Title: Knowing Kimono family guide
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091310/00001
 Material Information
Title: Knowing Kimono family guide
Series Title: Knowing Kimono family guide
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida
Publisher: Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091310
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
Holding Location: Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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A Family Guide

Kimono (kee-mo-no) is a Japanese word that means
"thing to wear." Kimono look like robes and have
been worn in Japan for hundreds of years. In this
exhibition, you will see kimono from Japan that







77.,
are more than 80 years old and were worn by men,
women and children.





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Art Deco and Modernism in Japan TOKYO
The Samuel P. Harn Memorial Exhibition
/ SHIKOKU PACIFIC
March 8 May 17, 2009 OCEAN
; KYUSHU
The exhibition is organized and circulated by .
Art Services International in Alexandria,Virginia. OKINAWA
Made possible locally by the AEC Trust. JAPAN











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FRONT


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BACK


Remember, when wearing a kimono you
always fold the left side over the right! Folding
a kimono right to left is the traditional way to
dress someone for burial.

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What is an uchikake
(oo-chee-ka-kay)?
An uchikake is a beautifully
decorated kimono, usually
worn on a special occasion
like a wedding.


A furisode (fury-so-day) is a kimono worn
by a single woman, and a tomesode (toe-
may-so-day) is a kimono worn by a married
woman. A furisode has longer sleeves, and
a tomesode has shorter sleeves.To tell the
difference, look at the length of the sleeves.


Children's kimono
could be worn every
day as a school
uniform or for a
special occasion. A
miyamairi (mee-ah-
ma-eer-ee) is a kimono
worn by an infant who
is being blessed by
a priest. The priest will pray for the baby's
health and happiness.


A haori (hay-or-ee) is a formal jacket.When
a man's haori is turned inside out, you can see
handpainted designs on the inside.The Japanese
believed that beauty should be within, and this
is why the designs are on the inside.


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The cranes on this miyamairi symbolize long
life, and the bamboo symbolizes strength.


TOMESODE


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Kimono for
men are
usually very
simple in
design, but
men's underkimono,
or juban (joo-ban),
have beautiful designs
and patterns all over
the fabric.Walk
around the gallery
and see how many
men's juban you can
find.





Stop by the Bishop Study Center to
see kimono and other Japanese objects
that you can touch.


FURISODE







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What is a Crest?

A crest is a design that represents
something that is important to a family.
Here are three samples:

Takanoha (tah-kah-no-ha) is
Japanese for "hawk feather"
and is the symbol for the
samurai (sam-ah-ri), ancient
Japanese warriors.


Fuji (foo-jee) means "wisteria"
in Japanese and is the crest used
most in Japan. Wisteria is a plant
that has low-hanging, purple
blooms.This crest symbolizes
humbleness and respect.


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Unscramble the words below.


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'uDqnfr* 'DJD)IflE '!JoDH O 'oUOWN 1 :SJaMsuv


Kiri (keer-e) is Japanese for
"paulownia" (paw-low-nee-
uh), which is a tree.The wood
from this tree was used to
make very expensive pieces
of furniture.This is why the
kiri crest symbolizes high
excellence and worth.


Cover: Woman's kimono, Taisho
period, 1912-1926
What Women Wear: Woman's
formal, long-sleeved kimono (uchikake),
Early Showa period, 1930s
Young woman's formal kimono (furisode),
Taisho period, 1920s
Woman's semiformal kimono
(tomesode),Taisho period, 1912-1926
Kids' Kimono: Infant boy's ceremonial
kimono (miyamairi),Taisho period,
1920s


Inside Out Art: Man's formal jacket
(haori), Early Showa period, 1930s-
1940s
Design Details: Man's underkimono
(juban), Early Showa period, 1930s-
1940s
Seasons of Style: Woman's formal,
long-sleeved kimono (furisode), Taisho
period, 1920s
All images courtesy of the
Montgomery Collection,
Lugano, Switzerland


What would your family crest look like?




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