Title: Florida Health Insurance Study fact sheets
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091096/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Health Insurance Study fact sheets
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Florida Center for Medicaid and the Uninsured, University of Florida
Publisher: Florida Center for Medicaid and the Uninsured, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091096
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads
Full Text






Florida Health Insurance StudyHIS
Florida Health Insurance Study


ar Cvaga a
F eA


Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Rates of Health Insurance Coverage

Racial and ethnic minorities access and use health care less frequently
compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. One reason for this disparity is the
lower rates of health insurance coverage among racial and ethnic minority
groups. This fact sheet examines the racial and ethnic disparities in health
insurance coverage among non-elderly Floridians based on the 2004
Florida Health Insurance Study (FHIS) telephone survey.

In 2004, Hispanics had the highest rate of uninsurance (31.8%) of any
racial or ethnic group, in part because they are more likely to be recent
immigrants who do not qualify for Medicaid or to work for smaller firms that
do not provide insurance coverage. Hispanics in Florida were more than
twice as likely as Non-Hispanic Whites to be uninsured (an 18 percentage-
point difference). Almost one-quarter of Florida's Blacks were uninsured
(22.6%), compared with 14.3% of Non-Hispanic Whites.

A comparison of the 1999 and 2004 FHIS survey results indicate that
uninsurance rates increased over the 5-year period. In 2004, the
uninsurance rate among the non-elderly was 19.2%, representing an
increase of approximately 2 percentage points from the 1999 rate of
16.8%. Rates of uninsurance for Hispanics and Blacks each increased by
approximately 3 percentage points, while the rate for Non-Hispanic Whites
had only a 1 percentage-point change over the five-year period (Figure 1).


E1999 1 v2004


35% -

30% -

25% -

20% -

15% -

10% -

5% -

0%


Total


32%


23%


19%


13% 14%


I


Hispanic


Black


Non-Hispanic
White


Source: 1999 and 2004 Florida Health Insurance Studies (FHIS)










Age: Rates of uninsurance are lower in children compared to adults, primarily because of the availability of
state and federally funded programs such as Medicaid and KidCare (Florida's version of SCHIP). The lowest
uninsurance rate for children was among Non-Hispanic Whites (8.7%), followed by Blacks at 13.7%. Hispanic
children had the highest rate of uninsurance at 18.5%. Among non-elderly adults, there is a difference of 12
percentage points in the rates of uninsurance between Non-Hispanic Whites and Blacks (16.3% vs. 28.1%),
with Hispanics again exceeding all groups with 37.7% uninsured (Table 1).

Gender: Females are more likely to be insured than males. The male/female difference in rates of coverage
ranged from close to 4 percentage points for Blacks and Hispanics to 2 percentage points for Non-Hispanic
Whites. These gender disparities may reflect different employment experiences for men and women, but are
mitigated by the fact that women are more likely to obtain Medicaid coverage. Hispanic females are more
likely to be without coverage (30.0%) compared with Black (20.8%) and Non-Hispanic White women (13.3%).
Similarly, one-third of Florida's male Hispanics (33.6%) were uninsured, compared to about one-quarter
(24.6%) of Black males and 15.4% of Non-Hispanic White males.

Educational attainment: Rates of uninsurance decline with increasing years of education. Individuals
who have not completed high school are more likely to be uninsured relative to those with other levels of
educational attainment. However, regardless of the level of educational attainment, Hispanics are less likely
to have health insurance coverage than other groups. For example, among those who have completed
four or more years of college, 22.9% of Hispanics are uninsured compared to 15.0% of Blacks and 7.3% of
Non-Hispanic Whites. Over half (59.6%) of Hispanics who have not completed high school have no health
insurance coverage, compared to 47.0% of Blacks and 42.4% of Non-Hispanic Whites.

Federal Poverty Level: Despite Medicaid availability for eligible individuals, Hispanics with earnings at
poverty level were the most likely to be uninsured. Almost one half (48.9%) of these Hispanics living at 100%
of Federal Poverty Level or less were uninsured, compared with 31.9% and 31.4%, respectively, for Blacks and
Non-Hispanic Whites.

Table 1: Florida Uninsurance Rates by Race/Ethnicity, Age, Gender, Educational Attainment and Federal Poverty Level

Percent Uninsured (%)
CAEGR Blac Hipai Ote No-isai White


NON-ELDERLY FLORIDIANS 24.6 33.6 19.6 15.4
Ages 0 18 (CHILD) 13.7 18.5 15.9 8.7
Ages 19 64 (ADULT) 28.1 37.7 20.4 16.3


Male 24.6 33.6 19.6 15.4
Female 20.8 30.0 18.5 13.3
Edcto: No HS 47.0 59.6 44.9 42.4
High School 33.9 44.6 30.0 22.8
Some college 21.6 27.9 17.9 15.3
BS and BS+ 15.0 22.9 9.9 7.3
Federal Po t L l I Less than/= 100% FPL 31.9 48.9 36.5 31.4
101 150% FPL 30.7 46.8 41.5 33.4
151 200% FPL 22.3 30.3 35.0 27.1
201 250% FPL 19.9 29.9 15.4 22.5
251% FPL or greater 10.2 12.9 10.3 7.6


FLORIDA HEALTH INSURANCE STUDY


I TOTAL-


page 2











There is an association between rates of uninsurance and a variety of employment-related factors, including
employment status, employment sector, and firm size. Generally it has been found that workers with
temporary, low-paying, seasonal, or part-time positions were least likely to report offers of health insurance
coverage. F


Figure 2 examines uninsurance rates of adult
Floridians by employment status. In 2004, 63.7% of
unemployed Hispanics lacked coverage, compared
to 48.8% of Blacks and 41.6% of Non-Hispanic
Whites. Even among full-time workers, however,
almost one-third of Hispanic Floridians (31.6%) were
uninsured, compared with 20.0% of Blacks and 12.9%
of Non-Hispanic Whites. Part-time employees had
uninsurance rates that fell between the rates of the
unemployed and full-time employed, with Hispanics
uninsured at 41.2%, Blacks at 38.5% and 23.0% for
Non-Hispanic Whites.

Uninsurance rates by employment sector are shown
in Figure 3. Overall, employees in government, or
the public sector, were most likely to be covered
compared to the self-employed or those working in
private industry. Among those employed in the public
sector, almost all Non-Hispanic White employees
were insured (3.5% uninsured), while 15.9% of
Hispanic workers in this group were not covered.
Among Hispanics classified as "self-employed"
more than half (52.6%) were uninsured, double the
uninsurance rate for Non-Hispanic Whites in the same
employment sector (26.4%). Self-employed Blacks
closely paralleled Hispanics, with almost half (48.5%)
uninsured. Almost one-third of Hispanics in private
industry (30.9%) were not covered, followed by Blacks
at 25.0% and Non-Hispanic Whites at 14.8%.

Across all racial and ethnic groups, uninsurance rates
decrease as firm size increases. In small firms with
fewer than 25 employees, almost half of Hispanic and
Black workers lacked coverage (47.5% and 46.9%
respectively). In comparison, the rate of uninsurance
for Non-Hispanic Whites in these firms was 26.2%.
Among workers at firms with 500 or more employees,
the Hispanic uninsurance rate is 10.8%, with Blacks
closely following at 9.4% and Non-Hispanic Whites at
5.6% (Figure 4).


I Black 0 Hispanic 0 Non-Hispanic White
70% -

60%
49%
50%
39% 4142
40% 3 36%
32%
30% 27
23o
20% 12

10%

0%
Full-Time Part-Time Unemployed Not In Force
Source 2004 Florida Health insurance Study (FHIS)


60%

50%-

40%-

30% -

20%

10%

0%


53%


Government Private Industry


Self-employed


Source 2004 Florida Health insurance Study (FHIS)


60%

50%

40%

30% -

20%

10%

0%-


47%48%


38%


Fewer than 25 25 -99
employees employees


11 9% 11%



100-499 500 or more
employees employees


Source 2004 Florida Health insurance Study (FHIS)


Florida Center for Medicaid and the Uninsured


| 5 lil8CK .. ....9...., M NOn- t


'Y'~'CY


I Il~nCI~nnlCIllnle


e


page 3







FHIS
Florida Health Insurance Study


PO BOX 100227
GAINESVILLE, FL 32610


Florida Center for Medicaid and the Uninsured
Shapi ng a H t t hr at re Policy


Data Source and Methods
The findings presented in this fact sheet are based on data
from the 2004 Florida Health Insurance Study. Telephone
interviews were conducted between April and August of 2004
with 17,435 Florida households, collecting data on
approximately 46,876 individuals under age 65. Telephone
fieldwork was conducted by the Survey Research Center of
the University of Florida's Bureau of Economic and Business
Research. Up to 20 phone calls were made to each household
selected by random-digit dialing. Interviews were conducted in
English, Spanish, or Haitian Creole, at the discretion of the
interviewee. Each interview took approximately 14 minutes to
complete, depending on the size of the household. A full
household enumeration was implemented, and information
was also obtained about health status, access and utilization
of health services, and type of employment. Survey
methodology details are available at http://ahca.myflorida.com/
Medicaid/Research/Projects/fhis2004/.
The 2004 Florida Health Insurance Study was funded by the
State Planning Grant (SPG) program of the Health Resources
and Services Administration (HRSA, Grant Number 1-P090
A016 80-01-00), with state level management from Florida's
Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), and survey
work conducted by a team from the University of Florida's,
College of Public Health and Health Professions.


FHIS TEAM


FLORIDA AGENCY FOR HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION
AHCA ADMINISTRATOR: Mel Chang


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: R. Paul Duncan
CO-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Allyson G. Hall
PROJECT COORDINATOR: Colleen K. Porter
STATISTICIAN: Cynthia Wilson Garvan
INVESTIGATOR: Christy Harris Lemak
RESEARCH ASSISTANTS: Rebecca J. Tanner
Lorna P. Chorba


HEALTH MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATES
PRINCIPAL: Marshall E. Kelley
SENIOR CONSULTANT Nicola Moulton




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs