from the doctoral
program.
The purpose of a doctoral qualifying examination is to evaluate each student's comprehensive
understanding of the field, as well as the student's insight, creativity, and clarity of expression, and to
encourage initiation of work on the dissertation. The examination is one of the requirements for admission
to candidacy.
A graduate student does not become a candidate for the Ph.D. degree until granted formal admission to
candidacy. Such admission requires the approval of the student's supervisory committee, the department
chairperson, the college dean, and the dean of the Graduate School. The approval must be based on (1)
the academic record of the student, (2) the opinion of the supervisory committee concerning overall fitness
for candidacy, (3) an approved dissertation topic, and (4) a qualifying examination as described above.

Preparation for the Examination

To provide the committee with adequate information for the development of appropriate written
examination questions, each student shall submit to the committee chair syllabi or course descriptions and
paragraphs describing the parameters of the study area established for each question in consultation with
the appropriate committee member(s).The course descriptions need to include required readings for each
course taken during the coursework portion of the program. Students will be held responsible for the
coursework they were required to complete as a prerequisite to the doctoral program. All of these
materials syllabi, course descriptions and paragraphs describing each question area must be
submitted to the chair no later than the beginning of the semester planned for the qualifying examination.






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


As an alternative to the paragraphs describing each question, the student may submit a reading list of
current journals and journal articles, books, and other appropriate documents, prepared in consultation
with the individual committee members and chair. The reading list is meant to act as a study guide so that
the student and the committee agree on necessary preparation.

The student also must submit a dissertation prospectus, approved by the chair, to the supervisory
committee at least four weeks before beginning the qualifying examination. The purpose of the
prospectus is to provide both the committee and the student with an early working document for
dissertation topic. The prospectus includes the research problem, the paradigmatic and theoretical
foundations for the project, the rationale for the project, key definitions and literature of the topic, a
description of the methodology to be used (for example, survey research, experimentation, historical
research, legal research), and a tentative bibliography, research schedule, and tentative budget.
Prospectus guidelines are decided upon after consultation with the student's supervisory chair.

Scheduling Qualifying Examinations

It is the student's responsibility to schedule times for the written and oral portions of the examination.
After agreement by the supervisory committee chair that the student may schedule the examination, the
student simultaneously arranges the dates, times, and locations for both the written and oral portions of
the qualifying examination.

Between the admission to candidacy and the graduation date of the degree, there must be a minimum of
two semesters. The semester in which the qualifying examination is passed is counted, provided that the
examination occurs before the midpoint of the term. For example, if a student plans to graduate in the
spring term, the oral portion of the qualifying examination must be taken before the midpoint of the fall
term. However, if the student plans to graduate in the summer term, the oral portion of the qualifying
examination can be held after the midpoint of the fall term, but before mid-point of spring term.

All times and dates of the written and oral qualifying examinations will be announced to the members of
the faculty in advance and posted on a bulletin board available to graduate students. A copy of the written
questions for every qualifying examination must be on file in the Division of Graduate Studies for public
inspection.

Nature of the Qualifying Examination

The University of Florida requires that the examination be both written and oral. At the College of
Journalism and Communications, the written and oral portions are considered as parts of one unified
examination. The student must meet the university's registration requirements at the time he/she takes
the exam.

The student should register for MMC 7979 in the term in which he or she plans to take the qualifying
examination. The Graduate School provides the official notice that the student has been admitted to
candidacy. In the terms following Admission to Candidacy, the student will register for MMC 7980.

Written Portion of the Examination
Answers to the written portion of the examination must be written. Oral examinations are forbidden as
substitutes for any or all of the written portion.

The written portion of the examination shall be divided into five parts. Four of the five parts of the written
portion of the examination focus on the individual student's coursework and readings. There shall be one
part each on (a) mass communication in general, (b) the specific aspects of mass communication on
which the student focused, (c) research methods central to the study of those specific aspects of mass
communication, and (d) supporting studies taken outside the college.

The fifth part of the written examination will focus on the student's dissertation prospectus. The faculty will
ask the student questions designed to increase the student's understanding of the dissertation topic or
resolve outstanding issues in the prospectus. The faculty could ask the student to consider alternative
approaches to the dissertation topic.






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Any foreign language examination requirement must be met outside of the qualifying examination.

Time for Written Portion
The student will be allowed four hours for each part. The five four-hour parts of the examination must be
completed within ten official class days.

Responsibility for Preparing Questions
The student's supervisory committee members, under the direction of the chair, are responsible for the
development of the questions for the written portion of the qualifying examination in accordance with the
policies of the university and the college. The supervisory committee prepares the examination questions
within the context of the individual student's program.

Taking the Written Examination
The answers must be written within Weimer Hall and produced in electronic form. The arrangements to sit
for the written portion must be coordinated by the student in consultation with the supervisory committee
chair and Division of Graduate Studies. The student is responsible for reserving with the Division for
Graduate Studies and Research a computer, room, and other supplies necessary for the examination.
The chair of the committee will collect a printed version of the examination answers, plus one output copy
or photocopy for each additional supervisory committee member at the conclusion of each of the five
parts. The supervisory committee chair also will deliver one set for the official records to the Division of
Graduate Studies. The student is responsible for providing the additional copies.

Evaluation of Written Examination
Student responses are evaluated by the student's supervisory committee following the policies of the
university and the college and within the context of the individual student's program.

There will be no separate faculty evaluation for the written portion of the examination. Rather, the
committee will decide whether a student passes or fails the qualifying examination after the oral portion of
the examination. The chair will discuss the results of the written portion of the examination with members
of the supervisory committee and separately with the student prior to proceeding with the oral defense.

Oral Portion of the Examination
The oral portion of the examination should take place within one month of the student completing the
written portion of the examination. The oral portion of the qualifying examination must be held on campus.
A major purpose of the oral exam is to allow the student, in response to faculty, to answer questions that
arose as a result of the written portion of the examination. A second purpose is to encourage the
development of the dissertation proposal. At the very least, the status of the dissertation research should
be discussed. The supervisory committee chair may meet with committee members before admitting the
student to the oral portion of the examination, and a committee member may request such a meeting,
which request shall be honored by the chair.

All members of the supervisory committee must be present at the oral portion. Only with advance
notification and permission of the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research can a graduate
faculty member substitute for another committee member. Justification for the substitution must be made
in writing to the Associate Dean and contain a reasonable timeframe for the substitute to review and
prepare for the oral portion. Only in extraordinary situations would a substitution be approved less than
one month prior to the oral portion of the examination. No substitutions are permitted for the committee
chair or the external member. The supervisory committee has the responsibility at this time of deciding
whether the student is qualified to continue work toward the Ph.D. degree. If a substitution is denied, the
oral portion must be cancelled and rescheduled when all committee members are present.

Telephone participation or participation via videoconference is allowed only in special situations.
Justification for the request to have a member of the supervisory committee participate by telephone must
be made in advance and in writing to the Associate Dean. Advance permission is necessary to estimate
the costs of the call and to reserve a room. The Division of Graduate Studies will not reimburse telephone
expenses directly to students. Therefore, approval to pay for telephone expenses must be made in
advance with the division. The College will accept responsibility for the cost of the call only if the student
has followed all procedures properly.






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Evaluation of the Oral Examination
The oral portion of the examination will be evaluated by the entire supervisory committee following the
policies of the university and the college and within the context of the individual student's program.

At the conclusion of the oral portion of the examination, the entire committee must agree that the student
has passed, conditionally passed, or failed each of the five parts of the examination separately. If a
conditional pass is assigned for any portion of the exam, the student must complete additional
requirements, as assigned by the committee, to remove the "conditional" status. This work must be
completed within a reasonable time period determined by the committee. Any failure must be reported to
the Graduate School, and the student must wait at least one semester for a retake if a retake is
recommended by the student's committee and approved by the Graduate School.



ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FORM


When a student has successfully completed the qualifying examination and completed all requirements
for admission to candidacy, the completed, signed, Admission to Candidacy form will be submitted to the
Graduate School by the Division of Graduate Studies.
One week prior to the oral defense, the student must obtain the Admission to Candidacy form from the
Graduate Division (2019 Weimer Hall) and return it after completing the necessary information. The
program assistant will then prepare the official form. On the day of the oral portion of the qualifying
examination, the student must obtain the official Admission to Candidacy form from the program assistant
in charge of current student records, take it to the exam, and return it to the program assistant after
receiving signatures of all committee members.

The date that the dissertation topic was accepted by the supervisory committee must also appear on the
Admission to Candidacy form. The Graduate School will not grant approval of a student's Admission to
Candidacy form until the date that the qualifying examination was passed and the date the dissertation
topic was accepted both appear on the form. The later of the two dates will be the official date of
"Admission to Candidacy." If a period greater than four months elapses between the date that the student
passed the oral portion of the examination and committee approval of the dissertation topic, the student
must notify the Associate Dean in writing indicating the reason for the delay.

Petitions

Any petition requiring approval for exceptions to the policies described above will be submitted in writing
and must be approved in writing by the student's entire supervisory committee. The student will deliver the
petition to the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. The Associate Dean will review the
petition and seek Graduate Committee approval or denial.





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Appendix C

Avoiding Plagiarism





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Avoiding Plagiarism


By the time you reach graduate school, you should already have had the opportunity to
write a research paper, and so you should have had some instruction in how to cite
others' work properly to ensure academic honesty and to give credit to those upon
whose work they are drawing for their own papers. However, recent problems with
plagiarism and improper citation have revealed that many students apparently do not
understand what constitutes plagiarism or how to avoid plagiarizing by using others'
work correctly. This guide is meant to clarify what is acceptable use of others' work and
what is not.

Even after you have read this guide, however, it is imperative that students consult the
instructor in each course if they have questions about properly citing others' work.
Don't rely on your friends or other students to tell you what professors expect. Ask the
professors themselves, and keep asking questions until you are certain you understand
how material drawn from others' work should be credited.

What types of materials must I cite to avoid plagiarism?
In short, everything. Any material you use, from any source, MUST be properly cited. If
you yourself did not write the material and if you did not write it the way it appears
in the paper you must give credit to the original author or source. This includes
material from scholarly publications, newspapers, magazines, advertising, press
releases, television programs, web pages, conference papers, speeches, etc.

How should I cite material copied word-for-word from another source?
If you use material copied verbatim from any other source, you must enclose the
verbatim material in quotation marks to indicate that the particular wording of the
passage was not your own. For instance, look at the material below, drawn from an
article published in the Journal of Health Communication.

"The results also show that the depiction of young models in ads for youth brands
is not simply a consequence of the fact that people generally find younger models
more attractive than older models. In the ads for the adult brands, such as Merit,
Eve, and Carlton, few people perceived the models as less than 25 years old. Those
brands are clearly targeted toward adults, usually promising lower tar and nicotine
than other brands in an effort to encourage brand switching by addicted smokers,
and consequently the models they depict are also clearly adults. Some brands in this
study usually regarded as adult brands, notably Lucky Strike and Parliament, did
feature models who appeared to a sizable proportion of participants to be under 25,
perhaps indicating an effort to reposition these brands as youth brands."

Talk is Cheap: The Tobacco Companies' Violations
of Their Own Cigarette Advertising Code
JEFFREY JENSEN ARNETT
Journal of Health Communication, 10:419-431, 2005






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


If you used part of a sentence from this segment of the article, it should appear like this:

Arnett (2005) concluded that the data "also show that the depiction of young models in ads for youth

brands is not simply a consequence of the fact that people generally find younger models more attractive

than older models" (p. 429).


The citation style might vary depending on which reference style you are using, but all
reference styles require that you enclose the word-for-word material in quotation marks
and indicate the page on which it appeared.

If you used the entire passage, most reference styles would require that you single-
space the material and indent it from both margins. The indentation and single-spacing
then take the place of the quotation marks to show that the wording is that of the
original author, not yours.

The results also show that the depiction of young models in ads for youth brands
is not simply a consequence of the fact that people generally find younger models more
attractive than older models. In the ads for the adult brands, such as Merit, Eve, and
Carlton, few people perceived the models as less than 25 years old. Those brands are
clearly targeted toward adults, usually promising lower tar and nicotine than other brands
in an effort to encourage brand switching by addicted smokers, and consequently the
models they depict are also clearly adults. Some brands in this study usually regarded as
adult brands, notably Lucky Strike and Parliament, did feature models who appeared to a
sizable proportion of participants to be under 25, perhaps indicating an effort to reposition
these brands as youth brands. (Arnett, 2005, p. 429).


What if I want to paraphrase what another author wrote?


The key to paraphrasing properly is to make sure you're summarizing the meaning of
the other author's work in your own words, not simply making slight modifications to
the original author's wording. For instance, the "paraphrase" below is not correct:

Arnett (2005) concluded that his data showed that the portrayal of younger models in ads for youth

brands was not merely a result of the reality that consumers generally find younger models more

attractive. He argued that in the ads for adult-targeted brands, such as Merit, Eve, and Carlton, only a

few people saw the models as less than 25 years old. Those brands are obviously targeted toward

adults, typically advertising lower tar and nicotine than other brands in an attempt to encourage addicted

smokers to switch brands, so the models they use are clearly adults.

In this incorrect paraphrase, a few words (which appear in boldface) have been
changed; however, the essential structure of the information still mirrors what was
written by the original author. Thus, it still constitutes plagiarism.

29





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


A correct paraphrase would read something like this:

One explanation for the use of younger models might be that consumers have been shown to perceive

younger models as more attractive. However, Arnett (2005) concluded that model attractiveness did not

explain the use of younger models in ads for youth-targeted cigarette brands because few participants

perceived the models used in adult-targeted brands, such as Merit, Eve, and Carlton, as appearing

younger than 25. These brands, usually aimed at persuading addicted smokers to switch brands, typically

emphasize the brands' lower tar and nicotine and use models who are obviously adults older than 25.

An important note about paraphrasing:
You'll note that the preceding example of correct paraphrasing still includes the
author's name and the year the article was published. This is to make it clear that the
ideas stated there are not yours they are someone else's.


What if I don't have the original article but want to cite a work
I've seen mentioned in another article?
First, you should be aware that citing someone else's explanation of what a different
author has said generally is not recommended. In most cases, you should seek out the
original work because it's always possible that when you read the original work, you
will disagree with the interpretation of that work by the author whose citation you had
seen.

However, if you cannot find the original work, your in-text citation makes reference to
both the original work and the article in which you found it described. In the reference
list, you will show that you were quoting from someone else's citation of the work.

For instance, let's say that you want to use this quote from James Tiedge and colleagues
concerning the third-person effect:
"In either case, most people appear to be willing to subscribe to the logical inconsistency inherent in
maintaining that the mass media influence others considerably more than themselves" (Tiedge, Silverblatt,
Havice & Rosenfeld, 1991, p. 152).

But you can't find the original work instead, you only have the citation from Richard
Perloff's chapter in a book. In the text, cite both works:

"In either case, most people appear to be willing to subscribe to the logical inconsistency inherent in

maintaining that the mass media influence others considerably more than themselves" (Tiedge, Silverblatt,

Havice & Rosenfeld, 1991, p. 152, as cited in Perloff, 2002).

In the reference list, however, you would ONLY list Perloff:





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Perloff, Richard M. (2002). The third-person effect. In J. Bryan and D. Zillman, Eds., Media Effects:
Advances in Theory and Research, 2nd Edition, (pp. 489-506). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum
Associates, Publishers.
What if there's no author to cite?
Let's say you want to use a passage from the First Amendment Center's report on its
2005 State of the First Amendment Survey. If you were going to use the following
paragraph word-for-word, you'd simply enclose the passage (or the part of it you used)
in quotation marks. Instead of listing the author because there isn't one listed you
would credit the report itself in the reference (according to APA style other styles may
differ). In this case, it's an online report, so there is no page number to list. Instead, you
would list the paragraph number. In the reference list, you would provide the full
citation for the report, including the URL at which the report can be found.
"Nearly 80% of respondents agreed that broadcasters should be allowed to televise the proceedings of the
U.S. Supreme Court, though less than half agreed that broadcasters should be able to televise any
courtroom trial they wish." ("State of the First Amendment," 2005, 11).
You'd use a similar procedure if you were going to paraphrase the material from that
paragraph:

The State of the First Amendment survey (2005) revealed that less than 50 percent of respondents
believe broadcasters should have free reign to televise any courtroom trial; however, almost 8 in 10
respondents supported broadcasts of U.S. Supreme Court cases.


The penalties for plagiarism


Any violation of the above stated conditions in any class taken at UF is grounds for
immediate dismissal from the program and will result in revocation of the degree if
the degree previously has been awarded.

This document applies to all students taking courses in the College of Journalism
and Communications. If you are not a student in our college, please sign the
document and return it to your professor.


I have read and understand this document, and I agree to abide by these standards.



Print Name Date


Signature





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Appendix D

Academic Integrity in Graduate Studies






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


ACADEMIC INTEGRITY IN GRADUATE STUDIES IN THE COLLEGE OF
JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS


All graduate students in the College of Journalism and Communications are expected to conduct themselves with the
highest degree of integrity. It is the students' responsibility to ensure that they know and understand the
requirements of every assignment. At a minimum, this includes avoiding the following:

Plagiarism: Plagiarism occurs when an individual presents the ideas or expressions of another as his or her own.
Students must always credit others' ideas with accurate citations and must use quotation marks and citations when
presenting the words of others. A thorough understanding of plagiarism is a precondition for admittance to graduate
studies in the college.

Cheating: Cheating occurs when a student circumvents or ignores the rules that govern an academic assignment such
as an exam or class paper. It can include using notes, in physical or electronic form, in an exam, submitting the work
of another as one's own, or reusing a paper a student has composed for one class in another class. If a student is not
sure about the rules that govern an assignment, it is the student's responsibility to ask for clarification from his
instructor.

Research integrity: The integrity of data in mass communication research is a paramount issue for advancing
knowledge and the credibility of our professions. For this reason any intentional misrepresentation of data, or
misrepresentation of the conditions or circumstances of data collection, is considered a violation of academic
integrity.

Misrepresenting data reported in a thesis or dissertation is a clear violation of the rules and requirements of academic
integrity and honesty.

Any violation of the above stated conditions is grounds for immediate dismissal from the program and will
result in revocation of the degree if the degree previously has been awarded.




I have read and understand this document, and I agree to abide by these standards.


Print Name Date



Sign Name





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Appendix E

Doctoral Degree Plan






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


DEGREE PLAN FOR A PH.D. IN MASS COMMUNICATION
GRADUATE DIVISION COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GRADUATE FACULTY APPROVAL 4-04
UPDATED 6/22/06 AND JANUARY 2008


Your Signature:


Date:


Your Name
Printed:


UF ID #:


Specialization:

Methodological
Approach(es):

Supporting Studies:

Languages (if any):

Qualifying Exam:


Graduation:

Required
Attachments:


(anticipated term)

(anticipated term)


Statement of Research Interests and Intent, Curriculum Vitae, Program of
Study and Transcripts


Supervisory Committee (Signatures with dates indicate approval of this degree plan.) Please
complete the pink Supervisory Committee form at this time and obtain signatures on both documents. Return the
form to the Grad Division.
SIGNATURE DATE DEPARTMENT


Member:


Member:


Member:


Member:


Approved


Mass Communication


Mass Communication


Mass Communication


Second


Third,


Outside,


Optional


Associate Dean, Division of Graduate Studies wto


Chair:





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


STATEMENT OF RESEARCH INTERESTS AND INTENT

Present your research program and goals for employment after graduation. As part of the essay
relate experiences that have led to your interests and goals.

Within the context of your research program, discuss projects you are working on at the time this
essay is written, projects in planning stages, and projects you have or would like to undertake
before you complete your course work. Make clear the intellectual relationships among the
various projects. List convention papers and scholarly journal and trade press publications
anticipated from each project. Include both co-authored and solo works.

Describe your goals for employment after completing your degree.

Length: At least two pages, typed, and double-spaced.



CURRICULUM VITAE

Your Name
Doctoral Student
College of Journalism and Communications
University of Florida
PO Box 118400 2000 Weimer Hall
Gainesville FL 32611-8400

UF Student ID Number:
Local Residence:
EDUCATION
TEACHING EXPERIENCE
MASS COMMUNICATION WORK EXPERIENCE
RECENT HONORS
BOOKS
BOOK CHAPTERS
REFEREED PUBLICATIONS
OTHER PUBLICATIONS (Conference papers and others)
CURRENT RESEARCH





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


PROGRAM OF STUDY
The requirements for your degree plan are outlined below. You must explain and justify any
departures from distribution requirements. Your degree plan must be approved by your advisor
prior to pre-registration for your second semester of coursework. By the end of your second
semester, your committee members from inside the college also must sign your degree plan. In
addition, at that time, if you have not previously identified an outside member for your
committee, you must submit three names for a potential outside member. You are urged to
secure an outside committee member by pre-registration for your third semester. Your degree
plan will be approved by the associate dean at the end of the second semester.

List individual courses under appropriate headings. For an example of how to present courses,
see courses listed under Core, and dissertation research listings below. Include grades for
courses already completed.
*The degree plan represents the minimum number of hours to fulfill the degree requirements.
Your advisor may require additional course work in many cases.

Required Courses With advisor approval, up to 30 credits from your master's degree program
can be applied to doctoral program requirements. Students must take a minimum of five
advanced-level courses, at least three of which must be taken in the College. Advanced-
level courses are defined as those that require the completion of an original scholarly paper
(academic conference quality) that advances knowledge in the field. These courses can fit
under the Specialization, Methodological or Supporting categories listed below. No more than
two of these courses may be taken as independent study. These hours may not include
7979/7980 course hours. A minimum of 9 credit hours of coursework must be taken outside the
college. No substitute or transfer courses are allowed to substitute for advanced-level courses.
Please attach syllabi for all advanced-level courses.

CORE COURSES, 6 HOURS REQUIRED
COURSE TERM &YEAR CREDITS GRADE ADVANCED
MMC 6402 Mass Communication Perspectives 1st Fall 4 Y
MMC 6929 Communication Colloquium 1st Fall 1 N
MMC 6929 Communication Colloquium 1s1 Spring 1 N
N
N
Total Credits


SPECIALIZATION COURSES, 12-20 CREDITS REQUIRED (List courses individually.)
COURSE TERM &YEAR CREDITS GRADE ADVANCED
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Total Credits





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


METHODOLOGICAL COURSES, 12-20 CREDITS REQUIRED (List additional courses individually.)
COURSE TERM &YEAR CREDITS GRADE ADVANCED
Methods (inside college) 3 Y/N
Methods (inside college) 3 Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Total Credits


SUPPORTING COURSES, 26 CREDITS REQUIRED (List additional courses individually.)
(Note: Courses in this area may be used to strengthen areas of teaching, area specialization, and foundational
expertise. A minimum of 9 credit hours of coursework must be taken outside the college. Please see the
Doctoral Handbook for more details.)
COURSE TERM &YEAR CREDITS GRADE ADVANCED
Y/N


Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N


Total Credits
DISSERTATION RESEARCH, 18-24 CREDITS REQUIRED. MAY BE TAKEN IN ANY
COMBINATION, however, MMC 7980 may be taken only after you are
approved for candidacy. See Doctoral Handbook for more information.

COURSE TERM &YEAR CREDITS GRADE ADVANCED
MMC 7979 Advanced Research N
MMC 7979 Advanced Research N
MMC 7980 Research for Doctoral Dissertation N
MMC 7980 Research for Doctoral Dissertation N
Total Credits

GRAND TOTAL


TOTAL REQUIRED 90 CREDITS 5
ADVANCED LEVEL
COURSES





Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


Appendix F

Highlights in the History of the College






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


HIGHLIGHTS IN THE COLLEGE'S HISTORY

YEAR SPECIAL EVENT
1906 University News, forerunner of Independent Florida Alligator, first published.
1915 Maxwell Newton Beelerjoins faculty of the College of Agriculture as first part-time teacher of journalism.
First class, "Agricultural Journalism," taught in Spring Semester 1916.
1925 Legislature approves appropriation for setting up Department of Journalism and hiring full-time professor.
First full-time professor, Orland Kay "O.K." Armstrong, sets up Department of Journalism.
1927 Faculty expands to two as Elmer J. Emig arrives.
1928 First degrees injournalism conferred in June.
WRUF-AM goes on air.
1929 Elmer J. Emig named Department head, July 1, 1929.
1947 In summer term, first master's degree conferred.
1948 Faculty expands to three when John Paul Jones, Jr., arrives.
1949 School of Journalism founded, July 1, 1949. Rae O. Weimer named Director of School.
WRUF-FM goes on air.
1950 School of Journalism accredited, July 1, 1950.
1954 School expands to School of Journalism and Communications.
1955 School accredited in Advertising.
School moves to Stadium Building.
1956 University's first teaching by television started in School.
1958 Board of Control designates University of Florida to have only state School of Journalism and
Communications in Florida.
WUFT-TV goes on air.
School accredited in Radio-Television.
1959 James "Mickey" Ellenberg, Jr., becomes 500thjournalism graduate at June Commencement.
1967 Board of Regents votes for School to become College.
1968 John Paul Jones, Jr., named Dean of College.
1969 100th student graduated from master's program.
1970 Communication Research Center becomes a full-time operation.
1972 College departmentalized into Advertising, Broadcasting, Journalism, and Public Relations.
1973 Independent Florida Alligator becomes independent and moves off-campus.
1976 Ralph L. Lowenstein named Dean of College.
School accredited in Public Relations.
1980 College moves into Weimer Hall in spring quarter.
1980 College initiates "Professional Summer" program for faculty members.
1981 WUFT-FM goes on air.
1986 500th student graduated from master's program.
1989 W10BR (now WRUF) goes on the air.
1990 In May, first two doctoral degrees in mass communication conferred.
1994 Terry Hynes named Dean of College.
The Interactive Media Lab is established.






Doctoral Handbook 2008 2009


YEAR SPECIAL EVENT
1996 Graduate programs received highest overall ratings in the nation in U.S. News and World Report.


1997 Documentary Institute joins the College of Journalism and Communications.
College offers a new degree plan in documentary production.
1998 Department of Advertising is certified as an Institute by the International Advertising Association. This is the
first fully certified institute in the United States.
1999 College offers a new degree program in sports communication and a joint Juris Doctor/Ph.D. in mass
communication.
College awards its 50th Ph.D. degree.
2000 "Celebration 2000" in recognition of the 75th anniversary of the beginning of a formal journalism curriculum
at UF and the 50th anniversary of Rae O. Weimer's arrival at UF.
Division of Graduate Studies offers a project option in addition to thesis and non thesis options for the
Master's degree.
The Graduate Division was officially renamed the Division of Graduate Studies.
2001 College offers a new degree program in Science/Health Communication.
2002 New addition to Weimer Hall which houses the Radio Reading Service was dedicated.
College awards its 75th Ph.D. degree
College awards its 1200th Master's degree
Master of Advertising admits first class of students
2003 College admits first students to 4/1 joint master's degree programs
2004 College awards its 100th Ph.D. degree
College awards first MADV degrees in spring 2004.
2006 John W. Wright, II named Interim Dean of the College
Linda Hon named Associate Dean of the College
ACEJMC re-accredits the undergraduate and graduate programs.
2007 John Wright named Dean of the College of Journalism and Communications
























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