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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Introduction to the Counselor Education...
 General department information
 Policies, procedures, and...
 General degree information
 Program-specific information
 Practicum and internship
 Professional resources






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Title: Student handbook
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Department of Counselor Education, College of Education, University of Florida
Publisher: Department of Counselor Education, College of Education, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Introduction
        Page 6
    Introduction to the Counselor Education Department
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    General department information
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Policies, procedures, and guidelines
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
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        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    General degree information
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
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        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Program-specific information
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Practicum and internship
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Professional resources
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
Full Text




















Student Handbook
Department of Counselor Education
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


Revised August 2007


~L~ L~ i :
~*~~











IN TR O D U C TIO N ............................................................................................................................................ 6
SECTION ONE INTRODUCTION TO THE COUNSELOR EDUCATION DEPARTMENT ................... 7
M ISSIO N, G OA LS, AND O BJECTIVES ............................................................................................................. 7
An ethically informed professional identity.................................................................. ................... 7
A disciplined professional curiosity.............................................................................. ................... 8
An efficacious commitment to professional service.................................................... ................... 8
ACCREDITATION ........................................ .......... .................... 8
D EGREES A W ARDED ....................................................................... .............................. 9
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS OF CONCENTRATIONS AND PROGRAM IDENTIFIER CODES......................... .......... 9
COUNSELOR EDUCATION GRADUATE COURSE LIST .......................................................... 9
GENERAL AND PROGRAM-SPECIFIC CORE CURRICULA........................................................... 11
C A C R E P C ore C curriculum .................................................................................... ............................. 11
Counselor Education Core Curriculum ............................................... .......................................... 12
Program -specific Core Curricula................................................................................ ........................ 12
Mental Health Counseling (ACD) ............................................................................................................................... 12
M marriage and Fam ily C counseling (E D C ) ............... ................................................................. ..................... 13
S school C counseling and G guidance (S C G ) ..................................................................... ................................ 13
SECTION TWO GENERAL DEPARTMENT INFORMATION .............................................. .............. 13
DEPARTMENT OFFICES, FACILITIES, AND GUIDELINES ................................................................... ....... 13
Physical Location, Phone Numbers, Hours of Operation, and Home Page ..................................... 13
M ailing A address .................................................................................................. ....................... ......... 13
Facilities G guidelines ..................................................................................... .............................. ......... 14
D EPARTM ENT FACULTY AND STAFF........................................................................................ .................... 14
F ull-tim e F faculty ................................................................................................ ......................... ........ 16
P art-tim e F faculty ............................................................................................................... ......... ......... 17
A affiliate F a culty .................................................................................................. ......................... ........ 18
A djunct F faculty .................................................................................................................... .................. 18
Emeritus Faculty........................................................ 19
A dm inistrative S taff..................................................................................................... ............... ......... 19
S T U D E N T O R G A N IZA T IO N S .................................................................................... .......... .................. ...... 19
Beta C chapter, Chi Sigm a ota .................................................................................... ........................ 19
Counselors for Social Justice.................................................................. ................. 20
Counselor Education Student Association (CESA) .................................................. ................... 21
SECTION THREE POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND GUIDELINES..................................... ............ 22
ADMISSION, NEW STUDENT ENROLLMENT, AND GENERAL ORIENTATION.................... ...................... 22
Admission Requirements for Graduate Students ..................................................... ...................... 22
Categories of Graduate Student Classifications....................................................... ...................... 22
Program Pre-Professional Requirement ............................................ .......................................... 23
Essential Functions Required of Matriculated Students....................................... 23
Statem ent on Professionalism .................................................................................... ....................... 24
Matters of Protocol and Communication ............................................. ......................................... 25
Counselor Education Department Home Page......................... ..... .......................................... 26
G atorLink A ccounts............................................................................................................ ........ ......... 2 7
U F E m ail P policy ................................................................................................................ ......... ......... 2 7
UFID ........... ......................................... ........ 27
U F G atorl C ard .............................................................................................................. ........... ......... 2 7
N ew Student O orientation ......................................................................................................................... 27
Student Data Files, GIMS, and Change of Name or Contact Information ........................................ 28
Student Liability Insurance ..................................................................... ............................................ 29
ACADEMIC ADVISING, PROGRAM PLANNING, REGISTRATION ................................................... 30
Advisement, Career Guidance, and Counseling............................................................................... 30
Faculty Advisor and Change of Advisor ............................................ ........................................... 31
Supervisory C om m ittee ................................................................................................ ........................ 31


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Significance of C ourse N um bers ............................................................................................................ 32
C o urse R eg istration .................................................................................................... ........................ 33
Minimum Full-time Registration Requirements for Graduate Students ...................... ........... ..... 34
Academic Program Planning, Timeline, and Planned Programs ............................ ........................ 35
M.Ed./Ed.S., M.A.Ed./Ed.S., Ed.S. Only, or Direct Entry Form I .................................................. ............... 36
D direct E ntry Form II ............... ..................................... 36
P h .D o r E d .D .... . .............. ....... .. ....... ............. ............. ........ ..................... ............ ....... . ...... 3 6
Completing Core Clinical Courses and Clinical Experiences Outside Program Area......................... 36
Undergraduate Credit Hours Towards Graduate Programs .................................... ........................ 37
Tran sfer o f C re d it ..................................................................................................................................... 3 7
Change of A cadem ic Program ................................................................................................................ 38
D epartm ent C ore C urricula ..................................................................................................................... 39
Student-Initiated Research Opportunities ................................................................. ........................ 39
S D S 6 9 0 5 In d iv id u a l W o rk ........................................................................................................... ................ ..... 3 9
MHS 6910 and MHS 6940 ...................... ................ .............................................. 42
ENROLLMENT, ACADEMIC STANDING AND RETENTION .................................... .............................43
Continuous Enrollment, Time Limitations, and Leave of Absence.......................... ......... .. 43
R evidence R equirem ents ........................................................................................... ........................ 44
A cadem ic S standing ................................................................................................................ .... ........ 44
Grades, Grade Points, and Graduation.............................................. .......................................... 45
Student R review Policy ................................................................................................ ........................ 45
Student Retention Policy and Procedures ............................. ..... ............................................. 46
FINAL TERM AND GRADUATION INSTRUCTIONS AND GUIDELINES...................... ...... .. .................... 47
Term Prior to Graduation......................................................................... 47
Final Academic Term Registration and Guidelines .................................................. ...................... 47
G radiation C heck .................................................................................. ............................................ 4 7
M.EEd./d.S., M.A.E./Ed.S., and Ed.S. only Final Oral Examination................... ................... 48
Ph.D. and Ed.D. Dissertation Examination ............................................................... ................... 48
Pre-C om m encem ent R itual........................................................................................ ........................ 48
FUNDING O PPO RTUNITIES ................................................................................... ............ .................. ....... 48
F ello w sh ip s ................................................................................................... .......................... ......... 4 9
G graduate A ssistantships................................................ ..................................................................... 49
OTHER DEPARTMENT AND UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES ....................................................... 50
Classroom Instruction Evaluations ............................................................ ................................... 50
Clinical Instruction Evaluations ................................................................. ......................................... 51
Endorsement/Recommendation Policy ............................................. ........................................... 51
Extracurricular Counseling Activities ......................................................... ................................... 52
F faculty M meetings ............................................................................................................ ............ ......... 53
R research with H um an Subjects................................................................................. ........................ 53
SECTION FOUR GENERAL DEGREE INFORMATION............................................................................... 54
MASTER OF EDUCATION AND SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION DEGREE PROGRAMS ......................................... 54
Requirements for the Master's Degree............................................................................................ 54
MED/EDS and EDS-only Programs Overview.................................................................................. 54
Specialist in Education Only (Ed.S.) Program Overview.................................................... 54
M aster's Thesis ................................... ..................................... ............................................... 55
M.EEd./d.S., M.A.E./Ed.S., and Ed.S. only Final Oral Examination................... ................... 55
S C G F ina l O ra l E x a m inatio n ............... ................................................................................................................5 5
A C D a nd E D C F final O ra l E xa m inatio n ....................................................................... .................................. 56
Final Exam nation Form .................................................................................... ........................ 59
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY/DOCTOR OF EDUCATION DEGREE PROGRAMS ................... ... ..............60
R equirem ents for the Ph.D ................................................... ............................................................ 60
D doctoral Program O overview ....................................................................................... ........................ 60
D doctoral C ore C urricula .............................................................................................. ........................ 62
Professional Practice Em phasis ....................................... ..................... 62
Counselor Education Emphasis ........................... ..... ...............62
R ese a rch D esig n a nd M etho d o lo gy . ....................... ............................................................. ......... ..................... 6 2


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Field Experiences.............................. 62
Practice and Internship Electives .................................. .... ...............63
C counselor Education E m phasis .............................................................................................................. 63
Ph.D. and Ed.D. Dissertation Differentiating Guidelines ........................................ ........................ 64
Doctoral Supervisory Committee and Meetings ....................................................... ........................ 64
A acting D doctoral C om m ittee C hairperson ..................................................... ....................................... .... 64
Responsibilities of a Doctoral Committee Chairperson....................... ...... ................................. 64
Responsibilities of Doctoral Supervisory Committee Members............................ ....... ................. 66
C choosing your Doctoral Supervisory Com m ittee ...................................... ................... ................. ............... 66
Suggestions for Inviting Faculty Members to Serve on Doctoral Supervisory Committees........................... 67
Changing a Doctoral Supervisory Committee Chair or Member........................................ .................... 67
F o rm a l D o cto ra l C o m m itte e M e etings ................................................................................. ......................... 6 8
Annual Evaluation of Doctoral Student Progress...................................................... ................... 68
Doctoral Research Requirem ents.............................................................................. .... ............... 69
Completing the Ed. S. During Doctoral Studies......................................................... ....................... 69
Milestone Requirements .......................................... ........ 70
D doctoral P planned P program D evelopm ent ............... ....................................................... ........................... ... 70
Doctoral Q qualifying Exam nations ............................................................... 71
Oral Qualifying Examination and Admission to Candidacy.......................... ................................ 82
D issertation P proposal and P proposal S em inar................................................................ ..................... .... 84
D issue rtatio n a nd F final O ral E xa m inatio n ............................................................... ....................................... 88
SECTION FIVE PROGRAM-SPECIFIC INFORMATION ..................................... .................................... 92

M ENTAL H EALTH C OUNSELING (A C D) ............................................... ................................................... 92
Entry-level Masters and Specialist Program Description.................................................................... 92
D doctoral Program D description .................................................................................... ........................ 93
MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COUNSELING (EDC) .................................... ........................................... 94
Entry-level Masters and Specialist Program Description.................................................................... 94
D doctoral Program D description .................................................................................... ........................ 96
SCHOOL COUNSELING AND G UIDANCE (SC G) ................................................................... ................... 96
Entry-level Masters and Specialist Program Description.................................................................... 97
M is s io n S ta te m e n t.......................... .............................................................................................. ........... .... 9 7
N national M odel Statem ent................................................................... ..................................... ..... 98
School C counseling C certification ................................................................................. .......... ......... 98
Florida School Counselor Certification Test Requirem ents............................. ... ................................ 98
A cadem ic R equirem ents fo r C certification .............................................................. ....................................... 98
D doctoral Program D description .................................................................................... ........................ 99
M mission Statem ent .............................................. 100
SECTION SIX PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP ......................................................................................102
PREFACE ............................................. ............. ... ......... ................... .. .............. 102
GENERAL PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS ........................... ................... 102
Purposes and Expectations of Clinical Experiences ...................................... 102
Selecting a Clinical Site and the Practicum and Internship Fair......................... ................... 102
Clinical Documentation and Deadline Dates...................................................... 104
Professional Liability Insurance................................................................................ ........................ 104
Personal H health Insurance ....................................................................................... ....... ............ 105
Fingerprint Requirements for School Counseling Students............................................................ 105
Grading ......................................................................................................................................... 105
Student Feedback and Concerns ........................................................................ 105
PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP INFORMATION FOR ENTRY-LEVEL STUDENTS ........................... ................... 106
Course Pre- and Corequisite Requirements........................................................ 106
Course Sequence and Registration Requirements....................................... 106
Supervision and Taping Requirements .......................................................................... 108
School Counseling and Guidance Accomplished Practice Requirements....................................... 108
Site and Direct Service Hour Requirements .................................... .............. ................... 108
Elective Track Clinical Experience Requirements ............................... .................. 109
PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP INFORMATION FOR DOCTORAL STUDENTS................................ ................... 110


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MHS 7810 Practicum in Counseling Supervision (4 credits/maximum 8 credits) ........................... 110
MHS 7840 Internship in Counselor Education (6 credits/maximum 12 credits)............................. 110
MHS/SDS 7830 Internship in Counseling and Development (5 credits) ......................................... 111
MHS 7804/MHS 7807/SDS 7820 Group Supervision forAgency/Marriage & Family/School
Counseling and G uidance (1 credit) ..................................................................................................... 111
SECTION SEVEN PROFESSIONAL RESOURCES .......................................................................... 113
PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING ASSOCIATIONS .................................................. 114
American Counselinq Association (ACA) .................................. ............... ...................... 114
American Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHCA) ..................................................... 114
American Association of Marriace and Family Therapy (AAMFT) ........................................ 114
American School Counselor Association (ASCA) ..................................................... 114
Florida Counselinq Association (FCA)................................................................ 114
Florida Association for Marriace and Family Therapists (FAMFT).......................... .......... 114
Florida Mental Health Counselors Association (FMHCA)..................... ............................ 114
Florida School Counselor Association (FSCA) ................................. ...... ................... 114
National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC)............................................................. 114
UNIVERSITY AND COUNSELING PROFESSIONAL LEGAL AND ETHICAL INFORMATION .................................... 14
University of Florida Students' Riqhts and Responsibilities............................... ................. 115
University of Florida Student Guide to Academic Honesty.............................. .............. 115
University of Florida Student Conduct Code........................................................ 115
Integrity in Graduate Study: A Graduate School Guide .............................................................. 115
American Counselinc Association 2005 Code of Ethics................................... ................... 118
National Board for Certified Counselors Ethics Information ................................ ................... 118
AAMFT Lec al and Ethics Information ......................................................................... 118
American School Counselor Association Lecal and Ethical Information ......................................... 118
LIC ENSU R E A N D C ERTIFICA TIO NS ...................................................................... .......... .................. ....... 118
Licensure ................................................................ ... ............................... 118
Florida Licensure in Mental Health and Marriage and Family Therapy ............... ................ ............... 119
C certification s ..................................................................................................................... ..... .......... 12 0









INTRODUCTION
Welcome to the University of Florida and to the Department of Counselor Education.
The purpose of this student handbook is to provide a central point of reference
containing information enabling students to proceed successfully through their
academic programs and faculty to most effectively advise students. This handbook
contains both information and hyperlinks to the Counselor Education Department,
College of Education, University of Florida, and counseling professional resources. It
serves as a mentoring tool for students' professional development. Students and faculty
will be notified throughout the year of policy and procedure updates, which will be
integrated into future editions of this Handbook. In general, students are required to
follow the Department Student Handbook version current at the time of first term of
enrollment. Faculty reserve the right to require students to follow a newer version if
doing so will benefit the student's professional preparation.
The department will house the handbook online at Department, College, and University
Policy and Procedure Resources. Refer to the Counselor Education department web
page for other resource pages and links.
Students and faculty are responsible for knowing and following policies, procedures,
and guidelines at the department, college, and university levels found in the following
key resources:
* Counselor Education Student Handbook
* University of Florida Graduate Catalog
* Graduate Student Handbook (available as a link from the menu on the Graduate
School's web page for Graduate Students)
* College of Education graduate student guidelines
Each student is strongly encouraged to maintain hard copies of this student handbook,
the edition of the graduate catalog current at the time of admissions, and all course
syllabi for the duration of the student's professional career. The department and the
university do not maintain copies of these materials.
The handbook is organized into seven major sections. Section One serves as a broad
introduction to the Department of Counselor Education. Section Two provides general
department information. Section Three identifies and describes relevant guidelines,
policies, and procedures for successful movement from admissions through enrollment
to graduation. Section Four provides general degree information. Section Five outlines
program specific information, including planned programs. Section Six details the
guidelines, policies and procedures relevant to the clinical practicum and internship
requirements. Section Seven provides links to resources relevant to entry into the
counseling profession, including ethical and professional standards and licensure and
certification resources. Department related forms are located on the Department Policy
and Procedures web page. All clinical forms are on the Practicum and Internship web
page.
Questions and feedback about this handbook should be directed to the Counselor
Education Graduate Coordinator.









SECTION ONE INTRODUCTION TO THE COUNSELOR EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

Mission, Goals, and Objectives
The mission of the Department of Counselor Education is to prepare exemplary
counselor educators, marriage and family therapists, mental health counselors, school
counselors, and program administrators who generate, use, and disseminate
knowledge about human development and human relating to enrich the quality of life for
all people, and who collaborate with others to solve critical personal, family, educational,
social, and vocational problems in a diverse global community. Students and faculty of
the Department are expected to behave in accord with the highest ethical and
professional standards while engaged in accomplishing this mission.

Counselor Education faculty challenge and support students enrolled in departmental
programs to develop the following as personal and professional goals: an ethically
informed professional identity; a disciplined professional curiosity about human
performance, human possibility, and human relating; and an efficacious commitment to
professional service. The following objectives serve to challenge faculty and students
towards achieving these goals.

An ethically informed professional identity
Students and faculty are encouraged to embrace their chosen professional identity and
to prepare themselves to competently perform the scope of practice promoted by their
program specialization: Marriage and Family Therapy, Mental Health Counseling,
and/or School Counseling. Although students and faculty may qualify for more than one
professional credential, usually there is a professional identity that is considered
primary.

Students and faculty are encouraged to participate in local, state, regional, national, and
international activities relevant to their professional practice.

Students and faculty are expected to recognize and respect the possibilities and limits
of their own abilities, knowledge, frames of reference, skill, and authority, and to behave
in accord with the highest ethical and professional standards such as those advanced
by the American Counseling Association, the American Association for Marriage and
Family Therapy, the American Mental Health Counselors Association, the National
Board for Certified Counselors, Florida Statutes 455 and 491, and Florida Rule Chapter
64B4.

Students and faculty are expected to regard themselves as professionals and to work
closely and cooperatively with other professionals, including those in: public and private
schools, colleges and universities; community and private agencies, institutions, and
programs; businesses, industries, and philanthropic organizations; and government
agencies.

Students and faculty are encouraged to consult frequently with their advisor(s), clinical
supervisorss, and/or professional colleagues regarding the choices confronting them in
their various professional activities.









A disciplined professional curiosity
Students and faculty are challenged to ask far-reaching questions.

Students and faculty are expected to master the tools of professional research to aid
them in their search for trustworthy answers to their questions.

Students and faculty are expected to construct their own ethically informed
philosophical orientation to the helping process by utilizing the various theoretical,
research, and practice resources available and articulating an ethical justification for the
choices made.

Students and faculty are encouraged to take calculated risks in their search for creative
and innovative solutions to human problems.

Students and faculty are expected to create new knowledge and model efficacious
practices.

Students and faculty are expected to disseminate their knowledge to all interested
parties so as to enhance efficacious practices that enrich the quality of life for all.

Students and faculty are expected to dedicate themselves to continuous personal and
professional development through life-long learning.

An efficacious commitment to professional service
Students and faculty are expected to respect and enhance the worth, dignity, equality
and positive development of all people within their communities of engagement.

Students and faculty are expected to give compassionate and competent ethically-and-
culturally sensitive professional service that promotes mental health and human
potential and ameliorates mental illness and human misery.

Students and faculty are expected to promote equal educational, employment, and self-
development opportunities for all people, including ethnic minorities, women, older
persons, and persons with disabilities.

Students and faculty are expected to commit themselves to improve the quality of life in
the world community as well as in the immediate communities in which we live.

Students and faculty are expected to provide leadership that enhances professional
efficacy and inspires public trust.

Students and faculty are expected to be accountable to the profession, to the public,
and to each other.

Accreditation
All entry-level and doctoral programs in Mental Health Counseling, Marriage and Family
Counseling, and School Counseling and Guidance are fully accredited by the Council









for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)
through 2011.

The school counseling and guidance program is accredited by the National Council for
the Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Degrees Awarded
The graduate programs lead towards entry-level and doctoral degrees. Entry-level
degrees are earned concurrently and are awarded simultaneously. These include the
Master of Education (M.Ed.) and Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) degrees. Students
completing an optional masters thesis earn the Master of Arts in Education (MAEd)
rather than the M.Ed. Students with a previously earned masters degree in counseling
may elect to pursue a Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) degree. Doctoral students may
earn either a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) or a Doctor of Education (Ed.D.). See the
Graduate Catalog for a thorough description of the degrees awarded. See Section Four
for more information describing the entry-level and doctoral degrees.

Academic Programs of Concentrations and Program Identifier Codes
The Department of Counselor Education is comprised of three academic programs of
concentration, commonly referred to as tracks. Each program has a three-letter
"program identifier code" designated by the State University System. Programs and
their identifier codes are Mental Health Counseling (ACD), Marriage and Family
Counseling (EDC), and School Counseling and Guidance (SCG). Students should be
familiar with the program names and identifier codes. See Section Five for specific
descriptions of each program area, including planned programs.

Counselor Education Graduate Course List
The following is a historical list of graduate courses within the Counselor Education
department. Not all courses may be active, currently offered, or listed in the current
graduate catalog. Note when courses have minimum and maximum credit limits.
Course Course Name Credits S/U Grade
Number Applies
MHS 5005 Introduction to Counseling 3
MHS 6000 Assessment and Treatment of Family Violence 3
MHS 6020 Counseling in Community Settings 3
MHS 6061 Spiritual Issues in Multicultural Counseling 3
MHS 6068 Counseling in A Global Community 3
MHS 6071 Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental Disorders 3
MHS 6080 Counseling Needs of Older Persons 3
MHS 6200 Assessment in Counseling 3
MHS 6340 Career Development 3
MHS 6400 Personality and Mental Health Counseling 3
MHS 6401 Counseling Theories and Applications 4
MHS 6409 Counseling Older Persons: Theories and 3
Techniques









Course Course Name Credits S/U Grade
Number Applies
MHS 6421 Play Counseling and Play Process with 3
Children
MHS 6428 Multicultural Counseling 3
MHS 6429 Counseling for Mid-Life and Pre-Retirement 3
MHS 6430 Introduction to Family Counseling 3
MHS 6440 Marriage Counseling 3
MHS 6450 Substance Abuse Counseling 3
MHS 6471 Sexuality and Mental Health 3
MHS 6480 Developmental Counseling over the Life Span 3
MHS 6500 Group Counseling: Theories and Procedures 3
MHS 6602 Educational Mediation 3
MHS 6705 Professional, Ethical, and Legal Issues in 3
Marriage and Family Counseling
MHS 6720 Professional Identity and Ethics in Counseling 3
MHS 6831 Supervision for a Split Internship 3; max 6 S/U
MHS 6905 Individual Work 1-4; max
12
MHS 6910 Supervised Research 1-5; max S/U
5
MHS 6940 Supervised Teaching 1-5; max S/U
5
MHS 6971 Research for Master's Thesis 1-15 S/U
MHS 6973 Project in Lieu of Thesis 1-9 S/U
MHS 7402 Brief Therapy 3
MHS 7431 Advanced Family Counseling 4
MHS 7600 Consultation Procedures 3
MHS 7610 Practicum in Counseling Supervision 4; max 8 S/U
MHS 7730 Seminar in Counseling Research 3
MHS 7740 Research in Counseling 3
MHS 7800 Practicum I in Counseling (no longer offered) 3 S/U
MHS 7804 Group Supervision in Agency Counseling 1; max 5 S/U
MHS 7805 Practicum in Agency Counseling 3 (await S/U
confirmation
to increase
to 4)
MHS 7806 Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 3 (await S/U
confirmation
to increase
to 4)
MHS 7807 Group Supervision in Marriage and Family 1; max 5 S/U
Counseling
MHS 7830 Internship in Counseling and Development 5; max 15 S/U
MHS 7840 Internship in Counselor Education 6; max 12 S/U
MHS 7946 Internship in Agency Program Management 6; max 12 S/U


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Course Course Name Credits S/U Grade
Number Applies
MHS 7979 Advanced Research 1-12 S/U
MHS 7980 Research for Doctoral Dissertation 1-15 SU
SDS 6401 Counseling Skills for Non-Counselors 3
SDS 6411 Counseling with Children 3
SDS 6413 Counseling Adolescents 3
SDS 6520 Family, Student Development and Role of 3
Teacher as Advisor
SDS 6620 Organization and Administration of Guidance 3
and Personnel Programs
SDS 6804 Practicum I in Student Development 3 S/U
SDS 6831 Supervision for a Split Internship 3; max 6 S/U
SDS 6905 Individual Work 1-4; max
12
SDS 6936 Seminar in Counselor Education 3
SDS 6938 Special Topics 1-4; max
12
Death and Dying 3
Family-School Collaboration 3
Feminist Therapy 3
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, & Transsexual Issues 3
in Counseling
Interpersonal Communication 3
Introductory Doctoral Seminar 3
Spirituality in Clinical Practice 3
Trauma/Crisis Counseling 3
Women's Issues in Counseling 3
SDS 7800 Practicum in School Counseling 3 (await S/U
confirmation
to increase
to 4)
SDS 7820 Group Supervision in School Counseling 1; max 5 S/U
SDS 7830 Internship in Counseling and Development 5; max 15 S/U

General and Program-specific Core Curricula

CACREP Core Curriculum
The following list identifies the eight entry-level CACREP core curricula areas and, in
parentheses, the corresponding courses in the department, which serve to fulfill those
respective standards.
* Human Growth and Development (MHS 6480)
* Social and Cultural Foundations (MHS 6428)
* Helping Relationships (MHS 5005 & MHS 6401)


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* Group Work (MHS 6500)
* Career and Lifestyle Development (MHS 6340)
* Appraisal (MHS 6200)
* Research and Program Evaluation (MHS 7740)
* Professional Orientation (MHS 6720 or MHS 6705)

Counselor Education Core Curriculum
The following courses establish the foundation for study in Counselor Education and is
required of all students in all degree-seeking programs in the department.
* Pre-professional requirement: Basic Statistics
* MHS 5005 Introduction to Counseling
* MHS 6200 Assessment in Counseling and Development
* MHS 6340 Career Development
* MHS 6401 Counseling Theories and Applications
* MHS 6428 Multicultural Counseling
* MHS 6480 Developmental Counseling Over the Life Span
* MHS 6500 Group Counseling: Theory and Process
* MHS 6720 Professional Identity and Ethics in Counseling
* MHS 7740 Research in Counseling and Development
* XXX xxxx Practicum (as appropriate to program)
* XXX xxxx Group Supervision appropriate to Practicum
* XXX xxxx Internship (as appropriate to program)
* XXX xxxx Group Supervision as appropriate to Internship

Program-specific Core Curricula

Mental Health Counseling (ACD)
The ACD core curricula listed below is required of all Mental Health Counseling
students in all degree programs in the department.
* MHS 6020 Counseling in Community Settings
* MHS 6071 Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental Disorders
* MHS 6430 Introduction to Family Counseling
* MHS 6450 Substance Abuse Counseling
* MHS 6481 Sexuality and Mental Health


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Marriage and Family Counselinq (EDC)
The EDC core curricula listed below is required of all Marriage and Family Counseling
students in all degree programs in the department.
* MHS 6020 Counseling in Community Settings
* MHS 6071 Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental Disorders
* MHS 6430 Introduction to Family Counseling
* MHS 6440 Marriage Counseling
* MHS 6450 Substance Abuse Counseling
* MHS 6471 Sexuality and Mental Health
* MHS 6705 Professional, Ethical, and Legal Issues in Marriage and Family
Counseling
* MHS 7431 Advanced Family Counseling

School Counselinq and Guidance (SCG)
The SCG core curricula listed below is required of all School Counseling and Guidance
students in all degree programs in the department.
* SDS 6411 Counseling Children
* SDS 6413 Counseling Adolescents
* MHS 6421 Play Counseling & Play Process with Children
* SDS 6620 Organization & Administration of Guidance & Personnel Programs
* SDS 6938 Family-School Collaboration

SECTION Two GENERAL DEPARTMENT INFORMATION

Department Offices, Facilities, and Guidelines

Physical Location, Phone Numbers, Hours of Operation, and Home Page
Norman Hall Room 1215

352-392-0731 Phone
352-846-2697 Fax

Monday through Friday, 8:00am to 5:00pm

http://education. ufl. edu/counselor
Dr. Kitty Fallon, Webmaster

Mailing Address
Department of Counselor Education
POB 117046
Gainesville, FL 32611-7046


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Facilities Guidelines
The administrative office and the offices of the department's chairperson, graduate
coordinator, and administrative staff are located in Norman Hall Room 1215. The offices
of regular, full-time department faculty members are located in the corridors adjacent to
the administrative office. All faculty members in the department receive mail through the
department administrative office. The faculty copy machine is located in the
administrative office. Leave with the administrative staff any messages for faculty or any
requests for copies. Only faculty and staff are permitted in the mailbox and copy room.

The department has a general mailbox for students, located in Norman Hall 1215. The
primary purpose of this mailbox is to serve as a place for faculty members or fellow
students to leave messages or materials for students. The "student mailbox" is not
intended for receipt of regular postal mail for students, and you are specifically
discouraged from using the department address for personal mailings. The department
assumes no responsibility for mail received for you in care of the department address.
The student mailbox may be cleared out on a regular basis and undated items or items
with delivery dates more than thirty days prior may be discarded.

The department has multiple conference, class and laboratory rooms to be used for
department meetings and other official functions of the department. See administrative
staff to reserve conference and meeting space. See administrative staff for technical
instruction and assistance with all laboratory equipment.

Department Faculty and Staff
There are four possible academic ranks for full-time, tenure-accruing teaching faculty at
the University of Florida. In order of progression, they are: Assistant Professor,
Associate Professor, Professor, and Distinguished Service Professor. Additionally, there
are non-tenure career lines at the University, including but not limited to, in order of
progression: Assistant Scholar, Associate Scholar, and Scholar. Finally, Assistant
Instructor and Instructor ranks may be assigned, usually to teaching faculty not holding
a doctoral degree. All faculty members in Counselor Education hold the academic rank
of assistant professor or assistant scholar or above. Faculty assignments are based on
each faculty member's professional experiences, expertise, interests, and/or academic
preparation, not their academic rank. Emeritus faculty members are retired from the
department.

Promotion within the academic ranks, both tenure- and non-tenure accruing, is based
on peer and administrative evaluations of the faculty member's performance in the
department, college, and university in the areas of teaching, research, and service. The
University of Florida Board of Trustees awards the Distinguished Service Professor rank
in recognition of "an exceptional record of achievement in the areas of teaching,
research & publication, and professional & public service that is recognized both
nationally and internationally."

A faculty member's academic standing refers to the person's eligibility to teach graduate
courses and to serve on graduate student supervisory committees at the University of


-14-









Florida. According to the currently published Graduate Council Policy Manual, "The
privileges regarding the level of involvement of graduate faculty in supervising students
are determined by the dean of the college and/or department chair in consultation with
the faculty members and in accordance with criteria established by that unit. Faculty
who hold appointments at the rank of assistant professor or above, or an equivalent title
as defined by the Florida Administrative Code, are eligible to become members of the
graduate faculty of the University of Florida subject to the following minimum
requirements: (1) the graduate faculty appointment (budgeted, joint, affiliate, courtesy,
or adjunct) must be in a graduate-degree-granting department, college, or center; (2)
graduate faculty appointees must have the terminal degree appropriate to their
academic field or discipline, or must show a comparable level of attainment through
experience; (3) appointment to the graduate faculty must be supported by a vote, with a
two-thirds majority, of all eligible graduate faculty in the appointing department. Eligibility
of the voting members will be determined by each department/program. The
appointment must have the endorsement of the department chair and the dean of the
college; and (4) the faculty member must meet the criteria established by the appointing
college and/or department." Ranks relevant to positions in the Department of Counselor
Education, persons in the following positions are eligible for graduate faculty
appointment without special petitions: Assistant Scholar, Associate Scholar, Scholar,
Eminent Scholar, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Professor, Distinguished
Professor, Distinguished Service Professor, and Graduate Research Professor"

Only those Counselor Education faculty members who hold Graduate Faculty status
may serve as a regular member of doctoral studies supervisory committees and direct
dissertation research as the chair of doctoral studies supervisory committees. Current
information regarding the respective academic ranks and standing, including eligibility to
chair doctoral supervisory committees, of the faculty in Counselor Education is available
from the administrative staff in the department's office.

In addition to full-time teaching faculty, individuals from within the University and
surrounding professional communities serve as Affiliate and Adjunct faculty. Clinical
Affiliate Faculty status is granted to those who provide "a limited direct contribution to
the department (e.g., teaching, clinical supervision, consultation, or serving on graduate
committees)" while holding primary positions elsewhere in the University of Florida
community. Clinical Faculty can hold any of three academic ranks (i.e., Clinical
Assistant, Clinical Associate, and Clinical Professor), based on peer and administrative
evaluations of their performance in their primary department. Adjunct faculty members
provide a limited direct contribution to the department, while their primary position is
outside the University of Florida community.

See the Counselor Education department's Meetinq Us web page for links to personal
web pages and to the College of Education research portfolios. Listed below are
department faculty members and administrative staff, their title, the year they joined the
department, and their contact information.


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Full-time Faculty
Ellen S. Amatea, Professor, 1974
Interim Department Chair
Ph.D., Florida State University, 1972
Norman Hall Room 1215
352-392-0731, Ext. 232
eamatea()coe.ufl.edu

Mary Ann Clark, Associate Professor, 2000
Ph.D., University of Florida, 1998
Norman Hall Room 1214
352-392-0731, Ext. 229
maclark(coe.ufl.edu

M. Harry Daniels, Professor, 1996
Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1978
Norman Hall Room 1201
352-392-0731, Ext. 226
harrvd()coe.ufl.edu

Andrea L. Dixon, Assistant Professor, 2006
School Counseling and Guidance Program Coordinator
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 2002
Norman Hall Room 1207
352-392-0731, Ext. 238
rayle(ufl.edu

Silvia Echevarria-Doan, Associate Professor, 1993
Marriage and Family Counseling Program Coordinator
Ph.D., Purdue University, 1994
Norman Hall Room 1203
352-392-0731, Ext. 237
silvia()coe.ufl.edu

Kathleen "Kitty" Fallon, Assistant Scholar, 2004
Admissions, Clinical, and Graduate Coordinator
Ph.D., University of Florida, 2004
Norman Hall Room 1215-C
352-392-0731, Ext. 228
kfallon()coe.ufl.edu

Michael Garrett, Associate Professor, 2006
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 1996
Norman Hall Room 1202
352-392-0731, Ext. 230
mqarrett(coe.ufl.edu


-16-









Larry Loesch, Professor, 1973
Ph.D., Kent State University, 1973
Norman Hall Room 1212
352-392-0731, Ext. 225
Iloesch()coe.ufl.edu

Peter Sherrard, Associate Professor, 1986
Ed.D., University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 1973
Norman Hall Room 1216
352-392-0731, Ext. 234
psherrard()coe.ufl.edu

Sondra Smith-Adcock, Associate Professor, 1999
Mental Health Counseling Program Coordinator
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 1997
Norman Hall Room 1209
352-392-0731, Ext. 239
ssmith()coe.ufl.edu

Edil Torres Rivera, Professor, 2005
Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1995
Norman Hall Room 1206
352-392-0731, Ext. 233
edil0001@(coe.ufl.edu

Cirecie West-Olatunji, Assistant Professor, 2003
Ph.D., University of New Orleans, 1997
Norman Hall Room 1204
352-392-0731, Ext. 235
cwestolatunii()coe.ufl.edu


Part-time Faculty
James A. Archer, Professor, 1981
Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1971
Norman Hall Room 1210
352-392-0731, Ext. 231
iarcher(coe.ufl.edu

William Conwill, Assistant Professor, 2004
Ph.D., Stanford University, 1980
Norman Hall Room 1208
352-392-0731, Ext. 236
Turlington Hall Room 3334
352-392-5724 or 352-392-0936
wconwill@ufl.edu


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Affiliate Faculty
Mary Fukuyama, Clinical Professor
Counseling Center, 301 Peabody Hall
352-392-1575
fukuvama()counsel.ufl.edu

Wayne Griffin, Clinical Associate Professor
Counseling Center, 301 Peabody Hall
352-392-1575
griffin(S)counsel.ufl.edu

Rafael Harris, Clinical Assistant Professor
Counseling Center, 301 Peabody Hall
352-392-1575
harris()counsel.ufl.edu

Carlos Hernandez, Clinical Assistant Professor
Counseling Center, 301 Peabody Hall
352-392-1575
hernandez()counsel.ufl.edu

Natalie Arce Indelicato, Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor
Counseling Center, 301 Peabody Hall
352-392-1575
indelicate()counsel.ufl.edu

Michael Murphy, Clinical Associate Professor
Counseling Center, 301 Peabody Hall
352-392-1575
murphvycounsel.ufl.edu

Ana Puig, Affiliate Faculty
Assistant Scholar and Research Director
College of Education, Office of Educational Research
Norman Hall Room 131
352-392-2315, Ext. 235
anapuig(q)coe.ufl.edu

Meggen Sixbey, Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor
Counseling Center, 301 Peabody Hall
352-392-1575
sixbey(vcounsel.ufl.edu

Adjunct Faculty
Bill Farley
Private Practitioner
(352) 338-3521


-18-









Linda Goodwin
Private Practitioner
lindaqoodwin@alltel.net

Lesley Hull
Private Practitioner
leslevhullphd(bellsouth. net

Marshall Knudson
Director, Alachua County Crisis Center
mlk(alachua.fl.us

Mickie Miller
Private Practitioner
miller.mickie(@qmail.com

Stephanie Sarkis
Private Practitioner
stephanie(stephaniesarkis.com

Emeritus Faculty
Robert Myrick, Professor Emeritus
Max Parker, Professor Emeritus
Jim Pitts, Associate Professor Emeritus
Joe Wittmer, Distinguished Professor Emeritus

Administrative Staff
Patty Bruner, Program Assistant
Norman Hall Room 1215-B
352-392-0731, Ext. 222
pbruner()coe.ufl.edu

Candy Spires, Senior Secretary
Department Graduate Secretary
Norman Hall Room 1215
352-392-0731, Ext. 223
cspires()coe.ufl.edu

Student Organizations

Beta Chapter, Chi Sigma lota
Established in 1985, Chi Sigma lota is the international honor society for counselors
working in professional and academic settings. The mission of Chi Sigma lota
International is to promote scholarship, research, professionalism, and excellence in
counseling and to recognize high attainment in the pursuit of academic and clinical
excellence in the field of counseling. The University of Florida's Beta Chapter was the


-19-









second chapter established and serves as a link within our community to promote
networking and service among students, alumni, faculty, and local professionals.
Students who have completed 9 credit hours with a grade point average of 3.5 or higher
are eligible to be initiated and are expected to contribute to its activities. We invite you
to consult the Beta Chapter website and the Chi Sigma lota International website and
talk to any of the members for any additional information. Your insights, interests, and
unique perspectives are welcome additions to our Chapter, and we look forward to your
participation.

2007-2008 EXECUTIVE BOARD


Michael Brubaker, President
Eric Davis, President-Elect
Whitney Nobles, Secretary
Xiaodi Zhou, Treasurer
Wendy Olsen, Past President


2007-2008 Committee Chairpersons
Erin Camizzi, Community Service Chair


brubakel ()ufl.edu
edavis76(.ufl.edu
wnobles2()ufl.edu
fuqee613(lyahoo.com
woslen48()vahoo.com


camizzi()ufl.edu


Keely Hope, Professional Development Chair keelvihope(vahoo.com


Sarah Milligan, Fundraising Chair
Matt Rudmann, Membership Chair
Laura Shannonhouse, Bulletin Board Chair
Eric Thompson, Web Master

Faculty Support
Dr. Kitty Fallon, Chapter Co-Advisor
Dr. Andrea L. Dixon, Chapter Co-Advisor


srmilliq()ulf.edu
mrudmann()ufl.edu
pandoral ()ufl.edu
erict56()ufl.edu


kfallon()coe.ufl.edu
adixon()coe.ufl.edu


Counselors for Social Justice
We are an organization of counseling students, counselor educators, and community
members who have joined together to expose and confront issues of social injustice
through education & awareness, scholarship, and action. We address issues of social
justice through the lens of counseling and the ways in which our profession can act as
an agent of change and healing in regard to such issues. Given our profession's service
to those experiencing social injustices and our profession's value of empowering clients,
we believe it is our responsibility to gain further knowledge, wisdom, and action about
ways that counselors can confront individuals, groups, and systems that maintain
structures that perpetuate social injustices. Our organizational values include:
Constructive and peaceful confrontation of injustices;


-20-









Collaboration within the community regardless of educational, social, economic,
or other factors;
Supporting the individual passions and interests of our members;
Open leadership practices that allow for consistent member feedback and input;
Community-driven agenda setting and action.
2007-2008 Leadership


President Kevin Tate
President-Elect Tonya Bentley-Anderson
Vice President of Financial Affairs Adrienne Baggs
Vice President of Communications Kimberli Dawson
Vice President of Community Relations Harmony Lenas
Vice President of Community Relations Perry Peace
Faculty Advisor Dr Kathleen Fallon


ktate@ufl.edu
kgb2005@ufl.edu
abaggs@ufl.edu
monoloco@ufl.edu
hpl03@ufl.edu
perry143@ufl.edu
kfallon@coe.ufl.edu


Counselor Education Student Association (CESA)
Currently inactive, CESA primary purposes included: provide a formal channel of
communication among students, faculty and staff associated with the department;
represent student interests at department business meetings; sponsor social gatherings
that foster positive relationships among students and faculty members associated with
the department; serve as advocates for graduate students in Counselor Education;
create and promote extracurricular professional development activities for students in
programs in the department; promote and sponsor graduate student participation in and
presentation of professional programs at local, state, regional, and national
conferences; foster professional responsibility and accountability among students in
programs in the department; and recruit and promote professional and personal
resources (as needed) for students in programs in the department. Students may
contact the Department Chairperson if they wish to reactive CESA.


-21 -









SECTION THREE POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND GUIDELINES


Admission, New Student Enrollment, and General Orientation

Admission Requirements for Graduate Students
The University of Florida Graduate School, the College of Education, and the
Department of Counselor Education all require a minimum grade average of B for all
upper-division undergraduate work and acceptable scores on the Graduate Record
Exam (GRE). These minimum requirements are used in the context of a holistic
credential review process.
For all doctoral applicants, the Counselor Education department requires a minimum
grade average of B+ for all graduate work and acceptable scores on the GRE. An
applicant with a previous graduate or professional degree or equivalent from a
regionally accredited U.S. institution may request an exemption from the Graduate
Record Examination and undergraduate GPA requirements on the grounds that the
candidate has already demonstrated the ability to do graduate work. In such a case, the
admissions review will focus primarily on the applicant's potential for success in a
Counselor Education program. Exceptions to the above requirements are made only
when an applicant's complete file, including letters of recommendation, are reviewed by
the department, recommended by the department, and approved by the Dean of the
Graduate School.
All international applicants seeking admission to the Graduate School and to the
Department of Counselor Education must submit satisfactory scores on the GRE.
International applicants must submit a satisfactory score on the Test of English as a
Foreign Language (TOEFL). An acceptable TOEFL score is a minimum of 213
computer based, 550 paper based, or 80 web based. Other acceptable assessments
and their minimum score include: International English Language Testing System
(IELTS) minimum score 6; Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB)
minimum score 77; or successful completion of the University of Florida English
Language program. International applicants who meet the following conditions may be
exempt from the English language test requirements: (a) international students whose
native language is English; or (b) international applicants who have spent at least one
academic year in a degree-seeking program at a college or university in a country
where English is the official language, if their attendance was in the year immediately
prior to UF admission.

Categories of Graduate Student Classifications
7 Designates beginning graduate students who have earned fewer than 36
graduate credit hours or who are seeking their first master's degree; also known as
"Beginning" graduate student
8 Graduate students who have earned a master's degree, or who have earned 36
or more credits while seeking a graduate degree, who have not been admitted to
doctoral candidacy; also known as "Advanced" graduate student
9 Graduate students who have been admitted to doctoral candidacy


-22-









Program Pre-Professional Requirement
A course in Basic Statistics (e.g., STA 2024 or equivalent) is the one undergraduate
pre-professional requirement for all programs in the department. New students must
complete this course prior to the first term of enrollment or no later than during the first
term of enrollment.

There are no specific undergraduate pre-professional academic majors required for
entry into programs in the department. Students admitted reflect a wide variety of
academic majors.

Essential Functions Required of Matriculated Students
A matriculating graduate student in Counselor Education must possess fundamental
abilities and skills in five categories: observation, communication, motor movement,
intelligence, and social efficacy. However, it is recognized that degrees of ability vary
widely between individuals. Individuals are encouraged to discuss their disabilities with
the Admissions Coordinator and, jointly, consider technological and other facilitating
mechanisms needed in order to train and function effectively as a Marriage and Family
Counselor, a Mental Health Counselor, a School Counselor, and/or a Counselor
Educator. The Department of Counselor Education at the University of Florida is
committed to enabling its students to utilize any reasonable means or accommodations
to complete the course of study leading to a degree.

Observation
Learning to be a professional Marriage & Family Therapist, Mental Health Counselor,
and/or School Counselor necessitates the functional use of sensory modalities such as
vision and hearing. For example, a student must be able to comprehenddemonstrations
of counseling skills and techniques and a student must be able to understand and
represent clients accurately.

Communication
Learning to be a professional Marriage & Family Therapist, Mental Health Counselor,
and/or School Counselor requires that a student demonstrate computer literacy and the
ability to read, write and speak efficaciously. For example, a student must be able to
verbally communicate effectively and sensitively with clients and to send and receive
messages accurately.

Motor Control
Learning to be a professional Marriage & Family Therapist, Mental Health Counselor,
and/or School Counselor necessitates that a student is able to execute such motor
movements that may be reasonably required for the student to provide general care and
emergency services for clients. Such actions include coordination of both gross and fine
muscular movements, equilibrium, and functional use of the senses of touch and vision.

Intellectual, Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities
Learning to be a professional Marriage & Family Therapist, Mental Health Counselor,
and/or School Counselor necessitates that a student be able to use abilities required in
measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis and the synthesis of information.


- 23-









Social Efficacy
Learning to be a professional Marriage & Family Therapist, Mental Health Counselor,
and/or School Counselor necessitates that students must possess the emotional health
required for the full utilization of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment,
the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the development of mature,
sensitive and effective relationships with clients, and the diagnosis and treatment of
clients. Students must be able to tolerate challenging workloads and to function
effectively under stress. Students must be able to adapt to changing multicultural
environments, display flexibility, and learn to function in the face of uncertainties
inherent in the problems of many clients. Empathy, compassion, integrity, interpersonal
skill, professional aspirations, and personal motivation are all qualities that are
assessed during the admissions and education process.

Statement on Professionalism
The academic programs in this department are established to prepare graduates of the
programs to enter professions. The term profession in this context means an occupation
or career for which there is a known body of knowledge, both theoretical and research,
an identified set of appropriate skills, and a set of behavioral standards adhered to by
members of the profession.

As a student admitted to a program in the department, you are engaged in a
professional preparation curriculum. Therefore, upon admission, the department
accepts you as a professional and expects you to act in accord with the highest
professional standards.

The most common manifestation of professionalism is adherence to professional ethical
standards. Links to these standards are provided in Section Seven. The department
faculty members expect you to be knowledgeable of these standards and to act in
accord with them. However, professionalism encompasses much more than just
adherence to ethical and/or other written standards. It includes appropriate and effective
manners of interacting with people, personal conduct and self-presentation, and respect
for people, property, and processes.

Some of the more subtle aspects of professionalism, both in and out of the department,
are addressed in this handbook. However, it is not possible to convey in this handbook
all the aspects of professionalism pertinent to the various professions reflected in this
department.

As a basic guideline, if you have any concern about appropriate professional behavior
for you or for others, contact immediately your faculty advisor. If you are unable to
contact your faculty advisor, or if your faculty advisor is not the appropriate contact
person for the situation, contact the department Chairperson, or another faculty member
if the Chairperson is unavailable. Do not feel forced to evaluate the situation by yourself;
do not rely on the opinions of your student peers; and do not hesitate to contact a
faculty member.


-24-









Matters of Protocol and Communication
The Department of Counselor Education is extremely large and complex along a
number of dimensions, including numbers of students and faculty members, programs
offered, and student matriculation requirements. Both formal and informal procedures
are in operation in an organizational structure this large and complex. In order for the
department to operate efficiently and effectively, both the formal and informal
procedures must function smoothly. The formal procedures are outlined throughout this
handbook. The purpose of this section is to provide some guidelines for you about
activities or subjects not addressed in other sections as a mentoring tool in your own
professional development.

You are primarily responsible for your effective progression through your program in this
department. Do not assume that the university, department, faculty members, staff, or
your faculty advisor will take care of you to make sure you get through your program.
Read and review this handbook often throughout your program when you have a
question or concerns about a policy, requirement, or procedure.

If you have reviewed the handbook and are unable to determine an effective response
to your question or concern, contact your faculty advisor or chairperson of your doctoral
studies supervisory committee. If your faculty advisor/doctoral chair is not able to
provide an effective response to your question or concern, your advisor should contact
the department Graduate Coordinator or Chairperson. This line of communication is
essential to the effective operation of the department for several reasons. First, neither
the Graduate Coordinator nor Chairperson is able or willing to be advisor to all the
students in the department. Second, it is essential that your faculty advisor know what
you are doing. Bypassing your faculty advisor is likely to cause future difficulties for you.
It is also disrespectful to your faculty advisor. Third, when your faculty advisor
determines the appropriate response to your question or concern, your advisor can use
the information for other advises; thus, this is a parsimonious method of conveying
information to students in the department.

It is important for you to understand that faculty members have many professional
responsibilities other than teaching. These responsibilities consume large amounts of
time and, therefore, it is sometimes difficult to contact faculty members. However, all
faculty members are required to establish, advertise, and keep at least five open office
hours per week. Faculty members may be contacted during their office hours; however,
most faculty members prefer scheduled individual appointments.

Students are encouraged to ask faculty members what means of communication are
most effective and preferred (i.e., email, phone, personal visit, scheduled appointment).
When leaving a message for faculty, state your name, the date of your message, and
how you may be contacted, such as your email address, phone numbers, hours when
you can be reached, or your mailing address. Please provide your contact information
and leave a brief statement of your reason for the contact.

Each faculty member in the department holds a doctoral degree and therefore merits
being addressed as Dr. (name). However, individual faculty members have individual


-25-









preferences for the use, or non-use, of the title "Dr." It is appropriate for you to ask
individual faculty members how they prefer to be addressed. However, as a matter of
professional courtesy, non-use of the title "Dr." is appropriate only in individual, one-on-
one, situations. When other faculty members, staff, or students are present during your
interaction with a faculty member, it is appropriate to use the title "Dr."

Department telephones and materials (e.g., letterhead, envelopes, and other office
supplies) are not available for use by students. Students must have the direct
authorization from a faculty member to use department materials. Students are
permitted to use office telephones only in cases of medical emergency.

Department administrative staff members are prohibited from dispensing certain types
of information. In order to protect students' rights, privacy, and safety, department
administrative staff members are prohibited from disclosing information about students.
Additionally, staff members will not disseminate faculty personal phone numbers or
contact information. Being called at home or on a personal cell phone is a matter of
individual choice among faculty members. You should inquire of individual faculty
members about their preferences for calls at home.

If you call or visit the department to request information presented in this handbook or
information that is prohibited from dissemination by the policies in this handbook, the
department staff, including administration and faculty, will advise you respectfully to
consult this handbook. Do not take this as an affront to your integrity as a person or as a
professional; department staff members have been instructed to respond this way.

In the past, a few students have brought refreshments to academic functions such as
masters and doctoral oral or final examinations. Clearly they have done so to make the
activity as pleasant as possible for all involved, and the faculty attending have
appreciated the thought and preparation. However, provision of refreshments by
students at formal, academic activities is inappropriate. It is essential that effective
distinctions be made between formal and informal interactions among students and
faculty.

Counselor Education Department Home Page
In order to best utilize technology as a means for informing department members, the
department maintains a web page, http://education.ufl.edu/counselor. Contained within
this page are resources relevant for admissions, enrollment, graduation, and
professional development. This page is designed to be a virtual community for students,
staff, faculty, and alumni. You are encouraged to not only consult this page for
information but to contribute to its dynamic current flavor. You may email the
Department Webmaster, Dr. Kitty Fallon, at kfallon(coe.ufl.edu with current news,
announcements of contributions to the profession such as publications and
presentations, contribute photographs from department events, and provide alumni
news following graduation. Contact the Webmaster if you notice dead links or have
suggestions for improvements.


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GatorLink Accounts
Each applicant, student, faculty, and staff member must have a GatoLink username and
password. A GatorLink account is required to access the University's network and
services. Establishing a GatorLink account will provide you with a University of Florida
email account, which is your GatorLink username@ufl.edu. To establish a GatorLink
account, link to https://mv.ufl.edu/ps/signon.html and click on GatorLink Account
Creation.

UF Email Policy
All official department and university correspondence sent via email will be sent directly
to a students University of Florida email account. GatorLink email addresses will not
forward email to non-UF third-party email providers. Students are responsible for
checking their UF email account.

Link to http://www.it.ufl.edu/policies/forwarding.html for more information on the
University of Florida email policy, including information on how to access your University
email when you are away from campus.

UFID
A University of Florida identification number (UFID) is generated when candidates apply
to the University. That UFID number remains with you as you principal identification.
Students are responsible for knowing their UFID number; you will be asked for it during
course registration, utilizing registrar and financial services, and in conducting all your
business with UF.

UF Gatorl Card
The UF Gatorl card is a standardized and convenient form of identification with the
ability to function as a key to access a variety of University systems and services. The
University of Florida official ID Card is required for all students, faculty and staff. Your
Gatorl Card lists your UFID number.

The card may be obtained at ID Card Services located on the Ground Floor of the
Bookstore and Welcome Center adjacent to the Reitz Union. Types of cards available
are: student, staff, faculty, spouse, courtesy, and cards for certain other University
affiliated individuals. In order to obtain a card, an official picture Identification and UF-ID
number is needed. The cost is $15.00. Link to http://www.bsd.ufl.edu/G1 C/index.asp for
more information.

New Student Orientation
The Graduate School hosts a new student orientation to welcome students to the
University of Florida Graduate School. Whether new or a previous UF student, all newly
enrolling students are strongly urged to attend the Graduate School New Student
Orientation.

The department holds a new student orientation meeting at the beginning of each
academic term in which students are admitted to programs in the department. Typically,


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this meeting is scheduled at least one to two days in advance of the first day of classes
for the academic term. The primary purposes of this meeting are to: acquaint new
students with the Counselor Education faculty and staff and with each other; provide
information essential to new students as they begin their respective programs; introduce
new students to current students, particular the leadership from student organizations;
introduce new students to the department faculty and to their "acting" doctoral
chairperson; assist new students with course registrations appropriate for their first
terms of enrollment in their respective programs; respond to questions new students
may have about the department and its operations; and gather necessary information
from new students.

The faculty strongly encourages attendance by all new students. New students who are
unable to attend this meeting are asked to contact the department office as soon as
possible after the meeting to determine their faculty advisor or acting doctoral
chairperson, to obtain any information they need, and to provide the information
requested during the meeting.

Student Data Files, GIMS, and Change of Name or Contact Information
Student data files are maintained at the University, Graduate School, and Counselor
Education department levels.
The University maintains a directory listing for each individual student and employee.
Link to the Address and Directory Changes for instructions on updating your UF profile.
The Graduate School maintains student records on the online Graduate Information
Management System (GIMS). All graduate faculty have access to GIMS through Quick
Links on the menu in MyUFL. They can only view their individual records, showing their
graduate faculty appointments and what supervisory committees they are on. All
graduate students have access to GIMS through Quick Links on the menu in MyUFL.
They can only view their individual records, showing what degree segments they have
on record.
In the Counselor Education department, large numbers of masters/specialist and
doctoral students are enrolled in various programs. Maintaining effective lines of
communication with each student is a very difficult task. To manage student data, three
distinct files are created for each student. First, a file is created for each student
containing hard copies of all application, enrollment, and graduation information.
Second, administrative staff members create and maintain an electronic data file,
including relevant contact, advisor, program enrollment, relevant assistantship, and
graduation information. Third, a distinct clinical file is maintained housing all
documentation pertaining to clinical practicum and internship. Information from this file
is used to comprise all licensure and certification correspondence. Note that access to
student data files is restricted to department faculty members and staff and can be used
only for official department or university business.

Each student's initial file is created from information obtained during the application and
orientation processes. From that point through graduation, it is your responsibility to
insure your student data file contains up-to-date information. It is essential you notify


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department administrative staff immediately, in writing, of any changes of name, contact
information, or other relevant data.

It is the student's responsibility to notify both the Counselor Education Department and
the University of Florida with name or contact information changes. At the department
level, email the graduate secretary and provide all contact information: name, UFID,
mailing address, phones, and email changes. At the university level, link to
http://www. registrar. ufl.edu/currents/addresschanqe. html for instructions. Note the
university may require more information when changing a name. Call the University of
Florida Registrar's office at 352-392-1374, ext. 7106 if you have questions.

Your failure to maintain accurate information in your data files (a) may result in the
department being unable to provide important information to you, (b) absolves the
department from insuring that you have received important information, and (c) may
have a significant negative impact on your standing in the department and/or your
effective progression within your academic program.

Student Liability Insurance
Litigation involving practitioners in the professions represented by programs in the
department has increased dramatically in recent years for many reasons; the result is
that every practicing professional is a potential target for litigation. Adherence to
professional ethical standards and high standards for personal and professional conduct
are perhaps the best ways for professionals to avoid involvement in litigation.
Nevertheless, since there is no "foolproof' way to avoid litigation, most practicing
professionals now consider liability insurance to be a necessity.

The Counselor Education department requires all students to obtain professional liability
insurance upon first term enrollment. Until a student registers for clinical courses, it is
sufficient to maintain your policy in your personal records. Proof of insurance is now a
condition of enrollment in all departmental clinical practicum and internships and must
be submitted to the Clinical coordinator prior to beginning work at your site. Proof may
be in the form of a letter from your insurance provider and/or a copy of your insurance
policy or insurance card.

If you become involved in litigation as a result of activities required of practicum or
internship students, you may or may not be entitled to the services of the University
attorneys and/or the attorneys representing the practicum or internship site. However,
remember that University and practicum and internship site attorneys are employed to
represent the interests of the University and practicum & internship site first. Your own
insurance plan provides representation for you, should you ever have need of it.

Students can obtain professional liability insurance at a discounted rate as a benefit of
membership through national professional organizations. Link to the following agencies
that partner with ACA, AMHCA, AAMFT, and ASCA for more information: ACA
Insurance Trust, CPH & Associates, and ASCA liability insurance resources.


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Academic Advising, Program Planning, Registration


Advisement, Career Guidance, and Counseling
Although the underlying processes are sometimes integrally related, distinctions among
the terms advisement, career guidance, and personal counseling can be made.
Advisement may be defined as a process wherein you and your faculty advisor discuss
your academic plans and requirements, as well as the related department and/or
university policies, regulations, and procedures. This Handbook has been developed to
serve as a major resource for advisement procedures. However, it is not intended to
supplant advisement in terms of effective communication between you and your
assigned faculty advisor. You have the right to effective advisement from your assigned
faculty advisor. However, you also have the responsibility to seek advisement from your
assigned advisor or a faculty advisor who you select following department procedures.
This responsibility includes seeking advisement only from your faculty advisor. If you
obtain advisement from other than your faculty advisor (e.g., from other students,
department administrative staff, or faculty other than your faculty advisor), you will have
to bear the consequences of behaviors resulting from such advisement. The department
does not assume responsibility for problems resulting when you obtain incorrect
advisement from other than your faculty advisor. If your faculty advisor misadvisess"
you, the department will do whatever it is able, and to your advantage, to correct
resultant problems.

Career guidance may be defined as a process wherein you and a faculty member or
other professional work together to help you determine professional career-related
goals for you. Career guidance thus encompasses consideration of your professional
development in a context much broader, and much more general, than that for
advisement. All faculty in this department are willing to assist you with career guidance
within the context of this definition. Note, however, that the outcome of such career
guidance may have significant implications for advisement processes in which you
subsequently engage.

Counseling may be defined as a process wherein you work with a professional
counselor to help you alleviate personal (i.e., other than professional development)
concerns or problems. Although all faculty members in the department are competent to
provide such counseling services, it is inappropriate for them to do so for you because
of your enrollment in a program in the department. If a faculty member was to provide
personal counseling services for you, it would place them in a dual relationship situation
with you (i.e., the faculty member would be both your counselor and your evaluator).
Dual relationships of this nature are unethical, for both you and faculty. If you are in
need of personal counseling services, you may obtain them from a variety of counseling
service resources, including those on and off campus.

For campus career guidance and counseling services, please consult the Career
Resource Center, Student Mental Health Services, the Counseling Center, and the
Dean of Student's Student Counseling and Support Services listing. Each may have
community-based referral sources should you wish to seek services outside the
university.


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Faculty Advisor and Change of Advisor
Upon admission to a degree program in the department, you are automatically assigned
a regular member of the department faculty who will serve as your faculty advisor. The
name of the faculty advisor assigned to you is announced at the new student orientation
meeting, if not sooner. It is your responsibility to know who is serving as your faculty
advisor. See the administrative staff if you do not know who is your faculty advisor.

Your faculty advisor is your primary source of contact and communication with the
department. Therefore, the department encourages the formation of effective,
professional relationships between students and faculty advisors. In view of the number
of students in the department, a major portion falls upon you for the responsibility for the
formation of such a relationship with your advisor. The department encourages you to
show initiative in getting to know your advisor. You are strongly urged to meet with your
faculty advisor no later than mid-term of your first semester of enrollment to develop a
Planned Program of graduate study and to continue to consult with your advisor
throughout your period of graduate study.

Each student is to have a designated faculty advisor at all times while enrolled in a
program in the department. You may elect to change faculty advisors at any point prior
to your applying for graduation with the department and the graduate school. To change
advisors, it is professional to discuss this with your current advisor and provide a reason
for the change, identify and request if another faculty member is willing to serve as your
advisor, and notify the department of the change. Administrative staff will submit a
revised Supervisory Committee form to the Graduate School notifying them of your
change in advisors.

To document the change process, students must complete and submit an original and
two photocopies of the Change of Advisor form to the Graduate Coordinator. The
Graduate Coordinator will review and approve the change, sign the form, file the original
in your student file and return the copies to your new advisor. You may retrieve your
copy of the form from your new advisor. Changing faculty advisors becomes official
upon receipt and approval of the Change of Advisor form. If the Graduate Coordinator
does not approve your change of advisors or has questions regarding the change, you
will be contacted at the earliest convenience.

Supervisory Committee
The UF Graduate School maintains student records distinct from, but related to, those
maintained in the department. UF Graduate School policies stipulate that each degree-
seeking student enrolled in a graduate program in the university must have a
"Supervisory Committee Form" on file in the Graduate School records office. This form
is an electronic document submitted only by the department graduate secretary based
on information provided by the student.

Entry-level M.Ed./Ed.S. or Ed.S. only students must have a Supervisory Committee
Form on file no later than the end of the first academic term in which you enroll in class.
Doctoral students must have a Supervisory Committee Form on file with the Graduate
School no later than the end of the second academic term following formal admission


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into a doctoral program in the department. This deadline is in effect regardless of
whether the doctoral student enrolled in classes during either of the first two academic
terms following formal enrollment. The department graduate secretary enters a
student's Supervisory Committee information online through the GIMS system.

Failure to have this form on file with the Graduate School is sufficient justification for the
Graduate School to cancel a student's enrollment in a graduate program in the
university.

The online Supervisory Committee Form in the GIMS system provides information on a
student's current faculty advisor, program, degrees) sought, and anticipated date of
graduation. For entry-level M.Ed./Ed.S. and Ed.S. only students, this form is completed
and submitted electronically by department graduate secretary within the first weeks of
initial first-term enrollment. In the case of M.Ed./Ed.S. or Ed.S. only students, a single
faculty advisor is identified. In the case of doctoral students, doctoral students identify a
minimum of four doctoral supervisory committee members including a chairperson of
the doctoral committee. See Section Four for information on selecting doctoral
supervisory committee members.

A new Supervisory Committee Form must be submitted on GIMS by the department
graduate secretary each time a student changes faculty advisors, academic programs
or degrees sought or if a doctoral student changes the composition of the supervisory
committee. Students must provide the graduate secretary in writing with appropriate
information and documentation of changes. Doctoral students should submit a Change
of Advisor form to indicate changes in supervisory committee members. See policies
within this handbook for procedures and guidelines for Change of Advisor and Change
of Academic Program.

The Graduate School staff reviews the accuracy of the information on a student's
Supervisory Committee Form as part of the evaluation of a student's eligibility for
graduation. A student will not be permitted to graduate if the Supervisor Committee
information is incorrect at the time the student applies for graduation. It is to your
advantage to insure that the Graduate School has a current and accurate Supervisory
Committee Form on file for you.

Significance of Course Numbers
1000 2999 Undergraduate courses. May not be used as part of any graduate
degree requirements, and will not be used in computing the graduate grade point
average.
3000 4999 Undergraduate courses. The minimum number of credits required
for a graduate degree must be earned in graduate-level courses. For work outside the
major, courses numbered 3000 or above, not to exceed 6 credits, may be taken
provided they are part of a previously approved plan of study.
5000 5999 Graduate courses. May be taken by upper-division undergraduate
students with permission of instructor; normally a GPA of 3.0 is required.


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6000 6999 Graduate courses. May also be taken by undergraduate students if
they have senior standing, a 3.0 grade point average, and permission of the instructor
and the department.
7000 7999 Graduate courses. Intended primarily for Advanced Graduate
Students.

Course Registration
Registration in graduate-level courses offered through the department is "controlled" so
that students officially enrolled in department programs get priority enrollment.
Graduate courses in the department are usually not open to non-majors; exceptions are
sometimes made for those who have already earned a graduate degree in Counseling
who are completing coursework required for certification and/or licensure in Florida.
The method of control is that course "Section Numbers," which are required for
registration in the University, are only available in the department. Thus, students will
always register through department administrative staff and will not register online
through the University.

To select your courses, be sure to consult the Counselor Education Department's up-to-
date list of courses offered which is available just prior to the University's regular
registration period. Obtain a copy of this list from one of the administrative staff
members in the department office. Copies may be available online on the Counselor
Education webpage. Then, consult with your advisor about your proposed selections.
Refer to the Registrar's web page for a listing of class times and periods.

Students enrolling for the first term in the department will register for courses at New
Student Orientation. Beginning in the second semester, currently enrolled students may
register for classes during the course registration appointment time established by the
UF Registrar's Office and reported to students through ISIS.

There are two course registration periods for each academic term: (1) Regular, or early,
registration and (2) late registration. The regular registration period is scheduled during
the term preceding the one in which classes will be taken. For example, regular
registration for the Spring Semester is typically held during the middle of the Fall
Semester. The late registration period is during the first two to three days of each
semester.

Students may only register on or after your designated registration appointment time.
You must contact the department administrative office during the regular or late
registration period and request admission to (i.e., registration for) the courses) you wish
to take. If there is space available in the specified course, your name will be recorded
on a class roster through the online registration procedure. Students will be registered in
order, according to the following priority: (1) students reporting in person, (2) students
sending email, and (3) students who phone or leave voicemail.

Historically, administrative staff members have attempted to accommodate student
requests to register for courses that were closed due to full enrollment. They have
maintained wait lists. However, the process was disrupted when students attempted to


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persuade teaching faculty directly to be admitted into a full course. This resulted in
confusion between faculty, staff, and students and vulnerability to inequitable
preferential treatment. Practices of wait lists and students circumventing wait lists to
contact faculty directly are no longer in use. Students are responsible for maintaining
contact only with administrative staff for course registration. If a course is full, students
may check back regularly with staff members to inquire about an opening in the course.

Class meeting times and locations are available on the course schedule and on the
course syllabus. It is your responsibility to determine where and when your classes
meet.

Problems in registration, and subsequently in fulfillment of graduation requirements,
occur typically because of failure to research in advance available information regarding
Graduate School registration requirements and Counselor Education course
requirements, as outlined in the Graduate School Catalog. Consider this applied
example for registering for variable credit courses (e.g., SDS 6938). Use of this SDS
6938 course title allows a variety of contemporary topics to be addressed during any
academic term without approval of the UF Graduate Council, which must approve all
"regular" courses before they can be listed in the Graduate Catalog. Although each
"SDS 6938" course may be assigned from one to four (1-4) semester credit hours per
academic term, the Department typically assigns SDS 6938 courses three (3) semester
credit hours. The UF Graduate Catalog lists the following course as earning variable
credit: SDS 6938-Special Topics (1-4; max: 12). The one to four (1-4) notation used in
the course listing indicates a per-term maximum that can be accepted for credit.
Students can earn no more than four (4) semester credit hours of SDS 6938 per
academic term, regardless of the number of SDS 6938 courses taken that term, and
may apply a maximum of twelve (12) credits of SDS 6938 toward their respective
graduation requirements. Should you elect to take two, three (3) credit 6938 courses in
the same semester, only 4 of the 6 total credits for which you registered in the two SDS
6938 courses will be counted toward your total for graduation. Similar limitations apply
to other courses (e.g., SDS 6905).

Check in advance registration policies in the Counselor Education department section of
the Graduate School Catalog when you register for any course, particularly variable
credit courses. Do not make assumptions about registration policies. If you have
registration policy questions, check with your advisor. If your advisor needs help, your
advisor should check with the Graduate Coordinator or the department Chairperson.

Minimum Full-time Registration Requirements for Graduate Students
Refer to the Registration Requirements section of the Graduate Catalog to determine
the credit hours requirements for full-time registration. Course load requirements vary
depending on whether a student is receiving a fellowship, has a graduate appointment,
and varies depending on the semester in the academic year. Students should also
attend to minimum registration requirements during the final academic term.


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Academic Program Planning, Timeline, and Planned Programs
You are expected to develop a plan of study that is tailored to your interests and career
goals as a graduate student and enables you to meet degree requirements. Although
your Faculty Advisor is a resource to you and gives final approval to your plan, you are
expected to take the initiative in reviewing the Planned Program prescribed for those in
your Program Area (e.g., mental health counseling, marriage and family counseling, or
school counseling and guidance), identifying any additional graduate courses you may
wish to take, and submitting your proposed plan for review and approval by your Faculty
Advisor, by the department's Graduate Coordinator, and by the UF graduate school.
There are several important requirements you must keep in mind as you formulate your
program of studies: (a) the university minimum credit hour requirements for the
degrees) you are pursuing, (b) the university's residence requirement, (c) the particular
curricular requirements of your degree program, and (d) the academic requirements for
any certification or licensure you wish to attain. Consult the UF Graduate Catalog and
relevant licensure and certification resources for information that may impact your
individual planned program of student. You are responsible for insuring your planned
program is consistent with completing requirements to meet your career goals.

Entry-level students must file the approved Planned Program form in the department
office by no later than the last day of regularly scheduled classes of the first semester in
which you have enrolled for classes in the university. Doctoral students must complete
their planned program and secure approval from the doctoral chair and supervisory
committee by no later than the last day of regularly scheduled classes of the second
semester in which they have enrolled for classes in the university. You must complete
the Planned Program form relevant to your program area and degree sought, which
specifies the curricular experiences you must complete to receive the degrees) for the
program in which you are enrolled. There are three planned programs associated with
each program specialization. Students should select the planned program appropriate
to their degree sought. The following is an explanation of each planned program form.
See Section Five for links to planned program forms for each specific program area.

Once approved, your planned program may only be changed under the following
circumstances: (1) you request a change of planned program, and your faculty advisor
and the graduate coordinator approve the request, (2) the department institutes new or
revised curricular requirements for a program, or (3) the UF Graduate School or College
of Education mandates a change in requirements for all graduate students. If you make
a change in your planned program, such as adding or deleting a course, students must
submit to the department a Change of Planned Program form.

If you have an approved planned program on file with the department at the time a new
requirement affecting program curricula is instituted by the UF Graduate School, the
College of Education, or the department; usually you will have the option of following
either the old requirement as indicated on your approved planned program or the new
requirement. If you do not have an approved planned program when the new
requirement goes into effect, you must follow the new requirement.


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M.Ed./Ed.S., M.A.Ed./Ed.S., Ed.S. Only, or Direct Entry Form I
This planned program is appropriate for students pursuing the entry-level master and
specialist degrees, students earning the Specialist in Education only degree, or students
who were admitted as direct-entry doctoral students who are completing the entry-level
degrees prior to doctoral coursework.

Direct Entry Form II
Only students admitted at the direct-entry doctoral level should complete this form. It is
the second planned program completed at the conclusion of the entry-level program
and at the beginning of completing doctoral coursework. Direct-entry students should
complete this form with their doctoral supervisory committee no later than the end of the
first term after beginning doctoral coursework.

Ph.D. or Ed.D.
This planned program is appropriate for students admitted to the doctoral program and
who have earned previously a masters degree in counseling.
Your Planned Program serves as a contract you have made with the university as to
your plan of study. Successful completion of the curricular experiences stipulated on
your Planned Program insures that you will receive the degrees) to which you are
entitled (unless you are dismissed from a program for reasons other than academic
performance). Please consult with your Faculty Advisor after you have developed an
initial plan. Your Faculty Advisor will review the curricular experiences expected in your
chosen program, approve work already completed, indicate necessary additions and/or
changes (if any) to your proposed program of study, discuss curricular alternatives
available, and certify the final agreement. The planned program then must be submitted
to and approved by the student's supervisory committee.

Then, the Planned Program form submitted to the department must be printed clearly.
Sign and date the form in the appropriate spaces. Make two (2) clear photocopies of
your completed Planned Program form, have your Faculty Advisor sign and date the
original and both photocopies, and deliver all three copies to the Graduate Coordinator.
Students attempting to substitute previously completed courses should submit with the
Planned Program form copies of corresponding course syllabi. The Graduate
Coordinator will review your Planned Program and any corresponding supporting
documentation to assure that it meets university, college, and department requirements.
If changes are needed, the Graduate Coordinator will notify your Faculty Advisor who in
turn will contact you. When approved, the Graduate Coordinator will sign and date your
Planned Program forms. The original will be retained for your department file; two
copies will be returned to your Faculty Advisor, one of which is for you.

Completing Core Clinical Courses and Clinical Experiences Outside Program Area
Students wanting to complete clinical courses and clinical experiences outside their
primary program must comply with the following guidelines: (1) review the core clinical
courses for department programs (P. 12 of Student Handbook), (2) add core clinical
courses as elective courses in your planned program, and (3) add appropriate


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practicum course and group supervision course as elective courses in your planned
program.
Note that due to external stakeholder requirements, students pursuing school
counseling and guidance must have that program as their primary program. Pursuing
school counseling and guidance as an elective program is not an option.

Undergraduate Credit Hours Towards Graduate Programs
Please refer to the Courses and Credit section of the Graduate Catalog for explanation
of the conditions under which undergraduate courses may be used in graduate study. A
maximum of six credits of undergraduate courses may be applied to your approved
Planned Program of graduate study.

Graduate students enrolled in programs in the Department of Counselor Education do
not receive credit for enrollment in any of the undergraduate courses offered through
the department, and undergraduate courses offered through the department completed
prior to admission cannot be transferred or otherwise applied to a graduate student's
planned program in the department.

Your Faculty Advisor, the department Graduate Coordinator, and the Graduate School
must grant approval to include undergraduate courses in your planned program. If you
desire to include any undergraduate course as part of your planned program, discuss
your intention (and the specific course) with your Faculty Advisor at the time you
construct your planned program. Be prepared to present a rationale that demonstrates
that the courses) is appropriate and pertinent to your professional preparation.

Transfer of Credit
If you completed graduate level coursework while previously enrolled as a Master's
degree-seeking student or as a post-baccalaureate, non-degree-seeking student, you
may be want to transfer some of your previous graduate credits toward meeting degree
requirements in your current graduate program in the department.

Consult the Graduate Catalog for UF Graduate School policies for transfer of credits for
masters-level students and policies for doctoral students.

A maximum of nine (9) graduate semester credit hours from an institution accredited to
provide graduate instruction or a maximum of fifteen (15) graduate (5000-7999 level)
semester credit hours from post-baccalaureate work at the University of Florida can be
transferred towards a masters degree. A maximum of thirty (30) graduate semester
credit hours can be transferred from a previously earned masters from an institution
accredited to provide graduate instruction towards a doctoral degree.

Graduate credit hours must have been earned within the past seven (7) years.

Application for transfer of credits must be made during your first term of enrollment
following your formal admission to a program in the department, regardless of the
number of credit hours taken. Transfer of credit requests made after this deadline are
rarely accepted.


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Undergraduate coursework can not be transferred, regardless of your standing/ status
in the institution at the time the coursework was taken. See the Undergraduate Credit
Hours Towards Graduate Programs policy for guidelines on applying, not transferring,
undergraduate courses within your graduate program of study.

The coursework to be transferred must be commensurate with the standard of research
and practice currently operating at the University of Florida (e.g., the content covered is
still considered relevant to current standards of practice). Only coursework taken at
institutions whose accreditations are recognized by the University of Florida can be
transferred.

The responsibility rests with the student's faculty advisor or doctoral supervisory
committee to ensure the academic integrity of course work to be transferred, basing
acceptance of graduate transfer credits on established criteria. Coursework to be
transferred must be approved by the student's Faculty Advisor, the department's
Graduate Coordinator, and the Dean of the Graduate School.

The student must submit with an application for transfer of credits a transcript or grade
report indicating the coursework to be transferred and the grades) received by the
student requesting the transfer.

Only courses wherein the student received a grade of B or better may be transferred.
Courses graded below B, on an S/U basis, or Pass/Fail basis cannot be transferred.

Nonresident and/or extension coursework taken at another institution and
correspondence (study) coursework cannot be transferred.

Coursework transferred is applied to a student's program requirements and is noted on
students' transcripts. Transferred course grades are not used in computation of the
student's grade point average.

If you are seeking only a Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) degree, you can transfer up to
nine (9) graduate credits from (an) institutions) which offers) a master's or doctoral
degree in the program area in which the courses) to be transferred was (were) taken.
However, you rarely need transfer credits because planned program requirements
usually exceed minimum degree/program requirements.

If you want to transfer credits from previous graduate coursework, discuss this with your
Faculty Advisor. If your advisor agrees, see department administrative staff for current
transfer of credit procedures. Provide transcript or grade report from the institution
where the coursework you wish to transfer was taken.

Change of Academic Program
When students are admitted into the Department of Counselor Education, they are
admitted specifically into one of the following academic program emphases (or
specializations): School Counseling and Guidance (SCG), Mental Health Counseling
(ACD), or Marriage and Family Counseling (EDC).


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Since the number of students that can be admitted to an academic program during any
particular academic term is limited to the number of faculty advisors available,
admission to one academic program does not constitute admission to another academic
program. Therefore a student admitted into one academic program who wants to
change to another academic program in the department must make a formal written
request for transfer to the Department Chairperson. The request must state the
student's current academic program, the academic program to which the student seeks
admission, and the academic term the desired change is to be effective. The
department chairperson will notify the student if additional application materials and/or
additional interviews are necessary to evaluate the request. The department
chairperson also will notify the student of the decision regarding the change of
academic major request.

If a request for a change of academic major is approved, department administrative staff
must complete and submit on your behalf a Change of Degree Form. This form is used
to change a UF graduate student's classification (major, department or college.

Department Core Curricula
The core curricula are based on the eight content areas established by CACREP and
required of all masters-level students. Listed below are the eight content areas and the
corresponding course codes offered in the department.
Human Growth and Development MHS 6480
Social and Cultural Foundations MHS 6428
Helping Relationships MHS 5005 and MHS 6401
Group Work MHS 6500
Career and Lifestyle Development MHS 6340
Appraisal MHS 6200
Research and Program Evaluation MHS 7740
Professional Orientation MHS 6720 or MHS 6705

Student-Initiated Research Opportunities

SDS 6905 Individual Work
As part of their professional preparation, students enrolled in all programs in the
department may elect to complete individualized, student-initiated research projects
under faculty supervision prior to graduation.

Prior to enrolling in SDS 6905, a student must have completed successfully MHS 7740,
Research in Counseling. Students who are substituting another course for MHS 7740
must receive approval from the MHS 7740 instructor that the course is equivalent.

Students enrolled in a doctoral program are required to successfully complete at least
one data-based research project, for a minimum of two semester credits in SDS 6905.

Students may not substitute SDS 6905 Individual Work for a required course.

Types of Acceptable Individual Research Projects


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The following types of research may be used to earn credit in SDS 6905 (and SDS
6910):
Data-based: This type of research involves the collection, analysis, and interpretation
of numeric data. The research project may be either descriptive or experimental in
nature.

Field Study: This type of research involves the design, implementation, and evaluation
of a field-based counseling or student personnel/development activity. The final project
report must include information and empirical evidence regarding the relative
effectiveness of the activity.

Literature Review: This type of research involves the collection, evaluation, and
interpretation of both researches and theoretical discourses on a topic. It necessitates
extensive review of published and unpublished information on the topic.

Theory-Based Counseling Case Study: This type of research involves extensive
review of the literature and research for a chosen theoretical counseling orientation and
application of the knowledge gained to a counseling case. This type of SDS 6905
research project is required for students in the ACD and EDC programs.

SDS 6905 Procedures
After you decide to engage in an SDS 6905 research project, secure a supervisor. No
student will be permitted to register for SDS 6905 until s/he has arranged to have the
activity supervised by a faculty member. To arrange supervision, make an appointment
with a prospective faculty supervisor, outline your plan for the research project, and
request supervision of the project. Note that the majority of faculty in the department
are on 9-month contract and are unavailable to supervise in the summer. After securing
a project supervisor, present her/him with a fully developed proposal, including an
introduction, nature and scope of literature to be reviewed, and complete methodology
section.

Next, complete and make three copies of the Approval Form for SDS 6905 Individual
Work Project. This form must be completed and presented to the department
administrative staff at the time you register. All research projects involving human
subjects, regardless of the nature of the project, must be approved by the University of
Florida Institutional Research Review Board (aka Human Subjects Committee). A copy
of IRB's written approval should be attached to the Approval Form.

The Graduate Coordinator will review the form to assure that the department will have
an accurate and effective record of your research activity. The Graduate Coordinator
does not approve, disapprove, or evaluate the nature and/or quality of the research
proposed. If the information is sufficient, the Graduate Coordinator will sign all four
copies, retain one copy for your department file, and return the other three copies to
your academic advisor. You can retrieve two of the copies from her/him and give one to
your research supervisor. If the Graduate Coordinator does not authorize your project,
the four copies of the form will be returned to your Faculty Advisor who will contact you.


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SDS 6905 Course Title
At registration, you are asked to provide a "course title" for your SDS 6905. This title
does not have to be the same title that you use for your final SDS 6905 research report.
The "course title" chosen for each SDS 6905 registration will appear on your academic
transcript. You may want to consult with your research supervisor to determine a title.
An SDS 6905 "course title" must meet the following guidelines.

The title may not duplicate an existing course title for any course regularly offered
through the department (i.e., may not duplicate any course title listed in the UF
Graduate Catalog as an offering of the department of Counselor Education).

It may not exceed twenty-one (21) letters and spaces. If the title you provide exceeds
21 characters and spaces, it will be truncated at 21 characters on your transcript.

It must be provided at the time of registration for SDS 6905 both on the registration list
kept by the department for SDS 6905 and on the application form.

It should be determined after very careful consideration! Be sure to work closely with
your academic advisor and research supervisor to determine the nature of the research
activity to be conducted and an appropriate course title before registration. It is
extremely difficult to change a course title once it has been sent to the UF Registrar's
Office. The most frequent reason for request of a change of "course title" is a change in
the nature of the research being conducted for SDS 6905.

SDS 6905 General Comments
Be sure to adhere to the following SDS 6905 guidelines.

Be sure to schedule regular meetings with your project supervisor during the period in
which you are conducting the research to discuss problems and progress. You are
entitled to and expected to be supervised during the entire project.

Final written reports of the SDS 6905 research project must be prepared and presented
in accord with the guidelines of the current edition of the Publication Manual of the
American Psychological Association.

Whether on or off campus, if you conduct research involving human subjects, you are
required to have the proposal approved by the University of Florida Institutional
Research Review Board prior to initiating the research activities. Be sure to discuss this
requirement with your project supervisor.

If copyrighted instruments or other materials are used in the research, you must obtain,
in writing, appropriate approval from authors and/or publishers.

You are strongly encouraged to use research advisors who have expertise in the topic
area of your investigation. In the event you cannot identify such a research supervisor,
you should solicit suggestions from department faculty.

SDS 6905 Cover Page for Final Report


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The original and each of the copies of the student's SDS 6905 Project Report should
include the following information on the cover page:
* Title of Project
* Type of Project
* Student's Name
* Student's UFID Number
* Academic term and year student registered in SDS 6905 for this project
* Current Date
* Student's E-Mail Address
* Academic Credit Requested
* Assigned Grade
* Required Signatures and Date of Signature
o Student
o Project Supervisor
o Faculty Advisor
o Graduate Coordinator

SDS 6905 Final Report and Evaluation
You are required to submit the original (typewritten, double-spaced) and three (3) clear
photocopies of the final report for your SDS 6905 project. In order to receive a final
grade in the academic term in which you register for SDS 6905 credits, plan to submit
your project report by no later than two weeks before the last Wednesday of classes
(excluding Finals Week); late submission will delay your grade.
First submit the final report to your project supervisor so that s/he can enter a grade on
all four copies and sign all four cover pages. Next, ask your academic advisor or
doctoral chairperson to sign the four cover pages and forward all four copies to the
department graduate coordinator. If the information provided is sufficient, the
department graduate coordinator will sign the title pages, retain one copy for the
department file, and return the other copies to your academic advisor or doctoral
chairperson. You can retrieve two copies her/him and give one copy to your project
supervisor. If your report is not sufficient, the department graduate coordinator will
return the original and copies to your doctoral chairperson, who will then contact you.
The final grade for the SDS 6905 project will be determined by the project supervisor
and will be designated with a letter grade.

MHS 6910 and MHS 6940
Students may elect to engage in an ongoing research project being conducted by a
member of the faculty or to assist a faculty member in teaching a graduate or
undergraduate course. If so, students can enroll in MHS 6910 Supervised Research


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or MHS 6940 Supervised Teaching. Do not register for MHS 6910 or MHS 6940 until
you have arranged to have the activity supervised by a faculty member. To arrange
supervision, make an appointment with a prospective faculty supervisor prior to the
semester in which you plan to do the work, agree on a plan for your involvement and its
supervision, prepare a summary of the plan for submission at the time of registration
and a summary of the outcome, both of which will be placed in your departmental
record.
The maximum cumulative credits for courses offered through the department for which
sequential enrollments are permitted are specified in the UF Graduate School Catalog.
However, special rules apply to the following courses.
MHS 6910 Supervised Research. This course is intended to allow students who
engage in research activities directly supervised by department faculty members (e.g.,
as research assistants) to receive academic credits for their activities.
MHS 6940 Supervised Teaching. This course is intended to allow students who
engage in teaching activities directly supervised by department faculty members (e.g.,
as teaching assistants) to receive academic credits for their activities.
Graduate School policies stipulate that students may accumulate a maximum total of
(only) five (5) semester credits in each of these courses during their entire enrollment(s)
in programs in the UF Graduate School. Registrations exceeding these maximums are
not counted toward credits for graduation for the degree program in which the student is
enrolled at the time the maximum is exceeded. For example, if you received 3 credits in
MHS 6910 and 2 credits in MHS 6940 during your MED/EDS program, you would be
limited to 2 additional credits in MHS 6910 and 3 additional credits in MHS 6940 during
your doctoral program.
If you enroll for credit hours beyond your allowable limits in either or both of these
courses, your registrations will automatically be changed (by the Graduate School) so
that you do not exceed the maximums. Remember that a change of your registration
without your knowledge could have serious detrimental effects on any financial aid loan,
assistantship, fellowship, or tuition waiver status.

Enrollment, Academic Standing and Retention

Continuous Enrollment, Time Limitations, and Leave of Absence
Students should maintain continuous enrollment from their first semester through
program completion, including minimum enrollment of 3 graduate credit hours in fall and
spring terms and 2 graduate credit hours in summer term.
All work counted toward a master's degree must be completed during the 7 years
immediately preceding the date on which the degree is to be awarded. This includes
transfer credit. All work for a doctoral degree must be completed within 5 calendar years
after satisfactory performance on the qualifying examination, or this examination must
be repeated. Doctoral students should consult the Requirements for the Ph.D. section
of the Graduate Catalog for time limitations.


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Students who will not be registered at the University of Florida for a period of more than
one academic semester must notify in writing the department chair, requesting a leave
of absence for a designated period of time. A doctoral student who ceases to be
registered at UF for more than one term needs prior written approval from the doctoral
committee chair for a leave of absence for a stated period of time. Students who do not
enroll at the university for two consecutive terms, including any summer term, must
apply for readmission. Readmission is not guaranteed and is subject to availability.
More information on readmission may be found on the web at Readmission to UF.
Applications for readmission are available online on the UF Graduate Admission web
page. A non-refundable application fee is required.

Residence Requirements
Masters-level students will find reference to residence requirements within the Degree
Requirements section of the Requirements for Master's Degrees in the Graduate
School. Doctoral students should refer to the Campus Residence Requirements section
in the Graduate Catalog.

Academic Standing
Any graduate student may be denied further registration in the University or in a
graduate major if progress toward the completion of the planned program becomes
unsatisfactory to the department, college, or the Graduate School. Failure to maintain
an overall B (3.0) average in all work attempted is by definition unsatisfactory progress.
In addition to an overall GPA requirement of 3.0, graduate students must also have a
3.0 GPA in their major course work (as well as in minor course work if a minor is
declared) at the time of graduation.
If a student's cumulative GPA and/or a student's individual semester GPA falls below
the 3.00 minimum, the student will be placed on "Academic Probation" status with the
UF Graduate School in the semester following the one in which the student's cumulative
and/or individual academic term GPA fell below the 3.00 minimum. Note that notices of
being placed on "academic probation" are distributed, monitored, and enforced by the
UF Graduate School. The department has no control over these processes.
The consequences of "academic probation" status are as follows:
* The student is prohibited from participating in regular (i.e., early) registration for the
next semester in which the student intends to enroll. A student who has been on
"academic probation" may participate in late registration for a subsequent semester
if the "academic probation" status has been removed by the Graduate School.
* Although the student may have applied within the department for placement for a
practicum or internship, s/he will not be permitted to register for the practicum or
internship during regular registration.
A student placed on "academic probation" for a given academic term has until the last
day of regularly scheduled classes (i.e., excluding the Final Exam period) in that
academic term to raise her/his cumulative and individual (preceding) semester GPA's
above the 3.00 minimum. Failure to meet the minimum GPA standards) by this


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deadline may result in the student's dismissal from the program in which the student is
enrolled.
Because this policy is implemented and controlled by the UF Graduate School, a
student on "academic probation" status must present evidence to the UF Graduate
School the situation has been rectified (i.e., a Change of Grade form) in order to have
the "academic probation" status removed. Notifying the department is not sufficient.
Records in the UF Registrar's Office must indicate that the student's cumulative and
preceding term GPA's exceed the required minimum.

Grades, Grade Points, and Graduation
Refer to the Grades section of the Graduate Catalog for explanation of acceptable
grades for graduate students. To calculate your grade point average (GPA), multiply
grade value times the number of credit hours for total grade points. Divide the total
number of grade points by the number of hours carried, excluding S/U option hours.
Grades of S (Satisfactory) and U (Unsatisfactory) are the only grades that can be
awarded to students registered in the following courses: 6910-Supervised Research,
6940-Supervised Teaching, 6971-Masters Research, 7979-Advanced Research, and
7980-Doctoral Research. All 1000- and 2000-level courses may be taken S/U but 3000
and 4000 may not be taken S/U.
The following grades must be changed before a student is permitted to graduate: D, E
(failing grade), I, X (absent from exam), and U (unsatisfactory).
The following grades are not computed in a GPA: S (satisfactory), U (unsatisfactory).
Incomplete (I) grades recorded on the student record indicate the non-punitive initial-
term receipt of an I. A grade of I is not considered a failing grade for the term in which it
is received, and it is not computed in the grade point average. However, if the I* or N*
has not been changed by the end of the next term for which the student is enrolled and
receives grades, it will be counted as a failing grade and used in computation of the
grade point average. Grades of Incomplete (I) should be removed as quickly as
possible. Grades of I carry no quality points and lower the overall grade point average.
All I grades should be completed before awarding a graduate degree. I grades should
not be assigned to S/U graded courses.
Graduate students may repeat courses in which they earn failing grades. The grade
points from the first and second attempts will be included in the computation of the
grade point average, but the student will receive credit for only the second attempt.

Student Review Policy
The Department of Counselor Education is committed to monitoring the progress of our
specialist and doctoral students on an annual basis. To do this, faculty as a whole will
periodically review the progress of each student in the specialist and doctoral programs.
The student's academic performance and progress toward degree completion will be
judged by the faculty as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. The faculty will recommend a
decision about the student's academic standing: continuation in good standing,
probation, or discontinuation. The student's advisor will then confer with the student


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and share any relevant feedback resulting from the faculty review of the student's
progress.

Student Retention Policy and Procedures
All professions subscribe to peer review. As counseling professionals, we are
responsible for monitoring each other's professional behavior. This monitoring involves
evaluation of cognitive (i.e., academic) competence, practice efficacy, and personal and
professional conduct according to professional standards of care [i.e., Ethical
Standards, Standards of Preparation, and Professional Conduct Codes] promoted by
professional counseling organizations and associations [e.g., the Association for
Counselor Education and Supervision, the American Counseling Association, the
National Board for Certified Counselors, the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling
and Related Educational Programs, and the American Association for Marriage and
Family Therapy].
To protect the rights of students, the Counselor Education faculty have adopted the
following retention policy and procedure for occasions when questions arise concerning
a student's conduct and/or suitability for entry into a profession represented by a
program in the department, even though the student may be evidencing satisfactory
performance in academic course work.
If, in the professional judgment of a Counselor Education faculty member, a student's
behavior is deemed inappropriate and/or professionally unbecoming, the student's right
to due process is respected when the faculty member follows these procedures:
1. The faculty member who has become aware of a problem meets with the student,
discusses her/his concern with the student, explores alternatives with the student,
and tries to construct a mutual agreement on resolving the problem.
2. If deemed important and appropriate, the faculty member may also write a letter to
the department Chairperson summarizing the meeting with the student. The faculty
member concurrently informs the student, in writing, that a letter has been sent to
the department Chairperson. The student may also write a letter summarizing
her/his point of view.
3. If the department Chairperson deems the student's problem to be serious enough in
nature and/or the proposed resolution, if any, unacceptable, the department
Chairperson can appoint a Retention Committee composed of three current
department faculty members, excluding the faculty member initiating the procedure
to investigate all aspects of the situation and to make recommendations concerning
the student to the entire department faculty. The student is always informed, in
writing, of these proceedings and is always interviewed by the retention committee
as one aspect of the investigation.
4. The Retention Committee's report, including recommendations and/or requirements,
is presented to the department faculty in a Closed Meeting (i.e., a meeting of
department faculty members only; students are not permitted to attend this meeting).
5. When the department faculty members have acted upon the Retention Committee's
report, the department Chairperson and the student's faculty advisor meet with the


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student to convey the department's decisions) and/or recommendations. The
department Chairperson and the student's faculty advisor subsequently monitor the
student's progress in carrying out the department's recommendations for the
student.
6. If the student is not satisfied with the department's decision, s/he can subsequently
follow the appeals procedures of the College of Education and/or University of
Florida. To inquire about appeals procedures within the College of Education,
contact the Director of Graduate Studies.

Final Term and Graduation Instructions and Guidelines
It is the student's responsibility to ensure all requirements have been met and every
deadline is observed. Failure to do so will result in delaying graduation. If you change
the term in which you graduate, you must repeat these instructions.

Term Prior to Graduation
* Review the relevant sections under the General Regulations in the Graduate School
Catalog.
* Submit the appropriate masters or doctoral Graduation Checklist to department
graduate secretary no later than three weeks before the last day of classes of the
term prior to graduation.
* Review UF Critical Dates and Deadlines for final term deadlines, including degree
application deadlines, thesis and dissertation dates.

Final Academic Term Registration and Guidelines
* Review UF Critical Dates and Deadlines for final term deadlines, including degree
application deadlines, thesis and dissertation dates.
* In order to graduate, a graduate student must have earned a minimum 3.0 overall
GPA and a 3.0 in academic major and completed work required to correct all
Incomplete (I) grades
* During the term the final examination is given and during the term the degree is
awarded, a student must be registered for at least three (3) credits in fall or spring
and two (2) credits in summer (thesis students in 6971 and doctoral students in
7980). Students on a fellowship or assistantship must be registered appropriately for
their appointment.
* Complete Application for Degree with UF Registrar notifying the graduate school of
your intent to graduate.

Graduation Check
Students are encouraged to confirm that they are eligible to graduate by reviewing all
department, College of Education, and UF Graduate School requirements and
completing all requirements by the stated deadline. Students are invited to use the
appropriate masters or doctoral department Graduation Checklist to review
requirements and tasks that must be accomplished before they can graduate.


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To begin the graduation check at the department, submit the appropriate Graduation
Checklist to the Graduate Coordinator by no later than three (3) calendar weeks prior to
the end of the academic term preceding the one in which you intend to graduate. If
there are concerns about requirements applicable to you, the Graduate Coordinator will
contact you through your Faculty Advisor as soon as possible.
Completing the Application for Degree with the UF Registrar initiates a check of your
records by the Graduate School. The Graduate School notifies the department
Graduate Coordinator of a student's unfulfilled requirements for graduation during the
tenth week of the Fall and Spring semesters and the seventh week of the Summer
semester. Upon receipt of notification from the Graduate School of unfulfilled
requirements, the Graduate Coordinator forwards the notifications to the respective
faculty advisors of the students for whom the notifications were received. The
respective faculty advisors are asked to contact the students involved and to request
that the students rectify the situation. Note that only the student can complete and/or
correct the unfulfilled requirements noted by the UF Graduate School.
It is strongly recommended that students anticipating graduation maintain close contact
with their respective faculty advisor during the last three weeks of their final term.
Graduating students must provide the department with reliable contact information for
the weeks leading up to and following graduation. Students must be able to be
contacted should problems arise during the degree certification process following the
end of term.

M.Ed./Ed. S., M.A.E./Ed. S., and Ed. S. only Final Oral Examination
Refer to the Master of Education/Specialist in Education Degree Programs section for
further information on preparing for the final oral examination, including required
documentation.

Ph.D. and Ed.D. Dissertation Examination
Refer to the Doctor of Philosophy/Doctor of Education Degree Programs section for
further information on preparing for the final doctoral dissertation examination, including
required documentation.

Pre-Commencement Ritual
The Department of Counselor Education hosts either an annual or semi-annual pre-
commencement ritual to honor department graduates. Pay attention during your final
academic term for plans to hold a department ceremony.

Funding Opportunities
A limited number of funding opportunities are extended to counselor education graduate
students. The majority of funding associated with the department is in the form of
fellowships and graduate assistantships. Refer to the College of Education Scholarships
web page for a limited number of scholarships specifically for counselor education
students. Link to the Graduate School's Financial Aid section for a description of and
links to further resources on funding assistance at the University of Florida. Students
may also find additional funding resources within the College of Education Scholarship


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page, within the University of Florida Student Financial Affairs. Finally, counselor
education students may pursue graduate assistantship opportunities around campus.
Students are responsible for pursuing assistantship opportunities. They may utilize the
College of Education's Recruitment, Retention, and Multicultural Affairs Office as a
resource in identifying assistantship opportunities on campus.

Fellowships
Each year, the University of Florida allocates a specific number of fellowship award
dollars to each college. From that amount and any additional funds, the College of
Education identifies a specific number of fellowship awards for College of Education
newly entering doctoral students. Typically, fellowships provide financial support for four
years and include teaching and research expectations. Departments nominate to a
college-wide review committee accepted doctoral candidates, demonstrating highly
competitive academic backgrounds, GRE scores, and potential for research and
academic success. Competitive fellowship nominees intend to pursue an academic
career goal in higher education. Accepted doctoral candidates may have a previously-
earned masters in counseling or may be considered "direct entry." Accepted direct entry
candidates are admitted as doctoral students and have the right to pursue directly the
masters, specialist, and doctoral degrees.
Students awarded fellowships are expected to demonstrate consistently strong
academic progress during each year of financial support. Additionally, refer to the
original letter of award that describes expectations for enrollment and teaching and
research involvement. Fellowship students are expected to comply with registration,
research or teaching experiences, and will be evaluated on their performance each
semester by their faculty mentor.
Fellowship students are assigned a teaching or research assignment each academic
year along with a faculty mentor, who may or may not serve as the student's doctoral
supervisory committee chair. Assignments are based on the best available match
between current faculty projects, teaching needs, and student interest and
developmental goals. Fellows have an opportunity each semester to evaluate their
experience, and their progress is evaluated by the faculty mentor.
Fellowship students who began their program with out of state residency should contact
the University of Florida Registrar's Office to apply for residency classification change
as soon as eligible. Refer to the Residency and Tuition section of the Graduate Catalog
for information on how to apply for Florida residency.
For additional resources on fellowships within the College of Education, see the Director
of Graduate Studies in Norman Room 186. For information on fellowship letters of
appointment, memorandums of understanding, and other business-related matters,
contact the Business Manager in the Office of Fiscal and Administrative Services in
Norman Room 134.

Graduate Assistantships
As needed, the Department extends graduate assistantship appointments to doctoral
students for an academic term, and assignments are instructional or supervisory in
nature. The assistantships include a stipend and tuition waiver. Doctoral students


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interested in being considered for a graduate assistantship should email the Department
Chair a cover letter and resume or curriculum vita.

Other Department and University Guidelines

Classroom Instruction Evaluations
The College of Education faculty value effective classroom instruction, and believe that
one way for classroom teaching to be improved is for course instructors to receive
specific feedback from students on teaching methods and activities. Therefore, College
and University policy stipulates that faculty members (and others who teach courses for
the department) must obtain students' evaluations of their teaching for all their classes
during each academic year. The information received is included in an annual merit
performance review of each faculty member and in an annual adjustment of Counselor
Education teaching assignments.
In order to obtain students' evaluations of teaching, the department uses the
"Instructional Evaluation" procedures developed by and used throughout the UF College
of Education. Two weeks before the end of each semester in which you are enrolled in
a class which is taught by a Counselor Education faculty member, you will be given the
"Instructional Evaluation" form by a student volunteer in the class while the faculty
member absents the class. After the materials are completed, the student volunteer will
collect the completed materials and return them to the department administrative office.
There are three parts to the "Instructional Evaluation" materials you will receive. Parts
one and two request information about the instructor; part three requests written
comments. You are asked to provide the class information requested (i.e., course,
section #, term, year, & the instructor's name), rate the various items presented, and
write your comments on the back of the form. It is important that you do NOT put your
name or other personally identifying information (e.g., student number) on any of the
materials.
You will be asked use the following scale (i.e., poor/below average/average/above
average/excellent) to rate the instructor on the categories below:
* Description of course objectives and assignments.
* Communication of ideas and information.
* Expression of expectations for performance in this class
* Availability to assist students in or out of class.
* Respect and concern for students.
* Stimulation of interest in course.
* Facilitation of learning.
* Enthusiasm for the subject.
* Encouragement of independent, creative, & critical thinking
* Overall Rating of Instructor.


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* Command of the subject matter.
* Preparation for class.
* Clarity and audibility of speech.
* Monitoring the class's understanding of the material.
* Evaluating student performance in terms of important objectives of the class.
* Helpfulness of comments on graded assignments.
* Encouraging students to ask and respond to questions in class.
* Challenging students intellectually.
* Making students feel welcome in seeking help in or out of class.
* Setting high academic standards.
* Focusing on the objectives stated for the course.
* Conducting the course in an organized manner.
Please be as honest and specific as possible in your responses to these questions. In
your comments, make sure you include what you liked about the class as well as what
you didn't like. The information you provide and your ratings in this procedure will in no
way affect the grade you receive in the course because the Instructor will not see the
evaluations and a summary of the ratings until grades are submitted.

Clinical Instruction Evaluations
Students are invited to evaluate practicum and internship sites, site hosts, and
supervisors at the end of every semester.

Endorsement/Recommendation Policy
Ordinarily, endorsements or recommendations for a program graduate are given to
support her/his applications) for program-specific professional positions and position
levels (e.g., School Counseling graduates applying for School Counseling positions),
but program graduates often create novel opportunities. Program graduates can be
effective and fully functioning professionals in a variety of service delivery settings when
there is a good fit between the professional's knowledge and skill and the needs and
demands of the work setting. Therefore, a faculty member's endorsements usually
address the "goodness of fit" anticipated, based on personal knowledge of a student's
development and performance in the program and her/his knowledge of the anticipated
work setting. You can help your faculty endorser accomplish this by choosing an
endorser who has first-hand knowledge of your performance and giving her/him as clear
a description as possible of the settings in which you are seeking employment.
Faculty members do not "automatically" provide verbal and/or written endorsements
(e.g., letters of recommendation); therefore, if you want a faculty member to provide a
verbal and/or written endorsement for you, please make a specific request to that
faculty member for an endorsement. In general, faculty are happy to provide both
verbal and written endorsements/recommendations for graduates of programs in the
department as long as the endorsements requested are appropriate.


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When requesting a verbal or written endorsement, you should provide a copy of the
position description for which you are applying, your resume, all specific contact
information relevant to the endorsement, and a response deadline date.

Extracurricular Counseling Activities
When students enrolled in programs in the department have opportunities to become
involved in professional counseling activities that are separate from their required
program activities, these opportunities are referred to as "extracurricular" counseling
activities. They are considered extracurricular because they are neither conducted
under the auspices of the department nor are they supervised by professional staff in
their official capacity as representatives of the University of Florida. All counseling
activities that are not program requirements fall under this definition, regardless of
whether students are being paid for the provisions of those services. Remember that all
program-required counseling activities are conducted within the context of a practicum
or internship in which you are enrolled; therefore all other counseling activities, whether
paid or not, are extracurricular.

The department and university can only assume responsibility for students engaging in
counseling activities within the limits of program requirements. Therefore, if you engage
in extracurricular counseling activities, you are entirely responsible for whatever
happens in those activities, and the department and university can assume no
responsibility whatsoever for whatever happens during your extracurricular counseling
activities. Moreover, use of university resources (e.g., legal services, physical facilities,
or material resources) by students for extracurricular counseling activities is strictly and
specifically prohibited.

The department neither encourages nor discourages students from engaging in
extracurricular counseling activities. However, the department does require that
students planning to engage in extracurricular counseling activities inform the
department, in writing, prior to commencement of the activities. This requirement
covers any time students are officially enrolled as degree candidates in programs in the
department, regardless of whether they are currently enrolled in classes in the
university.

If you plan to engage in extracurricular counseling activities, please make an
appointment with the department chairperson before you begin the activities. Prior to
the meeting, complete the Extracurricular Counseling Activities Form, including a
description of the extracurricular counseling activities in which you plan to engage and,
if you are not licensed in Florida, a report on the Florida-licensed mental health
professional who will provide supervision. This will serve as the department's
notification only for the activities you describe on the form. If in the future you plan to
engage in other and/or additional extracurricular counseling activities, please submit
another form describing those new activities.

There are significant potential legal ramifications involved in students' counseling
activities, and these ramifications become extremely complex if distinctions between
counseling program requirements and extracurricular counseling activities are not clear.


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Therefore, students who engage in extracurricular counseling activities without having
provided written notification to the department prior to inception of those activities are
subject to immediate dismissal from programs in the department and the university.

Faculty Meetings
The Department of Counselor Education reserves the time between 10:00am and
12:00pm on Mondays for Department Faculty Meetings, which are held in the Robert O.
Stripling Conference Room Norman Hall Room 1205. The department chairperson
schedules Department Faculty Meetings for the semester in advance. Program Faculty
meetings are often held on the Mondays not reserved for Department Faculty Meetings.
No meetings are held if there are no immediate business matters for the faculty to
discuss. Counselor Education courses or other regular instructional or supervisory
meetings are not to be scheduled.

Counselor Education Students are invited and encouraged to attend all scheduled
faculty meetings, except when the faculty meets in closed session to discuss
evaluations of students or faculty.

Research with Human Subjects
Students and faculty involved in research with human subjects must consult the
appropriate University of Florida Institutional Review Board.


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SECTION FOUR GENERAL DEGREE INFORMATION


Master of Education and Specialist in Education Degree Programs

Requirements for the Master's Degree
In addition to the department requirements and guidelines, students must comply with
the Graduate School Requirements for the Master's Degree, as outlined in the Graduate
Catalog. Faculty advisors are encouraged to review these requirements. Among
requirements in this section are transfer of credit, supervisory committee, leave of
absence, and thesis requirements.

MED/EDS and EDS-only Programs Overview
The department offers entry-level degree programs in which degree-seeking students
can earn both the Master of Education (M.Ed.) and the Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)
degrees by successfully completing a minimum of seventy-two (72) acceptable, post-
baccalaureate semester graduate-credit hours of required coursework. For students
wanting to complete the thesis, the Masters of Arts in Education (MAE) and the
Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) degrees can be earned by successfully completing a
minimum of seventy-two (72) acceptable, post-baccalaureate semester graduate-credit
hours, including a 6-semester-credit-hour Master's Thesis or Master's Project. Entry-
level graduate students major in one of the following professional program
specializations: Mental Health Counseling (ACD), Marriage and Family Counseling
(EDC), or School Counseling and Guidance (SCG).
These degree programs are for students who either have not previously completed a
master's degree program or who have previously completed a master's degree program
having other than a counseling focus and who desire to obtain a second Master's
degree.
There is no defined master's-only degree offered within the context of the M.Ed./Ed.S.
or MAE/Ed.S. programs identified above. To earn the M.Ed. or MAE degree you must
complete all requirements for the combined degrees.

Specialist in Education Only (Ed. S.) Program Overview
The department offers an intermediate-level, post-masters, Specialist in Education
(Ed.S.) degree program in which degree-seeking students who already hold a masters
degree in counseling can earn the Specialist in Education (Ed.S.-only) degree by
successfully completing a minimum of thirty-six (36) acceptable, post-masters semester
graduate-credit hours of required coursework in one of the following professional
program specializations: Mental Health Counseling (ACD), Marriage and Family
Counseling (EDC), or School Counseling and Guidance (SCG).
The Ed.S.-only degree is for all students, including currently-enrolled doctoral students,
who have previously completed a master's degree program with an emphasis in
counseling. In addition to the successful completion of at least thirty-six semester credit
hours beyond the master's degree, students must pass the Final Oral Examination.


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The 36-credit minimum is required regardless of the number of semester credit hours
previously completed in an earned master's degree. The 36-credit minimum cannot
include semester credit hours taken for fulfillment of program pre-professional
requirements.

Master's Thesis
Students are required to assemble a thesis supervisory committee of three members, all
of whom are internal faculty members in the Counselor Education department. One
committee member would serve as the student's thesis supervisor. Each committee
member must be willing, at minimum, to read the thesis and participate in the final oral
examination during which time the student presents the thesis.
When developing a thesis proposal, students and faculty supervisors should consult
thesis resources located within the Requirements for Master's Degrees in the Graduate
Catalog, resources on the Graduate Editorial Office, and College of Education Theses
resources. Consult the appropriate deadlines to create a timetable.
The final oral examination in which a student presents the masters thesis may be
conducted in lieu of the final oral examination, also known as exit interview, in which
non-thesis students participate. Given this, the thesis supervisory committee may ask
the student about her or his academic and clinical experiences in addition to questions
about the thesis.

M.Ed./Ed. S., M.A.E./Ed. S., and Ed. S. only Final Oral Examination
UF Graduate School policy stipulates that students enrolled in M.Ed./Ed.S., MAE/Ed.S.,
or Ed.S.-only programs must complete successfully a final comprehensive oral and/ or
written examination prior to graduation. This examination must be held on campus,
must cover at least the student's major field of concentration, and must be conducted no
earlier than the academic term preceding the one in which the student intends to
graduate (i.e., within six months of the date of graduation). Note that the student must
be registered for a minimum of three (3) graduate credit hours during the academic term
in which the examination is completed.

SCG Final Oral Examination
A final oral exam in the department is to be arranged by each student with his or her
faculty advisor in the semester in which the student expects to graduate. The School
Counseling Program offers students the option of either a "group" final exam that has
proved to be both interesting and challenging for those who select that option or an
individual exam.
To be eligible for the group exam, students must be in good standing in the department
and have permission from their faculty advisor. The ninety-minute exam is scheduled in
advance at a specified time and place. All participants must be on time so they can
work as a group. If a student is late, s/he will have to take an individual exam, which will
be arranged for a later time.


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If you want to participate in the final group exam, send the SCG program coordinator an
e-mail making that request and send the name of your faculty advisor so the program
coordinator can make arrangements with your advisor.

ACD and EDC Final Oral Examination
Professionals are expected to: possess the unique skills, knowledge, and experience
required to perform a generally acknowledged important social function; make
independent judgments concerning the effective utilization of skills, knowledge, and
experience; commit to a program of continuous personal and professional development;
follow a set of ethical principles prescribed by the profession; and be accountable to
their professional peers and to the public.
Therefore, in the final oral examination for mental health and marriage and family
counseling students, the faculty asks students to demonstrate present levels of
professional competence before they face the impending demands of post-graduate
supervised clinical practice. The examination committee will review a written integrative
paper, view a video presentation of the examinee's clinical work, and evaluate the
examinee's response to faculty questions about the paper and the video.
The specific objectives of the examination are:
To provide students with the opportunity to articulate their personal theory of
therapy at this stage of their career;
To demonstrate therapeutic behavior congruent with that philosophy;
To provide a forum in which they can represent themselves professionally as
mental health or marriage and family counseling;
To help the faculty determine if they are theoretically and clinically ready for
post-degree supervised clinical practice as Registered MHC or MFT Interns;
To help students and faculty identify areas of strength on which students can
build as they graduate and begin their post-degree clinical supervision.
It is the intent of the faculty that this be a positive and productive experience for
students, and faculty will make every effort to be encouraging and facilitative. Students
must, in turn, give considerable effort and attention to their papers and tapes and
prepare well for their presentations. Follow the following guidelines for preparing the
integrative paper and video supplement.

Inteqrative Paper Guidelines
Write an integrative paper detailing your personal approach to therapy, which includes
the following areas. The paper is to be a creative expression of your own views as you
dialogue with the key documents in the field, comparing and contrasting your position
with the position of seminal theorists in mental health or marriage and family counseling.
Your conceptualization of the client/system and relevant attributes as situated
in a broader socio-cultural context;
Your views concerning health and pathology in client systems;
Your approach to assessment and diagnosis;


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Your approach to generating goals and objectives in counseling/therapy;
Your understanding of the processes of change or no change;
Your preferred intervention strategies and their purpose;
Your approach to evaluating the effectiveness of therapy; and
A summary of the research literature supportive of your approach and, if
applicable, a summary of the implications of your approach for future
research.
This should be a scholarly, referenced paper, following current APA guidelines of
between 10 and 15 pages in length that articulates your identity as a behavioral and
social scientist.
It is imperative that a hard copy of the paper be given to each member of your
examining committee no less than one full week prior to the presentation. If your paper
is not distributed one full week in advance of the scheduled examination, you must
reschedule it.

Video Supplement
Please give a written supplement to the videotape that you will be presenting to
members of your examining committee forty-eight hours before your oral presentation.
Remember, the primary purpose of your presentation is to demonstrate interventions
that are consistent with your theoretical position. This supplement is to:
Give faculty a context for their viewing of the interventions presented on
videotape. This might include a description of the client/system, their
presenting problems, their goals for counseling, and your goals for your work
with this particular client/system.
Include your rationale for the four intervention examples you are presenting to
the faculty.
Tell the reader the length of each video segment and what element of your
theory the selection demonstrates.
Attach written evidence of the effectiveness of your approach with at least one client or
client system. For example, provide a completed feedback instrument that provides
outcome data relevant to your approach.
Be sure to disguise identifying data about the clients/systems so that their privacy is
protected. Collect the video supplement after the examination and dispose of it
properly. Erase the videotape, unless you have written permission of your clients to
preserve the tape and written materials for educational purposes.
Since the focus will be on your interventions rather than on client behaviors,
it is not necessary for you to present from only one case. Indeed, your video segments
may be from several different cases, although, it's easier to organize material from one
case. Make sure you have appropriate release forms on file for each tape segment for
each client or client system shown.


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Final Oral Examination Presentation
You will have one hour to present and explain your work. Your advisor will
serve as moderator for the examination, calling the examination to order, notifying your
committee when questioning may begin, and stopping at 60 minutes so that a formal
process of evaluation can commence. Conduct the session and take responsibility for
your presentation within the guidelines offered here. We recommend that you work
closely with your advisor in preparing all materials so that your examination runs
smoothly.
Once your advisor has called the meeting to order, you are to give a maximim of 10
minutes to overview the interventions that you will present in the videotape and indicate
how, in a very general sense, they are consistent with your theory as articulated in the
paper. Following the introduction, present a 20-minute, total tape time, sample of your
work, particularly, your theory-based interventions. It is exceedingly important that you
focus primary attention on your interventions rather than on client dynamics or
problems. Show how these specific interventions are consistent with your theory and
demonstrate how they are effective in achieving their assumed goal.
Care should be taken that the videotape is of high technical as well as therapeutic
quality. The faculty will not accept segments that are difficult to view or hear.
During the 10-minute introduction and the first 10 minutes of your tape, those persons
attending will be asked not to interrupt. Thereafter, for the remaining time,
approximately 30 minutes, people will be free to ask questions about both the videotape
and the paper.
Your advisor is to indicate when questioning can begin and to assure that the focus of
the questioning and discussion centers on you and your presentation. (It is assumed
that all members of the examination committee will have read the paper in advance).
The time without questions will give you the opportunity to demonstrate your capacities
for self-presentation and verbal expression.
Your advisor will interrupt the discussion at the end of 50 minutes and ask you to step
outside the room while each of the examining faculty complete an evaluation form.
Your advisor will then invite you to return and will moderate an evaluative discussion of
your presentation.
Evaluation and Remediation
In order to pass the examination, your faculty committee members must reach
consensus you have presented successfully each of the four work samples presented:
your personal theory paper, written supplement to the videotape, videotape
presentation, and verbal presentation. In the event that you do not earn a passing
recommendation on the written materials, but do earn a passing grade on the videotape
and the oral presentation, you may redo these papers without making another
presentation. However, failing the oral or tape presentation will necessitate a second
examination.
In the event of a second failure of any portion of this exam, your committee


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will probably recommend that you be dropped from the program. However, if you
prepare diligently and work closely with your advisor, the faculty anticipates this
unhappy event will be very unlikely.
The faculty members view this final examination as the culmination of your theoretical
and clinical experience in the entry-level program. When the faculty "passes" you, it
means that we believe you have presented sufficient evidence to demonstrate that you
are functioning at the level expected of a competent graduate of the mental health or
marriage and family counseling program, and are ready for the post-degree supervised
clinical experience required by law for entry into the profession.

Guidelines for Arranqing the Final Oral Examination Committee and Examination
The final hour-long oral examination is conducted by a three-person committee
consisting of your faculty advisor and two other faculty members holding regular
appointments in the department, and it must be conducted no later than two weeks prior
to the end of regularly scheduled classes during the academic term in which you intend
to graduate. The vote must be unanimous.
To schedule your final oral examination, first contact your faculty advisor and determine
some possible dates and times when s/he will be available to conduct your final oral
examination. Then contact other faculty members in the department, who hold regular
faculty appointments, and request their participation in your final oral examination until
you have found two who can meet at one of the times provided by your advisor. When
your faculty advisor and two other faculty members have agreed to meet with you for at
least an hour, provide written confirmation of the time, date, and location for your final
oral examination for each of the faculty participants. The student is responsible for
scheduling the room and reserving any audiovisual equipment needed for the final
examination. See the department graduate secretary for assistance reserving the room
and equipment. Most faculty prefer that you arrange to have your final oral examination
conducted during the first five weeks of the academic term in which you intend to
graduate because they have a greater number of unscheduled time periods available.
Students final oral examination must be completed no later than two weeks prior to the
last day of regularly scheduled classes.
After the final examination has been successfully completed, be sure the Final
Examination Form is completed, signed, and filed with the UF Graduate School. See the
department graduate secretary prior to your scheduled final examination to confirm the
Final Examination Form has been prepared. The faculty advisor should return the
completed form to the department graduate secretary.

Final Examination Form
See the department graduate secretary and request your final examination form be
generated.


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Doctor of Philosophy/Doctor of Education Degree Programs


Requirements for the Ph.D.
In addition to the department requirements and guidelines, students must comply with
the Graduate School Requirements of the Ph.D., as outlined in the Graduate Catalog.
Supervisory committee chairs and members are encouraged to review these
requirements. Among others, doctoral students must comply with Residence
Requirements and Time Limitations. These requirements also clarify further transfer of
credit, leave of absence guidelines, supervisory committee and dissertation
requirements.

Doctoral Program Overview
The mission of the College of Education is to prepare exemplary practitioners and
scholars; to generate, use and disseminate knowledge about teaching, learning and
human development; and to collaborate with others to solve critical educational and
human problems in a diverse global community. Consistent with the mission of the
college, the doctoral programs in the College of Education at the University of Florida
strive to achieve integration and program appropriate balance among teaching,
research, and service and/or professional practice. These components provide a basis
for the development of well-prepared students who will have extensive disciplinary and
interdisciplinary knowledge, skills, and experience.
The department faculty fosters a highly qualified, diverse student population. A strong
core of common curricular requirements in combination with individually tailored
programs of study for all doctoral students prepare them to make significant scholarly
contributions, solve problems, and provide services that enhance the human condition
and our society.
All three Counselor Education doctoral degree program majors/specializations
emphasize the following components:
* A foundation that is built upon successful completion of all requirements of an
appropriate entry-level program;
* A common curricular core in Counselor Education and Research Design &
Methodology, specifically relevant to doctoral-level preparation;
* A specialized, clinical concentration (i.e., academic major) that corresponds to each
doctoral student's preferred professional context, identity, or specialty (i.e., Marriage
& Family Counseling, Mental Health Counseling, and School Counseling).
* An elective research emphasis that reflects the additional research expertise
expected of doctoral-level professionals (e.g., advocacy; agency/budget/
department/school administration & management; clinical supervision; clinical
practice issues (e.g., anxiety, delinquency, depression); consultation; crisis
intervention; educational/mental health policy formation, implementation &
evaluation; employee assistance; personnel management; psycho-educational
program development, program management and & program evaluation;
professional regulation; specialized clinical practice; staff development/team
building; and/or teaching/training).


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Doctoral students in programs in the department are provided significant educational
opportunities in teaching and clinical supervision, research, clinical practice, and
professional service. Typical, structured learning activities found in doctoral student
programs include:
Teaching Clinical Supervision (Preparation, structured practice, and evaluative
feedback in one or more of the following instructional acts is recommended)
College and university teaching at the undergraduate level
Oral presentation and discussion-leading for graduate level courses
Clinical teaching and/or supervision of pre-service students
Preparation and delivery of professional development activities for practitioners
Tutoring for graduate or undergraduate students in an academic specialization
Conducting individual and/or group clinical supervision to entry-level counseling
students
Research (Preparation, supervised practice, and evaluative feedback in two or more of
the following is recommended)
Collaboration on one or more research projects with peers and/or mentors
Design and conduct of an original research study
Scholarly dissemination of research through publication or conference
presentation (individually or with professional peers)
Preparation of a sole-authored scholarly or scientific treatise (i.e., dissertation)
Participation in grant proposal preparation
Professional Service Activity (Supervised participation in two or more of the following is
recommended)
Membership and/or participation in one or more academic and/or professional
society
Attendance at state, regional, and/or national conferences
Consultation in a field of expertise
Participation or observation of faculty mentor(s) in consultation activity
Participation in review of papers and/or journal manuscripts as part of
professional juried processes
Community or campus service or leadership in area of professional expertise
Professional Practice (Recommended when appropriate for professional discipline or
area of study)
Supervised experience in the provision of professional service in a field setting
Supervised administrative experience, including leadership responsibilities, in a
professional context


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Doctoral Core Curricula
The CACREP program accreditation the Department of Counselor Education has
earned has been achieved and maintained, to a great extent, because the department
requires all students enrolled in all three doctoral program practice specializations to
successfully complete the Core Curricula that established the foundation for study in
Counselor Education. See the General and Program-specific Core Curricula section of
the handbook for foundational core courses completed at the master's level. The entry-
level masters/specialist curriculum forms the foundation of the doctoral program. The
following courses form the doctoral core curricula and are built on the entry-level
foundation.

Professional Practice Emphasis
A minimum of four, and usually more, courses specifically related to the
doctoral program specialty area (i.e. Mental Health Counseling, Marriage and Family
Counseling, School Counseling and Guidance). This emphasis must also be evident in
the selection of sites and supervision in the field experiences.

Counselor Education Emphasis
MHS 6400 Personality and Advanced Counseling Theories
MHS 7600 Consultation Procedures
MHS xxxx Doctoral Integrative Seminar

Research Design and Methodoloqy
Doctoral students must satisfy the College of Education College-wide Research
Methodology Requirements for Doctoral Students.
EDF 6403 Quantitative Foundations of Educational Research or EDF 6400 Quantitative
Foundations of Educational Research: Overview and EDF 6402 Quantitative
Foundations of Educational Research: Inferential Statistics (students must complete
either the 6-credit EDF 6403 or both the 3-credit EDF 6400 and EDF 6402. EDF 6400
and EDF 6402 must be taken in consecutive semesters and both must be completed to
comply with College of Education research methodology requirements.)
Additional research methodology courses) relevant to dissertation topic and negotiated
with doctoral supervisory committee
SDS 6905 Individual Work (data-based study)
MHS 7730 Seminar in Counseling Research
MHS 7980 Research for Doctoral Dissertation

Field Experiences
MHS/SDS xxxx 7830 Internship in Counseling and Development
MHS/SDS xxxx Group Supervision in Specific Program Specialization
MHS 7808 Practicum in Counseling Supervision
MHS 7840 Internship in Counselor Education


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Practice and Internship Electives
MHS 6940 or SDS 6940 Supervised Teaching (1-5; Max. 5)
MHS 7946 Internship in Agency Program Management
MHS/SDS 7830 Internship in Counseling and Development
MHS/SDS Group Supervision in Specific Program Specialization
The core-course summary above demonstrates that there is considerable commonality
among all three doctoral specializations because the doctoral program in Counselor
Education has been designed to:
* Prepare all doctoral students to work in institutions of higher education which offer
graduate-level counselor education programs;
* Prepare all doctoral students to work in professional practice settings, which offer
the professional services of Marriage and Family Therapists, Mental Health
Counselors and/or School Counselors; and
* Enable all doctoral students to graduate from a doctoral program in "Counselor
Education and Supervision" which meets CACREP accreditation standards.

Counselor Education Emphasis
The counselor education emphasis is designed to provide advanced graduate-level
preparation for doctoral students, in all three doctoral program specializations, to work
in institutions of higher education which offer graduate-level counselor education
programs. The counselor education emphasis is designed to foster and enhance each
student's development of skills in teaching, consultation, counseling & psychotherapy,
research, supervision, program development & evaluation, and/or organizational &
program management.
All doctoral students are required to complete departmental requirements applicable to
one of the M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. program specializations in the department, or in a
closely related program of graduate study elsewhere.
All doctoral students are required to complete a core of supervised practical
experiences, including the one practicum and one internship appropriate to their
M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. program specialization in the department, and at least one
additional clinical internship at the doctoral level and one internship in counselor
education (i.e., MHS 7840). Those students who hold an active Florida license (e.g.,
LCSW, LMFT, LMHC) may elect, pending approval of their Doctoral Supervisory
Committee, to enroll in MHS 7946 Internship in Agency Program Management, rather
than MHS 7830 Internship in Counseling and Development.
All doctoral students are encouraged to engage in professional activity characteristic of
counselor educators, such as the following experiences:
MHS 6910 Supervised Research (e.g., presentation of a paper/program pertinent
to the student's program specialization at a professional meeting or convention
and/or submission of a manuscript pertinent to the student's program
specialization to a professional journal).


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MHS 6940 Supervised Teaching (e.g., assisting a faculty member in teaching the
Lab section of MHS 5005).
In addition, doctoral students may elect two courses offered in the UF College of
Education Department of Educational Leadership (i.e., EDH 6066 American Higher
Education, and EDH 6305 College and University Teaching), which are germane to
preparing students to work in institutions of higher education.

Ph.D. and Ed.D. Dissertation Differentiating Guidelines
The College of Education Office of Graduate Studies offers guidelines for distinguishing
between the Ph.D. and Ed.D. for both qualitative and quantitative based research
studies. Refer to these distinctions and consult with your doctoral committee to identify
the most appropriate degree for you to pursue.

Doctoral Supervisory Committee and Meetings

Acting Doctoral Committee Chairperson
Upon admission to a doctoral degree program in the department, you are assigned a
faculty member who will serve as your temporary, acting doctoral chairperson. Each
doctoral student must have a designated doctoral chairperson at all times during the
student's enrollment. The faculty member assigned has agreed to work as the "acting"
chairperson of your yet-to-be-appointed doctoral committee after having examined how
your training goals and research interests fit with his/hers.
The name of the acting doctoral chairperson assigned to you is provided to you at the
new student orientation meeting if not sooner. In the first weeks of the term, the
graduate secretary files on your behalf with the Graduate School your first Supervisory
Committee Form listing your acting doctoral committee chair.
Seek advisement from your acting chair for your program-related activities (e.g., course
registration) during the first academic term immediately following your admission to a
doctoral program and until you have selected your permanent doctoral chairperson.
By the end of the last week of regularly scheduled classes of your second academic
term of enrollment, you must constitute a "permanent" Doctoral Studies Supervisory
Committee, regardless of whether you enroll for coursework during that academic term.
After constituting your official permanent Doctoral Studies Supervisory Committee, seek
advisement from your committee chairperson and other committee members regarding
the construction and endorsement of your official planned program of doctoral studies
and consideration of any and all changes you may wish to make.

Responsibilities of a Doctoral Committee Chairperson
To compliment the information in this section, doctoral students and faculty members
may refer to the College of Education's resource on Responsibilities of a Doctoral
Committee Chairperson.
In addition to the critical, but somewhat intangible, duties of serving as a doctoral
student's major professor (i.e, advising, serving as a role model, stimulating scholarly
research, evaluating progress, monitoring job search activities, and mentoring), there


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are technical requirements and paperwork, identified below, that must be completed by
a doctoral chairperson so that a doctoral student can meet UF Graduate School
requirements for graduation. Many of these requirements are completed with the
department's graduate secretary. See the graduate secretary or the graduate
coordinator for clarification and further instructions.
After agreeing to serve as chair, the chairperson helps the student select doctoral
supervisory committee members and makes sure that student has the department's
graduate secretary file the Appointment of Supervisory Committee form.
The chairperson, in cooperation with the student and members of the doctoral
supervisory committee, develop and sign the planned program form, secure
confirmation from the department's graduate coordinator, and have it placed in the
student's file. Typically a formal meeting is called of the student's doctoral supervisory
committee for the purpose of approving the student's planned program.
During the first semester the student is enrolled at UF, the chairperson writes a transfer-
of-credit petition letter, if one is necessary, to the Graduate School requesting that up to
30 graduate credits from a previously earned master's degree be credited to the
student's doctoral program.
The chairperson prepares the student's written doctoral qualifying specialization
examination with input from the doctoral supervisory committee members and/or
supervises the student in the preparation of a specialization paper, which will be
evaluated by the student's doctoral supervisory committee.
The chairperson presides at the student's oral doctoral qualifying examination and
submits an Admission to Candidacy form after the student's successful completion of
both oral and written qualifying examinations.
The chairperson presides at the student's dissertation proposal meeting and
subsequent meetings to discuss dissertation progress.
The chairperson reminds the student to prepare and submit the proposal and
appropriate approval forms for review by the Office of Graduate Studies & Research
and UF's Institutional Review Board and informs the graduate coordinator when
approval is received.
The chairperson conducts an annual evaluation of the student's progress, soliciting
information from the student and the student's doctoral supervisory committee
members, and sends a letter of evaluation to the student and the departmental
chairperson.
One semester before the student intends to graduate, the chairperson determines which
of the existing doctoral supervisory committee are still available, helps the student to
select new committee members, and submits a change of Doctoral Supervisory
Committee form, if needed.
The chairperson reminds students of relevant deadline dates.
After the doctoral supervisory committee members agree that the student's dissertation
is ready for submission, the chairperson prepares the letter of transmittal, which


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authorizes the student to submit the dissertation to the Office of Graduate Studies and
the Graduate School Editorial Office.
The chairperson completes the final examination notification form, submits it ten (10) full
working days before the doctoral dissertation defense, and publicizes the date of the
dissertation defense.
The chairperson presides at the final oral doctoral examination (i.e., dissertation
defense) and signs the Final Examination Form.
The chairperson reviews the final draft of the defended dissertation to confirm that all
required changes are made (including those required by the Graduate School editorial
office) before signing final copy.
The chairperson escorts the student, or arranges a substitute escort, at graduation if the
student attends the University of Florida College of Education commencement
ceremony.

Responsibilities of Doctoral Supervisory Committee Members
In addition to a chairperson, your Doctoral Studies Supervisory Committee must include
a minimum of three other graduate faculty members, for a total of four persons. Only
persons who hold Graduate Studies Faculty (GSF) status and are approved by the
graduate school may serve as member. A list of Graduate Faculty is provided in the
Graduate Catalog. Check with the department graduate secretary prior to selecting a
committee member to confirm if a faculty member holds graduate faculty status.
Your doctoral supervisory committee members will assist you in formulating your
program of studies, participate in your doctoral level training and in designing and
conducting your doctoral dissertation research, and conduct your doctoral qualifying
exams and your dissertation defense.

Choosing your Doctoral Supervisory Committee
Consult the following guidelines when selecting your doctoral supervisory committee
members.
Your doctoral supervisory committee must consist of at least four faculty members
holding graduate faculty status. Consult the current Graduate Catalog for a list of
Graduate Faculty, and confirm with the department's graduate secretary that each
proposed member holds graduate faculty status. There is no maximum limit; however,
history has shown that it is extremely difficult to coordinate activities among members of
a doctoral supervisory committee containing more than five persons.
The chairperson of your doctoral studies supervisory committee must be a member of
the Graduate Faculty. See the above paragraph for confirming graduate faculty status.
You can either request the doctoral chairperson originally assigned to you or you can
ask another faculty person to serve as your committee chairperson, if s/he is available
and willing.
At least two members of your committee must hold a regular or affiliate appointment in
the Department of Counselor Education. Adjunct faculty members do not fulfill this
requirement.


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At least one member of your committee must hold an academic appointment in a
department other than the Department of Counselor Education so s/he can serve as the
External Member of your committee. Faculty members who hold joint or affiliate
appointments, appointments in the Department of Counselor Education and another UF
department, are not eligible to serve as the External Member of your committee.

Suggestions for Inviting Faculty Members to Serve on Doctoral Supervisory Committees
Discuss your professional goals and plans with the faculty members) you hope to have
as your chairperson; make a choice; and ask her/him to serve as your permanent
doctoral supervisory committee chairperson.
Be prepared for a faculty member to turn down your invitation to serve as chair. The
faculty member may have no openings available. The most common reason why faculty
members do not, and cannot, agree to serve as committee chairpersons is that
departmental policies restrict the number of doctoral supervisory committees for which a
faculty member serves as chair. Therefore, if you wish to have a faculty person other
than your temporary acting chairperson serve as your permanent chair, secure a new
chair's official commitment prior to relinquishing your current acting chairperson.
Once you have determined your permanent doctoral supervisory committee
chairperson, as a professional courtesy, ask your chair to recommend both other faculty
who might be committee members and those persons, if any, with whom s/he would
prefer not to work. Your chairperson may not have specific recommendations in this
regard, but s/he may have suggestions as to the type of expertise you need to have
represented on your committee given your areas of interest, such as research
methodology.
Next, create your own list of eligible persons; prioritize it; have your chairperson review
it; and then approach each person on your list. Be prepared to discuss with each
faculty member approached your professional aspirations, program goals, research
interests, and expectations for her/his involvement on your doctoral studies supervisory,
and solicit from each faculty member her/his expectations for you.
Remember, regardless of the suggestions you receive from other people, the selection
of the members of your committee is ultimately up to you. You need to select people
you know and respect, people who challenge and support your work, and who, working
together, will help you accomplish your goals as a doctoral candidate.

Changing a Doctoral Supervisory Committee Chair or Member
Students may change their doctoral committee chairperson and/or committee members
at any time. However, the change becomes official only after the department graduate
coordinator receives a completed Change of Advisor form from you, files a new
Supervisory Committee Form on your behalf with the Graduate School, and receives
written approval from the Graduate Dean.
To change doctoral committee members, submit to the graduate coordinator three
completed and signed copies of the Change of Advisor form. If the graduate coordinator
approves the change, the original of the form will be retained for your department file,
and the request will be forwarded on a Supervisory Committee form to the Graduate


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School for approval. Check with the department's graduate secretary to confirm the
request has been approved by the Graduate School.
The Graduate School requires new Supervisory Committee Forms whenever committee
changes are made.
Doctoral students must have on file with the Graduate School a final revised
Supervisory Committee Form listing all current members of the student's doctoral
studies supervisory committee before the end of the second academic term preceding
formal application for graduation from a doctoral program in the department. Contact the
department graduate secretary to check your current supervisory committee members
on file with the graduate school. Submit a Change of Advisor form to the graduate
coordinator to process any changes.
The Graduate School staff reviews the accuracy of the information on a student's
supervisory committee form as part of the evaluation of a student's eligibility for
graduation. If the Graduate School does not have a current, completely accurate
Supervisory Committee Form on file for you during the academic term prior to the one in
which you intend to graduate, your graduation will be delayed for a minimum of one
academic term. This is a Graduate School policy. It cannot be amended or changed by
the department. Be sure the Graduate School has an accurate, current Supervisory
Committee Form on file for you and that it contains currently accurate information so
that you can graduate on time.

Formal Doctoral Committee Meetings
There are at least four formal meetings that you and all members of your doctoral
supervisory committee must attend.
(1) The purpose of the first meeting is the formal approval of your planned program
of doctoral study.
(2) Known as the admission to candidacy meeting, the purpose of the second
meeting is the completion of your doctoral oral qualifying examination and
approval of your dissertation research topic and plan. Be sure to meet with your
chairperson in advance to prepare a tentative title for and a full-page prospectus
of your dissertation research idea for presentation at the second meeting of your
committee.
(3) Also known as the dissertation proposal, the purpose of the third meeting is to
review and approve your dissertation research proposal. The proposal includes
the first three chapters of your dissertation.
(4) Commonly referred to as the dissertation defense, the purpose of the four
meeting is to conduct your final oral examination in which you are to report on
and defend your dissertation.

Annual Evaluation of Doctoral Student Progress
The Counselor Education department is committed to monitoring the progress of our
doctoral students on an annual basis. Each student and the student's doctoral studies
supervisory committee chairperson and committee members have an opportunity to


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assess a student's overall academic performance and progress towards completing the
doctoral program.
A doctoral student should negotiate with the committee chair an appropriate time each
year to complete the annual review. To complete this process, students will complete
and submit to their supervisory committee chairperson an Annual Self-report of
Progress Toward Completing Doctoral Studies form. The supervisory committee chair
and committee members will complete and submit to the supervisory committee
chairperson a Doctoral Committee Member's Report of Student's Progress Toward
Completing Doctoral Studies form. The committee chair should email the committee
members identifying the due date to submit to the chair the Committee Member Report.
The supervisory committee chair will compile the information and prepare a Summary of
Faculty Evaluation of Doctoral Student Progress and review the findings with the
student and committee members as needed. The student's academic performance and
progress toward degree completion will be judged by the committee as satisfactory or
unsatisfactory. The committee will recommend a decision about the doctoral student's
academic standing: continuation in good standing, probation, or discontinuation.
If the faculty recommends probation, the student will meet immediately with his or her
chair and the other members of the doctoral studies supervisory committee to discuss
needed areas of improvement and determine a course of action that addresses these
concerns. The doctoral supervisory committee must review progress within six months.
If the committee decides on discontinuation, the student's doctoral committee will be
dissolved and the student dropped from the program.

Doctoral Research Requirements
Counselor Education doctoral students must comply with Department and College of
Education Research Methodoloqy Requirements.

Completing the Ed. S. During Doctoral Studies
Doctoral students may choose to earn the Education Specialist (Ed.S.) degree. They
must complete a minimum of 36 graduate credit hours and combine their previous
masters coursework to complete the requirements of the M.Ed./Ed.S. planned program
specific to their program area. Notify the department graduate secretary when you begin
the doctoral program if you intend to earn the Ed.S. degree so that degree can be
added to your graduate school record.
Students should consult the Final Term and Graduation Instructions and Guidelines
section of the handbook to create a timeline for completing and graduating with the
Ed.S. Students electing to earn the Ed.S. have one additional requirement, the Final
Oral Examination, which is different from the Dissertation Defense.
UF Graduate School policy stipulates that students enrolled in Ed.S. programs must
complete successfully a final comprehensive oral and/or written examination prior to
graduation. Refer to the Final Oral Examination section in the masters and specialist
section for requirements, guidelines, and instructions.


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Milestone Requirements


Doctoral Planned Program Development
You are expected to develop a plan of study that is tailored to your interests and career
goals as a graduate student and enables you to meet degree requirements. Although
your doctoral chairperson and doctoral supervisory committee are resources for you
and give final approval to your plan, you are expected to take the initiative in reviewing
the planned program prescribed for those in your area of professional specialization,
identifying any additional graduate courses you may wish to take, and submitting your
proposed plan for review and approval by your doctoral chairperson, your doctoral
supervisory committee, the department's graduate coordinator, and by the UF graduate
school. See the Program-specific Information and Planned Programs section of this
handbook for copies of doctoral planned program.
Please consult with your doctoral chairperson after you have developed an initial plan.
Your doctoral chairperson will review the curricular experiences expected in your
chosen program, approve work already completed, indicate necessary additions and/or
changes, if any, to your proposed program of study, discuss curricular alternatives
available, and certify the final agreement for presentation to your doctoral supervisory
committee.
There are several important requirements you must keep in mind as you formulate your
program of studies: (a) the university minimum credit hour requirements for the
degrees) you are pursuing, (b) the university's residence requirement, (c) the particular
curricular requirements of your degree program, and (d) the academic requirements for
any certification or licensure you wish to attain. See the Requirements for the Ph.D. for
university requirements and for licensure and certification information, see Section 7 of
this handbook.
You must complete the Planned Program form relevant to your program specialty (i.e.,
Marriage & Family Counseling, Mental Health Counseling, School Counseling &
Guidance) which, when completed and approved by your doctoral supervisory
committee, specifies the curricular experiences you must complete to receive the
degrees) for the program in which you are enrolled. Your Planned Program serves as a
contract you have made with the university as to your plan of study. Successful
completion of the curricular experiences stipulated on your Planned Program insures
that you will receive the degrees) to which you are entitled, unless you are dismissed
from a program for reasons other than academic performance. See Section 5 of this
handbook for program-specific planned program forms.
Please file the approved Planned Program form in the department office by no later than
the last day of regularly scheduled classes of the second semester in which you have
enrolled for classes in the university. The program-relevant Planned Program form
submitted to the department must be printed. Sign and date the form in the appropriate
spaces. Make two photocopies of your completed Planned Program form, have your
Doctoral Chairperson sign and date the original and both photocopies, and deliver all
three copies to the Graduate Coordinator.


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The Graduate Coordinator will review your Planned Program to assure that it meets
university, college, and department requirements. If changes are needed, s/he will
notify your Doctoral Chairperson who in turn will contact you. When approved, s/he will
sign and date your Planned Program forms. The original will be retained for your
department file; two copies will be returned to your Doctoral Chairperson, one of which
is for you.

Doctoral Qualifying Examinations
University of Florida Graduate School policy stipulates that all students enrolled in
doctoral programs in the University must successfully complete a comprehensive
written and oral doctoral qualifying examination prior to admission to candidacy for the
doctoral degree. Individual academic departments within the university are responsible
for the implementation of this policy.
The Counselor Education Department provides a CACREP accredited doctoral program
in Counselor Education with three practice concentrations in Marriage and Family
Counseling, Mental Health Counseling, and/or School Counseling. In order to graduate,
doctoral students are expected to demonstrate mastery of theory, research, practice
and ethics/policy in at least one of the three practice concentrations in addition to the
fundamentals of theory, research, practice and ethics/policy pertinent to Counselor
Education.
The Counselor Education Department's Doctoral Qualifying Examination is intended to
be a fair and rigorous test of the student's mastery of important areas of professional
knowledge in the fundamentals of Counselor Education theory, research, practice, and
ethics/policy, and theory, research, practice, and ethics/policy pertinent to the Counselor
Education program concentration in which the student is enrolled (i.e., Marriage and
Family Counseling, Mental Health Counseling, and/or School Counseling). The
examinations require each doctoral student to demonstrate the ability to interpret, apply,
analyze, synthesize, evaluate and integrate concepts, ethical principles, policies,
research, research design, strategies, techniques and values derived from the student's
graduate preparation, readings and practice.
The Doctoral Qualifying Examination in the Department of Counselor Education does
not necessarily repeat or review specific content of completed courses; rather, it
requires the student to utilize intellectual and applied resources of the relevant
professional disciplines to solve problems posed in the questions asked.
The examination consists of three components:
(1) Component One Written Counselor Education Examination, which
assesses a student's comprehension of the topical material and the student's
ability to apply, analyze, synthesize and evaluate in writing Counselor
Education theory, research, practice, and ethics/policy.
(2) Component Two Written Counselor Education Specialty Examination or
Written Counselor Education Specialty Paper in Marriage and Family
Counseling, Mental Health Counseling, or School Counseling, which
assesses a student's comprehension of the topical material and the student's
ability to apply, analyze, synthesize and evaluate in writing theory, research,


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practice, and ethics/policy pertinent to the Counselor Education
concentration/specialization in which the student is enrolled.
(3) Component Three Oral Qualifying Examination, which assesses each
student's ability to apply, analyze, synthesize and evaluate professional
knowledge verbally by articulating informed and incisive responses to
interview questions posed by the student's Doctoral Studies Supervisory
Committee.
All students are required to complete successfully both the Written Counselor Education
Examination and the Written Program Specialty Examination before engaging in the
Oral Qualifying Examination.

Eligibility Criteria for the Doctoral Qualifying Examinations
The student must have on file in the Department at the time of initial participation in the
Doctoral Qualifying Examinations both a Doctoral Studies Supervisory Committee Form
that has been approved by the Graduate School and a Doctoral Studies Planned
Program that has been approved by the student's Doctoral Studies Supervisory
Committee and the Department's Graduate Coordinator.
After consulting with your Doctoral Supervisory Committee and securing their approval
each time, you are to submit an application form no later than one month prior to each
scheduled administration of the Counselor Education Examination each time the
student intends to participate in the examination. Complete the Written and
Specialization Qualifying Examinations Application form; secure the required signatures
including the Graduate Coordinator's; and present the application to the Chairperson of
the Doctoral Qualifying Examination Committee.
To be eligible to take the Doctoral Qualifying Examination, a student must be enrolled
for a minimum of three graduate credit hours during the academic term in which
participation in any part of the examination occurs.

Guidelines for Writinq Both the Counselor Education Written Qualifying Examination
and Counselor Education Specialty Examination
Each student participant is bound by the University of Florida's Graduate School
Integrity Guidelines and by professional ethics in the development of their examination
responses. You are to sign the honor code statement and file it with the department
when picking up the examination.
Students may use any written and/or electronic resource (e.g., books, articles, or notes),
as long as they are referenced accurately in the student's written responses.
The student is not to consult with anyone except the Doctoral Qualifying Examination
Committee Chair, or designated committee member, who can be reached by telephone
and/or e-mail during the weekend of the examination. The Doctoral Qualifying
Examination Committee Chair or her/his designee can advise the student about the
exam procedure only; s/he may not tell the student how to interpret the question, nor
whether an answer is correct, nor help the student respond to the examination
questions.


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Only the doctoral student taking the examination is to write and edit the examination.
The responses to the examination questions must be printed and double-spaced (via
printer or typewriter) in 12-point font, using Courier or Times Roman font. Grammatical
and spelling accuracy is expected. Style consistent with the current edition of the APA
Publication Manual is expected. The written response to each section of the
examination may not exceed 6 printed pages. Each response to an examination topic
must have a running head showing the student's UFID number, the examination topic
(i.e., Theory, Research, Practice, or Policy), the question number the student is
addressing, and the page number of the response. The pages of the response to each
topic should be paper-clipped together for ease of photocopying.
All students will have the same amount of time and follow the same rules unless an
exception is pre-approved and authorization has been received from the Departmental
Qualifying Examination Committee.
Each student is responsible for the choice of a place to work over the weekend. The
choice must be made known to the chairperson of the Doctoral Qualifying Examination
Committee before participation has been approved.
See the following sections for more information about the specific examinations. The
Doctoral Qualifying Examination Committee will use this specific information when
determining any exceptions to the rules and procedures.

Written Doctoral Qualifying Examination
Content of the Written Counselor Education Examination and Sample Questions
I. Theory This section allows evaluation of the student's ability to apply, analyze,
synthesize and/or evaluate basic theoretical approaches to career and human
development and to individual and group counseling. The following are sample
questions.
a. Postmodern traditions in the field of psychotherapy are taking us away
from theoretical certainties, or so called "truths," toward a critical respect
for differences and more collaborative, competence-based, meaning-
oriented, socially responsive therapies. Compare and contrast one
theoretical model or approach from the modernist tradition with another
from the postmodern tradition. Address the following points in your
discussion.
i. Each theory's underlying assumptions about change and human
nature
ii. Theoretical assumptions about the relationship between therapist
and client, in terms of hierarchy
iii. How each theory addresses contextual issues, such as culture,
gender, power, and control
iv. At least two distinctive interventions used within each of the
theoretical models or approaches of the theoretical models selected


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b. Develop a one-page description of a client and his or her presenting
problem. Then, discuss the treatment of that client and problem from three
different theoretical perspectives. Each answer should include a brief
summary of the approach and an in-depth analysis of how that particular
theory would be applied to this case. Include a critique of how useful each
particular theory might be in the case that you develop. Be sure to include
documentation of your rationale for using each of these theoretical
approaches.
c. "Therapists are very taken by fads which are sometimes called 'cutting
edge' approaches. In fact, many of the newer approaches, such as
narrative therapy, constructivist cognitive behavioral therapy, and solution-
focused therapy, are really nothing more than traditional theories that have
been repackaged with new terminology." Create an argument supporting
or refuting this statement. Plan to discuss relevant theoretical, research,
and practice literature to make your argument.
d. Describe how the professional literature in your field (marriage and family
therapy, mental health counseling, school counseling and guidance)
addresses the issue of integration of theory. Provide specific references
and examples that show how the issue of theory integration is being
addressed. Then, explain whether integration of theory or eclecticism are
the same or different. Finally, discuss the relative advantages or
disadvantages of theory integration.
II. Research This section allows evaluation of the student's ability to apply, analyze,
synthesize and/or evaluate research, research design, statistical procedures,
measurement and evaluation. The following are sample questions.
a. Assume that you are an editorial board member of a journal devoted to the
presentation of research articles on counseling and therapy outcomes.
The journal's editor has requested that you describe: (a) the major criteria
that you would use to evaluate manuscripts submitted to the journal and
(b) how you would apply these criteria. Present your response to this
request.
b. Qualitative research methodologies have been used rather infrequently in
the counseling professional literature. Advocate either that it is appropriate
that most research in counseling be quantitative in nature or that
qualitative research methodologies should be used with greater frequency.
c. Researchers in counseling have been criticized for their "over reliance" on
the rational-empiricism, quantitative, research paradigm. Compare and
contrast qualitative and quantitative research paradigms in regard to each
of the following:
i. Assumptions about the world (e.g., logical positivist vs. natural
phenomenological);
ii. Purpose of the research activity;
iii. Importance of the context of the study; and


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iv. Research methods and practices.
d. Identify and briefly describe a professional setting in which you would like
to work immediately after receipt of your doctoral degree. Next, describe
how you would use both formative and summative evaluation approaches
to evaluate the nature of your services. Briefly describe the primary
recipients of your professional services, the nature of your services, and a
formative and summative program of evaluation of your services.
Compare and contrast these two evaluation approaches in regard to the
following:
i. Purpose,
ii. Audience,
iii. Measurement techniques used, and
iv. Significance of results.
III. Policy This section allows evaluation of the student's ability to apply, analyze,
synthesize and/or evaluate ethical, legal, public, and private policies regarding the
organization, delivery, and evaluation of community, corporate, family, school and
university mental health services. The following are sample questions.
a. Should a professional association such as ACA or AAMFT take a stance
on pro-choice versus pro-life issues as a part of their policy? Discuss
either why you think such an action is or is not a good idea, and what
impact either taking a stance or not taking stance on this issue might have
on the professional organization's constituents.
b. Describe the organizational structure you plan to be employed within or
are thinking of applying to upon graduation. Discuss how organizational
policy within that structure should address the issue of burnout. Be sure to
address the following:
i. Describe the organization,
ii. Your role or position within that organization,
iii. Any pertinent information about how decisions are made and
influenced,
iv. Information as to how the organization might go about
implementing a plan to address burnout as part of its organization
policy,
v. Information as to any role you might have in this process, and
vi. Provide appropriate reference material as needed.
c. You are a graduate student enrolled in your internship program, unpaid,
and your client is a person on probation from the courts in a setting of your
choice and appropriate to your major field (mental health counseling,
marriage and family counseling, and school counseling and guidance).
Your client's attorney has called you to appear as a witness in a hearing


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before the court to consider whether the client's probation should be
revoked. Considering this situation, Florida laws, and professional codes
of ethics, what will be appropriate behavior or conduct on your part with
regard to the following:
i. Serving as a witness and answering questions regarding your
client's behavior
ii. Agency records
iii. Your records
iv. Prior communications between you, your clients, and their families
v. A statement of your credentials and competence, and
vi. Delineation of your role and the ethical, legal and professional
constraints on your role.
d. The information superhighway affects many things, including mental
health counseling, school counseling, and marriage and family therapy.
Apply your understanding of professional ethical conduct to electronic
mail. Be specific. Be sure you cover the following topics:
i. Psychotherapy via electronic mail;
ii. The use of electronic bulletin boards and chat rooms by groups of
practicing counseling professionals;
iii. The advertising of counseling and psychotherapy services via
home pages, electronic bulletin boards, and direct email; and
iv. The practice of psychotherapy across state lines.
IV. Practice This section allows evaluation of the student's ability to apply, analyze,
synthesize, and/or evaluate professional knowledge while using that knowledge to
solve practical problems in human service delivery. The following are sample
questions.
a. Imagine that you have been asked to develop and conduct a counseling
group for unemployed men and women who have been informed by the
Department of Children and Family Services that their welfare will be
terminated within six months. Most of these individuals have been on
welfare for at least two years and range in age from 18 to 53. Describe the
needs of this clientele, types of presenting problemss, and any other
salient features you deem relevant. Then, describe how you would
develop and manage the delivery of a 10-week, twice-per-week,
counseling group experience with these clients. What would be your
goals, format, methods, and expected outcomes? Support your response
by documenting how it is informed by theory, research, and practice.
b. Imagine that you have agreed to provide a two-day consultation workshop
to professional counselors working in schools and various mental health
agencies in a number of small rural communities in North Central Florida.


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The purpose of the workshop is twofold: (a) to assist counselors in
learning how to identify domestic violence victims and learning about
appropriate intervention options, and (b) to equip them to consult with law
enforcement and health professionals along with counseling professionals
so as to develop a community-based intervention response to such victims
and their families. The recipients, or consultees, of these counselors will
be the law enforcement, educational system, and health professionals in
the counselors' home communities. Your workshop has been funded by
the Department of Children and Family Services in the hope that it will
reduce the further victimization of such domestic abuse victims by well-
meaning but untrained mental health, law enforcement and health
professionals. Provide an outline of your training goals, methods, outline
of activities and expected outcomes for this two-day consultation
workshop. Support your proposed workshop format by documenting how it
is informed by theory, research, and practice.
c. A new inner city school has been identified as having a high proportion of
"at risk" students, as defined as demonstrating academic performance that
is well below national averages and over 70 percent of the students qualify
for free or reduced lunch. This school is interested in developing a "full
service school" program that will offer onsite counseling to students and
their families. You have been appointed project manager and your primary
responsibility is to convene a task force that will include representatives
from the school, helping professionals and the community, and to develop
the full services school plan. Identify key task force membership, goals,
proposed services, and your plan of action and time line. Develop
appropriate evaluation procedures to measure the impact of the program.
Support your program plans by documenting how it is informed by
scholarly theory, research, and practice.
d. Imagine that you have agreed to provide weekly clinical supervision to a
graduate student in our Counselor Education training program who is now
placed in a practicum in a practice setting with which you are familiar.
Describe the practice context, types of presenting problems, and any other
salient features pertinent to this assignment. Describe how you would
manage the beginning phase of supervision with this supervisee. State the
purpose, goals, and interventions for the first few supervisory sessions.
Certify your approach by documenting how it is informed by supervision
theory, research and practice; and show how you have integrated these in
the supervisory approach that you present.
Procedures for the Written Counselor Education Qualifyinq Examination
The Written Counselor Education Qualifying Examination allows currently enrolled
doctoral students three consecutive trials to complete successfully four content sections
of the examination. The three consecutive trials constitute each doctoral student's
Written Counselor Education Qualifying Examination Cycle.


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A student can elect to begin his/her examination cycle at any time a trial is scheduled,
but must successfully complete all four sections of the examination (i.e., Theory,
Research, Practice and Policy) within an examination cycle (i.e., three consecutive
trials). Participation in Trial One, the student's first attempt, marks the beginning of the
examination cycle of three consecutive trials for the participant.
Each of the four sections of the examination contains two questions. A student is
required to prepare an acceptable written response to one of two essay questions in
each section of the Written Counselor Education Examination. A different set of
questions is used for each administration of the examination.
Students are required to prepare an acceptable written response to all four sections of
the Written Counselor Education Qualifying Examination in Trial One. If it is apparent to
the faculty readers that a student did not make a good faith attempt to answer at least
one of the questions asked in each section of the examination, the Trial One
examination will be judged a failure and the student will be required to repeat all four
sections of the Written Counselor Examination Qualifying Examination in Trial Two.
Provided that students complete a reasonable attempt to answer all four sections of the
examination in Trial One, each section passed will not have to be retaken in subsequent
trials of the three-trial examination cycle.
Trial Two of each student's examination cycle, if needed, will consist only of the
sections of the Written Counselor Education Examination that must still be passed.
Trial Three of each student's examination cycle, if needed, will consist only of the
sections of the Written Counselor Education Examination that must still be passed.
The Written Counselor Education Examination is to be completed over a 72-hour period
extending from 9:00 a.m. Friday to 9:00 a.m. the following Monday. A variation in
scheduling (e.g., an alternate 72 hour period) can be arranged for those demonstrating
special circumstances beforehand.
The opportunity to take the Written Counselor Education Examination will be offered
three (3) times per academic year. The first opportunity is early in the Fall semester,
typically the third or fourth week of classes in September. The second opportunity is
early in the Spring semester, typically the third or fourth week of classes in January. The
third opportunity is late in the Spring semester, typically the first, second or third week of
classes in April. The departmental examination will not be offered during the Summer
semester. Information about specific dates when the examination is scheduled in any
given academic term is available in the department office.
Each section of the completed examination will be evaluated, independently, and in a
timely manner, by three faculty evaluators who have prepared the questions asked and
have discussed in advance what will constitute acceptable responses. They will award
each response a Pass or Fail evaluation. In order for a student to pass a section, two of
the three faculty members must assign a pass to the student's response for that section.
Faculty evaluators will base their evaluations on the following criteria:


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Understanding of Materials and Concepts The student indicates familiarity
with basic concepts and materials in areas tested; is precise in use of
concepts and ideas; avoids use of educational jargon and cliches.
Clarity of Expression The student keeps discussion relevant to question
asked; is clear and concise; presents a logical flow of ideas.
Evidence of Scholarship The student knows basic sources and major
research in area tested; uses references appropriately; reports facts
accurately and cites generalizations correctly.
Critical Mindedness The student supports beliefs with evidence; evaluates
sources cited; presents evidence of reflection on reading.
Creativity The student is sensitive to ramifications of problems; synthesizes
own solutions for problems; shows insights in diagnosis; proposes own
solutions.
A blind review process is used. That is, students are to put only their UFID numbers on
their response sheets so that the faculty members making the evaluations do not know
whose responses are being evaluated.
Faculty review and evaluation takes approximately three to four weeks to complete.
After all written responses have been evaluated by the faculty assigned to do so, each
examinee will receive a letter informing her/him of the results of the evaluation, that is,
each will receive an indication of either "Pass" or "Fail" for each section completed in
that particular trial.
All examination responses and accompanying faculty evaluations are kept permanently
in the student's master file in the department office. After receiving the results, each
student is entitled to review the individual evaluations made by each of the three faculty
members to each written response by making an appointment with the chairperson of
his/her doctoral program committee for this purpose. After reading the evaluations in
the presence of his/her doctoral chairperson, the student may elect to consult with the
original evaluator.
The Doctoral Qualifying Examination Committee will consider an appeal for a re-reading
of a completed examination only after all three trials have been attempted by the
student filing the appeal. If the request is granted, it will apply only to the answers
completed in Trial Three.
If a student fails to pass all four sections of the Written Counselor Education
Examination within three consecutive trials, the student is to meet with his/her doctoral
studies committee to determine the student's status in the program. Unless there are
extenuating circumstances that merit an exception, this failure will result in the
disbanding of the student's doctoral committee and the dismissal of the student from the
doctoral program.
The Departmental Qualifying Examination Committee will administer the Written
Counselor Education Examination and will mediate/ arbitrate any disputes regarding the
examination as the first line of appeal.


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The student may participate in his/her Oral Doctoral Qualifying Examination only after
successful completion of both the Written Counselor Education and Program Specialty
Examinations.

Specialization Examination or Paper
The student's doctoral supervisory committee negotiates with the student the content,
time, and place of the Program Specialty Examination or Paper. Usually this
requirement can be fulfilled by successfully completing either of two options: a take-
home Written Program Specialty Examination or a critical review Written Program
Specialty Paper.
The take-home Written Specialty Examination allows evaluation of the students' ability
to apply, analyze, synthesize and/or evaluate theory, research, practices, and
ethics/policies relevant to the Counselor Education program concentration in which they
are enrolled.
The critical review Written Program Specialty Paper allows evaluation of the student's
ability to apply, analyze, synthesize and/or evaluate theory, research, practice and
ethics/policy pertinent to a specific, specialty-related issue or topic relevant to the
program concentration in which they are enrolled.
After consulting with her/his doctoral committee chairperson to determine readiness, the
student will submit a Written and Specialization Qualifying Examinations Application.
After receiving the support of the Committee, the student can proceed to take the
examination or write the specialty paper. Once you submitted the completed form to the
Graduate Coordinator, begin arranging with your Supervisory Committee Chair and
Members for the Specialization Examination or Paper.
Procedures for the Written Counselor Education Specialty Examination
The content and format of the Written Program Specialty Examination shall be specified
by each student's doctoral studies supervisory committee in consultation, as needed,
with the faculty of the program in which the student is enrolled. The examination
questions shall be constructed by the student's doctoral studies supervisory committee
and will reflect the parameters of the program specialty in which the student is enrolled
and the scholarly activity in which the student has engaged.
The Written Program Specialty Examination can be scheduled at any time, provided
that the student's doctoral studies supervisory committee affirms their belief that the
student is prepared for the examination and the department's Graduate Coordinator
approves the request.
The Written Program Specialty Qualifying Examination will offer to doctoral students
three consecutive trials within a twelve-month period to complete the examination
successfully. The three consecutive trials constitute each doctoral student's Written
Program Specialty Qualifying Examination Cycle.
Each Written Program Specialty Qualifying Examination trial will consist of a take-home
examination to be completed within a specified time period, not to exceed 72 hours.
Students must follow the same Guidelines for Writing as those established for the
Written Counselor Education Qualifying Examination.


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The student's responses at each trial will be evaluated independently by the members
of the student's doctoral committee who have prepared the questions asked and
discussed what will constitute an acceptable answer. They will award each response a
Pass or Fail evaluation.
Students are advised to meet with members of their doctoral studies supervisory
committee prior to each trial of the program examination to review study content,
strategies and techniques.
If a student fails to pass the Written Program Specialty Qualifying Examination within
three consecutive trials, he/she is to meet with his/her doctoral studies committee to
determine the student's status in the program.
The Department Qualifying Examination Committee will mediate/arbitrate any disputes
regarding the Program Specialty Examination as the first line of appeal.
Procedures for the Written Counselor Education Specialty Critical Review Paper
Expectations
Before selecting this option, students must confer with their Doctoral Studies
Supervisory Committee members to develop a mutual understanding as to what will
constitute a successful Critical Review Paper and to identify a program relevant issue or
topic that merits attention.
Consultation Encouraged
Students are encouraged to consult with her/his doctoral supervisory committee
chairperson and committee members as needed while writing the paper.
Structure of Paper
The student's critical review paper shall include the following major subsections, unless
directed otherwise by her/his doctoral supervisory committee:
I. Delineation of the Program-related Topic Area In this section the student will
define the program-related topic and identify all pertinent parameters,
delimitations, etc. In other words, this portion serves as the introduction and
overview of the chosen topic.
II. Personal Preparation In this section the student will describe her/his
preparatory activities and experiences relative to her/his program-related topic.
Both academic and non-academic preparatory experiences will be identified and
described.
III. "State of the Art" In this section the student will provide a comprehensive, in-
depth presentation concerning the "state of the art" of the program topic. Among
the topics for possible inclusion are an historical overview, relevant theoretical
perspectives, current practices and issues, significant research, ethical concerns,
and relevant legislation. It is anticipated that this section will incorporate
numerous pertinent references from the professional literature.
IV. Implications for the Profession In this section the student will identify and
describe the major implications for the present and future of Counselor Education


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and the professions of Marriage & Family Therapy, Mental Health Counseling,
and/or School Counseling given the current "state of the art." Among possible
topics for inclusion in this section are emerging trends, potential professional
issues, potential future practices, needed research, and potential directions in
professional preparation in the area.
V. Personal Integration This section will contain a comprehensive explanation of
how the student either integrates or plans to integrate knowledge from the
program area into her/his professional functioning. The student is to be as
specific as possible in this section. Two types of personal integration shall be
covered: (a) how the knowledge gained will be integrated with the student's
"personal theory" about the program topic, and (b) how the knowledge gained will
be integrated into the student's future professional behaviors.
Format of Paper
The student's Critical Review Paper must follow the guidelines in the current edition of
the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and must be printed
and double-spaced in 12 point Times Roman font. Grammatical and spelling accuracy
is expected, as is a complete and accurate reference list.
Evaluation of Paper
The student's Doctoral Studies Supervisory Committee will evaluate the paper to
determine whether the paper meets the standard expected. They will award the paper
a Pass or Fail evaluation.
After the Critical Review Paper has been approved by the student's doctoral studies
supervisory committee, one copy must be submitted to the student's doctoral studies
supervisory committee chairperson and one copy must be submitted to the department
graduate coordinator for signatures before the student will be allowed to take the
Doctoral Oral Qualifying Examination.
Eligibility for Oral Doctoral Qualifying Examination
Students who elect the Critical Review Paper option must successfully complete the
paper, receiving a pass, before they are eligible to participate in their Oral Doctoral
Qualifying Examination.

Oral Qualifying Examination and Admission to Candidacy

Procedures for the Doctoral Oral Qualifying Examination
The Doctoral Oral Comprehensive Qualifying Examination can be conducted only after
the student has successfully completed both the Written Counselor Education
Qualifying Examination and either the Written Program Specialty Qualifying
Examination or the Written Program Specialty Paper.
The Doctoral Oral Qualifying Examination may cover all academic and other
professional preparation pertinent to the student's professional goals and plans.
Although the questions presented during Doctoral Oral Qualifying Examination tend to
focus on the responses the student made in the written qualifying examinations, any


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topic pertinent to the student's professional preparation and professional goals and
plans is legitimate for questioning and discussion.
UF Graduate School policy stipulates that at least four graduate faculty members
holding regular university appointments must participate in the Doctoral Oral Qualifying
Examination. That is, the examining committee for the Doctoral Oral Qualifying
Examination must consist of at least the four members of a student's Doctoral Studies
Supervisory Committee.
A student should schedule at least one and one-half hours for his/her Doctoral Oral
Qualifying Examination. Typically, the first hour of this time period is used for the actual
oral qualifying examination. Then, after evaluating the student's performance, the
faculty members present who are not members of the student's Doctoral Studies
Supervisory Committee will leave. The student's Doctoral Studies Supervisory
Committee will spend the remainder of the time discussing the student's plans for
his/her dissertation research. Note, however, that examination committees may use
whatever procedures are appropriate to their needs.
No application form is needed for the oral examination. Arrange with your doctoral
studies committee chairperson and members when you shall schedule the oral
qualifying examination. It is the doctoral student's responsibility to arrange the meeting
date, time and place for his/her Doctoral Oral Qualifying Examination and to keep the
faculty participants informed about the arrangements. See the department
administrative staff for reserving rooms and any computer technology.
The department graduate secretary will file on your behalf an Admission to Candidacy
at the conclusion of a successful oral qualifying examination.

Admission to Candidacy
Admission to Candidacy constitutes official acknowledgment by the UF Graduate
School and the Department of Counselor Education that the student is ready to
commence doctoral dissertation research. Students may be admitted to candidacy only
after they have completed successfully all parts of their respective Doctoral
Comprehensive Qualifying Examinations, including all parts of their written and oral
qualifying examinations.
An Admission to Candidacy form and a form indicating the courses taken by the student
to fulfill the UF College of Education research requirements must be filed with the
Graduate School in order for a doctoral student to be officially admitted to candidacy.
This form is to be filed at the conclusion of the student's successful completion of the
doctoral oral comprehensive qualifying examination. The Admission to Candidacy form
is filed electronically via GIMS by the department graduate secretary.
Request the Admission to Candidacy form from the department graduate secretary and
complete the form to indicate courses taken for fulfillment of the College of Education
research requirements prior to the time you participate in your doctoral oral qualifying
examination. Take the forms with you to your doctoral oral qualifying examination.
When you have completed your oral qualifying examination successfully, ask that each
member of your examining committee sign the Admission to Candidacy form in the


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appropriate places and put both forms in the department graduate coordinator's office
mailbox for her/his signature and transmittal to the Graduate School.
You will be required to indicate the title of your proposed dissertation on your Admission
to Candidacy form. Discuss this matter with your doctoral supervisory committee
chairperson prior to completing the form. If you subsequently change the title of your
dissertation, the UF Graduate School must be informed of the change. To effect a
subsequent change in the title of your dissertation, your doctoral supervisory committee
chairperson must write a letter to the Dean of the UF Graduate School indicating both
the old title stated on your Admission to Candidacy form and the new title. If a title
change is necessary, wait until you have completed your dissertation proposal seminar
before submitting a request for change of title of your dissertation.
A doctoral student must be registered for a minimum of three, program applicable,
semester credit hours during the academic term in which she/he is admitted to
candidacy, the term when the Admission to Candidacy form is submitted.

Dissertation Proposal and Proposal Seminar
The College of Education emphasizes research competency in the doctoral degree and
the development and implementation of a student's doctoral dissertation research
constitutes a substantial and significant portion of a student's professional preparation in
research. Therefore, the department faculty members place great emphasis on a
student's efficacy in designing and completing doctoral dissertation research.
The first step in the development of your doctoral dissertation is to identify all resources
available from the UF Graduate School Editorial Office, located in Room 109 Grinter
Hall. All work developed for your dissertation, including both your dissertation proposal
and the final copy of your dissertation manuscript, should adhere to the requirements
detailed by the editorial office.
You are encouraged to begin development of your dissertation research idea as soon
as possible in your program, but definitely before you participate in your doctoral oral
qualifying examination, which will include a discussion of your idea for your dissertation
research. Remember, you must submit a title for your dissertation on the Admission to
Candidacy form, which is submitted after successful completion of your oral qualifying
examination.
You are encouraged to frequently discuss your ideas and plans for developing your
dissertation proposal with your doctoral supervisory committee chairperson. Different
supervisory committee chairpersons have different methods for their respective doctoral
supervisees to follow in the development of dissertation proposals. Therefore, it is
important that you be clear about the expectations and procedures recommended or
required by your supervisory committee chairperson. In addition, you should also
discuss these matters and plans with the other members of your doctoral studies
supervisory committee so that you are all in agreement about how you are to proceed.
Your conversations with the members of your doctoral supervisory committee, your
review of the above resours, your study of the APA Publication Manual, and the
Graduate School Editorial Office guidelines will help you develop a dissertation proposal
which includes the following elements:


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A title/cover page
The Introduction chapter
The Review of the Related Literature chapter
The Methodology chapter
A References section
An Appendices section
Note that your dissertation proposal must be written in the future tense because at the
time of presentation it is indeed a proposal for future activity. Please also note that the
cover page for your dissertation proposal is distinctly different from the cover page for
the final version of your dissertation. The cover page text should be centered and
contain the following:
Exact title
By Student's Name
Supervisory Committee Members:
o List chairperson first
o Member 2
o Member 3
o Member 4
The seminar for this dissertation proposal will be held at xx:xx AM/PM on day,
month, date, year in Room xxxx, Norman Hall, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida
When you have completed your dissertation proposal, each member of your doctoral
supervisory committee must approve it. That is, each member of your Doctoral
Supervisory Committee must read your dissertation proposal and certify that, in their
respective individual opinions, it is ready for presentation at a formal meeting of your
doctoral supervisory committee. "Ready for presentation" means that the proposal is
correct in terms of style, grammar, format, and content. Each member of your doctoral
supervisory committee must be afforded sufficient time to make this determination.
When each member of your doctoral supervisory committee is ready to certify that your
proposal is developed sufficiently and is appropriate for presentation at a dissertation
proposal seminar, you may schedule your dissertation proposal seminar with your
doctoral studies supervisory committee.
Your dissertation proposal seminar is to be conducted by your doctoral chairperson and
all members of your doctoral supervisory committee must attend. You are expected to
prepare hard copies of the dissertation proposal for each member of your doctoral
studies supervisory committee.

Guidelines For Preparation Of Dissertation Proposals


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The doctoral dissertation provides an opportunity for both a learning experience for the
student, and the student's committee, and a contribution to knowledge in the profession.
Specifically, a dissertation study proposed by a student in the Department of Counselor
Education should: (a) investigate an area not previously studied or represent a new
approach to an area already under investigation, and (b) show high probability of
generating research findings which could be published in a professional journal in the
counseling profession or a related area. The following procedures for the development
and approval of dissertation proposals have been adopted by the faculty of the
Department of Counselor Education.
A dissertation topic, approved by the student's doctoral committee, is a prerequisite to
doctoral candidacy. This approval should be obtained on or before the date of the
doctoral oral qualifying examination and before necessary admission to candidacy
papers are filed. A preliminary prospectus, emphasizing the problems, research
questions and/or hypotheses, and procedures is a recommended first step in the
development of the dissertation proposal.
While there may be some variations in the organization of the proposal, the following
would constitute minimum elements of an acceptable proposal:
Statement of the problem;
Review of related literature;
Research questions and/or hypotheses under investigation;
Methodological procedures; and
Methods of data analyses.
The collection of data to be included in the dissertation will not be approved until the
dissertation proposal has been presented to the doctoral supervisory committee.
Because actual data collection cannot begin prior to the final approval of the proposal,
the early development of the dissertation proposal is strongly encouraged. Students are
urged to consult with faculty members in the areas of statistics and research early in the
development of dissertation proposals.

Guidelines for the Doctoral Dissertation Proposal Seminar with your Committee
The Doctoral Dissertation Proposal Seminar is a professional forum wherein the
doctoral student and the Doctoral Supervisory Committee, as well as other students and
faculty who may attend, discuss the student's doctoral dissertation research proposal.
The seminar is intended to enable the doctoral student to conduct the best possible
dissertation research.
I. Opening Remarks
a. The doctoral student should be prepared to begin the seminar by first
attending to the introductions of the members of her/his Doctoral Studies
Supervisory Committee, and any other faculty and quests who are
present.
b. After introductions, the doctoral student should present, in approximately
5-10 minutes, an overview of the proposed dissertation research. The


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student should highlight the major aspects of the proposed research,
including the nature and scope of the problem, need for the study,
population and sampling procedures, general research design and
procedures, and primary data analyses.
II. Discussion Following the Opening Presentation
a. Approximately forty minutes are allotted for discussion following the
student's opening presentation. During the discussion period the student
should be able to elaborate on the major points made during the overview
presentation. In addition, the student should also be prepared to discuss
the following:
i. Contextual information about the nature of the problem
ii. The statement of the problem
iii. The significance/need for the study
iv. The statement of purpose for the study
v. The research questions to be answered and/or the hypotheses to
be evaluated
vi. The population and the procedures to be used to obtain a sample
vii. The research design to be employed, if applicable
viii. Identification of the independent and dependent variables, if
applicable
ix. A description of the treatment procedures, if applicable
x. A complete description of the assessment instruments or
techniques to be employed
xi. A complete description of the research procedures
xii. The primary data analyses to be conducted
xiii. The theoretical framework underlying the study
xiv. Definitions of important terms in the study
xv. Literature support for any topic relevant to the study
xvi. The rationale for the methodological approach to the study
xvii. The validity, reliability, and appropriateness of assessment
instruments or techniques to be used
xviii. A description of research participant training, if applicable
xix. The potential methodological limitations
xx. The potential significance of the study's results


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Dissertation and Final Oral Examination


Submission of the Dissertation
Review the Checklist for Doctoral Dissertations on the Graduate School Editorial Office
web page.
The doctoral dissertation manuscript is prepared for its First Submission to the
University of Florida Graduate School upon completion of the data gathering and
analyses for the dissertation research project and Final presentation to the student's
doctoral studies supervisory committee. Typically, this completion involves revision of
the texts of the first, second, and third chapters, references, and appendices, originally
presented in the dissertation proposal seminar, as well as completion of the fourth and
fifth chapters and the dissertation abstracts, after the student's doctoral studies
supervisory committee has extensively reviewed and evaluated various drafts of the
manuscript and given suggestions to the student regarding its revision.
The department has implemented a procedure to help to insure that dissertation
manuscripts have been properly completed prior to First Submission to the UF
Graduate School. The Final Committee dissertation manuscript must be submitted to
each member of the doctoral student's doctoral supervisory committee for review and
evaluation prior to submission to the department. The word Final in this context is
intended to mean that the dissertation manuscript presented to each member of the
supervisory committee is fully and completely correct and accurate in regard to its
format, style, and content. It is essential that this form of the dissertation manuscript
conform to the standards and criteria in the most recent guidelines from the Graduate
School Editorial Office and the Publication Manual of the American Psychological
Association. The "Final Committee" dissertation manuscript will be the one presented
as the "First Submission" to the Graduate School.
Historically, there has been some confusion in the interpretation of the term "First
Submission". Technically, the term "First Submission" refers to a date in each academic
term schedule, established by the UF Graduate School, by which the fully completed
dissertation manuscript, including the abstract and biographical sketch, must be
submitted in order for the doctoral student to graduate in that academic term.
The term "First Submission" specifically does not mean that the dissertation manuscript
submitted is the first draft of the final version, or any other interpretation that implies that
the dissertation manuscript submitted is less than fully and completely correct and
accurate in regard to form, style, and content.
It is the responsibility of the doctoral degree candidate to proof the copy and to make
certain that the finished work is correct in every particular before submission to the
supervisory committee and the Graduate School.
It is the responsibility of the doctoral studies supervisory committee chairperson and the
committee members to ascertain that the candidate's thesis or dissertation is written in
acceptable English, in an appropriate scholarly style, and that it is carefully proofread
prior to submission to the Graduate School.


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The "First Submission" deadline precedes the "Final Submission" deadline, also
established for each academic term by the UF Graduate School. The time between the
"First Submission" and "Final Submission" deadlines is not intended to be used for final
editing, polishing, or other refining of the format and/or style of the dissertation
manuscript. Rather, any changes in the dissertation manuscript made during this period
should be based on suggestions, recommendations, or requirements stipulated by the
dissertation examining committee as a result of the student's final oral
examination/defense of the dissertation or based on editorial changes required by the
Graduate School Editorial Office.

General Audience Abstract of Dissertation
In order to facilitate communications about research conducted at the University of
Florida to audiences outside the university community, the UF Graduate School initiated
a policy requiring a General Audience Abstract for all dissertations. The general
audience abstract is required in addition to the regular dissertation abstract.
The general audience abstract should be a brief summary of the nature of the
dissertation research. The general audience abstract is to be a maximum of 150 words,
should be written such that lay persons can comprehend the nature and findings of the
research, and should be written in non-specialized, non-technical, language.
The preliminary information for the general audience abstract should contain the
following information:
Exact title of the dissertation
The student's full name
The student's telephone number
The name of the student's department
The name of the student's Doctoral Studies Supervisory Committee
Chairperson
The general audience abstract itself should follow immediately on the same page and
be a maximum of 150 words.
The general audience abstract must be distributed to the (1) department chairperson,
(2) department graduate coordinator, and (3) the Dean of the College of Education. A
hardcopy version and the electronic version must be submitted to the Graduate School
Editorial Office at the time the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School.

Final Oral Examination Dissertation Defense
Upon completion of the research and manuscript for the doctoral dissertation, doctoral
students are required to participate in a Final Oral Examination, also known as the final
defense. This examination must be completed no earlier than six calendar months
preceding the intended date of graduation and no later than three calendar weeks
preceding the intended date of graduation.
The student's Final Oral Examination Examining Committee must consist of no less
than the four members of the doctoral student's Supervisory Committee. One member


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of the Doctoral Committee may be "present" via conference telephone. The Assistant
Dean of the College of Education may also attend the student's Final Oral Examination
to guarantee that the conduct of the examination is rigorous and fair in every respect.
The procedures for constituting the Final Oral Examination Examining Committee and
for scheduling the examination are the same as those for the Oral Comprehensive
Qualifying Examination.
Typically, the questions presented in the Final Oral Examination will relate to the
student's dissertation research. However, questions relating to other aspects of the
student's professional preparation are permissible and appropriate.
Upon successful completion of the Final Oral Examination, the student is required to
make corrections and/or changes in the dissertation as specified by the UF Graduate
School Editorial Office. Such changes may be based on the review of the "First
Submission" manuscript and/or the review by the student's Final Oral Examination
Examining Committee. These changes must be made prior to "Final Submission" of the
student's dissertation to the UF Graduate School.
It is the student's responsibility to insure that all appropriate signatures required on the
dissertation are obtained before the dissertation is submitted after the Final Oral
Examination.
Following are some of the specific rules that apply to Final Oral Examinations for
doctoral students:
Final Oral Examinations must be scheduled during regular business hours,
i.e., between 8:00 am and 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday.
Doctoral degree candidates must deliver a fully prepared hard copy of the
dissertation to each member of the Examining Committee well in advance of
the scheduled Final Oral Examination. A minimum of two (2) calendar weeks
is considered appropriate. An electronic copy is not appropriate.
Major alterations in the dissertation suggested by Supervisory Committee
members should be communicated to the student before the Final Oral
Examination is scheduled. The student should make the changes such that
the members of the student's Final Oral Examination Committee have time to
read the revised version prior to the Final Oral Examination. Note that this
policy is consistent with the requirement that doctoral students' Supervisory
Committee members "sign off" on the dissertation before it is submitted to the
Graduate School.
The schedule for the Final Oral Examination must be such that all members
of the Examining Committee must be present for the entire Final Oral
Examination. If necessary one member may be present through the medium
of a telephone or video conference call.
The Dean of the Graduate School should be notified immediately if the
schedule for the doctoral student's Final Oral Examination is changed from
that which was submitted on the Letter of Transmittal. Failure to notify the
Dean of the Graduate School of any such change will automatically result in
nullification of the Final Oral Examination as scheduled.


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*Only the members of the Final Oral Examination Examining Committee vote
on the student's performance at/during the student's Final Oral Examination.
The function of others present, if any, is to ensure that the Final Oral
Examination procedures are conducted properly.

Submission of the Final Examination Form
All students in all programs in Counselor Education must have a Final Examination
Form filed with the UF Graduate School prior to graduation. The Final Examination form
is filed on your behalf electronically by the department graduate secretary.
A doctoral student's Final Examination Form typically is submitted when the Final Oral
Examination, also known as the Final Defense of the student's dissertation, has been
successfully completed if the student has provided the department graduate secretary
with the necessary information.
Prior to your final oral examination, request a copy of the Final Examination Form from
the department graduate secretary. Be sure to provide complete and accurate
information regarding the program in which you are enrolled and the degrees) you
expect to receive. Take the form to your Final Oral Examination meeting and have the
members of your examining committee sign the form during the meeting. This form
must be submitted regardless of whether your performance in the oral examination is
judged satisfactory or unsatisfactory.
At the conclusion of your final oral examination, ask the Examining Committee
Chairperson, your Doctoral Studies Supervisory Committee Chairperson, to indicate on
the Final Examination Form whether your performance on the examination was
satisfactory or unsatisfactory, and deliver the signed Final Examination Form to the
department graduate secretary. The Graduate Coordinator will review the form and
forward the information to the College of Education and the Graduate School. Two
copies will be returned to your Doctoral Committee Chairperson, and you can retrieve
one copy from her/him.
Please check with the Graduate School Records Office at 288 Grinter Hall sometime
prior to your anticipated date of graduation to insure that they have received your Final
Examination Form, that all requirements for graduation have been met, and that you are
on the official graduation list.
If a student submitted a dissertation to the Graduate School in a previous semester, but
did not graduate, the student needs to make a new first submission of the document. If
the thesis or dissertation student fails to make final submission by the designated
deadline, the manuscript must be resubmitted by the first submission deadline of the
semester in which the student intends to graduate. Usually, if a student doesn't
graduate in the term of submission, the dissertation requires sufficient re-view to
warrant a new review. Also, and more importantly, the submission along with the
application for graduation, sets the machinery in motion within the Graduate School for
certifying the degree.


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SECTION FIVE PROGRAM-SPECIFIC INFORMATION


Mental Health Counseling (ACD)
ACD Program Coordinator: Dr. Sondra Smith-Adcock
ACD Program Faculty: Dr. Ellen Amatea
Dr. James Archer, Jr.
Dr. William Conwill
Dr. M. Harry Daniels
Dr. Kitty Fallon
Dr. Michael Garrett
Dr. Peter A. D. Sherrard
Dr. Edil Torres Rivera
Dr. Cirecie West-Olatunji

Entry-level Masters and Specialist Program Description
The M.Ed./Ed.S. and MAE/Ed.S. program in Mental Health Counseling (ACD) is
designed to equip students with the pre-professional competencies required for
Registered Intern status and, after 2 years of post-degree supervised clinical
experience, (1) licensure in the State of Florida as Mental Health Counselors and (2)
clinical membership in NBCC's Academy of Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselors.
The entry level 72 credit hour M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. Mental Health Counseling
program is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related
Educational Programs (CACREP) in the Mental Health Counseling category. The
program prepares students for positions as Mental Health Counselors in community,
state, federal, and private social service agencies and for EAP positions in business and
industry. Graduates provide services such as child, youth, couple, family, employment,
health, multicultural, gerontological, substance abuse, and/or wellness counseling.
Students who complete the program are eligible to take the National Counselor
Examination (NCE) offered by the National Board For Certified Counselors (NBCC) in
order to qualify for National Certified Counselor status. They are also eligible to
become members of the American Counseling Association (ACA), and/or the American
Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHCA).
The M.Ed./Ed.S. and MAE/Ed.S. Mental Health Counseling program seeks to prepare
graduates who:
establish a professional identity as Mental Health Counselors;
have specialized knowledge and skills for mental health service delivery within a
specific mental health service setting and/or with specific, targeted mental health
service recipients;
have general knowledge of theories of human behavior, human development,
and human relating and the influence of context on same;


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have general knowledge of and experience with treatment modalities appropriate
for a broad range of mental health service recipients and mental health service
settings;
have general knowledge of and respect for the influences of culture/ethnicity,
gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic class, and have
experience in working with a broad array of clientele representing such diversity;
interact effectively with the full spectrum of mental health professionals; and
provide competent professional service and leadership within the mental health
field upon graduation.
Each student will complete a supervised practicum consisting of at least 400 service
hours and 100 hours of face-to-face client contact and one supervised internship
consisting of a minimum of 600 service hours and 250 hours of face-to-face client
contact in work settings appropriate to the student's area of specialization. The
internship can be taken for one semester, full-time (i.e., a minimum of 40 hours/week for
fifteen weeks) or over two semesters, part-time (a minimum of 20 hours/week for thirty
weeks).
Upon graduation from the Mental Health Counseling program, students are expected to
have accumulated a minimum of 1000 hours of experience in mental health service
delivery, 350 hours of face-to-face client contact and 75 hours of supervision.
The granting of the combined degrees M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. acknowledges that
both the basic counseling curriculum, as defined in the CACREP accreditation
standards, and the coursework in the Mental Health Counseling specialization have
been completed and that, in the opinion of the Faculty, students are prepared for post-
degree clinical supervision in Mental Health Counseling and Registered Intern status in
Florida. In addition, the specialized mental health counseling coursework can be
applied toward the clinical doctoral specialization should the student desire to pursue
the Ph.D. after completing M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. requirements.

Doctoral Program Description
The doctoral-level (Ph.D. or Ed.D.) Mental Health Counseling program specialization
challenges students to master comprehensive professional knowledge regarding mental
health policy formation and service delivery, to enhance their clinical practitioner
technique, and to develop efficacious consultative, leadership, managerial, research,
supervisory, and teaching/training skills.
In particular, doctoral students in the program are expected to develop advanced
knowledge and skills in clinical supervision, consultation, counselor education, post-
secondary teaching, qualitative and/or quantitative research methods; and specialized
clinical practice. In addition, they are expected to develop advanced knowledge and
skills in several of the following areas: agency/budget/department administration and
management; advocacy; crisis intervention; employee assistance program management
and service delivery; mental health policy formation, implementation and evaluation;
personnel management; professional regulation; psycho-educational program


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development, program management and program evaluation; and staff
development/team building/training.
The Mental Health Counseling program faculty are committed to helping students (a)
develop knowledge and skill as "scholar practitioners", that is, practitioners who can
deliver effective clinical and psycho-educational services and can use a variety of
research methods to evaluate the impact of clinical and psycho-educational practice; (b)
enhance the breadth and depth of their professional competence; (c) utilize both
individual clinical-developmental theoretical perspectives and systemic multi-cultural
social-ecological theoretical perspectives in the design of mental health interventions
and programs; and (d) gain in-depth exposure to a variety of modes of mental health
intervention and service delivery.
The Mental Health Counseling doctoral program specialization encompasses all the
requirements for the Counselor Education department's entry-level program described
in the above section and can provide Florida Registered Mental Health Counseling
Interns the opportunity, as needed, to complete one year of the two years of post-
degree supervised clinical experience required for licensure as Mental Health
Counselors in Florida.
The ACD Planned programs may be found on the Department Policy and Procedures
website.

Marriage and Family Counseling (EDC)
EDC Program Coordinator: Dr. Silvia Echevarria-Doan
EDC Program Faculty: Dr. Ellen Amatea
Dr. M. Harry Daniels
Dr. Peter A. D. Sherrard

Entry-level Masters and Specialist Program Description
The Marriage and Family Counseling program specialization emphasizes an eco-
systemic approach to understanding human problems and generating solution
opportunities: Students learn to moderate solution-oriented conversations among
interested parties (i.e., stakeholders) who are invited to seek "double descriptions" of
mutual concerns and problems, to listen carefully to each other, to entertain and invent
multiple solution possibilities, and to construct new narratives of cooperation and
commitment.
The M.Ed./Ed.S. and MAE/Ed.S. program in Marriage and Family Counseling is
designed to equip students with the pre-professional competencies required for
Registered Intern status and, after 2 years of post-degree supervised clinical
experience, licensure in the State of Florida as Marriage and Family Therapists and/or
Mental Health Counselors. The 72 credit-hour entry-level program, which is accredited
by Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
(CACREP), prepares entry-level Marriage and Family Therapists for careers in public
and private social service agencies, hospitals, churches, businesses (e.g., Employee
Assistance Programs), and independent practice settings.
The Marriage and Family Counseling program specialization prepares graduates who:


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establish a professional identity as Marriage and Family Therapists;
have specialized knowledge of and experience in assisting persons who present
with a diverse array of couple and family problems (e.g., regarding intimate
relating, marital discord, divorce, child-rearing, family/school conflicts, family
violence, suicide, and medical/psychiatric distress);
have specialized knowledge and skills for mental health service delivery within a
specific mental health service setting and/or with specific, targeted mental health
service recipients;
have general knowledge of clinical, developmental, systemic, and social-
ecological theories of human behavior, human development, and human relating;
have general knowledge of and experience with systemic and social-ecological
intervention modalities appropriate for a broad range of mental health service
recipients and mental health service settings;
have general knowledge of and respect for the influences of culture/ethnicity,
gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic class, and have
experience in working with a broad array of clientele representing such diversity;
interact effectively with the full spectrum of mental health professionals; and
provide competent professional service and leadership within the mental health
field upon graduation.
Each student will complete a supervised practicum consisting of at least 400 service
hours and 100 hours of face-to-face client contact and one supervised internship
consisting of a minimum of 600 service hours and 250 hours of face-to-face client
contact in work settings appropriate to the student's area of specialization. The
internship may be taken for one semester, full-time (i.e., a minimum of 40 hours/week
for fifteen weeks) or over two semesters, part-time (a minimum of 20 hours/week for
thirty weeks).
Upon graduation from the Marriage and Family Counseling program, students are
expected to have accumulated a minimum of 1000 hours of experience in mental health
service delivery, 350 hours of face-to-face client contact and 75 hours of supervision.
The granting of the combined degrees (i.e., M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S.) acknowledges
that both the basic counseling curriculum, as defined in the CACREP standards, and
the coursework in the Marriage and Family Counseling specialization have been
completed and that, in the opinion of the Faculty, students are prepared for post-degree
clinical supervision in Marriage and Family Therapy and Registered Intern status in
Florida. In addition, the specialized marriage and family coursework can be applied
toward the clinical doctoral specialization should the student desire to pursue the Ph.D.
after completing M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. requirements.
Students who complete the Marriage and Family Counseling program are eligible to
take the National Counselor Examination (NCE) offered by the National Board For
Certified Counselors (NBCC) in order to qualify for National Certified Counselor (NCC)
status. They are also eligible to become members of the American Mental Health
Counselors Association (AMHCA) and the International Association of Marriage and


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Family Counselors (IAMFC). And after completing two years of post-graduate
supervised clinical marriage and family counseling experience, students may be eligible
for Clinical membership in the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
(AAMFT) and for licensure in Florida.

Doctoral Program Description
The doctoral-level (Ph.D. or Ed.D.) Marriage and Family Counseling program
specialization challenges students to master comprehensive professional knowledge
regarding mental health policy formation and service delivery, to enhance their clinical
practitioner technique, and to develop efficacious consultative, leadership, managerial,
research, supervisory, and teaching/ training skills.
In particular, Doctoral students in the Marriage and Family Counseling program
specialization are expected to develop advanced knowledge and skills in clinical
supervision, consultation, counselor education, post-secondary teaching, qualitative
and/or quantitative research; and specialized clinical practice (i.e., couple and family
therapy). In addition, they are expected to develop advanced knowledge and skills in
several of the following areas: agency/ budget/ department administration and
management; advocacy; crisis intervention; employee assistance program management
and service delivery; mental health policy formation, implementation & evaluation;
personnel management; professional regulation; psycho-educational program
development, program management & program evaluation; and staff development/team
building/training.
The Marriage and Family Counseling program faculty are committed to helping students
(a) develop knowledge and skill as "scholar practitioners", that is, practitioners who can
deliver effective clinical and psycho-educational services and can use a variety of
research methods to evaluate the impact of clinical and psycho-educational practice; (b)
enhance the breadth and depth of their professional competence; (c) utilize both
individual clinical-developmental theoretical perspectives and systemic multi-cultural
social-ecological theoretical perspectives in the design of mental health interventions
and programs; and (d) gain in-depth exposure to a variety of modes of mental health
intervention and service delivery.
The Marriage and Family doctoral program specialization encompasses all the
requirements for the Counselor Education Department's entry-level (M.Ed./Ed.S. or
MAE/Ed.S.) program described in the above section and can provide Florida Registered
Marriage & Family Therapy Interns the opportunity, as needed, to complete part of the
two years of post-degree supervised clinical experience required for licensure as
Marriage & Family Therapists and/or Mental Health Counselors in Florida and for
Clinical Membership in the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.
The EDC Planned programs may be found on the Department Policy and Procedures
website.

School Counseling and Guidance (SCG)

SCG Program Coordinator: Dr. Andrea L. Dixon


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SCG Program Faculty: Dr. Ellen Amatea
Dr. Mary Ann Clark
Dr. M. Harry Daniels
Dr. Michael Garrett
Dr. Larry Loesch
Dr. Sondra Smith-Adcock
Dr. Edil Torres Rivera

Entry-level Masters and Specialist Program Description
The M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. program in School Counseling and Guidance is
designed to equip students with the pre-professional competencies required for Florida
Department of Education Certification in School Counseling. The entry-level, 72 credit
hour M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. School Counseling and Guidance program is accredited
by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
(CACREP) and by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education
(NCATE). The M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. School Counseling and Guidance program
provides students with the specialized knowledge and skills required for placements as
school counselors in public or private elementary, middle, or secondary schools.

Mission Statement
The central purpose of the M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. SCG program is to teach students
to conceptualize and organize a school-based program around the eight goals, which
characterize developmental guidance and counseling. Therefore, the SCG program
prepares competent graduates who:
Understand and facilitate positive change in school environments;
Understand and facilitate positive change in self and others;
Understand and facilitate positive change in students' attitudes and behaviors;
Understand and facilitate positive change in students' decision-making and
problem-solving skills;
Understand and facilitate positive change in students' interpersonal and
communication skills;
Understand and facilitate positive change in students' school success skills;
Understand and facilitate positive change in students' career awareness and
educational planning; and
Understand and facilitate positive change in students' community pride and
involvement.
Each goal has a set of objectives that specify the skills that our graduates acquire
and are able to implement in a school setting. Graduates of the (SCG) program are
able to:
Provide individual counseling;
Provide small group counseling;
Present large group/classroom guidance;


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Organize and implement peer facilitator programs;
Develop counseling and guidance activities for students who are not
succeeding in school;
Provide leadership in organizing developmental guidance experiences for all
students within a school;
Lead parent education groups;
Consult with teachers, parents, and administrators;
Consult with child study teams;
Demonstrate counselor effectiveness through accountability studies

National Model Statement
The M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. program in School Counseling and Guidance is
designed to fulfill the National Standards within the National Model for School
Counseling Programs of the American School Counselor Association to help school
counselors, school and district administrators, faculty and staff, parents, counselor
educators, state associations, businesses, communities, and policy makers to provide
effective school counseling programs for all students. The specific standards, which
facilitate student development in the three broad areas of academic development,
career development, and personal development can be found at
http://www.schoolcounselor.orq/content.asp?pl=325&sl=1 34&contentid=134.

School Counseling Certification

Florida School Counselor Certification Test Requirements
Students enrolled in the M.Ed./Ed.S. or MAE/Ed.S. School Counseling and Guidance
program in the department are required to complete the (a) Professional Education, (b)
General Knowledge, and (c) Subject Area (School Guidance and Counseling)
subsections of the Florida Teacher Certification Examinations (FTCE) in order to be
eligible for state certification as a school counselor.
Students seeking certification as a school counselor in Florida must take and pass the
FTCE requirement in order to be eligible for graduation. Students are encouraged to
take the General Knowledge section in the first year. Professional Education and
Subject Area sections may be taken in the second year. All scores must be submitted to
the College of Education Office of Student Services prior to graduation. Degrees will not
be certified without passing scores.
Information regarding State of Florida certification examinations for certification as a
school counselor can be found at: http://www.fldoe.orq/asp/ftce/. For further guidance,
contact the Coordinator, Student Services, in the COE Office of Student Services
(http://education.ufl.edu/web/?pid=37).

Academic Requirements for Certification
* Human Development and Learning three (3) semester credit hours required from
among the following:
o MHS 6480 Developmental Counseling Across the Life Span (3)
o EDF 6113 Educational Psychology: Human Development (3)


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* English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) three (3) semester credit hours
required from among the following:
o TSL 6700: ESOL for Counselors and Administrators (Developed for SCG
students; it is highly recommended SCG students register for this course;
the remaining courses are options only in cases of extreme time conflict)
o TSL 5143 ESOL Curriculum, Methods, and Assessment
o TSL 4320 ESOL Strategies
* Reading instruction three (3) semester credit hours required from among the
following:
o RED 3312 Classroom Reading I (3)
o RED 5355 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School (3)
* Classroom management, including school safety, ethics and law:
o ESE 6345 Effective Teaching and Classroom Management
* Assessment, including content of state tests, reading and interpreting data, and
using data to improve achievement:
o This requirement is fulfilled through successful completion of MHS 6200 -
Assessment in Counseling and Development, and MHS 7740 Research
in Counseling and Development, both of which are required courses in the
SCG MED/EDS program in the department.
* Democratic values and institutions:
o This requirement is fulfilled through successful completion of SDS 6411
Counseling Children, SDS 6413 Counseling Adolescents, SDS 6620
Organization and Administration of Guidance and Personnel Programs
and MHS 6720 Professional Identity and Ethics in Counseling, all of which
are required courses in the SCG MED/EDS program in the department.

Doctoral Program Description
The doctoral-level School Counseling and Guidance program prepares school
counselors for administrative, coordinating, supervisory, or managerial positions such
as school guidance coordinators, state supervisors, consultants in school guidance, or
counselor educators who specialize in school guidance and counseling. The program
encompasses the basic requirements of the entry-level SCG program, and extends
preparation through advanced study which addresses consulting, professional
accountability, providing professional leadership, research, specialized studies,
supervised clinical and administrative experiences, teaching, and writing for publication.
The development, management, and evaluation of developmental school guidance
programs is given special attention. The School Counseling program faculty are
advocates for guidance and counseling services that are appropriate and relevant for all
students in schools, not just those with problems or in crisis, and they promote the use
of developmental perspectives by school counseling and guidance practitioners.
Therefore, in addition to learning remedial and crisis intervention theories and


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strategies, students learn to view problems within a developmental frame, to construct
solutions that resonate with pertinent developmental challenges, and to create
"climates" which facilitate student learning and re-learning.
Specifically, all students are expected to develop skills and contribute ideas related to
six basic school counselor interventions: (a) individual counseling; (b) small group
counseling; (c) large group guidance, (d) peer facilitator programs, (e) consultation, and
(f) coordination of guidance services. Competence in six basic counselor interventions
must be demonstrated. Students demonstrate their own skills and then learn how to
help assist others in learning and implementing the skills.
Doctoral students in this program are required to complete a doctoral-level clinical
internship in a school setting. Doctoral students need to have completed all practicum
and internship requirements of the entry-level student prior to or upon entering the
doctoral program. The setting and focus of the other practicum and other internship are
determined by the student's supervisory committee chairperson and committee
members, which may include supervised experiences in staff development,
consultation, and teaching.

Mission Statement
The central purpose of the doctoral School Counseling and Guidance program is to
prepare graduates who can conceptualize and organize a school-based program
around the eight goals that characterize developmental guidance and counseling. The
doctoral-level School Counseling and Guidance program prepares competent graduates
who are able to:
* Understand and facilitate positive change in school environments;
* Understand and facilitate positive change in self and others;
* Understand and facilitate positive change in students' attitudes and behaviors;
* Understand and facilitate positive change in students' decision-making and problem-
solving skills;
* Understand and facilitate positive change in students' interpersonal and
communication skills;
* Understand and facilitate positive change in students' school success skills;
* Understand and facilitate positive change in students' career awareness and
educational planning; and
* Understand and facilitate positive change in students' community pride and
involvement.
The program goals are elaborated further in a set of objectives that specify the skills
that our graduates acquire and are able to implement in a school setting. Doctoral
graduates of the School Counseling and Guidance program are able to:
* Provide individual counseling;
* Provide small group counseling;


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