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Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: De Mesa Sanchez House, Block 7 Lot 6
Title: A report part 1
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091263/00011
 Material Information
Title: A report part 1
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: De Mesa Sanchez House, Block 7 Lot 6
Physical Description: Report
Language: English
Creator: Woodcock, Julie Anne
Publication Date: 1994
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
43 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
de Mesa-Sanchez House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 43 Saint George Street
Coordinates: 29.896429 x -81.313225
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091263
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
Resource Identifier: B7-L6

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D e oa ale o ie l h. 7













A RtiorQ ; PA Yr I
THE DE MESA-SANCHEZ HOUSE
ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA














Julie Anne Woodcock
ARC 6852
January 17, 1994










TABLE OF CONTENTS



Historical Background



Structural Research



Structural Analysis



Restoration of the De Mesa-Sanchez House



APPENDIX A



Works Cited


Pg 2


Pg 4


Pg 9


Pg 16


Pg 18


Pg 20










...-.-...--- HISTORICAL BACKGROUND


The original construction date of the De Mesa-

Sanchez House is unknown. However, it is almost

certain that it does not date before 1702 due to the

fact that the entire city was burned during the

Carolinian siege on the townX(WaterburyG 1983). Also,

the use of coquina and tabby increases in the 1730's

and this is the construction of this houseX(ManucyX

1962).



The first known owner of the house was Antonio De

Mesjyho is also perhaps the builder. He came to St.

Augustine by the 1740's and was employed by the Royal

Treasury. The house, at that time, was occupied by De

Mesa and his wife and seven childrenK(Smithg 1981). It

was a one room, one story residence and was constructed

out of coquinaX(Smithy 1981). According to

descriptions of typical First Spanish style homes in

The Houses of St. Augustine by Albert Manucy, the De

Mesa house is characteristic of the "St. Augustine"

look of the time.











In 1763, the British took over St. Augustine and

De Mesa and most of the other Spanish inhabitants left.

Three different parties owned the hbuse during the

British occupation which lasted from 1763-1783. Those

three were William Walton, the Governor, and James

Stout, the latter being the most important. The house

was used as an export office and a place to stay when

Stout and his family visited town. Stout added several

rooms along the street front (Smith, 1981).



The Spanish regained control of St. Augustine from

1784-1821. At this time, the house was sold to don

Juan Sanchez. He also enlarged the house )nd in the

mid-1790's the Royal Treasury occupied part of the

building. By 1803, Sanchez built an east wing, added a

second floor and constructed a detached kitchen1(Smith,

1981).



In 1821, the United States acquired Florida and in

1835, James Lisk bought the De Mesa-Sanchez house. He

enclosed several porches and built a second story to

integrate the detached kitchen with the rest of the

house. He also stuccoed the coquina and painted it











pink on the exterior kScardaville 1981). Since then,

there have been many owners of the house and features

were added and detracted at various times in

history (Scardaville 1981) Finally, in 1965, the

house was acquired by the St. Augustine Restoration

Foundation and later transferred to the Historic St.

Augustine Preservation Board (Scardaville/ 1981).



The De Mesa-Sanchez house is now a house museum in

the Restoration District of t'e city. It is part of an

exhibit that includes other:h uses and outdoor colonial

activities. It is restored t its 1837 appearance on

the interior and exterior(Sc:rdaville1 1981).




------- STRUCTURAL RESI ARCH



--y In reviewing the research gathered on the architectural

and structural nature of the De Mesa-Sanchez house,

there are several different proposals as to when

certain features were added and removed. This overview

attempts to present all of the possibilities, but

eliminates any that have been disproved with later










evidence. The research used inr "s Restoration of

the DeMesa-Sanchez House for the St. Augustine

Preservation Board, completed by Herschel Shepard in

1977, Historical Outline of the DeMesa-Sanchez Site, by

Michael Scardaville in 1978 and De Mesa Site,

Revisited, by James Smith in 19[ 1. The Scardaville

reference is more theoretical arid the Smith research is

supported by archaeological evidence. However, :

-d rW -fa t there are soer very important points in

the Scardaville research and therefore I pf~tl -e
4-"".',4 i. Since other parts )f this report include

names of owners, I will oilmF.-t*em from this portion ~c

and doil ctrio- ;it ltL structural data.



I. First Spanish Period



a. The 1764 Puente Map shows a small structure on the
extreme western end of the prcierty. He describes it
as a "stone house".

K. The lot was approximately 31.6 American feet N-S x
195.2 American feet E-W. (Scarlaville, 1978).

Excavations during 980 uncovered three
architectural feature a small single room house, a
larger, partially enclosed central courtyard, and a
small, detached rear kitchen of coquina. The house was
a one-room, 16.7 x 26.5 foot coquina structure built
some time before 1760. No flooring material was found
that dated back to this period. A large tabby floored










courtyard was found that extended from the rear of the
house eastward 23.3 x 35.0 feet to the edge of the
kitchen. A post hole was found somewhere along the
back wall of the house and this suggests a rear loggia
with a shed roof. The kitchen had a tabby floor and
the north-south dimension was a little less than 12
feetF (Smithy 1981).

Il No wooden construction materials were identified
during archaeological investigationsr(Deagan1 1978).

, British Period

cX The house was expanded to the south creating a
central hall with two flanking rooms. This symmetrical
plan is a typical British adaptation to Spanish
houses (Manucy( 1962).

)W. The front edge of the lot was expanded 9.8
American feet to the south making the actual frontage
42.8 American feetY(ScardavilleK 1978).

/6 The E-W dimension of the lot was expanded east to
236.5 American feet/(Scardavillex 1978).

The house was roofed with shingles and contained a
tabby floor (Scardaville/ 1978).

SA three room stone house on the west boundary of
the property with a detached kitchen was noted in the
1784 deed of sale to Sanchez. This refutes the theory
that there was a partial second story at this
timeK(Chain of Title). The west and south walls of the
kitchen were demolished and replaced with wood frame
construction$(Smithx 1981).

X A chimney base was built on Room 103's east wall
in the exact location of the, present door (Smithy
1981).

3, Second Spanish Period

( The south wall of Room 103 was removed providing
Asymmetrical two room plan along the










street/(Scardaville) 19',7). This explains the
difference in joiners on the door of that wall which
will be discussed later.

..( A new tabby floor was laid throughout the first
floor((Deagan, 1978).

J0. A second floor, a one story wing and loggia to the
east were added. The detached kitchen was rebuilt.
These changes are evidenced in the Rocque map of 1788
which says there was a one room second story. It is
believed that the partial second floor was accomplished
around 1784 and completed over the west wing around
1791 as evidenced in the Boot of Mortgages of 1791.

J~ Sometime before 1803 a second floor was completed
over the east wing and a few years later the loggia was
enclosed. An 1803 inventory describes the house as an
L shaped 2 story structure F.th a detached masonry
kitchen. The kitchen was shifted eastward by about 14
feet and was built entirely of coquina to be a larger
14.2 by 17.8-feet. The floc:- surface was earth. The
1803 inventory also indicate.- that the south room of
the east wing was a loggia s;-ipported by masonry arches
and also mentions a masonry walled
stairway)((ScardavilleX 1978i.

'e0 The frontage of the lot. was increased to 47
feet)(Scardaville )1978).

Is, These additions were roofed with
shingles Scardaville' 1977).

S The present roof framing over the second floor of
the west wing was all installed at the same time and
the framing dates no later tnan 1830 due to the hand
wrought nails and spikes. The rafters are numbered but
the numbers are out of sequence indicating that they
were probably reused.(Scardaville, 1977). From this
comes the theory that the original one room second
story was dismantled and rebuilt to be larger.

X" A covered balcony on the second floor was
constructed and this may have sheltered an exterior
stair to the new second floor. This is evidenced by
"the remains of jack rafters extending from the east










rafters to the east (Scardaville 1978)

al. There is architectural evidence that the south
wall of each northern room had a windowX(Scardaville
1977). a r

co The second floor roof of the east wing was
completed after the second floor roof of the west wing.
The framing of the east wing frames into and is
supported by that of the west wing.

j. The following conclusions nave been drawn: The
/expansion during the Second Sp;iish period took place
in two stages. Between 1784-171~8, a one story east
wing, a detached kitchen and a partial second floor
were added. Between 1788-1791, the second floor was
completed over the west and ea:.t wings (Scardaville-
1977).


American Territorial


.- A new layer of stucco w 3 applied over the coquina
rn the exterior. It was scored and painted pink.

IB5 The E-W dimension of the property was reduced to
159 feet.

Spf~ Rooms 104 and 203 and the eastern wing were added
SVbet ween 1893-1899.
Ie2 'Sanborn map of 1888 does not show Rooms 104 and
203m

K. CThe Sanborn map of 1893 is identical to the
present configuration.

0. By 1899, a two story one room addition was added
to the east of the kitchen and a one story one room
S addition to the east of that. The present balcony to
%, the south of the kitchen was extended around the east
of the kitchen to attach the addition.

J.C By 1924, the one room addition to the east of the










kitchen was removed.


ff. The south wall of Room 103 which had been removed
in the Second Spanish Period, was now replaced with two
wooden frame partitionsX (Smith 1981).


--- STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS

The following is a structural analysis based on
the recollection of the restoration architect on the
project, Herschel Shepard. Farther evidence was found
in the reports found in archival records at the
Preservation Board Office but most reports were
unavailable for analysis.

The analysis describes each -c3om, using room numbers
which correspond to the attached floor plan. (APPENDIX
A).

I. FIRST FLOOR

The first floor was constr c ted in phases and over at
least a century. Porches vcre built and then enclosed.
Additions were added in alrst all directions.

Room 103

This room is the original cie room one story building
built by De Mesa in the early to middle 18th century.


(There is evidence that the J:loor in this room was wood
during the territorial period and therefore, the
present floor is wood reconstructed at the time of the
restoration of the property in the 1970's. It was
reconstructed from archaeological evidence and there is
a tabby floor beneath.

Blind nail were used in the reconstruction so that no
one could misinterpret the -loor and baseboards as
being originally .* C A- A, k ch :c ^; !

The window in the room is in its original position and
the door leading to Room 106 was probably a window
before the construction of the east addition. The










jambs of the opening are splayed. which is a colonial
trait.

The finishes were removed from the walls and were
replaced with plaster and veneer plaster to represent
the original plaster finish.

All door frames, a few docrs, cornice trim, ceiling
planks, most windows, windcr sills, surrounds, and
returns were present at the time of restoration.

Exterior walls in this room are coquina.

All walls except the south wall are colonial with the
interior and exterior being plastered.

Ceiling planks arecoloial due to the rough sawn
finish.

The graining applied to the door to Room 102 was added
after the restoration.

The door frame leading to RK:om 102 is not mortise and
tenon and therefore, it +wa.-probably rcplaeZd -~a ..tim


The trim around the window .s a very simple style of
Georgian or Greek Revival and is not from the original
building of the one room structure.

Room 102

The foyer is part of the first expansion which took
place between 1763 and 1783. This expansion included
Rooms 102,101,106 and 108. James Stout was the owner
at the time of the additions to the house.

Door hinges are not original.

Ceiling planks are the same as Room 103.

Trim is similar to the trim in Room 103.

Molding on the front door was present at time of
restoration.










The wall connecting Room 103 is masonry constructionX 6- -

The wall connecting Room 101 is wood frame.

The floor is a reconstruction of the ei~g a floor.

Room 101

This room is also part of the first expansion performed
by Stout.

The floor covering is a reconstruction of American
Territorial covering evidenced in archaeological
reports.

The heads of nails in the fa:e-n~ai floor read through
the floor covering indicating that the wood floor
beneath is original and was 'ot replaced during
restoration. The width of t-e floor planks suggest
that they are territorial.

Duts were installed in the 'loor at the time of
restoration.

All wooden surfaces show evidence of hand planing.

The frames on the doors are nortise and tenon and show
hand planed marks.

Part of the floor near the hea rth had to be patched for
structural reasons at restorcicion.

Part of the plaster on the sclith wall is original and
is applied:directly to the cc Iuina.

The brick was replaced in the fireplace sometime after
original construction and a smoke shelf was built. The
smoke shelf is a mid-19th century feature. The brick
at the front of the fireplace could be original due to
its differing appearance from the interior brick.
Portland cement mortar is used and this did not come
into use until after 1890.

The fireplace frontispiece could possibly be from the
late 18th century but there is no clear evidence ee--"
axaeb.y when it was constructed. At any rate, it was











present at time of restoration. In order to replace
brick in a fireplace, the frontispiece must be removed
so the mantel could have been replaced or just
reinstalled.

The baseboards are the same as Room 103.

The door to Room 104 has splayed jambs as in Room 103.
This opening could have been a window originally. The
wood frame is hand planed.

The window trim is the same as Room 103.

Room 104

This addition took place after the Stout additions but
it is possible that this was a covered porch or outdoor
area of some sort.

During restoration, all of the joists, battens and
roofing were replaced.

The roof that was replaced could not predate the
addition of the second floor, because the rafters are
supported by the second floor wall well above the eave
height of a one-story building.

Room 105

When first constructed, this area may have been an
exterior patio with an exterior stair.

The saw marks in the structural members demonstrate
that they are original, not reconstructions.

The floorboards above the structural members have been
replaced.

The staircase materials have not been replaced since
the staircase was constructed.

Room 106

This room was added by Sanchez in his first expansion.

A window in the south wall opens into the staircase,










indicating that the stair was built after this
addition. The shutters on the interior of that window
indicate that when the stair was built it was left open
at the window to provide ventilation through the
window. However, this is arguable because the lath
behind the plaster in the stair is sawn wooden lath not
j. .-"'E.le e - ,( ), and the stair was built before
that. The shutters on the windows use hand wrought
nails which were used before the 1820's.

The ceiling planks are the same as those used in Room
103.

The molding is the same as that used in the other
rooms, as well.

The room was probably formed to be symmetrical around
the door leading to Room 103.

The door leading to Room 107 was probably a later
addition because a door would not normally be placed at
the end of a'wall in that fashion.

Room 107

The floor planks above the room were replaced at
restoration.

Room 108

The ceiling planks and the molding on the ceiling are
the same as Room 103.

The window is at a different height from the window in
Room 106.

There is no trim on the window.

It is theorized that this room was part of the Stout
addition due to its similarity to the other rooms of
Stout's expansion.

Room 110

This kitchen was not the original kitchen. The
original was constructed away from the main body of the










house with an earth floor. This kitchen has a tabby
floor and is attached to the house. It was originally
thought that the house was expai.ded to reach the
kitchen, but it is now known that the kitchen was
7 simply reconstructed. The kitchen was con-tiacted by
Lisk.

The door to Room 108 uses cut nails which is a 19th
century feature.

S A pintel hinge is used on the door to Room 108 and this
S hinge was not used until after 1830.





1 SECOND FLOOR

The second floor was constructed ir phases similar to
the first floor. It is theorized that Sanchez
constructed one room at first and .hen continued with
the rest of the second floor.

Room 201

This room was built in phases by Sanchez. The
configuration of the room as it appears today was
constructed by Sanchez near the :urn of the 19th
century.

The ceiling is the "tea tray sty. -" ceiling first
introduced by the EnglishX(Manucy~ 1962). Handwrought
nails are used in the ceiling.

The trim is similar to that found on the first floor
but it is stained as opposed to painted white. There
is a little more detailing on th3 top of the trim.

Due to this evidence, it is believed that Sanchez added
the trim downstairs.

The windows are 12 over 8 and appear to be the original
sash.

The frontispiece is more ornate than downstairs, but











this is consistent with most of the features on the
second floor and does not rule out the possibility that
Sanchez installed all of them.

The baseboards are the same as those found on the first
floor.

S The floor boards are wide and are the floorboards found
; '; at the time of restoration.

A The floorboards run straight and unspliced under the
Y partition dividing Rooms 201 and 202; this indicates
that the partition may have been added later.

When the addition was constructed, a partition may have
run east to west in this room just north of the outside
door. At this point, there is a continuous east-west
butt joint that is visible in the floorboards, and the
floor begins a definite slope down to the south in this
area. Traces of a partition are also visible in the
wall plaster. However, traces of a partition are not
visible in the ceiling, indicating the ceiling is
probably a later Sanchez addition.

Room 202

\ This room was the original Sanchez addition. However,
it originally extended to the previously mentioned
4 partition.

The ceiling is "tea tray", probably added by Sanchez.

Room 204

This was originally an outdoor loggia which was
enclosed by James Lisk.

The door leading to Room 205 is an outside type door
indicating that it was installed before the porch was
enclosed.

Room 205

This room was added by Sanchez.

There is a "tea tray" ceiling like those in Rooms 201










and 202.

There is a window to the north, which is a feature not
found in rooms to the west.

Room 210

This room was constructed over the kitchen by Lisk.

Room 209

This porch was probably rebuilt by Lisk. If the porch
had been built at an earlier time, the floor planks
would have been perpendicular to the house wall. The
framing of the porch is original American Territorial
and the floor boards were replaced at restoration.


-- RESTORATION OF THE DE MESA-SANCHEZ HOUSE


Sagree$with the original reasons for restoring

the house to its 1837 appearance due to the fact that

as much of the existing fabric as possible was saved.

However, r*s i-e-- t'.t- the various transformations of

the house over the centuries should be the focus for a

new restoration effort. 4b I- 4I -The layers of the

house's history should be explored and celebrated and

,6kg the house should be exhibited in this manner. The

De Mesa-Sanchez House has something unique to offer St.

Augustine in that it survived through the major periods

in the city's history. The house should be an


4u











educational device for investigating these periods.


Whether or not to employ furniture is another

question. *b ome furniture could be utilized

in a very didactic way. However, -__ __ =L iJ the

house should be fully furnished. The concentration

should be on the structural and finishing elements

employed in the house. St. Augustine is very lucky to

have such a fine example of architectural evolution and

the city should utilize this house to its fullest

potential.


17:











106


109


-r


FIRST FLOOR PLAN
DE MESA HOUSE


107


105


101


104


U


I


103


108


110















20b


204 2
II


*I


203










__SECOND FLOOR PL
DE MESA HOUSE


201


202


210


II


AN










WORKS CITED


Book of Mortgages 1z;7
1791

Clark, Susan
1983 The Museum of San Augustin Antiguo. Visitor
Services. St. Augustine, Florida. A 4 5 P&

Deagan, Kathleen
1978 1977 Excavations of the De Mesa-Sanchez
House Interior. Florida State University. .
Tallahassee, Florida.

The De Mesa-Sanchez House:History, Restoration and
Interpretation.
1980 Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board.
St. Augustine, Florida.

Genong, Overton G.
1974 Spanish Inn. St. Augustine, Florida. pL

Inventory 47
1803 ^ W -

Manucy, Albert C.
1962 The Houses of St. Augustine. St. Augustine
Historical Society. St. Augustine, Florida.

Puente Map
1764

Rocque Map
1788

Scardaville, Michael
1977 Preliminary Historical Outline of the De
Mesa-Sanchez(.Spanish Inn) Site. Historic St.
Augustine Preservation Board. St. Augustine,
Florida.

Scardaville, Michael
1978 Historical Outline of the De Mesa-
Sanchez(Spanish Inn) Site. Historic St. Augustine
Preservation Board. St. Augustine, Florida.










Scardaville, Michael
1981 History of the De Mesa Sanchez House. Paper
presented at the Woodmen of the World
Presentation. St. Augustine, Florida. c' ( c -

Shepard, Herschel
1977 Research Report: Restoration of the De Mesa-
Sanchez House for the St. Augustine Preservation
Board. C-qj <

Smith, James M.
1981 De Mesa Site, Revisited. Historic St.
Augustine Preservation Board. St. Augustine,
Florida.

Waterbury, Jean Parker (editor)
1983 The Oldest City. St. Augustine Historical
Society. St. Augustine, Florida.





D)A FT


A REPOrTr: PART Z
IWOERPRETIYE-l efP ftElO TuFr-P OSAL FOR
THE DE HESA-SANCHEZ HOUSE


























Teresa Maio
14 December 1993
University of Florida
ARC 6941











INTERPRETIVE DEVELOPMENT PROPOSAL FOR
THE DE MESA-SANCHEZ HOUSE
CA PS
(Abstracti k hrtSc4, o
The De Mesa-Sanchez House, built in the mid-eighteenth
century, remains today as part of a select group of buildings
which were constructed in St. Augustine during the First
Spanish occupation (Scardaville 1981). The history and
architectural development of the house provide a visual

document which relates the building's physical growth and
expansion to the history of the oldest continuously occupied
European settlement in the United States.


Restoration of the De Mesa-Sanchez House to its current

appearance began in 1977 with the transfer of the house and
property from the St. Augustine Restoration Foundation to the
Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board (Scardaville 1977).
After years of architectural, archaeological and historical
research, the house was restored to its 1837 configuration.
This allowed for the building to retain much of its original
and historic fabric and avoided extensive demolition and
removal of portions of the structure (Fisher and Shepard 1977;

HSAPB i978a, i978b).


Research revealed a complex architectural evolution of
the building which began during the First Spanish Period and
resulted in much of the buildi;s current configuration during
resuled i











the American Territorial Period (see Appendix A: History and
Architectural Development). Restoration to the 183
configuration allowed for interpretation of the building/
elements through the Territorial Period and remained within
the guidelines and directives of the Preservation Board's
Master Plan (HSAPB 1978a).


Currently, the De Mesa-Sanchez House is interpreted as a 414e e 4l
e -- _--- --V4
furnished "house museum" iSan Agustin Antigu and recreates ,
the domestic life and an historic interior of St. Augustine's
Territorial Period (Clark 1983). The interpretation
emphasizes this re-creation and fails to take into account the
evolutionary development of the structure as part of the
historical context of St. Augustine. Concerns have been
expressed regarding the focus of the interpretation on the
interior furnishings of the house (Fullham et al. 1993; HSAPB
1988, 1989; Spikes 1993a, 1993b) As a result, several changes
in the interpretive program of the house and its site have
been proposed and the Board is currently address the
interpretive development of the De Mesa-Sanchez Hous HS B
1993).
CAP5
Current Interpretive Program
After leaving the living history interpretive area of the
Spanish Quarte,) visitors enter the De Iesa-Sanchez yard
through a gate located to the rear of the structure. This











represents a one-hundred-year transition between the living
history interpretive area of the Spanish Quarter and the De

Hesa-Sanchez site and structure (HSAPB 1989). Currently,
there is no interpretation of the DL e t Ae-Csa-Sanchez yardth. mToursL
of the house are conducted every thirty minutes. Visitors
wait outside the building and to the south of the De Iesa-
Sanchez kitchen.


The tour begins in the kitchen and visitors are guided
through the rooms on the first floor and, subsequently, the
second floor. Interpretation of the house recreates the daily
life of a middle-class family relocated to St. Augustine in
the 1830's, during the American Territorial Period (Stewart
1982). Interpretation of the house includes facts regarding
the Loring Family who leased and occupied the house between
1837 and 1841 (Scardaville 1977).


Since there were no extant wills or inventories which
related directly to the Loring occupation of the house, the
interior re-creation was based on the prevailing styles and
tastes in St. Augustine during the American Territorial
Period. The majority of the furnishings are authentic period
antiques which reflect a combination of late eighteenth and
early nineteenth century pieces and emphasize the 1820's and
1830's (Harper 1979). The furnishings of the house provide
the basis for the interpretation of American Territorial











domestic life. The tours, which are approximately fifteen
minutes in length, focus on the furnishings of the house.
rather than on the architectural development of the structure
in relation to the history of St. Augustine (Wells 1993).


The guided tours conclude on the second floor landing
just outside the child's bed chamber Visitors are then
directed into an exhibit area. ",he exhibit area, located in
the eastern end of the second f -.or, contains panels and case
exhibits which present, the struc- :ral development of the house
in relation to the different ov'.ers and occupants and to the
history of St. Augustine between 1763 and 1845 (Stewart 1981).


Visitors exit the house throughh a door located at the
southeast corner of the stru. -ure and descend an exterior
stair. Following an EXIT sigr visitors then pass through a A
gate and enter the Peso De .irgo-Pellicer House) a j770's
structure which is currently used as the Museum Store (HSAPB
1993).


As a result of the cure interpretation of the De Mesa-
Sanchez House, several prob: 'ms are evident and can be
summarized as follows:
1) a one hundred year transition between the living history
interpretive area of the Sp,?iish Quarter and the Americ~ a
Territorial interpretation of ie De P es ns.-S.nche Hos











2) the current interpretive program does not maximize the
interpretive use of the De Mesa-Sanchez yard(

3) the sequence in which the rooms are presented does not
correspond to the structure's evolution)
4) the guided tours focus on the furnishings of the house
and fail to relate the evolutionary development of the
structure to the history of St. Augustine9

5) the location of the exhibit area on the second floor and
interpretation of the second floor does not comply with ADA
(Americans with Disabilities Act) guidelines &a
6) Aa seventy year transition between the interpretation of
the De Mesa-Sanchez House and the interpretation of the Peso
De Burgo-Pellicer House
CAP5
Recommendations and Pros
Thi histfnrircl s1initir'Anrs nf fhp ip Ttp e-canrhpr7 Tnirsp

provides an invaluable resource for relating'changes in the
configuration of the house. and in St. Augustine as the house
evolved during the First Spanish Period, the British Period,
the Second Spanish Per- od and the Territorial Period.
Interpretation as an A rican Territorial "house museum"
eliminates the expression :f other periods and fails to relate
the evolution of the building to the history of St. Augustine.

As an historical document, the De Mesa-Sanchez House
provides a visual lir. to the history of St. Augustine's past
and, more specifically, to the Spanish Quarter. Criteria











established in the current Property Management Plan recommend
the use of the De Mesa-Sanchez House to interpret Spanish St.
Augustine as part of the Spanish Quarter (HSAPB 1993).

This proposal advocates an "empty house" interpretive
policy that allows for the interpretation of the De Hesa-
Sanchez House through the building's history and architecture
rather than through the furnishings of any one period (George
1984; Task Force on Drayton Hall 1983). An "empty house"
interpretive policy affords the use of several forms of
interpretation which could be developed as follows".
4-
--> I. Guided Tour Presentations

Development of guided tours which begin in the "original" room
built by De Mesa and proceed on a room by room basis according
to the sequence of construction:4- --....
--* First Spanish Period (1750-1763)
Construction of "original" one story, one room "stone house"
with a detached kitchen.
----- British Period (1763-1784)
Expansion of structure to the south creating a three room
house with a detached kitchen.
SSecond Spanish Period (1784-1821) )
Addition of the second floor, one story east wing and loggia.
--> American Territorial (1821-1837)
Enclosure of porches a.nd integration of kitchen into house.

(Scardaville 1977, 1978)











-- 2, Exhibits
Placement of exhibit panels and case exhibits in the "kitchen"
which present an orientation to visitors.
Development of a video presentation which provides an
alternative interpretation of the second floor to those unable
to walk up the stairs. t4 t 4t .. A t ADA At t
Redevelopment of sliae/video presentation which documents the
archaeological research and the restoration.

--- 3. Outdoor Signage and Interpretive Displays
Development of outdoor signage and interpretive displays to:
4 delineate and interpret the historical background and
former landscaping practices in St. Augustine (see Robert -.
Stewart's Proposed Landscape Plan for the De Iesa-Sanchez .4 ~ "
Site).
S relate the site to the historical context of the Spanish
Quarter.


CAC5 Conclusion
As an architectural and cultural artifact, the De Nesa-
Sanchez House provides an invaluable resource for relating the
evolution of the structure to the continuous historical
context of St. Augustine. The implementation of an "empty
house" interpretive policy promotes the historical
significance of the house and allows for the expression of
cultural values through architectural features of the house.











This expression allows for the interpretation of the house as
it evolved during the First Spanish Period. the British
Period, the Second Spanish Period and the Territorial Period
and promotes the signifiLcance of St. Augustine as the oldest
continuously occupied European settlement in the United
States. A'




, . ..... At;:,L .. '^ .p *L ^'-y ....- *t .... ";
l., c L } i ; ,,, -
Ly ^^ ^ -..-"y
a.. OCC Lit. A^ ^ ,^(>7 Ce' . -


cr' Vk y {(oY- ^WAW
Works Cited
Clark, Susan
1983 The ?[useuz of San Agustin Antiguo: A Guide for New
zployees andS Volunteers. 4 rs U' ( bi/ /'c^. i
Fisher and Shepard
1977 Research Report: Restoration of the De 2esa-Sanchez
House for the St. Augustine Preseration Board. C "
Fullbhi. RDoss, Herschel Shepard and Tracy Spikesl
1993 Personal C',mrunication September 17.
George. Gerald
1984 The Great Drayton Hall Debate. History News
January: 7-12.


Harper, Robert


Histoi










Scarde


1979 Interpretive Furnishing Proposal for the De ?esa-


:ic St. Augustine Preservation Board (HSAPB)
1978a Nsoranu7 dated August 22.
1978b Zfeeti.n Notes dated August 28.
1988 lemorarnum dated July 19.
1989 NIemoratdum dated July 10.
1993 Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board Property
Ranasgemnt Plan.
ville, Iichael C.
1977 Prelimin2ary Report on the De fesa-Sanchez Site
iith Chain of Title Appended. 0,. 4
1978 Historical Outline of th DeDe Iesa-Sanchez Site


'-C,
- /-. 9


^*"v**""











1981 History of the De flesa-Sancher House. Wooden of
the World Presentation: 2 May. OA 4 '/1' '.
6'l


Spikes, Tracy
1993a Personal Communication September 21.
1993b Personal Coamniication October 12.

Stewart, Robert C.
1981 Outline of Themes.. Information and Visual
?tIterials for th De ~esa-Sanchez House.
1982 De .essi-Sanchez House: An Abbreviated Gided Tour.
Task Force on Drayton Hall
1983 Report and Recommen dtions on Prayton Hail.
National Trust for Historic Preservation.


Wells, Mike
1993 Personal Intervier 12 October.


/1.









Appendix A
History and Architectural Development
(^FOm Scords:l{ 1M7, ,1>g 7)









HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURAL DEVELOPMENT


OWNER


PERIOD


ANTONIO DE MESA


WILLIAM WALTON

BRITISH CROWN

J' SEPH STOUT


DON JUAN SANCHEZ




SANCHEZ FAMILY


LEWIS MELIZET


JAMES LISK


1750-1763


1764-1768

1768-1771

1771-1784


1784-1802




1803-1832


1832-1835

1835-1837


CONFIGURATION


ONE STORY, ONE ROOM
RECTANGLE.


ADDITION OF SEVERAL R001M
ALONG THE STREET.

ADDITION OF EAST WING AND
SECOND FLOOR OVER ENTIRE
:""-. ... ^:*NS"n:'..,TION Of
-.. .. 'I .. T .-
DETACHED ONE STORY KITCHEN.

DUCH OF CURRENT APPEARANCE
BY 1803.


ENCLOSURE OF SEVERAL PORCHES
AND INTEGRATION OF KITCHEN
INTO HOUSE. APPLICATION OF
SCORED PAINTED STUCCO TO
EXTERIOR.


USES/NOTES

RESIDENCE


RESIDENCE


RESIDENCE


RESIDENCE




RESIDENCE


RESIDENCE

RESIDENCE


SETH GIFFORD


JOHN BEDELL


1837-1844


RESIDENCE
LEASED TO
CHARLES LORING
FROM 1837 TO
1841

MORTGAGE FORE-
CLOSURE,
PURCHASED AT
AUCTION


1844









OWNER PERIOD


ANN HULBERT

DARIUS AND
HARY ALLEN


MARY STRISCHKA


LOUIS PACETTI


ELIZABETH WALLACE


SUSAN MEYERS


B.C. MAXWELL



SALLIE SULZNER


1844-1851

1851-1867


1867-1874


1874-1885


1885


1885-1886


1886-1892



1892-1905


ADDITION OF WOOD AND GLASS
STORE FRONT ON FIRST FLOOR
WEST FACADE.


ADDITIONS OF TWO STORY, ONE
ROOM TO THE EAST OF THE
KITCHEN AND ONE STORY, ONE
ROO TO EAST OF THAT, AND
SINGLE ROOM EAST OF SOUTH END
OF WEST WING. REPLACEMENT OF
WOODEN STOREFRONT WITH
MASONRY ARCHES.


RESIDENCE

RESIDENCE


BOARDING HOUSE:
ST. JOMHS HOUSE
(1867-1869)
CANOVA HOUSE
(1869-1870'S)

BARBER AND CIGAR
SHOP
(1884-1888)
SHOOTING GALLERY
(1884-1888)

BARBER AND CIGAR
SHOP
SHOOTING GALLERY

BARBER AND CIGAR
SHOP
SHOOTING GALLERY

BARBER AND CIGA]
SHOP
SHOOTING GALLERY


MUSIC SHOP (LOT)
(1893)
BICYCLE SHOP (LOT)
(1899)
MUSIC SHOP
(1899)
CURIO SHOP
(1904-1910)


lUSES/NOTES


CONFIGURATION










OWNER PERIOD


MARY STROBRIDGE

LAWERENCE WISCHERT

MARGARET BUTLER


THOMAS AND DORIS
WILES

MARGUERITE PHILLIPS


1905-1911

1911-1912

1912-1949


1949-1952


1952-1963


CONFIGURATION


REMOVAL OF OF EAST, ONE ROOM
ADDITION AND WEST BALCONY.
ADDITION OF STUCCO ARCHES
AT SOUTH BALCONY AND COCNCETE
STAIR AT EAST END OF BUILDING.


REMOVAL OF ARCHED
STORE FRONT. BALCONY
RECONSTRUCTED.


USES/NOTES


CURIO SH OP


MUSEUM
(1934-1937)
RESTAURANT
(1940)
ANTIQUE SHOP
(1945-1954)
NEWSPAPER OFFICE
(1949)

ANTIQUE SHOP
NEWSPAPER OFFICE


ANTIQUE SHOP
MUSEUM
(1959-1960)


GERALD BATH

ST. AUGUSTINE
RESTORATION.. INC.

HISTORIC
ST. AUGUSTINE
PRESERVATION
BOARD


1963-1965

1965-1977


1977-PRESENT


RESTORATION TO 1830'S
CONFIGURATION


(SCARDAVILLE 1977, 1978, 1981)












Appendix B
meeting Notes











Friday September 17, 1993
De Hesa-Sanchez House

Notes of meeting with Ful!iam,Shepard and Spikes:

-Drayton Hall (Blue Ribbon report) as example- furnishings?
-upstairs parlor colonial furnishings
-address cultural significance of furnishings
-Bob Steinbach and Stanley Bond-report containing basic
architectural changes
-originally a one room structure, walls may date from 1704,
tabby construction
-expansion during British period
-second story completed by end of British period
-originally a freestanding kitchen which was later enlarged
arid incorporated into structure
-1830 interpretation (Loring family)
-floors date from American territorial
-speak with interpreters (Sally Ber man)
what audience '/
general visitor f
what questions asked
traffic count
-St. Augustine not a destination as compared with
Williamsburg
-address problem of bottleneck at top of stairs
-tea tray ceiling (west wing, second floor)
-incorporation of static exhibits
-research guidelines as sources for duplication-
-balcony originally ran length of building
-literature review of other examples
-how people used rooms
information on people who lived there
-late i950's commissioned
-historic site report (Susan Parker)
-address structural changes and history of occupants
-Process
1. HSR (archaeology and history)
2. Summarize intent of general area interpretively
(context)
3. Address structural and family changes
-orchard and possible Native American burial ground behind
house
-Fatio House = example of graining
-restored as American Territorial
-bring history of interpretation into plan






* '


Tuesday September 21, 1993
De Ilesa-Sanchez House

Notes of meeting with Tracy Spikes:

-sources of information:
site files/flat files
plats
audio exhibit (based on Stan's research)
-obtain plans from research
-architectural bibliography from Herschel
-listing of deed transfers through Susan
-address use of surrounding yard and structure
-Flagler foundation (Center for Historic Research)- Eugene
Lyon
-comparison of other colonial (territorial) structures
-field drawings (Bostwick 1977)






4 *


Tuesday October 12, 1993

Notes of meeting with Mike Wells and Tracy Spikes:

-interpretation through progression of time line to understand
expansion of structure
-address lifestyles and furniture through present
appearance=American Territorial with concentration on 1839/40
-dominant questions address furnishings of house
-late 1830's/40's furniture style carried on to victorian
times
-narllyn=senter interpreter (Saturdays and Sundays)
-tour previously structured as "Old Spanish Inn"
-video presentation of remodelling work (Stan)
-slide presentation of interest to preservationists
-"living history museum"
-mission to educate and inform
-furnishings based on sources of time period and southern
culture




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