PAGE 1

Institute on Aging VA GRECC From Bench to Bedside Winter T he UF Institute on Aging is expanding its footprint so that thousands more of Floridas citizens can take part in clinical and translational research studies aimed at improving the health and independence of older adults. The institute will establish a 4,200-square-foot clinical research unit within UFs roughly 106,000-square-foot Research and Academic Cen ter at Lake Nona, which will be completed by the summer of 2012. The new unit gives us the ability to reach beyond Gainesville to recruit study participants, said Marco Pahor, M.D., director of the Institute on Aging. Being able to involve larger numbers of people from a wider geo graphical radius will improve the quality of our research data and the sound Residents of Orlando and its environs will be able to take part in future Institute on Aging studies of older adults. Current research includes the LIFE study, to assess whether physical activity or health education can prevent movement disability; The TTrial, to test whether giving testoster one to men who have depleted levels can help improve health and physical, sexual and mental function; and the ASPREE study, to determine whether daily low-dose aspirin can help stave off disabling conditions and increase life expectancy among healthy seniors. ary collaborations with researchers in the neighboring Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. Orlando, here we come! Institute on Aging Lengthens its Reach Into the Orlando Community via new Lake Nona Facility D IRECTORS MESSAGE Dear Friends of the IOA, It is my pleasure to announce that Robert Hromas, M.D., will join the University of Florida in February as chairman of the Department of Medi cine. Dr. Hromas is an authority on blood cancers and cancer drug discov ery. He earned his medical degree at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and trained in blood cancers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Re search Center. He was on the faculty at Indi ana University Medical Center for 13 years before going to the University of New Mexico, where he has been a professor, chief of hematology/oncol ogy and deputy director of the UNM Cancer Center. Dr. Hromas has published more than 120 research articles, and his can cer research grants total more than $3.5 million. He holds numerous leadership positions in national medical and scien awards for teaching and patient care. The department of medicine is one of the IOAs most important col laborators, and, as such, Dr. Hromas record of excellence in clinical and translational research, leadership and clinical operations will be pivotal to our institute and the university. Please join me in welcoming Dr. Hromas! Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum, Inc. of Tampa, Florida UFs new clinical research facility at Lake Nona will be completed in the summer of 2012. Robert Hromas, M.D.

PAGE 2

David Clark, Sc.D. is a researcher at the Malcom Randall VA Medical Centers Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, and a Junior Pepper Scholar of the UF Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center. His research focuses on enhancing walking capability among people who have restricted mobility, such as older adults and those who have suffered a stroke. In particular, he is investigating how changes in the nervous system contribute to weakness and impaired movement. The work is supported by a career development award from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and a pilot grant from the UF Pepper Center. T he UF Institute on Aging is continuing to recruit participants at a steady clip for the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders, or LIFE study, announced in the Spring 2010 edition of Continuum The LIFE study examines whether physical activity or health educa tion can prevent or delay major movement disability among older adults. The six-year, controlled trial of 1,600 older adults at risk of mobility disabil As of February 2011 two months ahead of schedule 920 par ticipants in all have been assigned to intervention groups. Pennington Biomedical Research Center leads recruitment with 150 participants. Florida is next, with 146 participants, and Wake Forest has 130. In close pursuit are Yale University, the University of Pittsburgh, Tufts University and Northwestern University. Stanford University, which has a relatively high percentage of lower-functioning participants and a high goal for minority recruitment, has assigned 84 participants. Racial and ethnic minority recruitment is being closely monitored. Across all sites, 162 nonwhite, racial minorities, or 18 percent, have been as signed. Northwestern, Wake Forest, Pennington and Stanford are leaders in minority recruitment. The LIFE Study team anticipates that the New Year will bring re newed interest in the study, and is devising strategies for increasing interest among ethnic minorities. For more information, please call 352-273-5919 and ask about The LIFE Study. Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) is Ahead of Recruitment Timeline Congratulations to the recruitment teams at all study sites for the outstanding results! Joe Nocera, Ph.D. has been promoted to a faculty position at the lecturer rank in the Department of Aging and Geriatric Research. He is also a research scientist with the Department of Veterans Affairs and a Junior Scholar of the UF Pepper Center. Previously, he completed postdoctoral fellowships in the department of aging and geriatric medicine and the department of neurology. Nocera did his doctoral studies in kinesiology at the University of Georgia, and his masters work at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Dr. Noceras research includes studying the relationship between cognitive function and physical function with emphasis on executive control, locomotion and balance. AWAR D S Connie Uphold, Ph.D., A.R.N.P., an associ ate professor of aging and geriatric research and education director of the Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Centers at the VA Medical Center, has received a four-year, $607,800 Veterans Affairs Service Directed Project Award for her project titled Web-Based Informational Materials for Caregivers of Veterans Post-Stroke. Uphold also has co-authored and co-edited the book A Lifeline for Stroke Caregivers: Information and Re sources to Keep Your Head Above Water published tional resources for caregivers of post-stroke veterans are at http://www.rorc.research. va.gov/rescue. Best wishes to Peggy Smith, who retired in December 2010 after 15 years of employment with the University of Florida and four years with the Department of Aging. Peggy, we will miss your enthusiasm and creativity! VA Career Development-2 Joshua Yarrow, Ph.D., a postdoctoral as sociate in the Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Centers at the VA Medical Center and in the UF College of Health and Human Performance, has received a 20112013 VA Career Development-2 Award of $498,000. His research project, under the mentorship of Steve Borst, Ph.D., is titled Testosterone and Spinal Cord Injury. VA Service Directed Project

PAGE 3

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS ANNOUNCE M ENTS Welcome to Our New Faculty and Staff: Yohannes Endeshaw, M.D., M.P.H. associ ate professor, geriatric medicine and clinical research; Ryan OMara assistant project manager, LIFE study; Barbara William son program assistant, LIFE study; Kelly Gamble research scientist, clinical research; Kimberly Case study coordinator, clinical research; Pam Dubiak graduate assistant, clinical research; Charles Gay interven tionist, LIFE study; David Clark, Sc.D. Pepper Junior Scholar; Joe Nocera, Ph.D. adjunct lecturer; Vasu Lakkimsetti, M.D. courtesy faculty; Emily Chappelle screener; Kyle Jersey phlebotomist; Anna Hernan dez grants assistant; Kathleen Jett, Ph.D., G.N.P. nurse practitioner, Oak Hammock. Opportunities to Participate In Research Studies: If you are interested in participating in a current or future Institute on Aging study, you can now enroll in our Institutional Review Board-approved recruitment registry. To enroll or obtain additional information, contact Cardie Dielschneider at or call 352-273-5919 New Positions: Several faculty positions are now open, and more will be posted soon. For employment opportunities, please e-mail Camelia Pascu at Yohannes Endeshaw, M.D., M.P.H. recently joined the Department of Ag ing and Geriatric Research and the In stitute on Aging as associate professor. Previously, he held a similar position at Emory University School of Medicine. ric and sleep medicine and has a strong record in research and publications. After earning his medical degree at Addis Ababa University, in Ethiopia, he did his residency in medicine at the Medical College of Vir ginia. Later, he completed a clinical and research fellowship in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at Emory University School of Medicine, and additional sleep medicine training at the Emory University Sleep Disorders Center. Dr. Endeshaw was an attending physician at Emorys Wesley Woods Center and Sleep Disorders Center, Grady Memorial Hospitals Memory Clinic, and the Atlanta VA Medical Centers GRECC/Sleep Clinic. Before that, he was an assistant professor and co-director of the primary care clerkship program in the health care sciences department at the George Washington University. He also holds a masters in public health and of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine. Dr. Endeshaws research focuses on how sleep disorders and related treatments affect daily func tioning and quality of life among older adults. That in cludes looking at the connection between sleep-disordered breathing and other ailments that affect the elderly. SPOTLIGHT P re-clinical and clinical researchers work hand in hand at UFs Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center to study the basic biology behind the causes of age-related muscle loss, called sarcope nia. A good example of this kind of partnership is the work of junior scholars Stephanie Wohlgemuth, Ph.D., and Steven Anton, Ph.D., with the mentor ship of Christiaan Leeuwenburgh, Ph.D., and Michael Perri, Ph.D. Usually, during aging, the muscles of rats show decreased activity of genes involved in a process called autophagy, which serves as the house keeper of cells by clearing away damaged compo nents. Aging impairs the cells ability to stay debrisfree, and as a result they no longer function properly, or are destroyed. To investigate ways to spur the cleanup pro cess, the researchers put rats on a lifelong low-calorie diet and allowed them to exercise voluntarily. The rats muscles showed increased activity of biological markers of the cleanup process. With those results in hand, the researchers wanted to see if they would get similar results in people. They carried out a clinical study to examine how the muscles of elderly, overweight women might respond to a six-month regimen of exercise and weight loss. In these women, markers of cleanup and of the function of mitochondria the energy-producing centers of cells were elevated, compared with levels detected in a control group. The two sets of results show how animal studies inform clinical stud ies by pointing to important biological markers that might be involved in helping older adults maintain independence in their daily activities. Translational Research is Key to Success at UFs Pepper Older Americans Independence Center Studies in rats help point human studies in the right direction.

PAGE 4

4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA University of Florida Institute on Aging PO Box 100107 Gainesville, FL 32610 Institute on Aging Executive Committee Editorial Board Marco Pahor, M.D., IOA Director Christy S. Carter, Ph.D., UF IOA Camelia Pascu, UF IOA Lynda Pasteur, UF IOA Louise Perras, UF IOA Czerne Reid, Ph.D., UF News & Comm. Melanie Ross, UF News & Comm. Constance Uphold, Ph. D. UF IOA, VA GRECC Marco Pahor, M.D., IOA Director Elena Andresen, Ph.D. Tetsuo Ashizawa, M.D. Henry V. Baker, Ph.D. Kenneth I. Berns, M.D., Ph.D. Stephen Borst, Ph.D. Christy S. Carter, Ph.D. Robert J. Cousins, Ph.D. Lauren E. Crump, M.P.H. Michael J. Daniels, Sc.D. Colleen Ebel Roger Fillingim, Ph. D. Ann L. Horgas, R.N., Ph.D. Christiaan Leeuwenburgh, Ph.D. Ron Lester, M.B.A., Ph.D. Michael Marsiske, Ph.D. John Meuleman, M.D. Susan Nayfield, M.D., M.Sc. Michael G. Perri, Ph.D. Scott K. Powers, Ph.D. Beverly Roberts, Ph.D. Philip J. Scarpace, Ph.D. Ron Shorr, M.D., M.S. Constance Uphold, Ph.D. MAKE A GIFT Giving to the Institute on Aging ...why every dollar counts U nlocking lifes mysteries particularly the secrets of how long and how well we live is the distinct focus of the University of Floridas Institute on Aging. Our scientists and physicians are dedicated to achieving better understanding of the mechanisms of aging and how we can maintain or enhance our physical independence and cognitive abilities. Private philanthropy is so essential to our work. Your gift, regardless of size, can that fuel positive cellular changes; identify new therapies that help rehabilitate aging bones and joints; or uncover additional pharmaceutical allies. Private philanthropy makes all this and much more possible. To learn more about how you can invest in a healthier and more independent tomorrow for us all, please contact Mary Ann Kiely at 352-273-9620 or email


Continuum newsletter
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Title: Continuum newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Institute on Aging, University of Florida
Publisher: Institute on Aging, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2011
Copyright Date: 2010
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UFFA Institut on AgingH VA


Institute on Aging Lengthens its Reach Into the
Orlando Community via new Lake Nona Facility
Orlando, here we come!


UF's new clinical research facility at Lake Nona will be completed in the summer of 2012.

The UF Institute on Aging is expanding its footprint so that thousand:
more of Florida's citizens can take part in clinical and translational
research studies aimed at improving the health and independence o
older adults. The institute will establish a 4,200-square-foot clinical research
unit within UF's roughly 106,000-square-foot Research and Academic Cen-
ter at Lake Nona, which will be completed by the summer of 2012.
"The new unit gives us the ability to reach beyond Gainesville to
recruit study participants," said Marco Pahor, M.D., director of the Institut
on Aging. "Being able to involve larger numbers of people from a wider geo
graphical radius will improve the quality of our research data and the sound
ness of our findings."
Residents of Orlando and its environs will be able to take part in
future Institute on Aging studies of older adults. Current research includes
the LIFE study, to assess whether physical activity or health education can
prevent movement disability; The TTrial, to test whether giving testoster-
one to men who have depleted levels can help improve health and physical,
sexual and mental function; and the ASPREE study, to determine whether
daily low-dose aspirin can help stave off disabling conditions and increase lif
expectancy among healthy seniors.
Community members also will benefit from potential cross-disciplin-
ary collaborations with researchers in the neighboring Sanford-Burnham
Medical Research Institute.t


Dear Friends of the IOA,
It is my pleasure to announce
that Robert Hromas, M.D., will join
the University of Florida in February as
chairman of the Department of Medi-
cine.
Dr. Hromas is an authority on
blood cancers and cancer drug discov-
ery. He earned his medical degree at the
University of Texas Medical School at
Houston, and trained in blood cancers
at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Re-
search Center.
He was on the
faculty at Indi-
ana University
s Medical Center
for 13 years
f before going to
the University
of New Mexico, Robert Hromas, M.D.
where he has been
a professor, chief of hematology/oncol-
ogy and deputy director of the UNM
e cancer Center.
SDr. Hromas has published more
than 120 research articles, and his can-
cer research grants total more than $3.5
million. He holds numerous leadership
positions in national medical and scien-
tific organizations, and has won many
awards for teaching and patient care.
The department of medicine is
one of the IOA's most important col-
laborators, and, as such, Dr. Hromas'
record of excellence in clinical and
translational research, leadership and
clinical operations will be pivotal to our
institute and the university. Pleasejoin
me in welcoming Dr. Hromaslt
C6*tt"ry




iA'


VA Service Directed Project
Connie Uphold, Ph.D., A.R.N.P, an associ-
ate professor of aging and geriatric research
and education director of the Geriatric
Research Education and Clinical Centers
at the VA Medical Center, has received a
four-year, $607,800 Veterans Affairs Service
Directed Project Award for her project titled
\ \. I.-Based Informational Materials for
Caregivers of Veterans Post-Stroke." Uphold
also has co-authored and co-edited the book
A Lifelinefor Stroke Caregivers: Information and Re
sources to Keep Tour Head Above Water, published
by the Government Printing Office. Addi-
tional resources for caregivers of post-stroke
veterans are at http://www.rorc.research.
va.gov/rescue.

VA Career Development-2
Joshua Yarrow, Ph.D., a postdoctoral as-
sociate in the Geriatric Research Education
and Clinical Centers at the VA Medical
Center and in the UF College of Health and
Human Performance, has received a 2011-
2013 VA Career Development-2 Award of
- I' ,.. .1I His research project, under the
mentorship of Steve Borst, Ph.D., is titled
"Testosterone and Spinal Cord Injury."






enthus_ .- LL'NM 'ia m- and" cretivty


David Clark, Sc.D. is
i m!. Malcom Randall
(:. B, '. B rain Reha
IR . C t. I Center, an
S. I!..1. .! 'the UF Cl
( )1. I .\,,ericans In
(:i. I. His research
I ii1ii. i. walking c
".I. 1!,ho have rest
I.... ...I.. .ler adults a
have suttered a strok
he is investigating how changes in the nerv
contribute to weakness and impaired move
is supported by a career development awar
Department of Veterans Affairs and a pilot
UF Pepper Center.


Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders
(LIFE) is Ahead of Recruitment Timeline
Congratulations to the recruitment teams at all study sites for the outstanding results!

4 he UF Institute on Aging is continuing to recruit participants at
a steady clip for the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for
Elders, or LIFE study, announced in the Spring 2010 edition of
Continuum.
The LIFE study examines whether physical activity or health educa-
tion can prevent or delay major movement disability among older adults.
The six-year, controlled trial of 1,600 older adults at risk of mobility disabil-
ity is being carried out at eight field sites around the country.
As of February 2011 -two months ahead of schedule -920 par-
ticipants in all have been assigned to intervention groups.
Pennington Biomedical Research Center leads recruitment with 150
participants. Florida is next, with 146 participants, and Wake Forest has
130. In close pursuit are Yale University, the University of Pittsburgh, Tufts
University and N. rIinM -i.- rn University. Stanford University, which has a
relatively high percentage of lower-functioning participants and a high goal
for minority recruitment, has assigned 84 participants.
Racial and ethnic minority recruitment is being closely monitored.
Across all sites, 162 nonwhite, racial minorities, or 18 percent, have been as-
signed. Northwestern, Wake Forest, Pennington and Stanford are leaders in
minority recruitment.
The LIFE Study team anticipates that the New Year will bring re-
newed interest in the study, and is devising strategies for increasing interest
among ethnic minorities.
For more information, please call 352-273-5919 and ask about "The
LIFE Study." #





a researcher at JoeN ocera, Ph.D. has been promoted
VA Medical to a faculty position at the lecturer
bilitation rank in the Department of Aging
d aJunior Pepper and Geriatric Research. He is also a
aude D. Pepper research scientist with the Department
dependence of Veterans Affairs and aJunior
focuses on Scholar of the UF Pepper Center.
capability among Previously, he completed postdoctoral
ricted mobility, fellowships in the department of
nd those who aging and geriatric medicine and the
e. In particular, department of neurology. Nocera
ous system did his doctoral studies in kinesiology at the University of
ment. The work Georgia, and his master's work at the University of Nevada,
d from the U.S. Las Vegas. Dr. Nocera's research includes studying the
grant from the relationship between cognitive function and physical function
with emphasis on executive control, locomotion and balance.#











Translational Research is Key to Success at UF's
Pepper Older Americans Independence Center
Studies in rats help point human studies in the right direction.

re-clinical and clinical researchers work hand in hand at UF's Claude
D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center to study the basic
biology behind the causes of age-related muscle loss, called sarcope-
nia. A good example of this kind of partnership is the work of junior scholars
Stephanie Wohlgemuth, Ph.D., and Steven Anton, Ph.D., with the mentor-
ship of C:hriiiaan Leeuwenburgh, Ph.D., and Michael Perri, Ph.D.
Usually, during aging, the muscles of rats show decreased activity of
genes involved in a process called autophagy, which serves as the "house-
keeper" of cells by clearing away damaged compo-
nents. Aging impairs the cells' ability to stay debris-
free, and as a result they no longer function properly,
or are destroyed.
To investigate ways to spur the cleanup pro-
cess, the researchers put rats on a lifelong low-calorie V
diet and allowed them to exercise voluntarily. The
rats' muscles showed increased activity of biological
markers of the cleanup process.
With those results in hand, the researchers wanted to see if they
would get similar results in people. They carried out a clinical study to
examine how the muscles of elderly, overweight women might respond to
a six-month regimen of exercise and weight loss. In these women, markers
of cleanup and of the function of mitochondria -the energy-producing
centers of cells -were elevated, compared with levels detected in a control
group. The two sets of results show how animal studies inform clinical stud-
ies by pointing to important biological markers that might be involved in
helping older adults maintain independence in their daily activities.


AYobarre, Endeshaw, M.D., M.PH.
!... !, I ined the Department of Ag-
.._ ..!. i eriatric Research and the In-
il.. ... !i Aging as associate professor.
I',. I .....- he held a similar position at
1 ..... I diversityy School of Medicine.
H. I ...... cd-certified in internal, geriat-
...! .i I 1. ep medicine and has a strong
.. .I i. research and publications.
.\Ii i earning his medical degree at
Addis Ababa University, in Ethiopia, he
did his residency in medicine at the Medical College of Vir-
ginia. Later, he completed a clinical and research fellowship in
the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at Emory
University School of Medicine, and additional sleep medicine
training at the Emory University Sleep Disorders Center.


Welcome to Our New
Faculty and Staff:
Yohannes Endeshaw, M.D., M.P.H., associ-
ate professor, geriatric medicine and clinical
research; Ryan O'Mara, assistant project
manager, LIFE study; Barbara William-
son, program assistant, LIFE study; Kelly
Gamble, research scientist, clinical research;
Kimberly Case, study coordinator, clinical
research; Pam Dubiak, graduate assistant,
clinical research; Charles Gay, interven-
tionist, LIFE study; David Clark, Sc.D.,
PepperJunior Scholar;Joe Nocera, Ph.D.,
adjunct lecturer; Vasu Lakkimsetti, M.D.,
courtesy faculty; Emily Chappelle, screener;
KyleJersey, phlebotomist; Anna Hernan-
dez, grants assistant; KathleenJett, Ph.D.,
G.N.P, nurse practitioner, Oak Hammock.

Opportunities to Participate
In Research Studies:
If you are interested in participating in a
current or future Institute on Aging study,
you can now enroll in our Institutional
Review Board-approved recruitment
registry. To enroll or obtain additional
information, contact Cardie Dielschneider
at cdielschneider@aging.ufl.edu or call
352-273-5919.

New Positions:
Several faculty positions are now open, and
more will be posted soon. For employment
opportunities, please e-mail Camelia Pascu
at cpascu@aging.ufl.edu.


Dr. Endeshaw was an attending physician at
Emory's Wesley Woods Center and Sleep Disorders
Center, Grady Memorial Hospital's Memory Clinic, and
the Atlanta VA Medical Center's GRECC/Sleep Clinic.
Before that, he was an assistant professor and co-director
of the primary care clerkship program in the health care
sciences department at the George Washington
University. He also holds a master's in public health and
a certificate in international health from the University
of Washington School of Public Health and Community
Medicine.
Dr. Endeshaw's research focuses on how sleep
disorders -and related treatments -affect daily func-
tioning and quality of life among older adults. That in-
cludes looking at the connection between sleep-disordered
breathing and other ailments that affect the elderly. C





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Giving to the Institute on Aging

...why every dollar counts

Unlocking life's mysteries particularly the secrets of how long and how

well we live -is the distinct focus of the University of Florida's Institute
on Aging. Our scientists and physicians are dedicated to achieving better
understanding of the mechanisms of aging and how we can maintain or enhance our
physical independence and cognitive abilities.

Private philanthropy is so essential to our work. Your gift, regardless of size, can
make the critical difference in funding new scientific endeavors. Imagine discoveries
that fuel positive cellular changes; identify new therapies that help rehabilitate aging
bones and joints; or uncover additional pharmaceutical allies. Private philanthropy
makes all this and much more possible.

To learn more about how you can invest in a healthier and more independent
tomorrow for us all, please contact Mary Ann Kiely at 352-273-9620 or email
mkiely@ufl.edu. #


M o M.D. I.A Irector
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Czern^^e Reid, h.D., F News Comm
MelanieB RsUFNews & Comm.
Constance Uphold, Ph.D.
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