• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Professional organizations and...
 Ethical and professional stand...
 Mission, goals, and objectives...
 Graduate school policies
 Counselor education faculty and...
 Counselor education policies
 General information
 Degrees, programs, and course...
 Program planning procedures
 School counseling and guidance...
 Marriage and family counseling...
 Mental health counseling (ACD)
 Practicum and internship proce...
 Practicum and internship forms...
 MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, EDS-only research...
 MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, EDS-only graduation...
 Florida certification and...
 Statements on competencies and...














Group Title: Student handbook
Title: MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, & EDS-only student handbook
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091434/00004
 Material Information
Title: MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, & EDS-only student handbook
Series Title: Student handbook
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Department of Counselor Education, College of Education, University of Florida
Publisher: Department of Counselor Education, College of Education, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2002
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091434
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Introduction
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Acknowledgement
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Professional organizations and services
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
    Ethical and professional standards
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
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        Page B-78
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    Mission, goals, and objectives of UF
        Page C-1
        Page C-2
        Page C-3
        Page C-4
        Page C-5
        Page C-6
        Page C-7
    Graduate school policies
        Page D-1
        Page D-2
        Page D-3
        Page D-4
        Page D-5
        Page D-6
        Page D-7
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    Counselor education faculty and staff
        Page E-1
        Page E-2
        Page E-3
        Page E-4
        Page E-5
        Page E-6
        Page E-7
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        Page E-10
        Page E-11
        Page E-12
        Page E-13
        Page E-14
        Page E-15
    Counselor education policies
        Page F-1
        Page F-2
        Page F-3
        Page F-4
        Page F-5
        Page F-6
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        Page F-15
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    General information
        Page G-1
        Page G-2
        Page G-3
        Page G-4
        Page G-5
        Page G-6
        Page G-7
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        Page G-12
        Page G-13
        Page G-14
        Page G-15
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    Degrees, programs, and course titles
        Page H-1
        Page H-2
        Page H-3
        Page H-4
        Page H-5
        Page H-6
        Page H-7
        Page H-8
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    Program planning procedures
        Page I-1
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    School counseling and guidance (SCG)
        Page J-1
        Page J-2
        Page J-3
        Page J-4
        Page J-5
        Page J-6
        Page J-7
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        Page J-21
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        Page J-24
        Page J-25
    Marriage and family counseling (EDC)
        Page K-1
        Page K-2
        Page K-3
        Page K-4
        Page K-5
        Page K-6
        Page K-7
        Page K-8
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        Page K-42
        Page K-43
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        Page K-46
    Mental health counseling (ACD)
        Page L-1
        Page L-2
        Page L-3
        Page L-4
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    Practicum and internship procedures
        Page M-1
        Page M-2
        Page M-3
        Page M-4
        Page M-5
        Page M-6
        Page M-7
        Page M-8
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        Page M-10
        Page M-11
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        Page M-13
        Page M-14
    Practicum and internship forms & instructions
        Page N-1
        Page N-2
        Page N-3
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    MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, EDS-only research requirements
        Page O-1
        Page O-2
        Page O-3
        Page O-4
        Page O-5
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        Page O-7
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    MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, EDS-only graduation requirements
        Page P-1
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    Florida certification and licensure
        Page Q-1
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    Statements on competencies and skills
        Page R-1
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Full Text





* UNIVERSITY OF

SFLORIDA


2002 COUNSELOR EDUCATION

MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, & EDS-only

STUDENT HANDBOOK



[Revised January, 2002]


Department of Counselor Education
1215 Norman Hall
University of Florida
P.O. Box 117046
Gainesville, FL 32611-7046
Phone: (352) 392-0731
Fax: (352) 846-2697
http://www.coe.ufl.edu/Counselor/CED/index.html









INTRODUCTION

WELCOME to the University of Florida (UF) and the Department of
Counselor Education. We hope the information in this revised 2002 edition of
the Counselor Education Student Handbook and in the 2001-2002 UF Graduate
School Catalog (available at the UF Registrar's Office) will enable you to fully
benefit from the opportunities available to you here at the University of Florida
and to successfully plan and implement your Counselor Education Graduate
program in Marriage and Family Counseling (EDC), Mental Health Counseling
(ACD), and/or School Counseling (SCG).
The Handbook and the Graduate Catalog delineate Program, Department,
and Graduate School guidelines, procedures, protocol, and regulations necessary
for successful completion of your degree program. Taken together, they specify
what you must do after matriculation in order to graduate with degrees) in hand.
You are encouraged to consult this Handbook and the Graduate School Catalog
frequently for answers to your program-related questions.
There are three editions of this 2002 Handbook:
* Those admitted into the MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, or EDS-only degree
program (regardless of specialization) are to use the 2002 Counselor
Education MAE/EDS, MED/EDS. and EDS-only Student Handbook.
* Those who already have a Masters in Counseling who are admitted into
the doctoral program (regardless of specialization) are to use the 2002
Counselor Education Doctoral Student Handbook.
* Those who have not yet earned a Masters degree in Counseling and
who have been admitted directly into the doctoral program are to use
the 2002 Counselor Education Direct Entry Student Handbook.

The three handbooks differ in the quantity of information included and in
the Planned Program Forms specifying courses required for each degree.








Please retain your copy of the relevant 2002 Handbook, the 2001-2002
Graduate School catalog, and all copies of the syllabi of courses you complete.
These documents are legally recognized as sources which explain program
requirements and provide course descriptions (in support of your graduate
transcript) so that you can document (whenever necessary) that you covered the
subject matter required by law for the certification(s) and/or licenses) you seek
after you graduate.
Again, welcome to the University of Florida! It is our hope that you will
experience the "challenge and support" that characterizes graduate education at
its best and that your enrollment initiates a challenging, enjoyable and productive
professional career.








ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The revised 2002 editions of the COUNSELOR EDUCATION
DOCTORAL and MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, & EDS-only STUDENT
HANDBOOKS have been reorganized into a "reader-friendly" format by Dama
Jackson and Kitty Fallon. Handbook content is based on the Graduate Council
Policy Manual, prior editions of the Counselor Education Student Handbook
(originally compiled by Dr. Larry C. Loesch in 1987), course materials prepared
by Dr. Ellen Amatea for the Doctoral Orientation Seminar she teaches, and
conversations with colleagues and students regarding essential information and
"most frequently asked questions".
Prior editions of the COUNSELOR EDUCATION DOCTORAL and
MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, & EDS-only STUDENT HANDBOOK were published in
April & August 1987, February & September 1988, January 1989, August 1991,
January & August 1992, January & August 1993, August 1994, August 1995,
August 1996, August 1998, September 1999, September 2000, and January 2001
(on line), and published as two versions in 1998, 1999, & 2000 (i.e., the
Counselor Education MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, and EDS-only Student Handbook
and the Counselor Education Doctoral Student Handbook). The two versions
were combined on line in the 2001 Counselor Education Student Handbook.
All previous editions of the Counselor Education Student Handbook are
now superseded by the 2002 versions now available. I hope the new revised
editions of the 2002 Counselor Education Student Handbooks help you to create
programmatic "order out of chaos" so that you can fully benefit from the clinical,
professional, and scholarly opportunities at the University of Florida.

Peter A.D. Sherrard, Ed.D., LMFC, LMHC, NCC, ABPP
Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator









TABLE of CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I. COUNSELING AS A PROFESSION

SECTION A. PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS and SERVICES
1. Professional Organizations ...................................................... A-
2. Benefits of M membership ................................... ........ ............ A-3
3. Beta Chapter-Chi Sigm a Iota............................... ................. A-3
4. CESA: The Counselor Education Student Association ............. A-4
5. National Counselor Certification (NBCC).................................. A-5
6. Professional Liability Insurance .......................... ................. A-6
7. Student M em bership ................................... ............................ A -7
SECTION B. ETHICAL and PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS
1 P reface ........... .................. .............. .............................. . B -
2. University of Florida Student Rights and Responsibilities ........ B-2
3. Academic Honesty Guidelines ............................................. B-3
4. Student Conduct Code................................................... ....... B -4
5. Values of the American Counseling Association ..................... B-10
6. American Counseling Association (ACA)
Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice ............................... B-12
6A. ACA Code of Ethics.................................. ................. B-12
6B. ACA Standards of Practice ............... ...................... B-37
7. National Board for Certified Counselors
(NBCC) Code of Ethics..................................... .................. B-45
8. American Association for Marriage and Family
Therapists (AAMFT) Code of Principles................................ B-56
9. Certified Rehabilitation Counselors
Code of Professional Ethics .............................. ................. B-65
10. American School Counselor Association (ASCA)
Ethical Standards for School Counselors.................................. B-77









II. DEPT. OF COUNSELOR EDUCATION. UF. GRADUATE SCHOOL
SECTION C. MISSION, GOALS, and OBJECTIVES
1. The Purpose of the University of Florida................................. C-l
2. The Mission of the University of Florida.................................... C-l
3. The Mission of the Graduate School................................... C-l
4. The Mission of the College of Education................................... C-2
5. Common Components of Doctoral Programs in College of
Education .......... ................ ........ ............ C-2
6. The Mission of Counselor Education................................... C-3
7. The Goals and Objectives of the Department of
Counselor Education .................... .. ................ ..... C-4
7A. An ethically informed professional identity ...................... C-4
7B. A disciplined professional curiosity............................. C-5
7C. An efficacious commitment to professional service .......... C-5
8. Why Are Mental Health Counseling & Marriage and Family
Counseling Programs in the College of Education? .................... C-6
SECTION D. GRADUATE SCHOOL POLICIES
1. Admission Requirements for Graduate Students (2/17/2000) ..... D-1
2. Graduate Admissions Processing System ................................. D-1
3. Categories of Graduate Student Classification............................ D-2
4. Significance of Course Numbers ................... .................... D-2
5. General Registration Information ................... .................... D-3
6. Class Time Periods Summer and Fall/Spring ........................... D-4
7. Minimum Full-Time Registration Requirements
for Graduate Students......................... ......... ....... D-4
8. Academic Standing .................... ............ ..... ............... D-6
9. Integrity in Graduate Study ................................................... D-7
10. Grade Posting Policy................. ... ....... ...... .............. D
11. Grade Points......................................................................... D 13
12. Computing Graduate Grade Point Averages ............................... D-14
13. Grades Below "C"................................ ................. D-15
14. Grades of Incom plete .............................................................. D-15
15. Repeating Courses to Improve Your Grade ................................ D-16
16. S/U Graded Courses (2/17/2000)................... .................... D-16
17. Definition of Credits ......... .. .............. .... ............... D-16
18. Traveling Scholar Program..................... .................... D-17
19. Seven Year Rule for Masters and EDS Candidates ................. D-17
20. M inimal Credit Requirements ...... ....... ............................... D-17








21. Residence Requirements ............................... ................ D-18
22. Interruption of Graduate Study..................................... D-18
23. Human Subjects Committee:
The Institutional Review Board (IRB) .............................. ... D-19
24. Tuition Fee Schedule: 2001-2002 Academic Year.................... D-22
25. Financial A id................. .................................... .......... ....... D -22
26. Graduate Assistantship Possibilities .......................................... D-26
27. Tuition (Matriculation Fee) Waivers ............... ................ D-27
28. Policy Issues and Procedures regarding Petitions ............ ....... D-28
29. Major Functions & Responsibilities of the Graduate School....... D-30
30. Major Functions & Responsibilities of the Graduate
C coordinator ...................................... ............. ................. ...... D -30
SECTION E. COUNSELOR EDUCATION FACULTY and STAFF
1. Counselor Education Faculty .................................................. E-1
2. Counselor Education Faculty Biographies................................ E-2
3. Office Staff and Administrative Assistants..................................... E-8
4. Counselor Education
Office Address, FAX, and Phone .......................................... E-9
5. Faculty Office Hours............................. ..... ............... E-10
6. M messages to Faculty and Staff .............................................. E-10
7. Faculty E-Mail Addresses ....... .................................... E-10
8. Administrative Staff E-Mail Addresses ................................. E- 11
9. Graduate Assistants' E-Mail Addresses................................. E-11
10. Faculty M eetings................ ..... ....... ......... ........... ...... E-12
11. Faculty Committee Assignments for 2001-2002...................... E-12
12. Visiting Scholars ................. .. ...... .......... .............. E-13
13. Affiliate, Adjunct, and Courtesy Faculty ................................ E-13
14. Faculty Academic Ranks and Standing................................... E-14
SECTION F. COUNSELOR EDUCATION POLICIES
1. Change of Academic M ajor .................................................. F-l
2. Course Registration and Section Numbers................................ F-l
3. End-of-Semester Examinations ............................ ................. F-3
4. Endorsement/Recommendation Policy .................................. F-3
5. Essential Functions Required for Matriculating Students............ F-3
6. Extracurricular Counseling Activities.................. ........... F-5
7. Extracurricular Counseling Activities Form ............................... F-7
8. Faculty A djudication Form ........................................................ F-9
9. Format for Course Syllabi ....................................... F-11








10. Grade Appeal Policy and Procedure .................................... F-13
11. Plagiarism Policy ......... .. ......... ............ ................. F-14
12. Program Pre-Professional Requirement................ .. .......... F-14
13 Student Evaluation of Academic Advisement............................. F-15
14. Student Evaluation of Classroom Instruction.............................. F-15
15. Student Evaluation of Practicum/Internship Supervision ........... F-17
16. Student Judicial Process. ....... .... ............... ................. F-17
17. Student Retention Procedures......................... ................. F-18
SECTION G. GENERAL PROGRAM INFORMATION
1. Accommodating Students' Religious Observances ................ G-
2. Bulletin Boards ..................... ............................................. G-
3. Campus and Community Counseling Services ........................... G-1
4. Class Attendance Policy ....... ....... .................................... G-2
5. Conference Room Usage .............. .... .................... G-2
6. Contributions to the Counselor Education Fund at the
University of Florida Foundation...................... ................. G-2
7. Counselor Education Listserve..................................... G-2
8. F orm s .......................................................... ....... .............. . . G -3
9. Graduate Student Computer Accounts....................... ........ G-3
10. Guidelines for UF Faculty Members .................................. G-4
11. Jury D uty ................. ...................................... ................. G -5
12. N ew Student O orientation ........................................................... G -5
13. Policy on Sexual Harassm ent .................................................. G-6
14. Reserving Laboratory Facilities................................ G-6
15. Retain Course Syllabi................. ........... ........ .......... G-7
16. Safety Rem inder........................... ...................... G -7
17. State of Florida Residency Requirements................................ G-8
17A. Request for Change in Residency Status Form............... G-9
17B. Florida Residency Assessment and Affidavit Form.......... G-11
18. Student D ata Files ............................................. ................ G -15
19. Student Information Policy................................................... G-15
20. Student M ailboxes......................... ...................... G -15
21. Student Mentorship Program ....... ...................................... G-16
22. Telephone Service....... ..... ............... ............ ................ G-17
23. UF Requires Computer Competency (CLAS)............................. G-17
SECTION H. DEGREES, PROGRAMS, and COURSE TITLES
1. Program Accreditations..... .. ................................ ... ...... ........ H-
2. Academic Degrees ...... .................... ............... H-2








3. Board of Regents Program Identifier Codes ............................... H-2
4. Academic Program Concentrations ............... ................. H-2
5. Academic Degree and Program Combinations ........................ H-2
6. The Professional Practice Specializations ................................ H-3
7. The General Requirements for Successful
Completion of Counselor Education Programs .................. H-3
8. Attending to Contextual Influences ................................ ...... H-3
9. MED/EDS & MAE/EDS Degree Program Overview ................. H-3
10. EDS-Only Degree Program Overview ................................. H-4
11. The CACREP Core Curricula ............................................. H-5
12. The Department's MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, & EDS-only
Core Curricula................. ............................................... H-5
13. School Core Curricula.............................................................. H-6
14. ACD Clinical Core Curricula.................................................. H-6
15. EDC Clinical Core Curricula........................................... H-6
16. UF Counselor Education Course List ................................... H-7
17. 1994 Course Conversion Chart ............................................ H-9
SECTION I. PROGRAM PLANNING PROCEDURES
1. Faculty A dvisor......................................... ........................... I-1
2. Change of Faculty Advisor........................................... -2
3. Form for Changing Faculty Advisor............... ................. -3
4. Developing your Planned Program of Studies .......................... -5
5. Five Year Schedule of Courses........................... ................. I-6
6. Undergraduate Credit Hours Counted Toward
A Graduate D egree.................................... .................... I-19
7. Transfer of Credit....................................... .......................... 1-19
8. Change of Planned Program .................................................. 1-21
9. Change of Planned Program Form........................... ........... 1-22
10. Graduate Certificate in Gerontology..................................... 1-24
11. Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies................................. 1-24
12. M ED/ED S Tim e Line.................................... ................. 1-25
SECTION J. SCHOOL COUNSELING and GUIDANCE (SCG)
1. School Counseling Program Coordinator ................................ J-1
2. SCG MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, and EDS-only
Program D description ....................... ....... .................. ... J-1
3. MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, and EDS-only Planned Program
Form (1/2002 revised version) ............................................ J-3
4. Planned Program Elective Options................................. J-7








5. M idpoint Evaluation...... ... ................ ........... ... J-9
6. Midpoint Evaluation Checklist ................. .. ................. J-10
7. M idpoint Examinations ....................... ... ...... .......... J-11
8. Midpoint Examination Application Form................................. J-13
9. SCG Practicum and Internship Requirements.......................... J-15
9A. Practicum and Internship ...... .............. .................. J-15
9B. General Information.......................... ................. J-15
9C. School Counseling Placements ................................... J-15
9D. The Host Counselor and University Supervisors................ J-16
9E. Four Participating (Learning) Roles ................................. J-16
9F. Representative Field Experiences and Expectations .......... J-17
9G. Cyberspace Supervision & School Counselor Network...... J-20
10. W ebsite Address ................. ... .. .... ............. ................. J-20
11. Final Oral Examination ............. ............ ....................... J-20
12. Florida School Counselor Certification .................. ........ J-21
13. Initial Teacher Certification.......................................................... J-21
14. Florida School Counselor Certification Requirements................ J-22
15. Expectations for UF Graduates Who Seek School Counseling
Courses and Florida Department of Education Certification...... J-24
16. Teacher Certification and Employment .................................. J-25
16A. Teacher Certification Examination ................................ J-25
16B. Seeking Employm ent.................................... ................. J-25
SECTION K. MARRIAGE & FAMILY COUNSELING (EDC)
1. EDC MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, and EDS-only
Program D description ......... ................ ..... .......................... K -
2. EDC MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, and EDS-only Planned Program
Form (1/2002 version) ...... .................... .................... K -4
3. EDC Planned Program Elective Options .................................. K-7
4. M idpoint Evaluation......... ........... ...... .... ............... K-10
5. Midpoint Evaluation Checklist Form.................................... K-11
6. M idpoint Examinations ......................................................... K-12
7. Midpoint Examination Application Form.................................. K-14
8. EDC Practicum and Internship Requirements........................... K-16
8A. Specific Practicum and Internship Requirements .............. K-16
8B. Selection Criteria for Practicum/Internship Sites for EDC.. K-16
8C. Choosing a Practicum/Internship Setting ...................... K-18
8D. Practicum 1 Requirements ....... ....... ............................ K-19
8E. Practicum 2 Requirements .................................... K-20
8F. Clinical Internship Requirements ................................. K-21








8G. Summary Report of Practicum and Internship Client Contact
Hours and Supervision Hours Form................................ K-23
8H. Evaluation of Student Development in
Practica/Intemships ......................................... ....... .. K-24
81. Macro Skill Development Checklist ................................ K-26
8J. Marco Skill Development Signposts the Micro Skills..... K-30
8K. Counselor Development Scale ..................................... K-35
9. Coursework Required for EDC Licensure in Florida
in 2001 & B eyond ................................................................ K -37
10. Final EDC Oral Examination....... ....... ................................ K-38
10A. Evaluation Form ........ ...... ... .. ................. ..... K-43
10B. Activities and Time Line....................... ................. K-45
10C. Time Frame ........ ... ........... ................... ............... K-46
SECTION L. MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING (ACD)
1. ACD MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, and EDS-only
Program D description ................................. .................. ...... L-1
2. ACD MAE/EDS, MED/EDS, and EDS-only Planned Program
Form (1/2002 version)......... ............................................ .... L-3
3. ACD Planned Program Elective Options................................. L-6
4. M idpoint Evaluation...................................... ................. L-9
5. Midpoint Evaluation Checklist Form................................... L-10
6. Midpoint Examinations ................ ... .. .................. L-11
7. Midpoint Examination Application Form ................................ L-13
8. ACD Practicum and Internship Requirements ......................... L-15
8A. Specific Practicum and Internship Requirements ............. L-15
8B. Selection Criteria for Practicum/Internship Sites for ACD. L-15
8C. Choosing a Prac/Intemship setting ............................... L-17
8D. Practicum 1 Requirements ............................................. L-18
8E. Practicum 2 Requirements ....... ....... ............................ L-19
8F. Clinical Internship Requirements ....................................... L-19
8G. Summary Report of ACD MED/EDS, MAE/EDS,
Practicum and Internship Client Contact and
Supervision H ours ........................................................... L -22
8H. Evaluation of Student Development in
Practica/Intemships ......................... ............ L-24
81. Macro Skill Development Checklist ............................. L-26
8J. Macro Skill Development Signposts the Micro Skills..... L-30
8K. Counselor Development Scale................... ................. L-36








9. CACREP Coursework Required for ACD Licensure,
2001 and beyond .......... .......................... ............... L-38
10. Final ACD Oral Examination......................................... L-39
10A. Evaluation Form ..... .. ................................ ... ...... ........ L-44
10B. Activities and Time Line....................... ................. L-46
10C. Time Frame ...... ................................... L-47
SECTION M. PRACTICUM & INTERNSHIP PROCEDURES
1. Introduction......................... .......... .... M -1
2. Program Requirements ............... ........................ .................. M -1
3. M alpractice Insurance .............................................................. M -2
4. Typical Practicum/Intemship Course Sequences ........................ M-2
5. The "Split" Internship ............................................................... M -3
6. Time Requirements for Practica ...................... ..... .............. M -5
7. Time Requirements for Clinical Internship.................................... M-5
8. Grades for Practicum/Internship Performance ......................... M-6
9. Individual and Group Supervision ................. .................... M-6
10. Site H ost Supervision.................................... ................. M -7
11. Students' Evaluation of Supervisors................................ M-7
12. Students' Evaluation of Sites and Site Host Supervision ........... M-8
13. Site Host Evaluation of Student Performance.......................... M-8
14. Group Supervisor's Evaluation of Student Performance ........... M-8
15. Individual Supervisor's Evaluation of Student Performance ...... M-8
16 Selection Criteria for Prac/Intern. Sites for ACD & EDC .......... M-9
17. Choosing a Practicum/Intemship Setting.................................. M-11
18. School Placem ents................................................ M -12
19. Application Procedure ...................... ........... ................ M-12
See Your Chairperson First ....................................... M-12
Submit an Application...................... ................. M-13
Contact the Site ........ ........ .................. ......... ..... M -13
Register as Required......................... ...................... M -13
SECTION N. PRACTICUM & INTERNSHIP FORMS &
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Instructions for Practicum/Intemship Forms............................. N-l
2. Students' D ate L og........................................ ....................... N -
D ate Log Form ...................... ........ ........................................ N -2
3. C control L og .................................... ............... .............. ......... N -4
Control Log Form ................ .................................................. N -5
4 A application ........................................... . ............... .... .......... N -6








A application Form ................. ... .. .. ......... .. ................... N -7
5. Site Agreem ent ......... ......... .... .................. ................. N-8
Site A greem ent Form ....................................... ............ ........ N -9
6. Individual Supervision Confirmation.................................... N-11
Individual Supervision Confirmation Form ................................ N-12
7. Prospectus ....... ....... ........ .................. ...... ........... N -13
Prospectus F orm ............................................ ....................... N -14
8. Site Host's M id-Sem ester Report.......................................... N-15
Site Host's Mid-Semester Report Form................................... N-16
9. Site Host's End-of-Term Report...................... .................. N-17
Site Host's End-of-Term Report Form .................................. N-18
10. Group Supervisor's End-of-Term Report ................................ N-20
Group Supervisor's End-of-Term Report Form....................... N-21
11. Individual Supervisor's End-of-Term Report ............................. N-22
Individual Supervisor's End-of-Term Report Form.................... N-24
12. Site Information Report................................. N-25
Site Information Report Form .................... ............. ............ N-26
13. Supervisor Rating Scale ................................... ........ ....... N-28
Supervisor Rating Scale Form ............... ............................ N-28
14. Summary Report of EDC & ACD Practicum and Internship
Client Contact Hours and Supervision Hours....................... N-30
SECTION O. RESEARCH REQUIREMENTS
1. SDS 6905: Student-Initiated Individual Research.................... 0-1
2. Types of Acceptable Individual Research Projects .................... 0-1
3. SD S 6905: Procedures......................... ....................... 0-2
4. SDS 6905: General Comments.................................... 0-3
5. SD S 6905: Course Titling ................ .................. .................. ... 0 -3
6. SDS 6905: Registration Application Form .................................... 0-5
7. SDS 6905: Final Report and Evaluation ................................ 0-7
8. SDS 6905: Cover Page for Final Report................................ 0-7
9. SDS 6910 (Supervised Research) and
MHS 6940 (Supervised Teaching)........................................ 0-8
10. College of Education Masters Thesis Submission Procedure...... 0-9
11. Electronic Theses and Dissertation (ETD) Requirement ............ 0-10
SECTION P. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
1. Residence Requirem ents ........................................................... P-1
2. M idpoint Evaluation........ .................................... P-1
3. Notify Graduate School of Intent to Graduate ............................ P-1








4. Steps Required for the College of Education's Certification of
Your Graduate Degree(s) to the Graduate School....................... P-3
5. Application for Graduation Deadlines..................... ........ P-4
6. Pre-Graduation Review of Completed Requirements ................. P-6
7. Graduation Checklist Form ................................................... P-9
8. Minimum Required GPA for Graduation................................... P-13
9. Final Academic Term Registration........................................... P-13
10. Final Oral Exam nation ................... ...................................... P-13
11. Submission of the Final Examination Form................................ P-14
III. ENTRY INTO COUNSELING PROFESSION
SECTION Q: FLORIDA CERTIFICATION and LICENSURE
1. Licensures in the State of Florida............................................. Q-1
2. Coursework Required for Licensure in Florida
as a Marriage & Family Therapist before 2001...................... Q-2
3. Coursework Required for MFT Licensure in Florida in 2001
and beyond ........................................... ............................. Q -5
4. Supervised Clinical Experience Required
for M FT Licensure in Florida.................. .... ............... Q-7
5. State-by-State MFT Licensure Information................................ Q-8
6. Coursework Required for Licensure in Florida as a Mental Health
Counselor before 2001 ........................ ........... Q-8
7. CACREP Coursework Required for Licensure in
Florida as a Mental Health Counselor in 2001 & Beyond...... Q-9
8. Supervised Clinical Experience Required
for MHC Licensure in Florida.......... ........ ... ... ............ Q-10
9. State-by-State Counselor Licensure Information ................... Q-11
10. Florida School Counselor Certification ................................ Q-12
11. Florida School Counselor Certification Requirements ............... Q-13
SECTION R: COMPETENCIES AND SKILLS
1. Competencies & Skills for Teacher Certification.................... R-1
1A Professional Education .............................. .......... ...... R-
lB. Guidance & Counseling (PK-12) ...................................... R- 1
2. IPEP Standards for UF's Counselor Education Program............ R-14
3. Accomplished Practices & Methods of Assessment ................ R-17






Section A Page 1


SECTION A. PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS and SERVICES
Al. PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
You are encouraged to join state and national organizations pertinent to your
professional interests and areas of expertise. The Faculty members believe that
professional organization membership is an integral part of their (and your)
professional responsibility. The national organizations which command the
largest representation in the department are:
American Counseling Association (ACA)
5999 Stevenson Avenue, Alexandria, Virginia 22304-3300
1-800-347-6647 FAX: 703-823-0252 www.counseling.org
American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (AAMFT)
1133 15th Street N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005-2710
1-202-452-0109 FAX: 202-223-2329 http://www.aamft.org
American Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHCA)
801 N. Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-9654
1-800-326-2642 FAX: 703-548-4775 www.amhca.org

Each of these national organizations in turn has a state-level counterpart:
Florida Counseling Association (FCA)
P.O. Box 300457, Fern Park, FL 32730
PHONE: 407-628-0793; FAX: 407-628-0790
E-MAIL: FCAoffice@aol.com
Florida Association for Marriage and Family Therapists (FAMFT)
P.O. Box 4722, Seminole, FL 34642
PHONE: 727/393-2517; FAX: 727/393-2517
E-MAIL: FAMFT@aol.com
Florida Mental Health Counselors Association (FMHCA)
335 Beard Street, Tallahassee, FL 32303
PHONE: 850/222-6000; FAX: 850/681-2890
E-MAIL: fmhca@webcom.com






Section A Page 2


FAMFT has a local chapter:
North Central Florida Association for Marriage and
Family Therapists (NCFAMFT)
1031 NW 6th St., Suite 2, Gainesville, FL 32601
PHONE: 352-376-5543; FAX: 376-2042

Additional professional organizations of interest are:
American Psychological Association;
American Vocational Association;
American Educational Research Association;
and/or their state-level counterparts.
Most national and state-level professional organizations have membership
subsections, known as "divisions," for members who have common, more
specific professional interests within the general organization. For example, the
American Counseling Association has the following membership divisions:
Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES)
Association for Adult Development and Aging (AADA)
National Career Development Association (NCDA)
American College Counseling Association (ACCA)
Association for Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Issues in
Counseling (AGLBIC)
Association for Humanistic Education and Development (AHEAD)
American School Counselor Association (ASCA)
American Rehabilitation Counseling Association (ARCA)
Association for Assessment in Counseling (AAC)
National Employment Counseling Association (NECA)
International Association of Addictions and Offender Counselors
(IAAOC)
Association for Spiritual, Religious, and Value Issues in
Counseling (ASERVIC)
Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW)
Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD)
Association for Counselors and Educators in Government (ACEG)
International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors (IAMFC)
Similarly, the Florida Counseling Association has the following membership
divisions:
Florida Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (FACES)
Florida College Counseling Association (FCCA)






Section A Page 3


Florida Career Development Association (FCDA)
Florida School Counselors Association (FSCA)
Florida Employment Counselors Association (FECA)
Florida Association for Specialists in Group Work (FASGW)
Florida Association for Multicultural Counseling & Development
(FAMCD)
Florida Association for Adult Development and Aging (FAADA)
Florida Association for Spiritual, Ethical, Religious
Values and Issues in Counseling (FASERVIC)
Notice that not all of the divisions of ACA are represented in FCA. This is
typical of national professional organizations and their state-level counterparts.

A2. BENEFITS of MEMBERSHIP
While there are many benefits to be derived from membership in a professional
organization, only the primary ones can be noted here. As a member of a
professional organization, you:
receive the publications (e.g., professional journals and newsletters) of
the organization, as well as those of the divisions to which you
belong.
usually are entitled to reduced registration rates for professional
meetings (e.g., conventions and workshops) sponsored by the
organization.
are eligible for member services (e.g., library resource use and legal
defense funds and services) provided by or through the organization.
have a method of direct involvement with activities and issues (e.g.,
legislation and professional credentialing, including certification,
licensure, and program accreditation) directly and/or indirectly
pertinent to your profession.
can network with other professionals having interests and areas of
expertise similar to yours.
Other benefits are typically relevant to your specific professional activities and
interests.

A3. BETA CHAPTER-CHI SIGMA IOTA
The University of Florida Department of Counselor Education is the home of
Beta Chapter of Chi Sigma Iota (CSI), the Greek-letter name for the Counseling
Academic and Professional Honor Society International..






Section A Page 4


CSI is an honor society of counseling professionals and counseling
professionals-in-training dedicated to excellence in scholarship, research, and
clinical practice. The primary purpose of CSI is to promote and recognize
exemplary attainment in the study and practice of counseling.
Students in programs in the department who anticipate becoming counseling
professionals may be eligible for membership in CSI-Beta Chapter if they meet
membership criteria, which include completion of a minimum of nine (9)
program-applicable semester credit hours, a graduate grade point average of at
least 3.50, and approval by the CSI Beta Chapter membership committee.
Those eligible for and interested in membership in Chi Sigma Iota are
encouraged to apply. Contact the current CSI-Beta Chapter President for
information.

A4. CESA-COUNSELOR EDUCATION STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Counselor Education Students are invited to join and expected to manage the
Counselor Education Student Association (CESA). Membership in CESA is
open to all students enrolled in programs in the department. The CESA officers
(i.e., President; President-elect; Secretary; and Treasurer) are elected from and
by the CESA membership on an annual basis. A faculty advisor for CESA is
appointed annually.
The primary purposes of CESA are to:
Provide a formal channel of communication among students, faculty and
staff associated with the department.
Represent student interests at department business meetings.
Sponsor social gatherings that foster positive relationships among
students and faculty members associated with the department.
Serve as advocates for graduate students in Counselor Education.
Create and promote extracurricular professional development activities
for students in programs in the department.
Promote and sponsor graduate student participation in and presentation of
professional programs at local, state, regional, and national conferences.
Foster professional responsibility and accountability among students in
programs in the department.
Recruit and promote professional and personal resources (as needed) for
students in programs in the department.






Section A Page 5


You are strongly encouraged to become and stay a member of CESA while you
are enrolled in a program in the department. Active involvement in CESA can
greatly enhance the quality of your experience in the program and help you
establish professional relationships that can last a lifetime.
Each year, two CESA representatives may be selected by the CESA officers
from the CESA membership to attend regular Counselor Education Faculty
meetings. They will have full voting privileges on all department matters
(EXCEPT those involving evaluations of students or faculty members
associated with the department).

The CESA "headquarters" room is located in 1313 Norman Hall. This room is
intended for use by all Counselor Education students for individual and group
study and/or socializing with other students. Students using this room are asked
to keep it "neat and clean" as a courtesy to other students.
CESA has a mailbox in 1313 Norman Hall. Messages or materials for CESA
can be placed in the CESA mailbox.
CESA periodically publishes the CESA newsletter, which is distributed to
students and faculty members associated with the department. The CESA
newsletter is a primary source of information for students about Counselor
Education business and activities.

A5. NATIONAL COUNSELOR CERTIFICATION (NBCC)
A "certification" is a professional credential awarded by a certifying agency to
persons who have applied for the certification and who have met the eligibility
criteria for the certification. Most professional certifying agencies are national
(or international) in origin and scope, and are distinguished from state-level
agencies.
The professional certifying agency for counselors is the National Board for
Certified Counselors, Inc. (NBCC). The various certifications awarded by the
NBCC include those leading to the following designations:
National Certified Counselor (NCC),
National Certified School Counselor (NCSC),
National Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor
(NCCMHC)
National Certified Master Addictions Counselor
(NCMAC)






Section A Page 6


The NCC designation is available to all counselors who have met general,
minimum academic and experiential preparation standards regardless of
individual professional specializations. Attainment of NCC status is
prerequisite to attainment of specialty status as an NCSC, NCCMHC, or
NCMAC.

Students successfully completing department MHC, MFC, or SCG MED/EDS,
MAE/EDS, EDS (only), and/or PhD or EdD Counselor Education degree
programs will have fulfilled the minimum NBCC eligibility criteria for NCC
status and will be given a "priority" eligibility because these programs are
accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related
Educational Programs (CACREP). Program graduates must successfully
complete NBCC's National Counselor Examination (NCE), which they can take
during their last semester of enrollment in courses in their respective programs.
The NCE is currently required for licensure in the majority of states licensing
Professional Counselors.
Information on the certifications offered through the NBCC are available in the
department office or from
National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc.
3 Terrace Way, Suite D
Greensboro, NC 27403-3660
PHONE: (336) 547-0607
FAX: (336) 547-0017
WEB SITE: http://www.nbcc.org
E-MAIL: nbcc(nbcc.org

A6. PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE
Litigation involving practitioners in the professions represented by programs in
the department has increased dramatically in recent years for many reasons; the
result is that every practicing professional is a potential target for litigation.
Adherence to professional ethical standards and high standards for personal and
professional conduct are perhaps the best ways for professionals to avoid
involvement in litigation. Nevertheless, since there is no "foolproof' way to
avoid litigation, most practicing professionals now consider liability insurance
to be a necessity.
The Counselor Education department REQUIRES all students (as
counselors and supervisors-in-training) to obtain professional liability
insurance before beginning practicum and internship experiences. Proof of






Section A Page 7


insurance is now a condition of enrollment in all departmental Practica
and Internships and must be submitted prior to beginning work at your
site. Proof may be in the form of a letter from your insurance provider
and/or a copy of your insurance policy or insurance card.
Students can obtain professional liability insurance at a discounted rate as a
benefit of membership through professional organizations such as the American
Counseling Association (ACA):
Marriage & Family Counseling students and Mental Health Counseling
students can arrange for insurance coverage by contacting ACA through its
website: http://www.counseling.org, by phone at 1-800-347-6647 ext.284, or
writing ACA at 5999 Stevenson Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22304-3300... OR...
by contacting the American Association of Marriage & Family Therapists
(AAMFT) through its website: http://www.aamft.org, by phone at 202/452-
0109, or writing AAMFT at 1133 15th Street NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC
20005-2710.
School Counseling students can arrange for insurance coverage by contacting
the American School Counselors Association (ASCA) through its website:
http://www.schoolcounselor.org, by phone at 1-800-306-4722, or writing
ASCA at 801 North Fairfax Street, Suite 310, Alexandria, VA 22314.
[As an alternative, students may elect to attach a rider to their homeowners or
apartment dwellers insurance policies].

If you become involved in litigation as a result of activities required of
practicum or internship students, you MAY or MAY NOT be entitled to the
services of the University attorneys and/or the attorneys representing the
practicum or internship site. HOWEVER, remember that university and
practicum & internship site attorneys are employed to represent the interests of
the University and practicum & internship site FIRST. Your own insurance
plan provides representation for you, should you ever have need of it.

A7. STUDENT MEMBERSHIP
Students in the department should know the following:
First, the costs for "student" membership in professional organizations
are considerably less than those for "regular" membership.
Second, membership in a national organization is separate from
membership in the state-level counterpart of the organization; you
may join one without joining the other.






Section A Page 8


Third, membership in divisions is distinct from membership in the
larger organization. However, typically, you must join the larger
organization and then you also may join as many divisions as you
wish.
Fourth, membership fees are (typically) for one year; memberships
must be renewed annually.
Fifth, memberships in professional organizations are accepted at any
time during the (calendar) year.
Sixth, membership provides abundant opportunities to build a network
of contacts that will be invaluable throughout your career.
Information and/or application materials for various professional organizations
are available in the department office. You are encouraged to talk with
department faculty members about professional organizations. You are usually
required to obtain the signature of a faculty member on the application
materials confirming your student status in order for you to become a student
member of a professional organization. All faculty members in the department
are happy to provide signatures for this purpose.

The faculty members strongly encourage you to join relevant professional
organizations when you have the financial resources to do so.






Section B Page 1


SECTION B. ETHICAL AND PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS

B1. PREFACE
Note 1: The following professional standards statements are provided
under expressed, written permission from the respective copyright holders.
Note 2: The ethical and professional standards statements presented herein
are evaluated and revised continuously by their authors. Users of this Handbook
should check the designated sources to determine if the versions printed here
are up to date.
Note 3: The academic programs in Counselor Education are established to
prepare graduates of the programs to become "professional" Marriage and
Family Therapists, Mental Health Counselors, and School counselors. The
term "professional" in this context refers to persons practicing an
occupation/ career for which there is a known body of theoretical and
research knowledge that disciplines professional practice, an identified set
of skills relevant to efficacious performance, and a set of ethically informed
behavioral standards which members of the profession agree to follow. As
a student admitted to a program in the department, you have begun preparation
for a career as a professional. Therefore, upon admission, the faculty and
staff expect you to act in accord with the highest professional standards
(such as those presented in this section). Above all, let us give people,
property, and processes our respect, and let us "view all through the clear lens
of compassion" (Lau Tzu).
Note 4: It is not possible to convey in this Handbook all the aspects of
professional responsibility pertinent to the various activities in the department.
What is possible is to present a basic guideline:

IF YOU HAVE ANY CONCERN ABOUT APPROPRIATE PROFESSIONAL
BEHAVIOR FOR YOU OR FOR OTHERS, CONSULT YOUR FACULTY
ADVISOR, the GRADUATE COORDINATOR, or the DEPARTMENT
CHAIRPERSON

REMEMBER: a cardinal principle of ethical discourse is the mandate to
CONSULT IN ALL THINGS QUESTIONABLE;
rigorous and thoughtful conversation generates clarity and consensus.






Section B Page 2


B2. UF STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Admission to the University of Florida is a privilege granted to those persons
who meet both high academic qualifications and high standards of health,
character, and conduct. Commensurate with this privilege is the responsibility
to abide by university regulations considered essential to sustaining a climate of
disciplined inquiry which allows all members of the University community to
exercise their rights as citizens and as scholars.
Information contained in this section has been edited from source documents.
Should questions arise as to specific meaning and interpretation of student
rights, student responsibilities, or student judicial processes relating to the
Student Conduct Code, the source documents for this section include Florida
State Statutes, Chapter 6C Florida Administrative Code, Chapter 6C1 Florida
Administrative Code, the Undergraduate Catalog, the University of Florida
Student Conduct Code and the University of Florida Graduate Student
Handbook.

STUDENT RIGHTS
The right to give and receive respect for personal feelings and reasoned
opinions, to treat others with dignity and be treated with dignity, and to pursue
an education of the highest quality.
The right to participate in self -governing student bodies, which provide
channels of communication and offer means for using democratic processes to
solve problems.
The constitutional rights of freedom of expression and assembly.
The right of freedom to hear and participate in dialogue and debate and to
examine diverse views and ideas.
The right of freedom to write and distribute printed material for reasons that are
not commercial without the exercise of prior restraint.
The constitutional rights of freedom of the press for all student publications.
The right of due process in disciplinary procedures in accordance with rules of
procedures prescribed in the Student Conduct Code.






Section B Page 3


STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES
The responsibility of facing the consequences) of one's own actions.
The responsibility for knowing and observing established University policies
presented in official University publications.
The responsibility to see that free discussions meet the standard of scholarly
inquiry characteristic of an academic community.
The responsibility for filing a statement of intent to make the distribution of all
printed material conform to the Student Conduct Code, and all laws of the city,
state, and nation governing freedom of expression.
The responsibility to exercise journalistic ethics.
The responsibility to insure that no student organization, constitution or other
organizational document includes discriminatory clauses pertaining to race,
creed, religion, color, sex, national origin, disability, or sexual preference.
The responsibility to become acquainted with the University Graduate Catalog,
Graduate Student Handbook, Department Handbook and other relevant
publications.

B3. ACADEMIC HONESTY GUIDELINES
All students are required to abide by the Academic Honesty Guidelines, which
have been endorsed by the University. Students will be asked to sign the
following declaration when completing tests and other academic work.

ON MY HONOR, I HAVE NEITHER GIVEN NOR HAVE I RECEIVED
UNAUTHORIZED AID in COMPOSING MY ANSWERS
to the QUESTIONS ASKED ON THIS EXAMINATION / ASSIGNMENT.
In addition, UF Faculty are asked to include the following oath in their course
syllabi:

We, the members of the University of Florida community, pledge to hold
ourselves and our peers to the highest standards of honesty and integrity.

The conduct set forth hereinafter constitutes a violation of the Academic
Honesty Guidelines. Those adjudged to have committed such conduct shall be
subject to the penalties listed in paragraph XI of the Student Conduct Code,
page 21.






Section B Page 4


Taking of Information copying graded homework assignments from another
student; working together with another individuals) on a take-home test or
homework when not specifically permitted by the teacher; looking or
attempting to look at another student's paper during an examination; looking or
attempting to look at text or notes during an examination when not permitted.
Tendering of Information giving your work to another student to be used or
copied; giving someone answers to exam questions either when the exam is
being given or after taking an exam; informing another person of questions that
appear or have appeared on an exam in the same academic term; giving or
selling a term paper or other written materials to another student.
Plagiarism copying homework answers from your text to hand in for a grade;
quoting text or other written materials submitted to a teacher when requested by
the teacher to present your own work; handing in a paper as your own work
which was purchased from a term paper service; retyping a friend's paper and
handing it in as your own work; taking a paper from fraternity/sorority files and
handing it in as your own work.
Conspiracy planning with one or more persons to commit any form of
academic dishonesty, including but not limited to, giving your term paper to
another student who you know will plagiarize it.
Misrepresentation having another student do your computer program and
handing it in as your own work; lying to a teacher to increase your grade; or any
other act of omission with intent to deceive a teacher as to the authorship of oral
or written materials submitted or presented to a teacher which would affect your
grade.
Bribery offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting money or any item or service
to a teacher or any other person so as to gain academic advantage for yourself
or another.

B4. STUDENT CONDUCT CODE
I. Introduction: Students enjoy the rights and privileges that accrue to
membership in a university community and are subject to the responsibilities
which accompany that membership. In order to have a system of effective
campus governance, it is incumbent upon all members of the campus
community to notify appropriate officials of any violations of regulations and to
assist in their enforcement. All conduct regulations of the University are
printed and made available to all students and are applicable upon publication
in the Independent Florida Alligator, the University Catalog, the Student Guide,
or any reasonable means of notification.






Section B Page 5


II. Authority: The President is charged with the responsibility for establishing
and enforcing regulations governing student life. Regulations are designed to
enable the University to protect against the conduct of those who, by their
actions, impair or infringe on the rights of others or interfere with the orderly
operations of the University. Discipline may be imposed for offenses against
the Code occurring at any other following locations or activities:
A. University campus;
B. University owned or controlled property;
C. Property or housing units assigned for responsibility to the University,
including, but not limited to, fraternity and sorority property;
D. Activities sponsored by the University;
E. Activities officially approved by the University which are conducted by
University chartered organizations, and;
F. Activities occurring off campus as provided in paragraph VI.
III. Rules of Procedure: The primary judicial bodies authorized by the
President and charged with the administration and enforcement of this code
shall formulate and furnish to students charged with an offense, rules of
procedure which shall insure basic procedural fairness including, but not limited
to:
A. The right to be notified in writing of the charges
against him/her with sufficient detail and time to
prepare for the hearing;
B. The right to a prompt hearing before an appropriate
official, committee, or court;
C. The right to know the nature and source of the evidence
which will be used against him/her;
D. The right to present evidence in his/her own behalf;
E. The right to freedom against compulsory
self-incrimination, and;
F. The right to appear with an advisor at the hearing.
IV. Suspension of Student Pending Hearing: Violations of the Student
Conduct Code, Sections V.A. 12 and V.A. 18, may result in immediate
suspension. If in the determination of the Director of Student Judicial Affairs,
the student poses a significant danger of imminent and serious physical harm to
himself/herself or others at the University; or immediate suspension is
necessary to protect health, safety or welfare of the student or others at the
University, the Director of Student Judicial Affairs may suspend the student






Section B Page 6


pending a hearing before the appropriate hearing body. The hearing will take
place within a reasonable time after notification of the suspension.

V. Violations of the Code of Conduct:
A. The following are violations of the Student Conduct Code and may result
in expulsion or any lesser sanction:
1. Furnishing false information to the University.
2. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of University documents, records, or
identification cards.
3. Unauthorized use, taking or destruction of public or private
property on campus, or acts committed with disregard of possible
harm to such property.
4. Actions or statements, which amount to intimidation, harassment,
or hazing.
5. Participation in or continued attendance at a raid on a University
living unit, after warning to disperse by a University official or any
law enforcement officer.
6. Disorderly conduct.
7. Disrupting the orderly operation of the University as defined in
Florida Statutes and the Demonstration Policy of the University.
8. Failure to comply with any University rule or regulation,
including, but not limited to, the Academic Honesty Guidelines.
9. Violations of Housing, Inter-Residence Hall Association,
and Area Government regulations.
10. Violation of conduct probation.
11. Possession, use or delivery of controlled substances as defined in
Florida Statutes.
12. Possession or use of a firearm on the University campus except as
specifically authorized in writing by the University.
13. Actions(s) or conduct, which hinders, obstructs or otherwise
interferes with the implementation or enforcement of the Student
Conduct Code.
14. Failure to appear before any of the disciplinary authorities and to
testify as a witness when reasonably notified to do so. Nothing in
this subsection shall be construed to compel self-incrimination.
15. Violation of any municipal ordinance, law of the State of Florida,
rule promulgated by the Florida Board of Regents, or law of the
United States.






Section B Page 7


16. Ticket scalping, i.e., selling tickets to any University of Florida
function or event being held or to be held on the University of
Florida campus, for more than $1.00 over the original price.
17. Possession or use of fireworks, explosives, dangerous chemicals,
ammunition or weapons (including, but not limited to, bows and
arrows or switch-blade knives).
18. Actions which are committed with disregard of the possible harm
to an individual or group, or which result in injury to an individual
or group.
19. Any actions, including those of a sexual nature or involving sexual
activities, which are intimidating, harassing, coercive, or abusive to
another person, or which invade the right to privacy of another
person.
20. Any action without authorization from the University which does
or causes to, access, use, modify, destroy, disclose or take data,
programs or supporting documentation residing in or relating in
any way to a computer, computer system or computer network or
causes the denial of computer system services to an authorized user
of such system.
B. The Student Honor Court may recommend expulsion or any lessor penalty
for academic dishonesty as defined by the Student Conduct Code and Academic
Honesty Guidelines. Conflicts in jurisdiction will be resolved by the Director
of Student Judicial Affairs.
C. Residence Hall Conduct Boards may recommend penalties as set forth by
the Office of Student Services for violation of the Student Conduct Code, Inter-
Residence Hall Association and/or Area Government regulations.
D. Student Traffic Court may impose authorized penalties for violations of
University traffic, parking, and vehicle registration regulations.
E. The Health Center Student Conduct Standards Committee hears cases of
alleged academic dishonesty by students of the Health Center colleges. The
committee is comprised of faculty and students from the Health Center,
appointed by the President. Recommendations of guilt or innocence or
sanctions, if appropriate, are made to the Dean for Student Services for final
action.
F. Other judicial bodies may be established and vested with jurisdiction by
appropriate authority.






Section B Page 8


VI. Off-Campus Conduct: When a student violates city, state or federal law,
by an offense committed off the campus and which is not associated with a
University-connected activity, the disciplinary authority of the university will
not be used merely to duplicate the penalty awarded for such an act under
applicable ordinances and laws. The University will take disciplinary action
against a student for such an off-campus offense only when it is required by law
to do so or when the nature of the offense is such that in the judgement of the
Director of Student Judicial Affairs, the continued presence of the student on
campus is likely to interfere with the educational process or the orderly
operation of the University; the continued presence of the student on campus is
likely to endanger the health, safety, or welfare of the University community or
its property; or the offense is of such a serious nature as to adversely effect the
student's suitability as member of the University community. If the Director of
Student Judicial Affairs determines that disciplinary action is warranted, the
Director of Student Judicial Affairs shall so notify the student in accordance
with Rule 6C1-4.16(5). The action of the University with respect to any such
off-campus conduct shall be made independently of any off-campus authority.
VII. Postponement of Hearing Due to Pending or Possible Criminal or
Civil Charges: If the student charged with a violation of the Student Conduct
Code, regardless of which primary judicial body may hear the matter, wishes to
have the hearing postponed because there is pending or possible civil or
criminal litigation which he/she feels might be prejudiced by the findings of the
hearing, such postponement may be granted provided the student agrees to
accept conduct probation or suspension, depending upon the gravity of the
offense. Such probation or suspension will be determined and activated by the
Director of Student Judicial Affairs and will remain in force until such time as
the student requests a hearing before the appropriate primary judicial body and
the hearing is held. The student shall be informed whether he/she would be
placed on probation or suspended prior to making a decision to postpone the
hearing.
VIII. Student Waiver of Right to Hearing: In the event a student charged
with a violation of the Student Conduct Code desires to waive the right to a
hearing by the appropriate official or hearing body, and the student so indicates
in writing, the Director of Student Judicial Affairs, provided he/she agrees to
accept jurisdiction, may make a determination of fact and take appropriate
action concerning the alleged violation.






Section B Page 9


IX. Summary Hearing: In the event a student charged with a violation of the
Student Conduct Code which, in the opinion of the Director of Student Judicial
Affairs, if proven, would not warrant a penalty in excess of two semesters
probation, and the student does not waive his or her right to a hearing before the
appropriate official or hearing body, the Director of Student Judicial Affairs
may require a hearing to be held before the chairperson of the committee on
Student Conduct or the chairperson's designated representative rather than
before the full committee.
X. Conflict of Jurisdiction: In the event that the offense is within the
jurisdiction of more than one primary judicial body, the Director of Student
Judicial Affairs shall determine which judicial body shall hear the charge.
XI. Adjudications A student adjudicated guilty of violations of the Student
Conduct Code shall be subject to sanctions commensurate with the offense and
any aggravating and mitigating circumstances, which may include one or more
of the following penalties, unless otherwise expressly provided:
A. Reprimand The student is given formal written notice and official
recognition is taken of the offense committed.
B. Conduct Probation The student is deemed not in good standing and
cannot represent the University on any athletic team other than intramurals or
hold an office in any student organization registered with the University. In the
event a student on conduct probation is found in violation of the terms of such
probation or of the Student Conduct Code which includes the Academic
Honesty Guidelines prior to the completion of the probation period, he/she may
receive expulsion or any other lesser penalty. The duration of any probation
period or any conditions or penalty(ies) imposed for the violation shall be in
proportion to the seriousness of the violation.
C. Suspension The student is required to leave the University for a given or
indefinite period of time, the termination of which shall depend upon specified
acts of the student's own volition related to mitigation of the offense committed.
D. Expulsion The student is permanently deprived of his/her opportunity to
continue at the University in any status.
E. Payment of Damages and/or Community Service The student is required
to pay for damages to University property, provided that such payment shall be
limited to the actual cost of repair or replacement of such property. The student
may also be required to complete a specified amount of community service.






Section B Page 10


F. Reduced or Failing Grade The student is given a reduced or failing grade
for the class in which the offense occurred for violations of the Academic
Honesty Guidelines, but only by the faculty member involved and upon
recommendation thereto.

XII. Appeal: The Student Honor Court and Residence Hall Conduct Board
make findings of fact and recommendations concerning innocence of guilt and
imposition of a judicial sanction to the Director of Student Judicial Affairs. The
student may appeal the recommendations of the Student Honor Court and
Residence Hall Conduct Board to the Director of Student Judicial Affairs. The
decision of the Director of Student Judicial Affairs may be appealed to the Dean
for Student Services.
The Student Conduct Committee and the Health Center Student Conduct
Standards Committee make findings of fact and recommendations concerning
innocence or guilt and the imposition of a judicial sanction to the Dean of
Student Services. The decision of the Dean for Student Services may be
appealed to the Vice President for Student Affairs.
All appeals must be made in writing to the appropriate official within five days
after notice of last action taken unless otherwise agreed upon in writing by the
appellant and the person to whom the appeal is directed.

B5. VALUES OF THE AMERICAN COUNSELING ASSOCIATION
(Approved by ACA [AACD] Governing Council, July 14-17, 1988)
CARING FOR SELF AND OTHERS
We believe in the worth and dignity of the individual and we value caring and
respect for self and others. We respect and care for the self by preserving
professional identity through the support of, and for, the professional
association (ACA), and by establishing and maintaining professional standards
and ethical behavior. We also respect and care for the self through continuing
personal development. We also value examination of the relationships among
the intellectual, physical, spiritual, and psychological aspects of human
development. We respect and care for others through identification and the
removal of barriers to human development and through pro-active approaches
to human rights. This respect and caring for others extends to concerns about
global issues such as world peace and the ecology. We value and celebrate the
diversity of cultures and interests within out society, our profession and our
association. We also value the power, strength, and support of a unified
profession.






Section B Page 11


ENABLING AND USING KNOWLEDGE
We believe that positive change in people, organizations and societies can be
facilitated. Positive change involves moving to higher levels of moral, ethical,
spiritual, intellectual, physical and interpersonal development. Working for a
positive change is a major function of our profession.

ACQUIRING AND USING KNOWLEDGE
We believe that we need to be aware of current and evolving knowledge,
including alternate ways of knowing, that can assist in facilitating positive
change. We have a responsibility to acquire, utilize, and disseminate new
knowledge in our field. We have a responsibility to utilize both traditional and
alternative methods of understanding. We have a responsibility to exert
leadership in using and sharing our knowledge and skills.

EMPOWERING LEADERSHIP
We believe in the kind of leadership which requires a willingness to take risks,
a readiness to take stands, and a responsibility to act on vital issues.
Empowerment means that individuals, groups and organizations, by their
actions, enable (empower) others to make changes. Counselors and human
development professionals see themselves as active leaders, willing to take
risks. Responsible and professional leaders act when faced with compelling
situations. Leaders who are committed to this belief are consistent in what they
say and do. This leadership style ensures that all populations served are
empowered to teach their human potential.

PROMOTING LINKAGE
We believe in fostering an integrative quality, interdependence, and
connectedness among people, organizations, and societies.
Collaboration is a preferred mode of operation which fits the philosophical
foundations on which the counseling and human development profession is
based. Action to accomplish identified goals, in some instances, involves
interpersonal coalition-building among professionals and at other times,
involves inter-professional cooperation.






Section B Page 12


B6. AMERICAN COUNSELING ASSOCIATION CODE of ETHICS
and STANDARDS of PRACTICE
(Approved by the Governing Council, April 1995)
Preamble
The American Counseling Association is an educational, scientific and
professional organization whose members are dedicated to the enhancement of
human development throughout the life span. Association members recognize
diversity in our society and embrace a cross-cultural approach in support of the
worth, dignity, potential, and uniqueness of each individual.
The specification of a code of ethics enables the association to clarify to current
and future members, and to those served by members, the nature of the ethical
responsibilities held in common by its members. As the code of ethics of the
association, this document establishes principles that define the ethical behavior
of association members. All members of the American Counseling Association
are required to adhere to the Code of Ethics and the Standards ofPractice. The
Code of Ethics will serve as the basis for processing ethical complaints initiated
against members of the association.

ACA CODE OF ETHICS
Section A:
The Counseling Relationship
A.1 Client Welfare
a. Primary Responsibility. The primary responsibility of counselors is to
respect the dignity and to promote the welfare of clients.
b. Positive Growth and Development. Counselors encourage client growth and
development in ways that foster the clients' interest and welfare; counselors
avoid fostering dependent counseling relationships.
c. Counseling Plans. Counselors and their clients work jointly in devising
integrated, individual counseling plans that offer reasonable promise of success
and are consistent with abilities and circumstances of clients. Counselors and
clients regularly review counseling plans to ensure their continued viability and
effectiveness, respecting clients' freedom of choice. (see A.3.b.)
d. Family Involvement. Counselors recognize that families are usually
important in clients' lives and strive to enlist family understanding and
involvement as a positive resource, when appropriate.






Section B Page 13


e. Career and Employment Needs. Counselors work with their clients in
considering employment in jobs and circumstances that are consistent with the
clients' overall abilities, vocational limitations, physical restrictions, general
temperament, interest and aptitude patterns, social skills, education, general
qualifications, and other relevant characteristics and needs. Counselors neither
place nor participate in placing clients in positions that will result in damaging
the interest and the welfare of clients, employers, or the public.

A.2. Respecting Diversity
a. Nondiscrimination. Counselors do not condone or engage in discrimination
based on age, color, culture, disability, ethnic group, gender, race, religion,
sexual orientation, marital status, or socioeconomic status. (See C.5.a, C.5.b.,
and D.I.i.)
b. Respecting Differences. Counselors will actively attempt to understand the
diverse cultural backgrounds of the clients with whom they work. This
includes, but is not limited to, learning how the counselor's own
cultural/ethnic/racial identity impacts her/his values and beliefs about the
counseling process. (See E.u. and F.W.i.).

A.3. Client Rights
a. Disclosure to Clients. When counseling is initiated, and throughout the
counseling process as necessary, counselors inform clients of the purposes,
goals, techniques, procedures, limitations, potential risks and benefits of
services to be performed, and other pertinent information. Counselors take
steps to ensure that clients understand the implications of diagnosis, the
intended use of tests and reports, fees and billing arrangements. Clients have
the right to expect confidentiality and to be provided with an explanation of its
limitations, including supervision and/or treatment team professionals; to obtain
clear information about their case records; to participate in the ongoing
counseling plans; and to refuse any recommended services and be advised of
the consequences of such refusal. (See E.5.a and G.2).
b. Freedom of Choice. Counselors offer clients the freedom to choose whether
to enter into a counseling relationship and to determine which professionals)
will provide counseling. Restrictions that limit choices of clients are fully
explained. (See A. 1.c.)
c. Inability to Give Consent. When counseling minors or persons unable to
give voluntary informed consent, counselors act in these clients' best interests.
(See B.3.)






Section B Page 14


A.4. Clients Served By Others
If a client is receiving services form another mental health professional,
counselors, with client consent, inform the professional persons already
involved and develop clear agreements to avoid confusion and conflict for the
client (See C.6.c.)

A.5. Personal Needs and Values
a. Personal Needs. In the counseling relationship, counselors are aware of the
intimacy and responsibilities inherent in the counseling relationship, maintain
respect for clients, and avoid actions that seek to meet their personal needs at
the expense of clients.
b. Personal Values. Counselors are aware of their own values, attitudes,
beliefs, and behaviors and how these apply in a diverse society, and avoid
imposing their values on clients. (See C.5.a.).

A.6. Dual Relationships
a. Avoid When Possible. Counselors are aware of their influential positions
with respect to clients, and they avoid exploiting the trust and dependency of
clients. Counselors make every effort to avoid dual relationships with clients
that could impair professional judgment or increase the risk of harm to clients.
(Examples of such relationships include, but are not limited to, familial, social,
financial, business, or close personal relationships with clients.) When a dual
relationship cannot be avoided, counselors take appropriate professional
precautions such as informed consent, consultation, supervision, and
documentation to ensure that judgment is not impaired and no exploitation
occurs. (See F.l.b.)
b. Superior/Subordinate Relationships. Counselors do not accept as clients
superiors or subordinates with whom they have administrative, supervisory, or
evaluative relationships.

A.7. Sexual Intimacies with Clients
a. Current Clients. Counselors do not have any type of sexual intimacies with
clients and do not counsel persons with whom they have had a sexual
relationship.
b. Former Clients. Counselors do not engage in sexual intimacies with former
clients within a minimum of two years after terminating the counseling
relationship. Counselors who engage in such relationship after two years






Section B Page 15


following termination have the responsibility to thoroughly examine and
document that such relations did not have an exploitative nature, based on
factors such as duration of counseling, amount of time since counseling,
termination circumstances, client's personal history and mental status, adverse
impact on the client, and actions by the counselor suggesting a plan to initiate a
sexual relationship with the client after termination.

A.8. Multiple Clients
When counselors agree to provide counseling services to two or more persons
who have a relationship (such as husband and wife, or parents and children),
counselors clarify at the outset, which person or persons are clients and the
nature of the relationships they will have with each involved person. If it
becomes apparent that counselors may be called upon to perform potentially
conflicting roles, they clarify, adjust, or withdraw from roles appropriately.
(See b.2. and b.4.d.)

A.9 Group Work
a. Screening. Counselors screen prospective group counseling/therapy
participants. To the extent possible, counselors select members whose needs
and goals are compatible with goals of the group, who will not impede the
group process, and whose well-being will not be jeopardized by the group
experience.
b. Protecting Clients. In a group setting, counselors take reasonable
precautions to protect clients from physical or psychological trauma.

A.10 Fees and Bartering
(See D.3.a. and D.3.b)
a. Advance Understanding. Counselors clearly explain to clients, prior to
entering the counseling relationship, all financial arrangements related to
professional services including the use of collection agencies or legal measures
for nonpayment. (A. 11 .c.)
b. Establishing Fees. In establishing fees for professional counseling services,
counselors consider the financial status of clients and locality. In the event that
the established fee structure is inappropriate for a client, assistance is provided
in attempting to find comparable services at acceptable costs. (See A.10.d.,
D.3.a., and D.3.b.)






Section B Page 16


c. Bartering Discouraged. Counselors ordinarily refrain from accepting goods
or services from clients in return for counseling services because such
arrangements create inherent potential for conflicts, exploitation, and distortion
of the professional relationship. Counselors may participate in bartering only if
the relationship is not exploitive, if the client requests it, if a clear written
contract is established, and if such arrangements are an accepted practice
among professionals in the community. (See A.6.a.)
d. Pro Bono Service. Counselors contribute to society by devoting a portion of
their professional activity to services for which there is little or no financial
return (pro bono).

A.11 Termination and Referral
a. Abandonment Prohibited. Counselors do not abandon or neglect clients in
counseling. Counselors assist in making appropriate arrangements for the
continuation of treatment, when necessary, during interruptions such as
vacations, and following termination.
b. Inability to Assist Clients. If counselors determine an inability to be of
professional assistance to clients, they avoid entering or immediately terminate
a counseling relationship. Counselors are knowledgeable about referral
resources and suggest appropriate alternatives. If clients decline the suggested
referral, counselors should discontinue the relationship.
c. Appropriate Termination. Counselors terminate a counseling relationship,
securing client agreement when possible, when it is reasonably clear that the
client is no longer benefiting, when services are no longer required, when
counseling no longer serves the client's needs or interests, when clients do not
pay fees charged, or when agency or institution limits do not allow provision of
further counseling services. (See A.10.b. and C.2.g.)

A.12 Computer Technology
a. Use of Computers. When computer applications are used in counseling
services, counselors ensure that: (1) the client is intellectually, emotionally, and
physically capable of using the computer application; (2) the computer
application is appropriate for the needs of the client; (3) the client understands
the purpose and operation of the computer applications; and (4) a follow-up of
client use of a computer application is provided to correct possible
misconceptions, discover inappropriate use, and assess subsequent needs.






Section B Page 17


b. Explanation ofLimitations. Counselors ensure that clients are provided
information as a part of the counseling relationship that adequately explains the
limitations of computer technology.
c. Access to Computer Applications. Counselors provide for equal access to
computer applications in counseling services (See A.2.a.).

Section B:
Confidentiality
B.1. Right to Privacy
a. Respect for Privacy. Counselors respect their clients' right to privacy and
avoid illegal and unwarranted disclosures of confidential information. (See
A.3.a. and B.6.a.)
b. Client Waiver. The right to privacy may be waived by the client or their
legally recognized representative.
c. Exceptions. The general requirement that counselors keep information
confidential does not apply when disclosure is required to prevent clear and
imminent danger to the client or others or when legal requirements demand that
confidential information be revealed. Counselors consult with other
professionals when in doubt as to the validity of an exception.
d. Contagious, Fatal Diseases. A counselor who receives information
confirming that a client has a disease commonly known to be both
communicable and fatal is justified in disclosing information to an identifiable
third party, who by his or her relationship with the client is at a high risk of
contracting the disease. Prior to making a disclosure the counselor should
ascertain that the client has not already informed the third party about his or her
disease and that the client is not intending to inform the third party in the
immediate future. (See B.1.c. and B.1.f)
e. Court Ordered Disclosure. When court ordered to release confidential
information without a client's permission, counselors request to the court that
the disclosure not be required due to potential harm to the client or counseling
relationship. (See B.l.c)
f. Minimal Disclosure. When circumstances require the disclosure of
confidential information, only essential information is revealed. To the extent
possible, clients are informed before confidential information is disclosed.






Section B Page 18


g. Explanation ofLimitations. When counseling is initiated and throughout the
counseling process as necessary, counselors inform clients of the limitations of
confidentiality and identify foreseeable situations in which confidentiality must
be breached. (See G.2.a.)
h. Subordinates. Counselors make every effort to ensure that privacy and
confidentiality of clients are maintained by subordinates including employees,
supervisees, clerical assistants, and volunteers. (See B.1.a.)

i. Treatment Teams. If client treatment will involve a continued review by a
treatment team, the client will be informed of the team's existence and
composition.

B.2. Groups and Families
a. Group Work. In group work, counselors clearly define confidentiality and
the parameters for the specific group being entered, explain its importance, and
discuss the difficulties related to confidentiality involved in group work. The
fact that confidentiality cannot be guaranteed is clearly communicated to group
members.
b. Family Counseling. In family counseling, information about one family
member cannot be disclosed to another member without permission.
Counselors protect the privacy rights of each family member. (See A.i., B.e.,
and B.4.d.)

B.3. Minor or incompetent clients
When counseling clients who are minors or individuals who are unable to give
voluntary, informed consent, parents or guardians may be included in the
counseling process as appropriate. Counselors act in the best interests of clients
and take measures to safeguard confidentiality. (See A.3.c.)
a. Requirement of Records. Counselors maintain records necessary for
rendering professional services to their clients and as required by laws,
regulations, or agency or institution procedures.
b. Confidentiality ofRecords. Counselors are responsibility for securing the
safety and confidentiality of any counseling records they create, maintain,
transfer, or destroy whether the records are written, taped, computerized, or
stored in any other medium. (See B.1.a.)
c. Permission to Record or Observe. Counselors obtain permission from
clients prior to electronically recording or observing sessions. (See A.3.a.)






Section B Page 19


d. Client Access. Counselors recognize that counseling records are kept for the
benefit of clients, and therefore provide access to records and copies of records
when requested by competent clients, unless the records contain information
that may be misleading and detrimental to the client. In situations involving
multiple clients, access to records is limited to those parts of records that do not
include confidential information related to another client. (See A.8., B.1.a., and
B.2.b.)
e. Disclosure or Transfer. Counselors obtain written permission from clients
to disclose or transfer records to legitimate third parties unless exceptions to
confidentiality exist as listed in Section B.1. Steps are taken to ensure that
receivers of counseling records are sensitive to their confidential nature.

B.5. Research and Training
a. Data Disguise Required. Use of data derived from counseling relationships
for purposes of training, research, or publication is confined to content that is
disguised to ensure the anonymity of the individuals involved. (See B.l.g. and
G.3.d.)
b. Agreement for Identification. Identification of a client in a presentation or
publication is permissible only when the client has reviewed the material and
has agreed to its presentation or publication. (See G.3.d.)
B.6. Consultation
a. Respect for Privacy. Information obtained in a consulting relationship is
discussed for professional purposes only with persons clearly concerned with
the case. Written and oral reports present data germane to the purposes of the
consultation, and every effort is made to protect client identity and avoid undue
invasion of privacy.
b. Cooperating Agencies. Before sharing information, counselors make efforts
to ensure that there are defined policies in other agencies serving the
counselor's clients that effectively protect the confidentiality of information.

Section C:
Professional Responsibility
C.1. Standards Knowledge
Counselors have a responsibility to read, understand, and follow the Code of
Ethics and the Standards ofPractice.






Section B Page 20


C.2. Professional Competence
a. Boundaries of Competence. Counselors practice only within the boundaries
of their competence, based on their education, training, supervised experience,
state and national professional credentials, and appropriate professional
experience. Counselors will demonstrate a commitment to gain knowledge,
personal awareness, sensitivity, and skills pertinent to working with a diverse
client population.
b. New Specialty Areas ofPractice. Counselors practice in specialty areas new
to them only after appropriate education, training, and supervised experience.
While developing skills in new specialty areas, counselors take steps to ensure
the competence of their work and to protect others from possible harm.
c. Qualified for Employment. Counselors accept employment only for
positions for which they are qualified by education, training, supervised
experience, state and national professional credentials, and appropriate
professional experience. Counselors hire for professional counseling positions
only individuals who are qualified and competent.
d. Monitor Effectiveness. Counselors continually monitor their effectiveness as
professionals and take steps to improve when necessary. Counselors in private
practice take reasonable steps to seek out peer supervision to evaluate their
efficacy as counselors.
e. Ethical Issues Cin\uhltltimn. Counselors take reasonable steps to consult
with other counselors or related professionals when they have questions
regarding their ethical obligations or professional practice. (See H.1)
f. Continuing Education. Counselors recognize the need for continuing
education to maintain a reasonable level of awareness of current scientific and
professional information in their fields of activity. They take steps to maintain
competence in the skills they use, are open to new procedures, and keep current
with the diverse and/or special populations with whom they work.
g. Impairment. Counselors refrain from offering or accepting professional
services when their physical, mental or emotional problems are likely to harm a
client or others. They are alert to the signs of impairment, seek assistance for
problems, and, if necessary, limit, suspend, or terminate their professional
responsibilities. (See A. 11.c.)






Section B Page 21


C.3. Advertising and Soliciting Clients
a. Accurate Advertising. There are no restrictions on advertising by counselors
except those that can be specifically justified to protect the public from
deceptive practices. Counselors advertise or represent their services to the
public by identifying their credentials in an accurate manner that is not false,
misleading, deceptive, or fraudulent. Counselors may only advertise the highest
degree earned which is in counseling or a closely related field from a college or
university that was accredited when the degree was awarded by one of the
regional accrediting bodies recognized by the Council on Postsecondary
Accreditation.
b. Tcstimonials. Counselors who use testimonials do not solicit them from
clients or other persons who, because of their particular circumstances, may be
vulnerable to undue influence.
c. Statements by Others. Counselors make reasonable efforts to ensure that
statements made by others about them or the profession of counseling are
accurate.
d. Recruiting Through Employment. Counselors do not use their places of
employment or institutional affiliation to recruit or gain clients, supervisees, or
consultees for their private practices. (See C.5.e.)
e. Products and Training Advertisements. Counselors who develop products
related to their profession or conduct workshops or training events ensure that
the advertisements concerning these products or events are accurate and
disclose adequate information for consumers to make informed choices.
f. Promoting to Those Served. Counselors do not use counseling, teaching,
training, or supervisory relationships to promote their products or training
events in a manner that is deceptive or would exert undue influence on
individuals who may be vulnerable. Counselors may adopt textbooks they have
authored for instruction purposes.
g. Professional Association Involvement. Counselors actively participate in
local, state, and national associations the foster the development and
improvement of counseling.






Section B Page 22


C.4. Credentials
a. Credentials Claimed. Counselors claim or imply only professional
credentials possessed and are responsible for correcting any known
misrepresentations of their credentials by others. Professional credentials
include graduate degrees in counseling or closely related mental health fields,
accreditation of graduate programs, national voluntary certifications,
government issued certifications or licenses, ACA professional membership, or
any other credential that might indicate to the public specialized knowledge or
expertise in counseling.
b. ACA Professional Membership. ACA professional members may announce
to the public their membership status. Regular members may not announce
their ACA membership in a manner that might imply they are credentialed
counselors.
c. Credential Guidelines. Counselors follow the guidelines for use of
credentials that have been established by the entities that issue the credentials.
d. Misrepresentation of Credentials. Counselors do not attribute more to their
credentials than the credentials represent, and do not imply that other
counselors are not qualified because they do not possess certain credentials.
e. Doctoral Degrees From Other Fields. Counselors who hold a master's
degree in counseling or a closely related mental health field, but hold a doctoral
degree from other than counseling or a closely related field do not use the title,
"Dr." in their practices and do not announce to the public in relation to their
practice or status as a counselor that they hold a doctorate.

C.5. Public Responsibility
a. Nondiscrimination. Counselors do not discriminate against clients, students,
or supervisees in a manner that has a negative impact based on their age, color,
culture, disability, ethnic group, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, or
socioeconomic status, or for any other reason. (See A.2.a.)
b. Sexual Harassment. Counselors do not engage in sexual harassment.
Sexual harassment is defined as sexual solicitation, physical advances, or verbal
or nonverbal conduct that is sexual in nature, that occurs in connection with
professional activities or roles, and that either (1) is unwelcome, is offensive, or
creates a hostile workplace environment, and counselors know or are told this;
or (2) is sufficiently severe or intense to be perceived as harassment to a
reasonable person in the context. Sexual harassment can consist of a single
intense or severe act or multiple persistent or pervasive acts.






Section B Page 23


c. Reports to Third Parties. Counselors are accurate, honest, and unbiased in
reporting their professional activities and judgments to appropriate third parties
including courts, health insurance companies, those who are the recipients of
evaluation reports, and others. (See B. .g.)
d. Media Presentations. When counselors provide advice or comment by
means of public lectures, demonstrations, radio or television programs, pre-
recorded tapes, printed articles, mailed material, or other media, they take
reasonable precautions to ensure that (1) the statements are based on
appropriate professional counseling literature and practice; (2) the statements
are otherwise consistent with the Code of Ethics and the Standards ofPractice;
and (3) the recipients of the information are not encouraged to infer that a
professional counseling relationship has been established. (See C.6.b.)
e. Unjustified Gains. Counselors do not use their professional positions to seek
or receive unjustified personal gains, sexual favors, unfair advantage, or
unearned goods or services. (See C.3.d.)

C.6. Responsibility to Other Professionals
a. Different Approaches. Counselors are respectful of approaches to
professional counseling that differ from their own. Counselors know and take
into account the traditions and practices of other professional groups with which
they work.
b. Personal Public Statements. When making personal statements in a public
context, counselors clarify that they are speaking from their personal
perspectives and that they are not speaking on behalf of all counselors or the
profession. (See C.5.d.)
c. Clients Served by Others. When counselors learn that their clients are in a
professional relationship with another mental health professional, they request
release from clients to inform the other professionals and strive to establish
positive and collaborative professional relationships. (See A.4.)

Section D:
Relationships With Other Professionals
D.1. Relationships With Employers and Employees
a. Role Definition. Counselors define and describe for their employers and
employees the parameters and levels of their professional roles.
b. Agreements. Counselors establish working agreements with supervisors,
colleagues, and subordinates regarding counseling or clinical relationships,






Section B Page 24


confidentiality, adherence to professional standards, distinction between public
and private material, maintenance and dissemination of recorded information,
workload, and accountability. Working agreements in each instance are
specified and made known to those concerned.
c. Negative Conditions. Counselors alert their employers to conditions that
may be potentially disruptive or damaging to the counselor's professional
responsibilities or that may limit their effectiveness.
d. Evaluation. Counselors submit regularly to professional review and
evaluation by their supervisor or the appropriate representative of the employer.
e. In-Service. Counselors are responsible for in-service development of self
and staff.
f. Goals. Counselors inform their staff of goals and programs.
g. Practices. Counselors provide personnel and agency practices that respect
and enhance the rights and welfare of each employee and recipient of agency
services. Counselors strive to maintain the highest levels of professional
services.
h. Personnel Selection andAssignment. Counselors select competent staff and
assign responsibilities compatible with their skills and experiences.
i. Discrimination. Counselors, as either employers or employees, do not
engage in or condone practices that are inhumane, illegal, or unjustifiable (such
as considerations based on age, color, culture, disability, ethnic group, gender,
race, religion, sexual orientation, or socioeconomic status) in hiring, promotion,
or training. (See A.2.a. and C.5.b.)
j. Professional Conduct. Counselors have a responsibility both to clients and to
the agency or institution within which services are performed to maintain high
standards of professional conduct.
k. Exploitive Relationships. Counselors do not engage in exploitive relation
ships with individuals over whom they have supervisory, evaluative, or
instructional control or authority.
1. Employer Policies. The acceptance of employment in an agency or
institution implies that counselors are in agreement with its general policies and
principles. Counselors strive to reach agreement with employers as to
acceptable standards of conduct that allow for changes in institutional policy
conducive to the growth and development of clients.






Section B Page 25


D.2. Consultation (See B.6.)
a. Conlllation as an Option. Counselors may choose to consult with any
other professionally competent persons about their clients. In choosing
consultants, counselors avoid placing the consultant in a conflict of interest
situation that would preclude the consultant being a proper party to the
counselor's efforts to help the client. Should counselors be engaged in a work
setting that compromises this consultation standard, they consult with other
professionals whenever possible to consider justifiable alternatives.
b. Consul/tnt Competency. Counselors are reasonably certain that they have
or the organization represented has the necessary competencies and resources
for giving the kind of consulting services needed and that appropriate referral
resources are available.
c. Understanding with Clients. When providing consultation, counselors
attempt to develop with their clients a clear understanding of problem
definition, goals for change, and predicted consequences of interventions
selected.
d. Consultant Goals. The consulting relationship is one in which client
adaptability and growth toward self-direction are consistently encouraged and
cultivated. (See A. .b.)
D.3. Fees for Referral
a. Accepting Fees from Agency Clients. Counselors refuse a private fee or
other remuneration for rendering services to persons who are entitled to such
services through the counselor's employing agency or institution. The policies
of a particular agency may make explicit provisions for agency clients to
receive counseling services from members of its staff in private practice. In
such instances, the clients must be informed of other options open to them
should they seek private counseling services. (See A.10.a, A. l.b., and C.3.d.)
b. Referral Fees. Counselors do not accept a referral fee from other
professionals.
D.4. Subcontractor Arrangements
When counselors work as subcontractors for counseling services for a third
party, they have a duty to inform clients of the limitations of confidentiality that
the organization may place on counselors in providing counseling services to
clients. The limits of such confidentiality ordinarily are discussed as part of the
intake session. (See B.l.e. and B.l.f.)






Section B Page 26


Section E:
Evaluation, Assessment, And Interpretation
E.1. General
a. Appraisal Techniques. The primary purpose of educational and
psychological assessment is to provide measures that are objective and
interpretable in either comparative or absolute terms. Counselors recognize the
need to interpret the statements in this section as applying to the whole range of
appraisal techniques, including test and nontest data.
b. Client Welfare. Counselors promote the welfare and best interests of the
client in the development, publication, and utilization of educational and
psychological assessment techniques. They do not misuse assessment results
and interpretations and take reasonable steps to prevent others from misusing
the information these techniques provide. They respect the client's right to
know the results, the interpretations made, and the bases for their conclusions
and recommendations.

E.2. Competence to Use and Interpret Tests
a. Limits of Competence. Counselors recognize the limits of their competence
and perform only those testing and assessment services for which they have
been trained. They are familiar with reliability, validity, related
standardization, error of measurement, and proper application of any technique
utilized. Counselors using computer-based test interpretations are trained in the
construct being measured and the specific instrument being used prior to using
this type of computer application. Counselors take reasonable measures to
ensure the proper use of psychological assessment techniques by persons under
their supervision.
b. Appropriate Use. Counselors are responsible for the appropriate application,
scoring, interpretation, and use of assessment instruments, whether they score
and interpret such tests themselves or use computerized or other services.
c. Decisions Based on Results. Counselors responsible for decisions involving
individuals or policies that are based on assessment results have a thorough
understanding of educational and psychological measurement, including
validation criteria, test research, and guidelines for test development and use.
d. Accurate Information. Counselors provide accurate information and avoid
false claims or misconceptions when making statements about assessment






Section B Page 27


instruments or techniques. Special efforts are made to avoid unwarranted
connotations of such terms as IQ and grade equivalent scores. (See C.5.c.)
E.3. Informed Consent
a. Explanation to Clients. Prior to assessment, counselors explain the nature
and purposes of assessment and the specific use of results in language the client
(or other legally authorized person on behalf of the client) can understand,
unless an explicit exception to this right has been agreed upon in advance.
Regardless of whether scoring and interpretation are completed by counselors,
by assistants, or by computer or other outside services, counselors take
reasonable steps to ensure that appropriate explanations are given to the client.
b. Recipients ofResults. The examinee's welfare, explicit understanding, and
prior agreement determine the recipients of test results. Counselors include
accurate and appropriate interpretations with any release of individual or group
test results. (See B.1.a. and C.5.c.)

E.4. Releases of Information to Competent Professionals
a. Misuse of Results. Counselors do not misuse assessment results, including
test results, and interpretations, and take reasonable steps to prevent the misuse
of such by others. (See C.5.c.)
b. Release of Raw Data. Counselors ordinarily release data (e.g., protocols,
counseling or interview notes, or questionnaires) in which the client is
identified only with the consent of the client or the client's legal representative.
Such data are usually released only to persons recognized by counselors as
competent to interpret the data. (See B.1.a.)

E.5. Proper Diagnosis of Mental Disorders
a. Proper Diagnosis. Counselors take special care to provide proper diagnosis
of mental disorders. Assessment techniques (including personal interview)
used to determine client care (e.g., locus of treatment, type of treatment, or
recommended follow-up) are carefully selected and appropriately used. (See
A.3.a. and C.5.c.)
b. Cultural Sensitivity. Counselors recognize that culture affects the manner in
which clients' socioeconomic and cultural experience is considered when
diagnosing mental disorders.






Section B Page 28


E.6. Test Selection
a. Appropriateness oflui itruments. Counselors carefully consider the validity,
reliability, psychometric limitations, and appropriateness of instruments when
selecting tests for use in a given situation or with a particular client.
b. Culturally Diverse Populations. Counselors are cautious when selecting
tests for culturally diverse populations to avoid inappropriateness of testing that
may be outside of socialized behavioral or cognitive patterns.

E.7. Conditions of Test Administration
a. Administration Conditions. Counselors administer tests under the same
conditions that were established in their standardization. When tests are not
administered under standard conditions or when unusual behavior or
irregularities occur during the testing session, those conditions are noted in
interpretation, and the results may be designated as invalid or of questionable
validity.
b. Computer Administration. Counselors are responsible for ensuring that
administration programs function properly to provide clients with accurate
results when a computer or other electronic methods are used for test
administration. (See A.12.b.)
c. Unsupervised Test-Taking. Counselors do not permit unsupervised or
inadequately supervised use of tests or assessments unless the tests or
assessments are designed, intended, and validated for self-administration and/or
scoring.
d. Disclosure of Favorable Conditions. Prior to test administration, conditions
that produce most favorable test results are made known to the examinee.

E.8. Diversity in Testing
Counselors are cautious in using assessment techniques, making evaluations,
and interpreting the performance of populations not represented in the norm
group on which an instrument was standardized. They recognize the effects of
age, color, culture, disability, ethnic group, gender, race, religion, sexual
orientation, and socioeconomic status on test administration and interpretation
and place test results in proper perspective with other relevant factors. (See
A.2.a.)






Section B Page 29


E.9. Test Scoring and Interpretation
a. Reporting Reservations. In reporting assessment results, counselors indicate
any reservations that exist regarding validity or reliability because of the
circumstances of the assessment or the inappropriateness of the norms for the
person tested.
b. Research Inltrminjnts. Counselors exercise caution when interpreting the
results of research instruments possessing insufficient technical data to support
respondent results. The specific purposes for the use of such instruments are
stated explicitly to the examinee.
c. Testing Services. Counselors who provide test scoring and test interpretation
services to support the assessment process confirm the validity of such
interpretations. They accurately describe the purpose, norms, validity,
reliability, and applications of the procedures and any special qualifications
applicable to their use. The public offering of an automated test interpretations
service is considered a professional-to-professional consultation. The formal
responsibility of the consultant is to the consultee, but the ultimate and
overriding responsibility is to the client.

E.10. Test Security
Counselors maintain the integrity and security of tests and other assessment
techniques consistent with legal and contractual obligations. Counselors do not
appropriate, reproduce, or modify published tests or parts thereof without
acknowledgment and permission from the publisher.

E.11. Obsolete Tests and Outdated Test Results
Counselors do not use data or test results that are obsolete or outdated for the
current purpose. Counselors make every effort to prevent the misuse of
obsolete measures and test data by others.

E.12. Test Construction
Counselors use established scientific procedures, relevant standards, and current
professional knowledge for test design in the development, publication, and
utilization of educational and psychological assessment techniques.






Section B Page 30


Section F:
Teaching, Training, And Supervision
F.1. Counselor Educators and Trainers
a. Educators as Teachers and Practitioners. Counselors who are responsible
for developing, implementing, and supervising educational programs are skilled
as teachers and practitioners. They are knowledgeable regarding the ethical,
legal, and regulatory aspects of the profession, are skilled in applying that
knowledge, and make students and supervisees award of their responsibilities.
Counselors conduct counselor education and training programs in an ethical
manner and serve as role models for professional behavior. Counselor
educators should make an effort to infuse material related to human diversity
into all courses and/or workshops that are designed to promote the development
of professional counselors.
b. Relationship Boundaries with Students and Supervisees. Counselors clearly
define and maintain ethical, professional, and social relationship boundaries
with their students and supervisees. They are aware of the differential in power
that exists and the student's or supervisee's possible incomprehension of that
power differential. Counselors explain to students and supervisees the potential
for the relationship to become exploitive.
c. Sexual Relationships. Counselors do not engage in sexual relationships with
students or supervisees and do not subject them to sexual harassment. (See A.6/
and C.5.b.)
d. Contributions to Research. Counselors give credit to students or supervisees
for their contributions to research and scholarly projects. Credit is given
through co-authorship, acknowledgment, footnote statement, or other
appropriate means, in accordance with such contributions. (See G.4.b. and
G.4.c.)
e. Close Relatives. Counselors do not accept close relatives as students or
supervisees.
f. Supervision Preparation. Counselors who offer clinical supervision services
are adequately prepared in supervision methods and techniques. Counselors
who are doctoral students serving as practicum or internship supervisors to
master's level students are adequately prepared and supervised by the training
program.
g. Responsibilityfor Services to Clients. Counselors who supervise the
counseling services of others take reasonable measures to ensure that
counseling services provided to clients are professional.






Section B Page 31


h. Endorsement. Counselors do not endorse students or supervisees for
certification, licensure, employment, or completion of an academic or training
program if they believe students or supervisees are not qualified for the
endorsement. Counselors take reasonable steps to assist students or supervisees
who are not qualified for endorsement to become qualified.

F.2. Counselor Education and Training Programs
a. Orientation. Prior to admission, counselors orient prospective students to
the counselor education or training program's expectations, including but not
limited to the following: (1) the type and level of skill acquisition required for
successful completion of the training, (2) subject matter to be covered, (3) basis
for evaluation, (4) training components that encourage self-growth or self-
disclosure as part of the training process, (5) the type of supervision settings
and requirements of the sites for required clinical field experiences, (6) student
and supervisee evaluation and dismissal policies and procedures, and (7) up-to-
date employment prospects for graduates.
b. Integration of Study and Practice. Counselors establish counselor education
and training programs that integrate academic study and supervised practice.
c. Evaluation. Counselors clearly state to students and supervisees, in advance
of training, the levels of competency expected, appraisal methods, and timing of
evaluations for both didactic and experiential components. Counselors provide
students and supervisees with periodic performance appraisal and evaluation
feedback throughout the training program.
d. Teaching Ethics. Counselors make students and supervisees aware of the
ethical responsibilities and standards of the profession and the students' and
supervisees' ethical responsibilities to the profession. (See C.1. and F.3.e.)
e. Peer Relationships. When students or supervisees are assigned to lead
counseling groups or provide clinical supervision for their peers, counselors
take steps to ensure that students and supervisees placed in these roles do not
have personal or adverse relationships with peers and that they understand they
have the same ethical obligations as counselor educators, trainers, and
supervisors. Counselors make every effort to ensure that the rights of peers are
not compromised when students or supervisees are assigned to lead counseling
groups or provide clinical supervision.
f. Varied Theoretical Positions. Counselors present varied theoretical positions
so that students and supervisees may make comparisons and have opportunities
to develop their own positions. Counselors provide information concerning the
scientific bases of professional practice. (See C.6.a.)






Section B Page 32


g. Field Placements. Counselors develop clear policies within their training
program regarding field placement and other clinical experiences. Counselors
provide clearly stated roles and responsibilities for the student or supervisee, the
site supervisor, and the program supervisor. They confirm that site supervisors
are qualified to provide supervision and are informed of their professional and
ethical responsibilities in this role.
h. Dual Relationships as Supervisors. Counselors avoid dual relationships
such as performing the role of site supervisor and training program supervisor
in the student's or supervisee's training program. Counselors do not accept any
form of professional services, fees, commissions, reimbursement, or
remuneration from a site for student or supervisee placement.
i. Diversity in Programs. Counselors are responsive to their institution's and
program's recruitment and retention needs for training program administrators,
faculty, and students with diverse backgrounds and special needs. (See A.2.a.)

F.3. Students and Supervisees
a. Limitations. Counselors, through ongoing evaluation and appraisal, are
aware of the academic and personal limitations of students and supervisees that
might impede performance. Counselors assist students and supervisees in
securing remedial assistance when needed, and dismiss from the training
program supervisees who are unable to provide competent service due to
academic or personal limitations. Counselors seek professional consultation
and document their decision to dismiss or refer students or supervisees for
assistance. Counselors assure that students and supervisees have recourse to
address decisions made, to require them to seek assistance, or to dismiss them.
b. Self-Growth Experiences. Counselors use professional judgment when
designing training experiences conducted by the counselors themselves that
require student and supervisee self-growth or self-disclosure. Safeguards are
provided so that students and supervisees are aware of the ramifications their
self-disclosure may have, on counselors whose primary role as teacher, trainer,
or supervisor requires acting on ethical obligations to the profession.
Evaluative components of experiential training experiences explicitly delineate
predetermined academic standards that are separate and not dependent on the
student's level of self-disclosure. (See A.6.)
c. Counselingfor Students and Supervisees. If students or supervisees request
counseling, supervisors or counselor educators provide them with acceptable
referrals. Supervisors or counselor educators do not serve as counselor to
students or supervisees over whom they hold administrative, teaching, or






Section B Page 33


evaluative roles unless this is a brief role associated with a training experience
(See A.6.b.)
d. Clients of Students and Supervisees. Counselors make every effort to ensure
that the clients at field placements are aware of the services rendered and the
qualifications of the students and supervisees rendering those services. Clients
receive professional disclosure information and are informed of the limits of
confidentiality. Client permission is obtained in order for the students and
supervisees to use any information concerning the counseling relationship in the
training process (See B.1.e.)
e. Standardsfor Students and Supervisees. Students and supervisees preparing
to become counselors adhere to the Code of Ethics and the Standards of
Practice. Students and supervisees have the same obligations to clients as those
required of counselors. (See H. 1.)

Section G:
Research and Publication
G.1. Research Responsibilities
a. Use of Human Subjects. Counselors plan, design, conduct, and report
research in a manner consistent with pertinent ethical principles, federal and
state laws, host institutional regulations, and scientific standards governing
research with human subjects. Counselors design and conduct research that
reflects cultural sensitivity appropriateness.
b. Deviation from Standard Practices. Counselors seek consultation and
observe stringent safeguards to protect the rights of research participants when a
research problem suggests a deviation from standard acceptable practices. (See
B.6.)
c. Precautions to AvoidInjury. Counselors who conduct research with human
subjects are responsible for the subjects' welfare throughout the experiment and
take reasonable precautions to avoid causing injurious psychological, physical,
or social effects to their subjects.
d. Principal Researcher Responsibility. The ultimate responsibility for ethical
research practice lies with the principal researcher. All others involved in the
research activities share ethical obligations and full responsibility for their own
actions.
e. Minimal Interference. Counselors take reasonable precautions to avoid
causing disruptions in subjects' lives due to participation in research.






Section B Page 34


f. Diversity. Counselors are sensitive to diversity and research issues with
special populations. They seek consultation when appropriate. (See A.2.a. and
B.6.)

G.2. Informed Consent
a. Topics Disclosed. In obtaining informed consent for research, counselors
use language that is understandable to research participants and that: (1)
accurately explains the purpose and procedures to be followed; (2) identifies
any procedures that are experimental or relatively untried; (3) describes the
attendant discomforts and risks; (4) describes the benefits or changes in
individuals or organizations that might be reasonably expected; (5) discloses
appropriate alternative procedures that would be advantageous for subjects; (6)
offers to answer any inquires concerning the procedures; (7) describes any
limitations on confidentiality; and (8) instructs that subjects are free to
withdraw their consent and to discontinue participation in the project at any
time (See B.l.f.)
b. Deception. Counselors do not conduct research involving deception unless
alternative procedures are not feasible and the prospective value of the research
justifies the deception. When the methodological requirements of a student
necessitate concealment or deception, the investigator is required to explain
clearly the reasons for this action as soon as possible.
c. Voluntary Participation. Participation in research is typically voluntary and
without any penalty for refusal to participate. Involuntary participation is
appropriate only when it can be demonstrated that participation will have no
harmful effects on subjects and is essential to the investigation.
d. Confidentiality oflnformation. Information obtained about research
participants during he course of an investigation is confidential. When the
possibility exists that others may obtain access to such information, ethical
research practice requires that the possibility, together with the plans for
protecting confidentiality, be explained to participants as a part of the procedure
for obtaining informed consent. (See B.1.e.)
e. Persons Incapable of Giving Informed Consent. When a person is incapable
of giving informed consent, counselors provide an appropriate explanation,
obtain agreement for participation and obtain appropriate consent from a legally
authorized person.
f. Commitments to Participants. Counselors take reasonable measures to honor
all commitments to research participants.






Section B Page 35


g. Explanations After Data Collection. After data are collected, counselors
provide participants with full clarification of the nature of the study to remove
any misconceptions. Where scientific or human values justify delaying or
withholding information, counselors take reasonable measures to avoid causing
harm.
h. Agreements to Cooperate. Counselors who agree to cooperate with another
individual in research or publication incur an obligation to cooperate as
promised in terms of punctuality of performance and with regard to the
completeness and accuracy of the information required.
i. Informed Consent for Sponsors. In the pursuit of research, counselors give
sponsors, institutions, and publication channels the same respect and
opportunity for giving informed consent that they accord to individual research
participants. Counselors are aware of their obligation to future research
workers and ensure that host institutions are given feedback information and
proper acknowledgment.

G.3. Reporting Results
a. Information Affecting Outcome. When reporting research results, counselors
explicitly mention all variables and conditions known to the investigator that
may have affected the outcome of a study or the interpretation of data.
b. Accurate Results. Counselors plan, conduct, and report research accurately
and in a manner that minimizes the possibility that results will be misleading.
They provide thorough discussions of the limitations of their data and
alternative hypotheses. Counselors do not engage in fraudulent research, distort
data, misrepresent data, or deliberately bias their results.
c. Obligation to Report Unfavorable Results. Counselors communicate to
other counselors the results of any research judged to be of professional value.
Results that reflect unfavorably on institutions, programs, services, prevailing
opinions, or vested interests are not withheld.
d. Identity of Subjects. Counselors who supply data, aid in the research of
another person, report research results, or make original data available take due
care to disguise the identity of respective subjects in the absence of specific
authorization from the subjects to do otherwise. (See B.l.g. and B.5.a.)
e. Replication Studies. Counselors are obligated to make available sufficient
original research data to qualified professionals who may wish to replicate the
study.






Section B Page 36


G.4 Publication
a. Recognition of Others. When conducting and reporting research, counselors
are familiar with and give recognition to previous work on the topic observe
copyright laws, and give full credit to those to whom credit is due. (See F.1.d.
and G.4.c.)
b. Contributors. Counselors give credit through joint authorship,
acknowledgment, footnote statements, or other appropriate means to those who
have contributed significantly to research or concept development in
accordance with such contributions. The principal contributor is listed first and
minor technical or professional contributions are acknowledge in notes or
introductory statements.
c. Student Research. For an article that is substantially based on a student's
dissertation or thesis, the student is listed as the principal author. (See F. 1 .d.
and G.4.a.)
d. Duplicate Submission. Counselors submit manuscripts for consideration to
only one journal at a time. Manuscripts that are published in whole or in
substantial part in another journal or published work are not submitted for
publication without acknowledgment and permission from the previous
publication.
e. Professional Review. Counselors who review material submitted for
publication, research, or other scholarly purposes respect the confidentiality and
proprietary rights of those who submitted it.

Section H:
Resolving Ethical Issues
H.1. Knowledge of Standards
Counselors are familiar with the Code of Ethics and Standards ofPractice and
other applicable ethics codes from other professional organizations of which
they are members, or from certification and licensure bodies. Lack of
knowledge or misunderstanding of an ethical responsibility is not a defense
against a charge of unethical conduct. (See F.3.e.)
H.2. Suspected Violations
a. Ethical Behavior Expected. Counselors expect professional associates to
adhere to Code of Ethics. When counselors possess reasonable cause that raises
doubts as to whether a counselor is acting in an ethical manner, they take
appropriate action. (See H.2.d. and H.2.e.)






Section B Page 37


b. Coniult ti,/n. When uncertain as to whether a particular situation or course
of action may be in violation of Code of Ethics, counselors consult with other
counselors who are knowledgeable about ethics, with colleagues, or with
appropriate authorities.
c. Organization Conflicts. If the demands of an organization with which
counselors are affiliated pose a conflict with Code of Ethics, counselors specify
the nature of such conflicts and express to their supervisors or other responsible
officials their commitment to Code of Ethics. When possible, counselors work
toward change within the organization to allow full adherence to Code of
Ethics.
d. Informal Resolution. When counselors have reasonable cause to believe that
another counselor is violating an ethical standard, they attempt to first resolve
the issue informally with the other counselor if feasible, providing that such
action does not violate confidentiality rights that may be involved.
e. Reporting Suspected Violations. When an informal resolution is not
appropriate or feasible, counselors, upon reasonable cause, take action such as
reporting the suspected ethical violation to state or national ethics committees,
unless this action conflicts with confidentiality rights that cannot be resolved.
f. Unwarranted Complaints. Counselors do not initiate, participate in, or
encourage the filing of ethics complaints that are unwarranted or intend to harm
a counselor rather than to protect clients or the public.
H.3 Cooperation With Ethics Committees
Counselors assist in the process of enforcing Code of Ethics. Counselors
cooperate with investigations, proceedings, and requirements of the ACA Ethics
Committee or ethics committees of other duly constituted associations or boards
having jurisdiction over those charged with a violation. Counselors are familiar
with the ACA Policies and Procedures and use it as a reference in assisting the
enforcement of the Code of Ethics.

ACA STANDARDS OF PRACTICE
All members of the American Counseling Association (ACA) are required to
adhere to the Standards ofPractice and Code ofEthics. The Standards of
Practice represent minimal behavioral statements of the Code ofEthics.
Members should refer to the applicable section of the Code of Ethics for further
interpretation and amplification of the applicable Standard of Practice.






Section B Page 38


Section A: The Counseling Relationship
STANDARD OF PRACTICE ONE (SP-1): NONDISCRIMINATION
Counselors respect diversity and must not discriminate against clients because
of age, color, culture, disability, ethnic group, gender, race, religion, sexual
orientation, marital status, or socioeconomic status. (See A.2.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWO (SP-2): DISCLOSURE TO CLIENTS
Counselors must adequately inform clients, preferably in writing, regarding the
counseling process and counseling relationship at or before the time it begins
and throughout the relationship. (See A.3.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THREE (SP-3): DUAL RELATIONSHIPS
Counselors must make every effort to avoid dual relationships with clients that
could impair their professional judgment or increase the risk of harm to clients.
When a dual relationship cannot be avoided, counselors must take appropriate
steps to ensure that judgment is not impaired and that no exploitation occurs.
(See A.6.a. and A.6.b.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FOUR (SP-4): SEXUAL INTIMACIES WITH
CLIENTS
Counselors must not engage in any type of sexual intimacies with current
clients and must not engage in sexual intimacies with former clients within a
minimum of two years after terminating the counseling relationship.
Counselors who engage in such relationship after two years following
termination have the responsibility to thoroughly examine and document that
such relations did not have an exploitative nature.
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FIVE (SP-5): PROTECTING CLIENTS
DURING GROUP WORK
Counselors must take steps to protect clients from physical or psychological
trauma resulting from interacting during group work. (See A.9.b.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE SIX (SP-6): ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING
OF FEES
Counselors must explain to clients, prior to their entering the counseling
relationship, financial arrangements related to professional services. (See A. 10.
a-d. and A. 11.c.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE SEVEN (SP-7): TERMINATION
Counselors must assist in making appropriate arrangements for the continuation
of treatment of clients, when necessary, following termination of counseling
relationships. (See A. 11.a.)






Section B Page 39


STANDARD OF PRACTICE EIGHT (SP-8): INABILITY TO ASSIST
CLIENTS
Counselors must avoid entering or immediately terminate a counseling
relationship if it is determined that they are unable to be of professional
assistance to a client. The counselor may assist in making an appropriate
referral for the client. (See A. 11 .b.)
Section B: Confidentiality
STANDARD OF PRACTICE NINE (SP-9): CONFIDENTIALITY
REQUIREMENT
Counselors must keep information related to counseling services confidential
unless disclosure is in the best interest of clients, is required for the welfare of
others, or is required by law. When disclosure is required, only information
that is essential is revealed and the client is informed of such disclosure. (See
B.l.a-f.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE TEN (SP-10): CONFIDENTIALITY
REQUIREMENTS FOR SUBORDINATES
Counselors must take measures to ensure that privacy and confidentiality of
clients are maintained by subordinates. (See B. .h.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE ELEVEN (SP-11): CONFIDENTIALITY IN
GROUP WORK
Counselors must clearly communicate to group members that confidentiality
cannot be guaranteed in group work. (See B.2.a.)

STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWELVE (SP-12): CONFIDENTIALITY IN
FAMILY COUNSELING
Counselors must not disclose information about one family member in
counseling to another family member without prior consent. (See B.2.b.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTEEN (SP-13): CONFIDENTIALITY OF
RECORDS
Counselors must maintain appropriate confidentiality in creating, storing,
accessing, transferring, and disposing of counseling records. (See B.4.b.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FOURTEEN (SP-14): PERMISSION TO
RECORD OR OBSERVE
Counselors must obtain prior consent from clients in order to electronically
record or observe sessions. (See B.4.c.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FIFTEEN (SP-15): DISCLOSURE OR
TRANSFER OF RECORDS






Section B Page 40


Counselors must obtain client consent to disclose or transfer records to third
parties, unless exceptions listed in SP-9 exist (See B.4.e.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE SIXTEEN (SP-16): DATA DISGUISE
REQUIRED
Counselors must disguise the identity of the client when using data for training,
research, or publication. (See B.5.a)
Section C: Professional Responsibility
STANDARD OF PRACTICE SEVENTEEN (SP-17): BOUNDARIES OF
COMPETENCE
Counselors must practice only within the boundaries of their competence. (See
C.2.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE EIGHTEEN (SP-18): CONTINUING
EDUCATION
Counselors must engage in continuing education to maintain their professional
competence. (See C.2.f.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE NINETEEN (SP-19): IMPAIRMENT OF
PROFESSIONALS
Counselors must refrain from offering professional services when their personal
problems or conflicts may cause harm to a client or others. (See C.2.g.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWENTY (SP-20): ACCURATE
ADVERTISING
Counselors must accurately represent their credentials and services when
advertising. (See C.3.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWENTY-ONE (SP-21): RECRUITING
THROUGH EMPLOYMENT
Counselors must not use their place of employment or institutional affiliation to
recruit clients for their private practices. (See C.3.d.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWENTY-TWO (SP-22): CREDENTIALS
CLAIMED
Counselors must claim or imply only professional credentials possessed and
must correct any known misrepresentations of their credentials by others. (See
C.4.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWENTY-THREE (SP-23): SEXUAL
HARASSMENT
Counselors must not engage in sexual harassment. (See C.5.b)






Section B Page 41


STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWENTY-FOUR (SP-24): UNJUSTIFIED
GAINS
Counselors must not use their professional positions to seek or receive
unjustified personal gains, sexual favors, unfair advantage, or unearned goods
or services. (See C.5.e.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWENTY-FIVE (SP-25): CLIENTS SERVED
BY OTHERS
With the consent of the client, counselors must inform other mental health
professionals serving the same client that a counseling relationship between the
counselor and client exists. (See C.6.c.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWENTY-SIX (SP-26): NEGATIVE
EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS
Counselors must alert their employers to institutional policy or conditions that
may be potentially disruptive or damaging to the counselor's professional
responsibilities, or that may limit their effectiveness or deny clients' rights.
(See D.1.c.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWENTY-SEVEN (SP-27): PERSONNEL
SELECTION AND ASSIGNMENT
Counselors must select competent staff and must assign responsibilities
compatible with staff skills and experiences. (See D. .h.)

STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWENTY-EIGHT (SP-28): EXPLOITIVE
RELATIONSHIPS WITH SUBORDINATES
Counselors must not engage in exploitive relationships with individuals over
whom they have supervisory, evaluative, or instructional control or authority.
(See D.1.k.)
Section D: Relationship With Other Professionals
STANDARD OF PRACTICE TWENTY-NINE (SP-29): ACCEPTING FEES
FROM AGENCY CLIENTS
Counselors must not accept fees or other remuneration for consultation with
persons entitled to such services through the counselor's employing agency or
institution (See D.3.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTY (SP-30): REFERRAL FEES
Counselors must not accept referral fees. (See D.3.b.)
Section E: Evaluation, Assessment, and Interpretation
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTY-ONE (SP-31): LIMITS OF
COMPETENCE






Section B Page 42


Counselors must perform only testing and assessment services for which they
are competent. Counselors must not allow the use of psychological assessment
techniques by unqualified persons under their supervision. (See E.2.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTY-TWO (SP-32): APPROPRIATE USE
OF ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENTS
Counselors must use assessment instruments in the manner for which they were
intended. (See E.2.b.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTY-THREE (SP-33): ASSESSMENT
EXPLANATIONS TO CLIENTS
Counselors must provide explanations to clients prior to assessment about the
nature and purposes of assessment and the specific uses of results. (See E.3.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTY-FOUR (SP-34): RECIPIENTS OF
TEST RESULTS
Counselors must ensure that accurate and appropriate interpretations
accompany any release of testing and assessment information. (See E.3.b.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTY-FIVE (SP-35): OBSOLETE TESTS
AND OUTDATED TEST RESULTS
Counselors must not base their assessment or intervention decisions or
recommendations on data or test results that are obsolete or outdated for the
current purpose. (See E.11.)
Section F: Teaching, Training, and Supervision
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTY-SIX (SP-36): SEXUAL
RELATIONSHIPS WITH STUDENTS OR SUPERVISEES
Counselors must not engage in sexual relationships with their students and
supervisees. (See F.1.c.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTY-SEVEN (SP-37): CREDIT FOR
CONTRIBUTIONS TO RESEARCH
Counselors must give credit to students or supervisees for their contributions to
research and scholarly projects. (See F. .d.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTY-EIGHT (SP-38): SUPERVISION
PREPARATION
Counselors who offer clinical and supervision services must be trained and
prepared in supervision methods and techniques. (See F. .f.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE THIRTY-NINE (SP-39): EVALUATION
INFORMATION






Section B Page 43


Counselors must clearly state to students and supervisees in advance of training,
the levels of competency expected, appraisal methods, and timing of
evaluations. Counselors must provide students and supervisees with periodic
performance appraisal and evaluation feedback throughout the training
program. (See F.2.c.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FORTY (SP-40): PEER RELATIONSHIPS IN
TRAINING
Counselors must make every effort to ensure that the rights of peers are not
violated when students and supervisees are assigned to lead counseling groups
or provide clinical supervision. (See F.2.e.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FORTY ONE (SP-41): LIMITATIONS OF
STUDENTS AND SUPERVISEES
Counselors must assist students and supervisees in securing remedial assistance,
when needed, and must dismiss from the training program students and
supervisees who are unable to provide competent service due to academic or
personal limitations. (See F.3.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FORTY-TWO (SP-42): SELF-GROWTH
EXPERIENCES
Counselors who conduct experiences for students or supervisees that include
self-growth or self disclosure must inform participants of counselors' ethical
obligations to the profession and must not grade participants based on their
nonacademic performance. (See F.3.b.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FORTY-THREE (SP-43): STANDARDS FOR
STUDENTS AND SUPERVISEES
Students and supervisees preparing to become counselors must adhere to the
Code of Ethics and the Standards ofPractice of counselors. (See F.3.e.)
Section G: Research and Publication
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FORTY-FOUR (SP-44): PRECAUTIONS TO
AVOID INJURY IN RESEARCH
Counselors must avoid causing physical, social, or psychological harm or injury
to subjects in research. (See G.l.c.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FORTY-FIVE (SP-45): CONFIDENTIALITY
OF RESEARCH INFORMATION
Counselors must keep confidential information obtained about research
participants. (See G.2.d.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FORTY-SIX (SP-46): INFORMATION
AFFECTING RESEARCH OUTCOME






Section B Page 44


Counselors must report all variables and conditions known to the investigator
that may have affected research data or outcomes. (See G.3.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FORTY-SEVEN (SP-47): ACCURATE
RESEARCH RESULTS
Counselors must not distort or misrepresent research data, nor fabricate or
intentionally bias research results. (See G.3.b.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FORTY EIGHT (SP-48): PUBLICATION
CONTRIBUTORS
Counselors must give appropriate credit to those who have contributed to
research. (See G.4.a. and G.4.b.)
Section H: Resolving Ethical Issues
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FORTY-NINE (SP-49): ETHICAL BEHAVIOR
EXPECTED
Counselors must take appropriate action when they possess reasonable cause
that raises doubts as to whether counselors or other mental health professionals
are acting in an ethical manner. (See H.2.a.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FIFTY (SP-50): UNWARRANTED
COMPLAINTS
Counselors must not initiate, participate in, or encourage the filing of ethics
complaints that are unwarranted or intended to harm a mental health
professional rather than to protect clients or the public. (See H.2.f.)
STANDARD OF PRACTICE FIFTY-ONE (SP-51): COOPERATION WITH
ETHICS COMMVIITTEES
Counselors must cooperate with investigations, proceedings, and requirements
of the ACA Ethics Committee or ethics committees of other duly constituted
associations or boards having jurisdiction over those charged with a violation.
(See H.3.)
References
The following documents are available to counselors as resources to guide them
in their practices. These resources are not a part of the Code of Ethics and the
Standards ofPractice.
American Association for Counseling and Development/Association for
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development. (1989). The
responsibilities of users of standardized tests (revised). Washington, DC:
Author.






Section B Page 45


American Counseling Association. (1988). American Counseling
Association Code of Ethics and Standards ofPractice. Alexandria, VA:
Author.
American Psychological Association. (1985). Standards for educational
and psychological testing (revised). Washington, DC: Author.
American Rehabilitation Counseling Association, Commission on
Rehabilitation Counselor Certification, and National Rehabilitation Counseling
Association. (1995). Code ofprofessional ethicsfor rehabilitation counselors.
Chicago, IL: Author.
American School Counselor Association. (1992). Ethical standards for
school counselors. Alexandria, VA: Author.
Joint Committee on Testing Practices. (1988). Code of fair testing practices
in education. Washington, DC: Author.
National Board for Certified Counselors. (1989). National Board for
Certified Counselors Code ofEthics. Alexandria, VA: Author.
Prediger, D.J. (Ed.). (1993, March). Multicultural assessment standards.
Alexandria, VA: Association for Assessment in Counseling.

B7. NATIONAL BOARD for CERTIFIED COUNSELORS

CODE OF ETHICS
National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc.
3 Terrace Way, Suite D
Greensboro, NC 27403-3660
Telephone (336) 547-0607
Fax (336) 547-0017
Web site http;//www.nbcc.org
E-mail: nbcc@nbcc.org
PREAMBLE
The National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) is a professional
certification board which certifies counselors as having met standards for the
general and specialty practice of professional counseling established by the
Board. The counselors certified by NBCC may identify with different
professional associations and are often licensed by jurisdictions which
promulgate codes of ethics. The NBCC code of ethics provides a minimal
ethical standard for the professional behavior of all NBCC certificants. This






Section B Page 46


code provides an expectation of and assurance for the ethical practice for all
who use the professional services of an NBCC certificant. In addition, it serves
the purpose of having an enforceable standard for all NBCC certificants and
assures those served of some resource in case of a perceived ethical violation.
The NBCC Ethical Code applies to all those certified by NBCC regardless of
any other professional affiliation. Persons who receive professional services
from certified counselors may elect to use other ethical codes which apply to
their counselor. Although NBCC cooperates with professional associations and
credentialing organizations, it can bring actions to discipline or sanction NBCC
certificants only if the provisions of the NBCC Code are found to have been
violated.
The National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc. (NBCC) promotes counseling
through certification. In pursuit of this mission, the NBCC:
Promotes quality assurance in counseling practice
Promotes the value of counseling
Promotes public awareness of quality counseling practice
Promotes professionalism in counseling
Promotes leadership in credentialing
SECTION A: GENERAL
1. Certified counselors engage in continuous efforts to improve professional
practices, services, and research. Certified counselors are guided in their work
by evidence of the best professional practices.
2. Certified counselors have a responsibility to the clients they serve and to the
institutions within which the services are performed. Certified counselors also
strive to assist the respective agency, organization, or institution in providing
competent and ethical professional services. The acceptance of employment in
an institution implies that the certified counselor is in agreement with the
general policies and principles of the institution. Therefore, the professional
activities of the certified counselor are in accord with the objectives of the
institution. If the certified counselor and the employer do not agree and cannot
reach agreement on policies that are consistent with appropriate counselor
ethical practice that is conducive to client growth and development, the
employment should be terminated. If the situation warrants further action, the
certified counselor should work through professional organizations to have the
unethical practice changed.






Section B Page 47


3. Ethical behavior among professional associates (i.e., both certified and non-
certified counselors) must be expected at all times. When a certified counselor
has doubts as to the ethical behavior of professional colleagues, the certified
counselor must take action to attempt to rectify this condition. Such action uses
the respective institution's channels first and then uses procedures established
by the NBCC or the perceived violator's profession.
4. Certified counselors must refuse remuneration for consultation or counseling
with persons who are entitled to these services through the certified counselor's
employing institution or agency. Certified counselors must not divert to their
private practices, without the mutual consent of the institution and the client,
legitimate clients in their primary agencies or the institutions with which they
are affiliated.
5. In establishing fees for professional counseling services, certified counselors
must consider the financial status of clients. In the event that the established fee
status is inappropriate for a client, assistance must be provided in finding
comparable services at acceptable cost.
6. Certified counselors offer only professional services for which they are
trained or have supervised experience. No diagnosis, assessment, or treatment
should be performed without prior training or supervision. Certified counselors
are responsible for correcting any misrepresentations of their qualifications by
others.
7. Certified counselors recognize their limitations and provide services or use
techniques for which they are qualified by training and/or supervision. Certified
counselors recognize the need for and seek continuing education to assure
competent services.
8. Certified counselors are aware of the intimacy in the counseling relationship
and maintain respect for the client. Counselors must not engage in activities
that seek to meet their personal or professional needs at the expense of the
client.
9. Certified counselors must insure that they do not engage in personal, social,
organizational, financial, or political activities which might lead to a misuse of
their influence.
10. Sexual intimacy with clients is unethical. Certified counselors will not be
sexually, physically, or romantically intimate with clients, and they will not
engage in sexual, physical, or romantic intimacy with clients within a minimum
of two years after terminating the counseling relationship.






Section B Page 48


11. Certified counselors do not condone or engage in sexual harassment, which
is defined as unwelcome comments, gestures, or physical contact of a sexual
nature.
12. Through an awareness of the impact of stereotyping and unwarranted
discrimination (e.g., biases based on age, disability, ethnicity, gender, race,
religion, or sexual orientation), certified counselors guard the individual rights
and personal dignity of the client in the counseling relationship.
13. Certified counselors are accountable at all times for their behavior. They
must be aware that all actions and behaviors of the counselor reflect on
professional integrity and, when inappropriate, can damage the public trust in
the counseling profession. To protect public confidence in the counseling
profession, certified counselors avoid behavior that is clearly in violation of
accepted moral and legal standards.
14. Products or services provided by certified counselors by means of
classroom instruction, public lectures, demonstrations, written articles, radio or
television programs, or other types of media must meet the criteria cited in this
code.
15. Certified counselors have an obligation to withdraw from the practice of
counseling if they violate the Code of Ethics, or if the mental or physical
condition of the certified counselor renders it unlikely that a professional
relationship will be maintained.

SECTION B: COUNSELING RELATIONSHIP
1. The primary obligation of certified counselors is to respect the integrity and
promote the welfare of clients, whether they are assisted individually, in family
units, or in group counseling. In a group setting, the certified counselor is also
responsible for taking reasonable precautions to protect individuals from
physical and/or psychological trauma resulting from interaction within the
group.
2. Certified counselors know and take into account the traditions and practices
of other professional disciplines with whom they work and cooperate fully with
such. If a person is receiving similar services from another professional,
certified counselors do not offer their own services directly to such a person. If
a certified counselor is contacted by a person who is already receiving similar
services from another professional, the certified counselor carefully considers
that professional relationship as well as the client's welfare and proceeds with
caution and sensitivity to the therapeutic issues. When certified counselors






Section B Page 49


learn that their clients are in a professional relationship with another counselor
or mental health professional, they request release from the clients to inform the
other counselor or mental health professional of their relationship with the
client and strive to establish positive and collaborative professional
relationships that are in the best interest of the client. Certified counselors
discuss these issues with clients and the counselor or professional so as to
minimize the risk of confusion and conflict and encourage clients to inform
other professionals of the new professional relationship.
3. Certified counselors may choose to consult with any other professionally
competent person about a client and must notify clients of this right. Certified
counselors avoid placing a consultant in a conflict-of-interest situation that
would preclude the consultant serving as a proper party to the efforts of the
certified counselor to help the client.
4. When a client's condition indicates that there is a clear and imminent danger
to the client or others, the certified counselor must take reasonable action to
inform potential victims and/or inform responsible authorities. Consultation
with other professionals must be used when possible. The assumption of
responsibility for the client's behavior must be taken only after careful
deliberation, and the client must be involved in the resumption of responsibility
as quickly as possible.
5. Records of the counseling relationship, including interview notes, test data,
correspondence, audio or visual tape recordings, electronic data storage, and
other documents are to be considered professional information for use in
counseling. Records should contain accurate factual data. The physical records
are property of the certified counselors or their employers. The information
contained in the records belongs to the client and therefore may not be released
to others without the consent of the client or when the counselor has exhausted
challenges to a court order. The certified counselors are responsible to insure
that their employees handle confidential information appropriately.
Confidentiality must be maintained during the storage and disposition of
records. Records should be maintained for a period of at least five (5) years
after the last counselor/client contact, including cases in which the client is
deceased. All records must be released to the client upon request.
6. Certified counselors must ensure that data maintained in electronic storage
are secure. By using the best computer security methods available, the data
must be limited to information that is appropriate and necessary for the services
being provided and accessible only to appropriate staff members involved in the
provision of services. Certified counselors must also ensure that the






Section B Page 50


electronically stored data are destroyed when the information is no longer of
value in providing services or required as part of clients' records.
7. Any data derived from a client relationship and used in training or research
shall be so disguised that the informed client's identity is fully protected. Any
data, which, cannot be so disguised may be used only as expressly authorized
by the client's informed and un-coerced consent.
8. When counseling is initiated, and throughout the counseling process as
necessary, counselors inform clients of the purposes, goals, techniques,
procedures, limitations, potential risks and benefits of services to be performed,
and clearly indicate limitations that may affect the relationship as well as any
other pertinent information. Counselors take reasonable steps to ensure that
clients understand the implications of any diagnosis, the intended use of tests
and reports, methods of treatment and safety precautions that must be taken in
their use, fees, and billing arrangements.
9. Certified counselors who have an administrative, supervisory and/or
evaluative relationship with individuals seeking counseling services must not
serve as the counselor and should refer the individuals to other professionals.
Exceptions are made only in instances where an individual's situation warrants
counseling intervention and another alternative is unavailable. Dual
relationships that might impair the certified counselor's objectivity and
professional judgment must be avoided and/or the counseling relationship
terminated through referral to a competent professional.
10. When certified counselors determine an inability to be of professional
assistance to a potential or existing client, they must, respectively, not initiate
the counseling relationship or immediately terminate the relationship. In either
event, the certified counselor must suggest appropriate alternative. Certified
counselors must be knowledgeable about referral resources so that a satisfactory
referral can be initiated. In the event that the client declines a suggested
referral, the certified counselor is not obligated to continue the relationship.
11. When certified counselors are engaged in intensive, short-term counseling,
they must ensure that professional assistance is available, at normal costs to
clients during and following the short-term counseling.
12. Counselors using electronic means in which counselor and client are not in
immediate proximity must present clients with local sources of care before
establishing a continued short or long-term relationship. Counselors who
communicate with clients via Internet are governed by NBCC standards for
Web Counseling.






Section B Page 51


13. Counselors must document permission to practice counseling by electronic
means in all governmental jurisdictions where such counseling takes place.
14. When electronic data and systems are used as a component of counseling
services, certified counselors must ensure that the computer application, and
any information it contains, is appropriate for the respective needs of clients and
is nondiscriminatory. Certified counselors must ensure that they themselves
have acquired a facilitation level of knowledge with any system they use
including hands-on application, and understanding of the uses of all aspects of
the computer-based system. In selecting and/or maintaining computer-based
systems that contain career information, counselors must ensure that the system
provides current, accurate, and locally relevant information. Certified
counselors must also ensure that clients are intellectually, emotionally, and
physically compatible with computer applications and understand their purpose
and operation. Client use of a computer application must be evaluated to
correct possible problems and assess subsequent needs.
15. Certified counselors who develop self-help/stand-alone computer software
for use by the general public, must first ensure that it is designed to function in
a stand-alone manner that is appropriate and safe for all clients for which it is
intended. A manual is required. The manual must provide the user with
intended outcomes, suggestions for using the software, descriptions of
inappropriately used applications, and descriptions of when and how other
forms of counseling services might be beneficial. Finally, the manual must
include the qualifications of the developer, the development process, validation
date, and operating procedures.
16. The counseling relationship and information resulting from it remains
confidential, consistent with the legal and ethical obligations of certified
counselors. In group counseling, counselors clearly define confidentiality and
the parameters for the specific group being entered, explain the importance of
confidentiality, and discuss the difficulties related to confidentiality involved in
group work. The fact that confidentiality cannot be guaranteed is clearly
communicated to group members. However counselors should give assurance
about their professional responsibility to keep all group communications
confidential.
17. Certified counselors must screen prospective group counseling participants
to ensure compatibility with group objectives. This is especially important
when the emphasis is on self-understanding and growth through self-disclosure.
Certified counselors must maintain an awareness of the welfare of each
participant throughout the group process.






Section B Page 52


SECTION C: MEASUREMENT & EVALUATION
1. Because many types of assessment techniques exist, certified counselors
must recognize the limits of their competence and perform only those
assessment functions for which they have received appropriate training or
supervision.
2. Certified counselors who utilize assessment instruments to assist them with
diagnoses must have appropriate training and skills in educational and
psychological measurement, validation criteria, test research, and guidelines for
test development and use.
3. Certified counselors must provide instrument specific orientation or
information to an examinee prior to and following the administration of
assessment instruments or techniques so that the results may be placed in proper
perspective with other relevant factors. The purpose of testing and the explicit
use of the results must be made known to an examinee prior to testing.
4. In selecting assessment instruments or techniques for use in a given situation
or with a particular client, certified counselors must carefully evaluate the
specific theoretical bases and characteristics, validity, reliability and
appropriateness of the instrument.
5. When making statements to the public about assessment instruments or
techniques, certified counselors must provide accurate information and avoid
false claims or misconceptions concerning the meaning of the instrument's
reliability and validity terms.
6. Counselors must follow all directions and researched procedures for
selection, administration and interpretation of all evaluation instruments and use
them only within proper contexts.
7. Certified counselors must be cautious when interpreting the results of
instruments that possess insufficient technical data, and must explicitly state to
examinees the specific limitations and purposes for the use of such instruments.
8. Certified counselors must proceed with caution when attempting to evaluate
and interpret performances of any person who cannot be appropriately
compared to the norms for the instrument.
9. Because prior coaching or dissemination of test materials can invalidate test
results, certified counselors are professionally obligated to maintain test
security.
10. Certified counselors must consider psychometric limitations when selecting
and using an instrument, and must be cognizant of the limitations when






Section B Page 53


interpreting the results. When tests are used to classify clients, certified
counselors must ensure that periodic review and/or retesting are made to
prevent client stereotyping.
11. An examinee's welfare, explicit prior understanding, and consent are the
factors used when determining who receives the test results. Certified
counselors must see that appropriate interpretation accompanies any release of
individual or group test data (e.g., limitations of instrument and norms).
12. Certified counselors must ensure that computer-generated test
administration and scoring programs function properly thereby providing
clients with accurate test results.
13. Certified counselors who develop computer-based test interpretations to
support the assessment process must ensure that the validity of the
interpretations is established prior to the commercial distribution of the
computer application.
14. Certified counselors recognize that test results may become obsolete, and
avoid the misuse of obsolete data.
15. Certified counselors must not appropriate, reproduce, or modify published
tests or parts thereof without acknowledgment and permission from the
publisher, except as permitted by the fair educational use provisions of the U.S.
copyright law.
SECTION D: RESEARCH & PUBLICATION
1. Certified counselors will adhere to applicable legal and professional
guidelines on research with human subjects.
2. In planning research activities involving human subjects, certified
counselors must be aware of and responsive to all pertinent ethical principles
and ensure that the research problem, design, and execution are in full
compliance with any pertinent institutional or governmental regulations.
3. The ultimate responsibility for ethical research lies with the principal
researcher, although others involved in the research activities are ethically
obligated and responsible for their own actions.
4. Certified counselors who conduct research with human subjects are
responsible for the welfare of the subjects throughout the experiment and must
take all reasonable precautions to avoid causing injurious psychological,
physical, or social effects on their subjects.






Section B Page 54


5. Certified counselors who conduct research must abide by the basic elements
of informed consent:
a. Fair explanation of the procedures to be followed, including
an identification of those, which are experimental
b. Description of the attendant discomforts and risks
c. Description of the benefits to be expected
d. Disclosure of appropriate alternative procedures that would
be advantageous for subjects with an offer to answer
any inquiries concerning the procedures
e. An instruction that subjects are free to withdraw their consent
and to discontinue participation in the project or activity at any
time.
6. When reporting research results, explicit mention must be made of all
the variables and conditions known to the investigator that may have affected
the outcome of the study or the interpretation of the data.
7. Certified counselors who conduct and report research investigations must do
so in a manner that minimizes the possibility that the results will be misleading.
8. Certified counselors are obligated to make available sufficient original
research data to qualified others who may wish to replicate the study.
9. Certified counselors who supply data, aid in the research of another person,
report research results, or make original data available, must take due care to
disguise the identity of respective subjects in the absence of specific
authorization from the subjects to do otherwise.
10. When conducting and reporting research, certified counselors must be
familiar with and give recognition to previous work on the topic, must observe
all copyright laws, and must follow the principles of giving full credit to those
to whom credit is due.
11. Certified counselors must give due credit through joint authorship,
acknowledgment, footnote statements, or other appropriate means to those who
have contributed to the research and/or publication, in accordance with such
contributions.
12. Certified counselors should communicate to other counselors the results of
any research judged to be of professional value. Results that reflect
unfavorably on institutions' programs, services, or vested interests must not be
withheld.






Section B Page 55


13. Certified counselors who agree to cooperate with another individual in
research and/or publication incur an obligation to cooperate as promised in
terms of punctuality of performance and with full regard to the completeness
and accuracy of the information required.
14. Certified counselors must not submit the same manuscript, or one
essentially similar in content, for simultaneous publication consideration by two
or more journals. In addition, manuscripts that have been published in whole or
substantial part should not be submitted for additional publication without
acknowledgment and permission from any previous publisher.
SECTION E: CONSULTING
Consultation refers to a voluntary relationship between a professional helper
and a help-needing individual, group, or social unit in which the consultant is
providing help to the clients) in defining and solving a work-related problem or
potential work-related problem with a client or client system.
1. Certified counselors, acting as consultants, must have a high degree of self
awareness of their own values, knowledge, skills, limitations, and needs in
entering a helping relationship that involves human and/or organizational
change. The focus of the consulting relationship must be on the issues to be
resolved and not on the persons) presenting the problem.
2. In the consulting relationship, the certified counselor and client must
understand and agree upon the problem definition, subsequent goals, and
predicted consequences of interventions selected.
3. Certified counselors acting as consultants must be reasonably certain that
they, or the organization represented, have the necessary competencies and
resources for giving the kind of help that is needed or that may develop later,
and that appropriate referral sources are available.
4. Certified counselors in a consulting relationship must encourage and
cultivate client adaptability and growth toward self-direction. Certified
counselors must maintain this role consistently and not become a decision
maker for clients or create a future dependency on the consultant.
SECTION F: PRIVATE PRACTICE
1. In advertising services as a private practitioner, certified counselors must
advertise in a manner that accurately informs the public of the professional
services, expertise, and techniques of counseling available.
2. Certified counselors who assume an executive leadership role in a private
practice organization do not permit their names to be used in professional






Section B Page 56


notices during periods of time when they are not actively engaged in the private
practice of counseling unless their executive roles are clearly stated.
3. Certified counselors must make available their highest degree (described by
discipline), type and level of certification and/or license, address, telephone
number, office hours, type and/or description of services, and other relevant
information. Listed information must not contain false, inaccurate, misleading,
partial, out-of-context, or otherwise deceptive material or statements.
4. Certified counselors who are involved in a partnership/corporation with
other certified counselors and/or other professionals, must clearly specify all
relevant specialties of each member of the partnership or corporation.
APPENDIX: CERTIFICATION EXAMINATION
Applicants for the NBCC Certification Examinations must have fulfilled all
current eligibility requirements, and are responsible for the accuracy and
validity of all information and/or materials provided by themselves or by others
for fulfillment of eligibility criteria.
Approved October 1997
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Reference documents, statements, and sources for the development of the
NBCC Code of Ethics were as follows: The Ethical Standards of the American
Counseling Association, Responsible Uses for Standardized Testing (AAC),
codes of ethics for the American Psychological Association, and the National
Career Development Association, Handbook of Standards for Computer-Based
Career Information Systems(ACSCI) and Guidelines for the Use of Computer
Based Career Information and Guidance Systems (ACSCI).

B8. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION for MARRIAGE and FAMILY
THERAPISTS

Code of Principles for Marriage and Family Therapists
This version of the AAMFT Code of Ethics
is in effect beginning July 1, 1998. This Code
may be revised by AAMFT at any time.
The Board of Directors of the American Association for Marriage and Family
Therapy (AAMFT) hereby promulgates, pursuant to Article 2, Section 2.013 of
the Association's Bylaws, the Revised AAMFT Code of Ethics, effective July 1,
1998.






Section B Page 57


The AAMFT Code of Ethics is binding on Members of AAMFT in all
membership categories, AAMFT Approved Supervisors, and applicants for
membership and the Approved Supervisor designation (hereafter, AAMFT
Member).
If an AAMFT Member resigns in anticipation of, or during the course of an
ethics investigation, the Ethics Committee will complete its investigation. Any
publication of action taken by the Association will include the fact that the
Member attempted to resign during the investigation.
Marriage and family therapists are strongly encouraged to report alleged
unethical behavior of colleagues to appropriate professional associations and
state regulatory bodies.
1. RESPONSIBILITY TO CLIENTS
Marriage and family therapists advance the welfare of families and individuals.
They respect the rights of those persons seeking their assistance, and make
reasonable efforts to ensure that their services are used appropriately.
1.1 Marriage and family therapists do not discriminate against or refuse
professional service to anyone on the basis of race, gender, religion, national
origin, or sexual orientation.
1.2 Marriage and family therapists are aware of their influential position
with respect to clients, and they avoid exploiting the trust and dependency of
such persons. Therapists, therefore, make every effort to avoid dual
relationships with clients that could impair their professional judgement or
increase the risk of exploitation. When a dual relationship cannot be avoided,
therapists take appropriate professional precautions to ensure judgment is not
impaired and no exploitation occurs. Examples of such dual relationships
include, but are not limited to, business or close personal relationships with
clients. Sexual intimacy with clients is prohibited. Sexual intimacy with former
clients for two years following the termination of therapy is prohibited.
1.3 Marriage and family therapists do not use their professional
relationships with clients to further their own interests.
1.4 Marriage and family therapists respect the right of clients to make
decisions and help them to understand the consequences of these decisions.
Marriage and family therapists clearly advise a client that a decision on marital
status is the responsibility of the client.
1.5 Marriage and family therapists continue therapeutic relationships only
so long as it is reasonably clear that clients are benefiting from the relationship.






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1.6 Marriage and family therapists assist persons in obtaining other
therapeutic services if the therapist is unable or unwilling, for appropriate
reasons, to provide professional help.
1.7 Marriage and family therapists do not abandon or neglect clients in
treatment without making reasonable arrangements for the continuation of such
treatment.
1.8 Marriage and family therapists obtain written informed consent from
clients before videotaping, audio recording, or permitting third party
observation.
2. CONFIDENTIALITY
Marriage and family therapists have unique confidentiality concerns because
the client in a therapeutic relationship may be more than one person. Therapists
respect and guard confidences of each individual client.
2.1 Marriage and family therapists may not disclose client confidences
except: (a) as mandated by law; (b) to prevent a clear and immediate danger to
a person or persons; (c) where the therapist is a defendant in a civil, criminal or
disciplinary action arising from the therapy (in which case client confidences
may be disclosed only in the course of that action); or (d) if there is a waiver
previously obtained in writing, and then such information may be revealed only
in accordance with the terms of the waiver. In circumstances where more than
one person in a family receives therapy, each such family member who is
legally competent to execute a waiver must agree to the waiver required by sub-
paragraph (d). Without such a waiver from each family member legally
competent to execute a waiver, a therapist cannot disclose information received
from any family member.
2.2 Marriage and family therapists use client and/or clinical materials in
teaching, writing, and public presentations only if a written waiver has been
obtained in accordance with sub-principle 2.1(d), or when appropriate steps
have been taken to protect client identity and confidentiality.
2.3 Marriage and family therapists store or dispose of client records in ways
that maintain confidentiality.
3. PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE AND INTEGRITY
Marriage and family therapists maintain high standards of professional
competence and integrity.
3.1 Marriage and family therapists are in violation of this Code and subject
to termination of membership or other appropriate action if they: (a) are






Section B Page 59


convicted of any felony; (b) are convicted of a misdemeanor related to their
qualifications or functions; (c) engage in conduct which could lead to
conviction of a felony, or a misdemeanor related to their qualifications or
functions; (d) are expelled from or disciplined by other professional
organizations; (e) have their licenses or certificates suspended or revoked or are
otherwise disciplined by regulatory bodies; (f) are no longer competent to
practice marriage and family therapy because they are impaired due to physical
or mental causes or the abuse of alcohol or other substances; or (g) fail to
cooperate with the Association at any point from the inception of an ethical
complaint through the completion of all proceedings regarding that complaint.
3.2 Marriage and family therapists seek appropriate professional assistance
for their personal problems or conflicts that may impair work performance or
clinical judgment.
3.3 Marriage and family therapists, as teachers, supervisors, and
researchers, are dedicated to high standards of scholarship and present accurate
information.
3.4 Marriage and family therapists remain abreast of new developments in
family therapy knowledge and practice through educational activities.
3.5 Marriage and family therapists do not engage in sexual or other
harassment or exploitation of clients, students, trainees, supervisees, employees,
colleagues, research subjects, or actual or potential witnesses or complainants in
investigations and ethical proceedings.
3.6 Marriage and family therapists do not diagnose, treat, or advise on
problems outside the recognized boundaries of their competence.
3.7 Marriage and family therapists make efforts to prevent the distortion or
misuse of their clinical and research findings.
3.8 Marriage and family therapists, because of their ability to influence and
alter the lives of others, exercise special care when making public their
professional recommendations and opinions through testimony or other public
statements.
4. RESPONSIBILITY TO STUDENT EMPLOYEES AND
SUPERVISEES
Marriage and family therapists do not exploit the trust and dependency of
students, employees, and supervisees.
4.1 Marriage and family therapists are aware of their influential position
with respect to students, employees and supervisees, and they avoid exploiting






Section B Page 60


the trust and dependency of such persons. Therapists, therefore, make every
effort to avoid dual relationships that could impair their professional judgment
or increase the risk of exploitation. When a dual relationship cannot be
avoided, therapists take appropriate professional precautions to ensure judgment
is not impaired and no exploitation occurs. Examples of such dual relationships
include, but are not limited to, business or close personal relationships with
students, employees, or supervisees. Provision of therapy to students,
employees, or supervisees is prohibited. Sexual intimacy with students or
supervisees is prohibited.
4.2 Marriage and family therapists do not permit students, employees or
supervisees to perform or to hold themselves out as competent to perform
professional services beyond their training, level of experience, and
competence.
4.3 Marriage and family therapists do not disclose supervisee confidences
except: (a) as mandated by law; (b) to prevent a clear and immediate danger to a
person or persons; (c) where the therapist is a defendant in a civil, criminal, or
disciplinary action arising from the supervision (in which case supervisee
confidences may be disclosed only in the course of that action); (d) in
educational or training settings where there are multiple supervisors, and then
only to other professional colleagues who share the responsibility for the
training of the supervisee; or (e) if there is a waiver previously obtained in
writing, and then such information may be revealed only in accordance with the
terms of the waiver.
5. RESPONSIBILITY TO RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS
Investigators respect the dignity and protect the welfare of participants in
research and are aware of federal and state laws and regulations and
professional standards governing the conduct of research.
5.1 Investigators are responsible for making careful examinations of ethical
acceptability in planning studies. To the extent that services to research
participants may be compromised by participation in research, investigators
seek the ethical advice of qualified professionals not directly involved in the
investigation and observe safeguards to protect the rights of research
participants.
5.2 Investigators requesting participants' involvement in research inform
them of all aspects of the research that might reasonably be expected to
influence willingness to participate. Investigators are especially sensitive to the
possibility of diminished consent when participants are also receiving clinical






Section B Page 61


services, have impairments which limit understanding and/or communication,
or when participants are children.

5.3 Investigators respect participants' freedom to decline participation in or
to withdraw from a research study at any time. This obligation requires special
thought and consideration when investigators or other members of the research
team are in positions of authority or influence over participants. Marriage and
family therapists, therefore, make every effort to avoid dual relationships with
research participants that could impair professional judgment or increase the
risk of exploitation.
5.4 Information obtained about a research participant during the course of
an investigation is confidential unless there is a waiver previously obtained in
writing. When the possibility exists that others, including family members,
may obtain access to such information, this possibility, together with the plan
for protecting confidentiality, is explained as part of the procedure for obtaining
informed consent.
6. RESPONSIBILITY TO THE PROFESSION
Marriage and family therapists respect the rights and responsibilities of
professional colleagues and participate in activities which advance the goals of
the profession.
6.1 Marriage and family therapists remain accountable to the standards of
the profession when acting as members or employees of organizations.
6.2 Marriage and family therapists assign publication credit to those who
have contributed to a publication in proportion to their contributions and in
accordance with customary professional publication practices.
6.3 Marriage and family therapists who are the authors of books or other
materials that are published or distributed cite persons to whom credit for
original ideas is due.
6.4 Marriage and family therapists who are the authors of books or other
materials published or distributed by an organization take reasonable
precautions to ensure that the organization promotes and advertises the
materials accurately and factually.
6.5 Marriage and family therapists participate in activities that contribute to
a better community and society, including devoting a portion of their
professional activity to services for which there is little or no financial return.






Section B Page 62


6.6 Marriage and family therapists are concerned with developing laws and
regulations pertaining to marriage and family therapy that serve the public
interest, and with altering such laws and regulations that are not in the public
interest.
6.7 Marriage and family therapists encourage public participation in the
design and delivery of professional services and in the regulation of
practitioners.
7. FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS
Marriage and family therapists make financial arrangements with clients, third
party payers, and supervisees that are reasonably understandable and conform
to accepted professional practices.
7.1 Marriage and family therapists do not offer or accept payment for
referrals.
7.2 Marriage and family therapists do not charge excessive fees for services.
7.3 Marriage and family therapists disclose their fees to clients and
supervisees at the beginning of services.
7.4 Marriage and family therapists represent facts truthfully to clients, third
party payers, and supervisees regarding services rendered.
8. ADVERTISING
Marriage and family therapists engage in appropriate informational activities,
including those that enable laypersons to choose professional services on an
informed basis.
General Advertising
8.1 Marriage and family therapists accurately represent their competence,
education, training, and experience relevant to their practice of marriage and
family therapy.
8.2 Marriage and family therapists assure that advertisements and
publications in any media (such as directories, announcements, business cards,
newspapers, radio, television, and facsimiles) convey information that is
necessary for the public to make an appropriate selection of professional
services. Information could include: (a) office information, such as name,
address, telephone number, credit card acceptability, fees, languages spoken,
and office hours; (b) appropriate degrees, state licensure and/or certification,
and AAMFT Clinical Member status; and (c) description of practice. (For






Section B Page 63


requirements for advertising under the AAMFT name, logo, and/or the
abbreviated initials AAMFT, see Sub-principle 8.14 and 8.15, below).
8.3 Marriage and family therapists do not use a name which could mislead
the public concerning the identity, responsibility, source, and status of those
practicing under that name and do not hold themselves out as being partners or
associates of a firm if they are not.
8.4 Marriage and family therapists do not use any professional identification
(such as a business card, office sign, letterhead, or telephone or association
directory listing) if it includes a statement or claim that is false, fraudulent,
misleading, or deceptive. A statement is false, fraudulent, misleading, or
deceptive if it (a) contains a material misrepresentation of fact; (b) fails to state
any material fact necessary to make the statement, in light of all circumstances,
not misleading; or (c) is intended to or is likely to create an unjustified
expectation.
8.5 Marriage and family therapists correct, wherever possible, false,
misleading, or inaccurate information and representations made by others
concerning the therapist's qualifications, services, or products.
8.6 Marriage and family therapists make certain that the qualifications of
persons in their employ are represented in a manner that is not false,
misleading, or deceptive.
8.7 Marriage and family therapists may represent themselves as specializing
within a limited area of marriage and family therapy, but only if they have the
education and supervised experience in settings which meet recognized
professional standards to practice in that specialty area.
Advertising Using AAMFT Designations
8.8 The AAMFT designations of Clinical Member, Approved Supervisor,
and Fellow may be used in public information or advertising materials only by
persons holding such designations. Persons holding such designations may, for
example, advertise in the following manner:
* Jane Doe, Ph.D., a Clinical Member of the American Association for
Marriage and Family Therapy.
Alternately, the advertisement could read:
Jane Doe, Ph.D., AAMFT Clinical Member.
* John Doe, Ph.D., an Approved Supervisor of the American Association for
Marriage and Family Therapy
Alternately, the advertisement could read:






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John Doe, Ph.D., AAMFT Approved Supervisor.
* Jane Doe, Ph.D., a Fellow of the American Association for Marriage and
Family Therapy.
Alternately, the advertisement could read:
Jane Doe, Ph.D., AAMFT Fellow.
More than one designation may be used if held by the AAMFT Member.
8.9 Marriage and family therapists who hold that AAMFT Approved
Supervisor or the Fellow designation may not represent the designation as an
advanced clinical status.
8.10 Student, Associate, and Affiliate Members may not use their AAMFT
membership status in public information or advertising materials. Such listings
on professional resumes are not considered advertisements.
8.11 Persons applying for AAMFT membership may not list their
application status on any resume or advertisement.
8.12 In conjunction with their AAMFT membership, marriage and family
therapists claim as evidence of educational qualifications only those degrees (a)
from regionally accredited institutions or (b) from institutions recognized by
states which license or certify marriage and family therapists, but only if such
state regulation is recognized by AAMFT.
8.13 Marriage and family therapists may not use the initials AAMFT
following their name in the manner of an academic degree.
8.14 Marriage and family therapists may not use the AAMFT name,
corporate logo, and/or the abbreviated initials AAMFT or make any other such
representation which would imply that they speak for or represent the
Association. The Association is the sole owner of its name, corporate logo, and
the abbreviated initials AAMFT. Its committees and divisions, operating as
such, may use the name, corporate logo, and/or the abbreviated initials AAMFT
in accordance with AAMFT policies.
8.15 Advertisements of Clinical Members may include the following:
AAMFT Clinical Member Logo, Clinical Member's name, degree, license or
certificate held when required by state law, name of business, address, and
telephone number. If a business is listed, it must follow, not precede the
Clinical Member's name. Such listings may not include AAMFT offices held
by the Clinical Member, nor any specializations, since such a listing under the
AAMFT name, Clinical Member logo, and/or the abbreviated initials AAMFT






Section B Page 65


would imply that this specialization has been credentialed by AAMFT. The
Clinical Member logo shall be used in accordance with stated guidelines.
8.16 Marriage and family therapists use their membership in AAFMT only
in connection with their clinical and professional activities.
8.17 Only AAMFT divisions and programs accredited by the AAMFT
Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education, not
businesses nor organizations, may use any AAMFT-related designation or
affiliation in public information or advertising materials, and then only in
accordance with AAMFT policies.
8.18 Programs accredited by the AAMFT Commission on Accreditation for
Marriage and Family Therapy Education may not use the AAMFT name,
corporate logo, and/or the abbreviated initials, AAMFT. Instead, they may
have printed on their stationery and other appropriate materials a statement such
as:
* The (name of program) of the (name of institution) is accredited by the
AAMFT Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy
Education.
8.19 Programs not accredited by the AAMFT Commission on Accreditation
for Marriage and Family Therapy Education may not use the AAMFT name,
corporate logo, and/or the abbreviated initials, AAMFT. They may not state in
printed program materials, program advertisements, and student advisements
that their courses and training opportunities are accepted by AAMFT to meet
AAMFT membership requirements.
Violations of this Code should be brought in writing to the attention of the
AAMFT Ethics Committee, 1133 15th Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC
20005-2710, (FAX: 202/223-2329; Telephone 202/452-0109).

B9. CODE OF PROFESSIONAL ETHICS for CERTIFIED
REHABILITATION COUNSELORS
The Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification has adopted the
Code of Professional Ethics for Certified Rehabilitation Counselors; and the
following professional organizations have adopted the Code for their
memberships: American Rehabilitation Counseling Association, National
Rehabilitation Counseling Association, and National Council on Rehabilitation
Education.


PREAMBLE






Section B Page 66


Rehabilitation Counselors are committed to facilitating personal, social, and
economic independence of individuals with disabilities. In fulfilling this
commitment, Rehabilitation Counselors work with people, programs,
institutions, and service delivery systems. Rehabilitation Counselors recognize
that both action and inaction can be facilitating or debilitating. Rehabilitation
Counselors may be called upon to provide counseling; vocational exploration;
psychological and vocational assessment; evaluation of social, medical,
vocational, and psychiatric information; job placement and job development
services; and other rehabilitation services, and do so in a manner that is
consistent with their education and experience. Moreover, Rehabilitation
Counselors also must demonstrate adherence to ethical standards and must
ensure that the standards are enforced vigorously. The Code of Professional
Ethics, henceforth referred to as the Code, is designed to facilitate the
accomplishment of these goals.
The primary obligation of Rehabilitation Counselors is to their clients, defined
in this Code as people with disabilities who are receiving services from
rehabilitation counselors. The basic objective of the Code is to promote the
public welfare by specifying and enforcing ethical behavior expected of
Rehabilitation Counselors. Accordingly, the Code consists of two kinds of
standards, Canons and Rules of Professional Conduct.
The Canons are general standards of an aspirational and inspirational nature
reflecting the fundamental spirit of caring and respect which professionals
share. They are maxims, which serve as models of exemplary professional
conduct. The Canons also express general concepts and principles from which
more specific Rules are derived. Unlike the Canons, the Rules are more
exacting standards that provide guidance in specific circumstances.
Rehabilitation Counselors who violate the Code are subject to disciplinary
action. A rule violation is interpreted as a violation of the applicable Canon and
the general principles embodied thereof. Since the use of the Certified
Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) designation is a privilege granted by the
Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC), the CRCC
reserves unto itself the power to suspend or to revoke the privilege or to
approve other penalties for a Rule violation. Disciplinary penalties are imposed
as warranted by the severity of the offense and its attendant circumstances. All
disciplinary actions are undertaken in accordance with published procedures
and penalties designed to assure the proper enforcement of the Code within the
framework of due process and equal protection of the laws.






Section B Page 67


When there is reason to question the ethical propriety of specific behaviors,
persons are encouraged to refrain from engaging in such behaviors until the
matter has been clarified. Certified Rehabilitation Counselors who need
assistance in interpreting the Code should request in writing an advisory
opinion from the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification.
Rehabilitation Counselors who are not certified and require assistance in
interpreting the Code should request in writing an advisory opinion from their
appropriate professional organization.
CANON 1 MORAL AND LEGAL STANDARDS
Rehabilitation Counselors shall behave in a legal, ethical, and moral manner in
the conduct of their profession, maintaining the integrity of the Code and
avoiding any behavior, which would cause harm to others.
Rules of Professional Conduct
R1.1 Rehabilitation Counselors will obey the laws and statutes in the legal
jurisdiction in which they practice and are subject to disciplinary action for any
violation, to the extent that such violation suggests the likelihood of
professional misconduct.
R1.2 Rehabilitation Counselors will be thoroughly familiar with, will
observe, and will discuss with their clients the legal limitations of their services,
or benefits offered to clients so as to facilitate honest and open communication
and realistic expectations.
R1.3 Rehabilitation Counselors will be alert to legal parameters relevant to
their practices and to disparities between legally mandated ethical and
professional standards and the Code. Where such disparities exist,
Rehabilitation Counselors will follow the legal mandates and will formally
communicate any disparities to the appropriate committee on professional
ethics. In the absence of legal guidelines, the Code is ethically binding.
R1.4 Rehabilitation Counselors will not engage in any act or omission of a
dishonest, deceitful, or fraudulent nature in the conduct of their professional
activities. They will not allow the pursuit of financial gain or other personal
benefit to interfere with the exercise of sound professional judgment and skills,
nor will Rehabilitation Counselors abuse their relationships with clients to
promote personal or financial gain or the financial gain of their employing
agencies.
R1.5 Rehabilitation Counselors will understand and abide by the Canons and
Rules of Professional Conduct, which are prescribed in the Code.






Section B Page 68


R1.6 Rehabilitation Counselors will not advocate, sanction, participate in,
cause to be accomplished, otherwise carry out through another, or condone any
act which Rehabilitation Counselors are prohibited from performing by the
Code.
R1.7 Rehabilitation Counselors' moral and ethical standards of behavior are
a personal matter to the same degree as they are for any other citizen, except as
these may compromise the fulfillment of their professional responsibilities or
reduce the public trust in Rehabilitation Counselors. To protect public
confidence, Rehabilitation Counselors will avoid public behavior that clearly is
in violation of accepted moral and ethical standards.
R1.8 Rehabilitation Counselors will respect the rights and reputation of any
institution, organization, or firm with which they are associated when making
oral or written statements. In those instances where they are critical of policies,
they attempt to effect change by constructive action within the organization.
R1.9 Rehabilitation Counselors will refuse to participate in employment
practices which are inconsistent with the moral or legal standards regarding the
treatment of employees or the public. Rehabilitation Counselors will not
condone practices which result in illegal or otherwise unjustifiable
discrimination on any basis in hiring, promotion, or training.
CANON 2 COUNSELOR-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP
Rehabilitation Counselors shall respect the integrity and protect the welfare of
people and groups with whom they work. The primary obligation of
Rehabilitation Counselors is to their clients, defined as people with disabilities
who are receiving services from rehabilitation counselors. Rehabilitation
counselors shall endeavor at all times to place their clients' interests above their
own.
Rules of Professional Conduct
R2.1 Rehabilitation Counselors will make clear to clients the purposes,
goals, and limitations that may affect the counseling relationship.
R2.2 Rehabilitation Counselors will not misrepresent their role or
competence to clients. Rehabilitation Counselors will provide information
about their credentials, if requested, and will refer clients to other specialists as
the needs of clients dictate.
R2.3 Rehabilitation Counselors will be continually cognizant of their own
needs, values, and of their potentially influential positions, vis-a-vis clients,
students, and subordinates. They avoid exploiting the trust and dependency of






Section B Page 69


such persons. Rehabilitation Counselors make every effort to avoid dual
relationships that could impair their professional judgments or increase the risk
of exploitation. Examples of dual relationships include, but are not limited to,
research with and treatment of employees, students, supervisors, close friends,
or relatives. Sexual intimacies with clients are unethical.
R2.4 Rehabilitation Counselors who provide services at the request of a third
party will clarify the nature of their relationships to all involved parties. They
will inform all parties of their ethical responsibilities and take appropriate
action. Rehabilitation Counselors employed by third parties as case consultants
or expert witnesses, where there is no pretense or intent to provide rehabilitation
counseling services directly to clients beyond file review, initial interview
and/or assessment, will clearly define, through written or oral means, the limits
of their relationship, particularly in the area of informed consent and legally
privileged communications, to involved individuals. As case consultants or
expert witnesses, Rehabilitation Counselors have an obligation to provide
unbiased, objective opinions.
R2.5 Rehabilitation Counselors will honor the right of clients to consent to
participate in rehabilitation counseling services. Rehabilitation Counselors will
inform clients or the clients' legal guardians of factors that may affect clients'
decisions to participate in rehabilitation counseling services, and they will
obtain written consent after clients or their legal guardians are fully informed of
such factors. Rehabilitation Counselors who work with minors or other persons
who are unable to give voluntary, informed consent will take special care to
protect the best interests of clients.
R2.6 Rehabilitation Counselors will avoid initiating or continuing consulting
or counseling relationships if it is expected that the relationship can be of no
benefit to clients, in which case Rehabilitation Counselors will suggest to
clients appropriate alternatives.
R2.7 Rehabilitation Counselors will recognize that families are usually an
important factor in clients' rehabilitation and will strive to enlist family
understanding and involvement as a positive resource in promoting
rehabilitation. The permission of clients will be secured prior to family
involvement.
R2.8 Rehabilitation Counselors and their clients will work jointly in
devising an integrated, individualized rehabilitation plan which offers
reasonable promise of success and is consistent with the abilities and
circumstances of clients. Rehabilitation Counselors will persistently monitor






Section B Page 70


rehabilitation plans to ensure their continued viability and effectiveness,
remembering that clients have the right to make choices.
R2.9 Rehabilitation Counselors will work with their clients in considering
employment for clients in only jobs and circumstances that are consistent with
the clients' overall abilities, vocational limitations, physical restrictions, general
temperament, interest and aptitude patterns, social skills, education, general
qualifications, and other relevant characteristics and needs. Rehabilitation
Counselors will neither place nor participate in placing clients in positions that
will result in damaging the interest and welfare of either clients or employers.
CANON 3 CLIENT ADVOCACY
Rehabilitation Counselors shall serve as advocates for persons with
disabilities.
Rules of Professional Conduct
R3.1 Rehabilitation Counselors will be obligated at all times to promote
access for persons with disabilities in programs, facilities, transportation, and
communication so that clients will not be excluded from opportunities to
participate fully in rehabilitation, education, and society.
R3.2 Rehabilitation Counselors will assure, prior to referring clients to
programs, facilities, or employment settings, that they are appropriately
accessible.
R3.3 Rehabilitation Counselors will strive to understand accessibility
problems of persons with cognitive, hearing, mobility, visual and/or other
disabilities and demonstrate such understanding in the practice of their
profession.
R3.4 Rehabilitation Counselors will strive to eliminate attitudinal barriers,
including stereotyping and discrimination, toward persons with disabilities and
will enhance their own sensitivity and awareness toward persons with
disabilities.
R3.5 Rehabilitation Counselors will remain aware of the actions taken by
cooperating agencies on behalf of their clients and will act as advocates of
clients to ensure effective service delivery.
CANON 4 PROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Rehabilitation Counselors shall act with integrity in their relationships with
colleagues, other organizations, agencies, institutions, referral sources, and
other professions so as to facilitate the contribution of all specialists toward
achieving optimum benefit for clients.






Section B Page 71


Rules of Professional Conduct
R4.1 Rehabilitation Counselors will ensure that there is fair mutual
understanding of the rehabilitation plan by all agencies cooperating in the
rehabilitation of clients and that any rehabilitation plan is developed with such
mutual understanding.
R4.2 Rehabilitation Counselors will abide by and help to implement "team"
decisions in formulating rehabilitation plans and procedures, even when not
personally agreeing with such decisions, unless these decisions breach the
ethical Rules.
R4.3 Rehabilitation Counselors will not commit receiving counselors to any
prescribed courses of action in relation to clients when transferring clients to
other colleagues or agencies.
R4.4 Rehabilitation Counselors, as referring counselors, will promptly
supply all information necessary for a cooperating agency or counselor to begin
serving clients.
R4.5 Rehabilitation Counselors will not offer on-going professional
counseling/case management services to clients receiving such services from
other Rehabilitation Counselors without first notifying the other counselor. File
review and second opinion services are not included in the concept of
professional counseling/case management services.
R4.6 Rehabilitation Counselors will secure from other specialists appropriate
reports and evaluations, when such reports are essential for rehabilitation
planning and/or service delivery.
R4.7 Rehabilitation Counselors will not discuss in a disparaging way with
clients the competency of other counselors or agencies, or the judgments made,
the methods used, or the quality of rehabilitation plans.
R4.8 Rehabilitation Counselors will not exploit their professional
relationships with supervisors, colleagues, students, or employees sexually or
otherwise. Rehabilitation Counselors will not condone or engage in sexual
harassment, defined as deliberate or repeated comments, gestures, or physical
contacts of a sexual nature unwanted by recipients.
R4.9 Rehabilitation Counselors who know of an ethical violation by another
Rehabilitation Counselor will informally attempt to resolve the issue with the
counselor, when the misconduct is of a minor nature and/or appears to be due to
lack of sensitivity, knowledge, or experience. If the violation does not seem
amenable to an informal solution, or is of a more serious nature, Rehabilitation






Section B Page 72


Counselors will bring it to the attention of the appropriate committee on
professional ethics.
R4.10 Rehabilitation Counselors possessing information concerning an
alleged violation of this Code, will, upon request, reveal such information to the
Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification or other authority
empowered to investigate or act upon the alleged violation, unless the
information is protected by law.
R4.11 Rehabilitation Counselors who employ or supervise other
professionals or students will facilitate professional development of such
individuals. They provide appropriate working conditions, timely evaluations,
constructive consultation, and experience opportunities.
CANON 5 PUBLIC STATEMENTS/FEES
Rehabilitation Counselors shall adhere to professional standards in establishing
fees and promoting their services.
Rules of Professional Conduct
R5.1 Rehabilitation Counselors will consider carefully the value of their
services and the ability of clients to meet the financial burden in establishing
reasonable fees for professional services.
R5.2 Rehabilitation Counselors will not accept for professional work a fee or
any other form of remuneration from clients who are entitled to their services
through an institution or agency or other benefits structure, unless clients have
been fully informed of the availability of services from other sources.
R5.3 Rehabilitation Counselors will neither give nor receive a commission
or rebate or any other form of remuneration for referral of clients for
professional services.
R5.4 Rehabilitation Counselors who describe rehabilitation counseling or the
services of Rehabilitation Counselors to the general public will fairly and
accurately present the material, avoiding misrepresentation through
sensationalism, exaggeration, or superficiality. Rehabilitation Counselors are
guided by the primary obligation to aid the public in developing informed
judgments, opinions, and choices.
CANON 6 CONFIDENTIALITY
Rehabilitation Counselors shall respect the confidentiality of information
obtained from clients in the course of their work.






Section B Page 73


Rules of Professional Conduct
R6.1 Rehabilitation Counselors will inform clients at the onset of the
counseling relationship of the limits of confidentiality.
R6.2 Rehabilitation Counselors will take reasonable personal action, or
inform responsible authorities, or inform those persons at risk, when the
conditions or actions of clients indicate that there is clear and imminent danger
to clients or others after advising clients that this must be done. Consultation
with other professionals mat be used where appropriate. The assumption of
responsibility for clients must be taken only after careful deliberation and
clients must be involved in the resumption of responsibility as quickly as
possible.
R6.3 Rehabilitation Counselors will not forward to another person, agency,
or potential employer any confidential information without the written
permission of clients or their legal guardians.
R6.4 Rehabilitation Counselors will ensure that there are defined policies
and practices in other agencies cooperatively serving rehabilitation clients,
which effectively protect information confidentiality.
R6.5 Rehabilitation Counselors will safeguard the maintenance, storage, and
disposal of the records of clients so that unauthorized persons shall not have
access to these records. All nonprofessional persons who must have access to
these records will be thoroughly briefed concerning the confidential standards
to be observed.
R6.6 Rehabilitation Counselors, in the preparation of written and oral
reports, will present only germane data and will make every effort to avoid
undue invasion of privacy.
R6.7 Rehabilitation Counselors will obtain written permission from clients
or their legal guardians prior to taping or otherwise recording counseling
sessions. Even with guardians' written consent, Rehabilitation Counselors will
not record sessions against expressed wishes of clients.
R6.8 Rehabilitation Counselors will persist in claiming the privileged status
of confidential information obtained from clients, where communications are
privileged by statute for Rehabilitation Counselors.
R6.9 Rehabilitation Counselors will provide prospective employers with
only job relevant information about clients and will secure the permission of
clients or their legal guardians for the release of any information which might
be considered confidential.






Section B Page 74


CANON 7 ASSESSMENT
Rehabilitation Counselors shall promote the welfare of clients in the selection,
utilization, and interpretation of assessment measures.
Rules of Professional Conduct
R7.1 Rehabilitation Counselors will recognize that different tests demand
different levels of competence for administration, scoring, and interpretation,
and will recognize the limits of their competence and perform only those
functions for which they are trained.
R7.2 Rehabilitation Counselors will consider carefully the specific validity,
reliability, and appropriateness of tests when selecting them for use in a given
situation or with particular clients. Rehabilitation Counselors will proceed with
caution when attempting to evaluate and interpret the performance of peoples
with disabilities, minority group members, or other persons who are not
represented in the standardized norm groups. Rehabilitation Counselors will
recognize the effects of socioeconomic, ethnic, disability, and cultural factors
on test scores.
R7.3 Rehabilitation Counselors will administer tests under the same
conditions that were established in their standardization. When tests are not
administered under standard conditions, as may be necessary to accommodate
modifications for clients with disabilities or when unusual behavior or
irregularities occur during the testing session, those conditions will be noted
and taken into account at the time of interpretation.
R7.4 Rehabilitation Counselors will ensure that instrument limitations are
not exceeded and that periodic reassessments are made to prevent stereotyping
of clients.
R7.5 Rehabilitation Counselors will make known the purpose of testing and
the explicit use of the results to clients prior to administration. Recognizing the
right of clients to have test results, Rehabilitation Counselors will give
explanations of test results in language clients can understand.
R7.6 Rehabilitation Counselors will ensure that specific interpretation
accompanies any release of individual data. The welfare and explicit prior
permission of clients will be the criteria for determining the recipients of the
test results. The interpretation of assessment data will be related to the
particular goals of evaluation.
R7.7 Rehabilitation Counselors will attempt to ensure when utilizing
computerized assessment services that such services are based on appropriate






Section B Page 75


research to establish the validity of the computer programs and procedures used
in arriving at interpretations. Public offering of an automated test interpretation
service will be considered as a professional-to-professional consultation. In this
instance, the formal responsibility of the consultant is to the consultee, but the
ultimate and overriding responsibility is to clients.
R7.8 Rehabilitation Counselors will recognize that assessment results may
become obsolete. They make every effort to avoid and prevent the misuse of
obsolete measures.
CANON 8 RESEARCH ACTIVITIES
Rehabilitation Counselors shall assist in efforts to expand the knowledge
needed to more effectively serve persons with disabilities.
Rules of Professional Conduct
R8.1 Rehabilitation Counselors will ensure that data for research meets rigid
standards of validity, honesty, and protection of confidentiality.
R8.2 Rehabilitation Counselors will be aware of and responsive to all
pertinent guidelines on research with human subjects. When planning any
research activity dealing with human subjects, Rehabilitation Counselors will
ensure that research problems, design, and execution are in full compliance with
such guidelines.
R8.3 Rehabilitation Counselors presenting case studies in classes,
professional meetings, or publications will confine the content to that which can
be disguised to ensure full protection of the identity of clients.
R8.4 Rehabilitation Counselors will assign credit to those who have
contributed to publications in proportion to their contribution.
R8.5 Rehabilitation Counselors recognize that honesty and openness are
essential characteristics of the relationship between Rehabilitation Counselors
and research participants. When methodological requirements of a study
necessitate concealment or deception, Rehabilitation Counselors will ensure
that participants understand the reasons for this action.
CANON 9 COMPETENCE
Rehabilitation Counselors shall establish and maintain their professional
competencies at such a level that their clients receive the benefit of the highest
quality of services the profession is capable of offering.






Section B Page 76


Rules of Professional Conduct
R9.1 Rehabilitation Counselors will function within the limits of their
defined role, training, and technical competency and will accept only those
positions for which they are professionally qualified.
R9.2 Rehabilitation Counselors will continuously strive through reading,
attending professional meetings, and taking courses of instruction to keep
abreast of new developments, concepts, and practices that are essential to
providing the highest quality of services to their clients.
R9.3 Rehabilitation Counselors, recognizing that personal problems and
conflicts may interfere with their professional effectiveness, will refrain from
undertaking any activity in which their personal problems are likely to lead to
inadequate performance. If they are already engaged in such activity when they
become aware of their personal problems, they will seek competent professional
assistance to determine whether they should suspend, terminate, or limit the
scope of their professional activities.
R9.4 Rehabilitation Counselors who are educators will perform their duties
based on careful preparation so that their instruction is accurate, up-to-date, and
scholarly.
R9.5 Rehabilitation Counselors who are educators will ensure that
statements in catalogs and course outlines are accurate, particularly in terms of
subject matter covered, bases for grading, and nature of classroom experiences.
R9.6 Rehabilitation Counselors who are educators will maintain high
standards of knowledge and skill by presenting rehabilitation counseling
information fully and accurately, and by giving appropriate recognition to
alternative viewpoints.
CANON 10 CRC CREDENTIAL
Rehabilitation Counselors holding the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor
(CRC) designation shall honor the integrity and respect the limitations placed
upon its use.
Rules of Professional Conduct
R10.1 Certified Rehabilitation Counselors will use the Certified
Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) designation only in accordance with the
relevant Guidelines promulgated by the Commission on Rehabilitation
Counselor Certification.






Section B Page 77


R10.2 Certified Rehabilitation Counselors will not attribute to the mere
possession of the designation depth or scope of knowledge, skill, and
professional capabilities greater than those demonstrated by achievement of the
CRC designation.
R10.3 Certified Rehabilitation Counselors will not make unfair comparisons
between a person who holds the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC)
designation and one who does not.
R10.4 Certified Rehabilitation Counselors will not write, speak, nor act in
ways that lead others to believe Certified Rehabilitation Counselors are
officially representing the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor
Certification, unless such written permission has been granted by the said
Commission.
R10.5 Certified Rehabilitation Counselors will make no claim to unique
skills or devices not available to others in the profession unless the special
efficacy of such unique skills or devices has been demonstrated by scientifically
accepted evidence.
R10.6 Certified Rehabilitation Counselors will not initiate or support
candidacy of an individual for certification by the Commission on
Rehabilitation Counselor Certification if the individual is known to engage in
professional practices which violate this Code.

B10. American School Counselors Association

ETHICAL STANDARDS for SCHOOL COUNSELORS

PREAMBLE
The American School Counselor Association is a professional organization
whose members have a unique and distinctive preparation, grounded in the
behavioral sciences, with training in clinical skills adapted to the school setting.
School counselors subscribe to the following basic tenets of the counseling
process from which professional responsibilities are derived:
1. Each person has the right to respect and dignity as a human being and to
counseling services without prejudice as to person, character, belief or practice.
2. Each person has the right to self-direction and self-development.
3. Each person has the right of choice and the responsibility for decisions
reached.






Section B Page 78


4. The counselor assists in the growth and development of each individual and
uses his/her highly specialized skills to insure that the rights of the counselee
are properly protected within the structure of the school program.
5. The counselor-client relationship is private and thereby requires compliance
with all laws, policies and ethical standards pertaining to confidentiality.
In this document, the American School Counselor Association has identified the
standards of conduct necessary to maintain and regulate the high standards of
integrity and leadership among its members. The Association recognizes the
basic commitment of its members to the Ethical Standards of its parent
organization, the American Association for Counseling and Development, and
nothing in this document shall be construed to supplant that code. The Ethical
Standards for School Counselors was developed to complement the AACD
standards by clarifying the nature of ethical responsibilities of counselors in the
school setting. The purposes of this document are to:
1. Serve as a guide for the ethical practices of all school counselors regardless
of level, area, or population served.
2. Provide benchmarks for both self-appraisal and peer evaluation regarding
counselor responsibilities to pupils, parents, professional colleagues, school and
community, self, and the counselor profession.
3. Inform those served by the school counselor of acceptable counselor
practices and expected professional department.
A. RESPONSIBILITIES TO PUPILS
The school counselor:
1. Has a primary obligation and loyalty to the pupil, who is to be treated with
respect as a unique individual.
2. Is concerned with the total needs of the pupil (educational, vocational,
personal and social) and encourages the maximum growth and development of
each counselee.
3. Informs the counselee of the purposes, goals, techniques, and rules of
procedure under which she/he may receive counseling assistance at or before
the time when the counseling relationship is entered. Prior notice includes the
possible necessity for consulting with other professionals, privileged
communication, and legal or authoritative restraints.




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