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ARTS AND HUMANITES WORKING GROUP
PRELIMINARY REPORT
4/18/2006
Major Author for the Working Group: Kirk Ludwig

1. Introduction

The Arts and Humanities Working Group is an ad hoc committee of the Faculty Senate convened
by the Faculty Senate Chair Professor Kim Tanzer in December 2005. Its purpose is to report on
the state of the arts and humanities at the University of Florida and to make recommendations for
the arts and humanities for incorporation into the University's strategic plan to move into the ranks
of the nation's elite public universities. The Working Group draws on faculty from the College of
Design, Construction and Planning; the College of Education; the College of Engineering; the
College of Fine Arts; the College of Law; the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; and the Ham
Museum of Art.

The committee was formed to respond in part to national concerns about the declining role of the
arts and humanities at AAU institutions, as described in the AAU report Reinvigorating the Humanities:
Enhancing Research and Education on Campus and Beyond,1 and in part to a perception among many
faculty at the University of Florida in the arts and humanities and other disciplines that, while the
arts and humanities are crucial to the mission and vitality of the University as a whole, this segment
of the University's intellectual infrastructure has received inadequate investment even relative to
local standards, and that this must be redressed for the University to attain its stated goals.

This is a preliminary report. It makes one recommendation.

In line with the primary recommendation of the AAU report, the University should
make the arts and humanities a major focus of institutional strategic planning.

This report is divided into four sections. Section two explains the role and importance of the arts
and humanities in a university. Section three provides some background on the state of the arts and
humanities at the University of Florida. Section four presents for further discussion a number of
proposals for raising the profile of the arts and humanities at the University. Appendix A lists the
members of the Working Group. Appendix B lists the recommendations made by the AAU report.

2. The role of the arts and humanities in the University

The arts and humanities cover a wide range of disciplines across a number of colleges and schools at
the University of Florida, including, but not limited to, the College of Design, Construction and
Planning; the College of Education; the College of Fine Arts; the Levin College of Law; and the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

The humanities include classics, comparative religion, English, history, linguistics, modem languages
and their literatures, philosophy, jurisprudence, the history, theory and criticism of the arts
(including architecture), and aspects of the social sciences-anthropology, economics, government,

1 AAU Task Force on the Role and Status of the Humanities, ,..i n 'I ...' , the Humanities: Enhancing Research
and Education on Campus and Beyond (New York: AAU, 2004). Available on-line at
httlp \ \\ .aau.edu/issues/HumRpt.pdf.









political science, psychology, and sociology-that are interpretive rather than quantitative. The arts
include architecture, ceramics, creative writing, dance, design, digital arts, drawing, film studies,
music, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and theater. The arts and humanities are
united by their concern, in different ways and from different perspectives, with fundamental aspects
of the human condition.

In many ways the public face of the university, the arts and the humanities are components of the
traditional core disciplines of the university that make a central contribution to its research, teaching,
and service missions. The vitality of the arts and the humanities, and their contribution to the
intensity and seriousness of the intellectual life of the university, is crucial to the vitality of the
university as a whole. Study in the arts and humanities is an important component of what it is to be
a civilized and educated human being, and is also crucial for achieving the synoptic view of ourselves
and our enterprises that locates us on a larger scale than the individual life. It also plays a central role
in teaching students how to express themselves clearly and effectively and to engage in extended
critical and interpretive thinking.

The central role of the arts and humanities in the university is reflected in the importance of strength
in the arts and humanities to the academic reputations of the best public and private research
universities. The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and the University of California at Berkeley,
among the premier research universities, not only among public universities, but among all
universities, have very strong arts and humanities departments, with many graduate departments
ranking in the top ten nationally. This is a crucial component of their overall academic reputation.

The arts and humanities therefore have a fundamental role in the university coordinate with that of
the basic sciences. No university can aspire to recognition as one of the county's greatpublic universities which is
not recognized as a leading center of research and teaching in the arts and humanities.

3. The arts and humanities at the University of Florida

The arts and humanities faculty have grown very modestly over the last 25 years, while both the
undergraduate and graduate student populations have grown significantly, as shown in chart 1. This
reflects a more general trend at the University of Florida of faculty growth failing to match growth
in the student population. However, it is also useful to compare growth in FTEs in the arts and
humanities with growth in FTEs in the natural and social sciences over the same time period. This is
shown in chart 2. While it is clear that faculty growth in the natural and social sciences has also failed
to keep pace with student population growth, it is also clear from chart 2 that arts and humanities
faculty, even across three colleges, have fallen further behind relative to faculty in CLAS in the
natural and social sciences.














CHART 1


600




500




400


S- j.-I FTE


~ 300


I-
200




100 :F-






1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
Years since 1980



CHART 2


600




500




L I IM[ul' I a1,I 2,-,,:151 31 1 _,3 1 :
400




i 300


E

200




100




0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
Years since 1980










It is important to note three things in addition about the disproportionate impact of the growth of
the student population, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, on the arts and humanities.
First, growth in the graduate student population in the arts and humanities must be coordinated with
growth in faculty, for in the arts and humanities, faculty research and graduate teaching tend to be
more in tension than in the sciences, where graduate students participate in faculty research projects
in working on their dissertations projects. Typically the research that graduate students do toward
their dissertations in the arts and humanities does not contribute to the research of their faculty
directors. Time spent on mentoring graduate students is therefore time that is not spent on faculty
research and writing, which is crucial to raising the University's research profile. Second, much of
the burden of developing language skills for students at the University falls to the humanities faculty
within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Third, writing intensive disciplines, as in the
humanities, are put under particular pressure by increases in the student to faculty ratio, for grading
and commenting on papers is labor intensive, a feature of it directly connected with its value to
students.

More significant for the University of Florida's aspiration to join the top tier of public universities is
the startling discrepancy in size between most arts and humanities departments at the University of
Florida (UF) and their counterparts at institutions such as the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill (UNC), the University of Michigan (UM), Ohio State University (OSU), and the
University of Texas at Austin (UT). Chart 3 provides a comparison of faculty sizes for departments
in the arts and humanities, and the social and physical sciences.2













2 Faculty numbers are from public lists of faculty in the relevant departments available on university web sites.
Where no number is given, the institution in question does not have a department of the relevant sort. For
example, UT has a religious studies program, but its affiliated faculty are drawn from many departments and
there are no faculty in religious studies per se. The University of Michigan does not have a religious studies
program or department. In the case of the languages, other universities often have several departments
covering the areas which Romance Languages and Literatures and German and Slavic Studies cover. In these
cases, the comparison is with the total number of faculty across the several departments which cover the
same language groups. No comparisons are made of faculty strengths in African and Asian languages because
the different disciplinary divisions at different institutions make direct comparisons difficult. For the same
reason no attempt was made to compare faculty in the biological sciences. Only current ranked faculty at the
main campus, in those cases where there are other campuses, are counted. Lecturers, adjuncts, visiting and
emeritus faculty are excluded. However, faculty with joint appointments with other departments are included,
and faculty equivalent ranks are included. Student population numbers are from official enrollment figures for
fall 2005 available on institution web sites. The figures in the column for averages are rounded to the nearest
whole number; these are the figures used in the calculation for UF/AVG and AV.-UF. The peer rankings and
student/faculty ratios are from the 2006 US News and World Reports College Rankings, available at
.












Peer
UF UNC UM OSU UT AVG UF/AVG AV.-UF
Art History 11 9 25 17 19 18 61% 7
Classics 11 14 26 15 23 20 55% 9
English 63 74 69 90 101 84 75% 21
Germanic/Slavic L. 17 16 29 27 28 25 68% 8
History 42 52 89 75 65 70 60% 28
Philosophy 17 25 22 21 34 26 65% 9
Religion 15 14 -- 7 -- 11 136% -4
Romance L. 25 23 32 47 44 37 68% 12

Architecture 30 -- 38 15 43 32 94% 2
Fine Art 20 9 50 25 32 29 69% 9
Music 46 67 116 69 79 83 55% 37
Theater and Dance 17 21 25 25 38 27 63% 10

Anthropology 36 27 45 15 35 31 116% -5
Criminology 16 -- -- -- -- -- -- --
Economics 18 30 56 36 38 40 45% 22
Political Science 36 37 48 40 60 46 78% 10
Psychology 59 40 96 50 50 59 100% 0
Sociology 22 28 36 34 43 35 63% 13

Astronomy 23 -- 17 20 20 19 121% -4
Chemistry 51 48 49 40 49 47 109% -4
Computer Science 37 37 50 34 45 42 88% 5
Geography 15 17 -- 24 17 19 79% 4
Geology 18 14 43 33 29 30 60% 12
Mathematics 54 33 67 71 57 57 95% 3
Physics 63 35 61 68 57 55 115% -8
Statistics 24 24 20 28 -- 24 100% 0

US News Peer Rank 3.5 4.2 4.5 3.6 4
# Students F'05 49,693 27,276 39,533 50,504 49,696
students/faculty 23/1 14/1 15/1 14/1 19/1

CHART 3


As this charts shows, among the first group, the humanities departments in CLAS together with art
history, the only area comparable to those at peer institutions (in arts and humanities) is Religious
Studies. In the second group, the arts, only architecture is roughly comparable to the average size of
departments in the comparison group. In the third group, the social sciences, two departments,
anthropology and psychology, are comparable in size to the average at peer institutions. None of the
peer institutions in this group have a criminology department, though research in criminology is
often done in sociology departments, which tend to be larger than the sociology department at UF.
The economics department is strikingly small compared with peer institutions. Political Science is









about 78% of the average size. In the physical and mathematical sciences, in contrast, there are four
departments either at or larger than the average size of departments in the comparison group, and
two at roughly 90% or better. Moreover, these are the central departments in that sector, astronomy,
chemistry, mathematics, physics, and statistics. Geology is the only department that is markedly
smaller than the average. The typical humanities department is 60-70% of the average of the
comparison group. The same is true of the arts, excluding architecture.

As a way of measuring how far the different groupings are from the average, we can compare the
total faculty deficit relative to the average for each of the four groups.

Group 1 90
Group 2 58
Group 3 40
Group 4 8

This provides a rough measure of the relative neglect of each of these groups.

It should go without saying that the size of a department is not a direct measure of the quality of its
faculty. Some relatively small departments have more prestige than larger ones. However, other
things being equal, size matters. Larger departments produce more research and are more visible in
the profession because they have more members who organize and attend conferences, give talks,
publish articles and books, give exhibitions, performances, etc. Larger departments more easily
achieve the critical mass of faculty working on related issues that quickens the pace of research.
Larger departments can also be more flexible in affording research opportunities to faculty because
the teaching and administrative load does not invariably fall on the same people. And student-faculty
ratios obviously are important in a variety of ways, since students necessarily receive less attention
from faculty when student-faculty ratios are higher, and the demands of meeting the teaching needs
of the University become in greater tension with the need to pursue research programs that are
essential to the University's national reputation as a center of academic excellence, as well as to the
vitality of its teaching. In short, the material conditions, faculty resources especially, underlying the
research and teaching enterprise of a university are among the fundamental factors determining its
level of achievement.

4. Proposals for further consideration

It is of vital importance that the University as an institution develop a long range plan, couched in
the most general terms, that will guide its planning, and relative to which it can measure its progress
periodically, making adjustments where it has failed to meet intermediate goals so as to keep on
track, and accommodating changed circumstances that present special opportunities or challenges
for the University. The University of Florida should have a twenty-year plan to achieve the goal of
being among the top five public universities in the country, and a ten-year plan to achieve material
and faculty parity with its major peer institutions. This must be an institutionalized goal in the sense
of being a goal that survives changes in administration. It must therefore be couched in general
enough terms to allow flexibility without its being abandoned. We conceive of a strategic plan for
the arts and humanities at the University of Florida as a part of this larger, long term, strategic plan
for achieving the University's goals.









It is not the purpose of this preliminary report to make final recommendations for a strategic plan
for the arts and humanities but rather to provide a starting point for further work. It will be useful
for this purpose to identify some long range goals for the arts and humanities and their connection
with the University's goal of moving into the top tier of public research universities by academic
rank. This will provide a framework for developing strategies for achieving our ultimate goals, for
setting near and intermediate term goals, and ordering priorities.

We organize our remarks on strategic planning for the arts and humanities under four headings: (a)
developing faculty resources, (b) enhancing graduate programs, (c) providing adequate research
infrastructure, and (d) promoting to the university's various audiences the work of the arts and
humanities.

(a) Faculty. The ultimate goal is to have an arts and humanities sector that is, and is recognized as,
one of the leading centers for research and teaching in the arts and humanities in the country and
internationally. The most important measure of this is research productivity, with an emphasis on
the quality and influence of the research of faculty in the arts and humanities rather than simply
quantity, for this is the fundamental basis of recognition of research excellence in each discipline.

There are three general long term goals relating to faculty development that are fundamental for the
arts and humanities to move the University into the top tier of public research universities. These
are, together with some subsidiary proposals for further discussion and development, as follows.

(i) Provide a research environment at the University of Florida for arts and humanities faculty
that promotes their achieving their full potential as researchers in their disciplines, emulating in
particular the best practices at the most competitive research institutions.

Improve research leave opportunities for arts and humanities faculty
Improve research support for junior faculty in the arts and humanities
Remove institutional obstacles to interdisciplinary and collaborative research
Support institutional arrangements for informal interactions that can give rise to new
ideas for interdisciplinary projects
Provide institutional support for centers in the arts and humanities
Improve support for organizing conferences and for travel for attending conferences

(ii) Recruit and retain the best faculty possible in the arts and humanities.

Improve salary and benefits for arts and humanities faculty so that they are competitive
with the best public institutions
Institute a step salary program and a system of periodic review designed to ensure faculty
in place do not fall behind their peers at the best public universities

(iii) Build the size of arts and humanities programs so that they achieve parity with those at
institutions with which we aim to compete.

Develop a step by step long range plan to bring arts and humanities faculties to rough
parity with our peer institutions









These are interconnected, and success in each will promote success in the others.

(b) Graduate programs. The second most important measure of a leading center for research in
the arts and humanities is the quality of graduate programs in these disciplines. This is in part a
reflection of the excellence of the faculty in these disciplines, and so directly tied to the previous
proposal, but requires also effective recruiting, training and placement, and graduate programs that
are comparable in size to our major competitors. The success of graduate students after leaving the
University of Florida has a large role to play in how the University of Florida's programs are seen,
particularly in the longer term. Their success reflects credit on their graduate institution, and as
leaders in their disciplines, they become themselves opinion leaders. Moreover, they will have an
influence on decisions by future applicants to graduate programs. Obviously, numbers matter here
as well.

There are four long term goals for graduate programs in arts and humanities it is important to have
in view.

(i) Bring the size of graduate programs in the arts and humanities up to parity with our peer
institutions.

(ii) Increase the quality of graduate students by more effective and competitive recruiting.

Increase stipends and health benefits so that they are competitive with top tier
graduate programs
Increase the availability of first-year fellowships
Make institutional decisions about allocation of monies for graduate student
recruitment prior to the recruitment season

(iii) Improve placement

Make it an institutional goal to provide support for placement of graduate students

(iv) Improve graduate student support

Make more and better dissertation fellowships a fund raising priority.

It is important that growth in graduate programs and in faculty be coordinated. As mentioned
above, there is a tension, in the arts and humanities, between faculty research and graduate teaching.
Graduate students in the arts and humanities typically do not pursue research projects under the
umbrella of a faculty member's research program. Their research work is independent. Arts and
humanities faculty make a significant contribution of time to mentoring graduate students, which is
important to their students' success. But this unavoidably takes away time from, and slows the pace
of, their own research. An increase in the numbers of graduate students without an increase in
faculty would result in a decrease in faculty productivity, which would lower the research profile of
the arts and humanities segment of the University, and result thereby in less competitive graduate
programs.

(c) Adequate research infrastructure. Appropriate infrastructure includes computing and
technology support for teaching and research, physical facilities for research and for the creation of









artistic works, and especially adequate support for the libraries, which are the backbone of the
research infrastructure for the arts and humanities. The three main goals are:

(i) Provide adequate funding for library research materials and technologies, journals, books.
electronic resources, etc.

(ii) Provide adequate technology infrastructure support of research and creative activities in
the arts and humanities.

(iii) Provide adequate studio, office, and classroom space of research and teaching in the arts
and humanities.

(d) Promoting the work of the arts and humanities. To enhance the reputation of the university,
the work of the arts and humanities should be promoted to a number of different audiences. The
three main goals are:

(i) Promote the research of the arts and humanities faculty in appropriate academic forums.
both in presentations at conferences, in performances and exhibitions, and in publications in
academic journals and from academic presses.

(ii) Promote the work of the arts and humanities to the general public, both in the state and
nationally.

(iii) Promote and support outreach by the humanities at the University to K-12 programs.

(iv) Promote the work of the arts and humanities in the local community, both within the
university and in Gainesville and north central Florida.









Appendix A-Arts and Humanities Working Group
Alex Alberro
Associate Professor, School of Art and Art History, College of Fine Arts
alberro(aUFL.EDU
Barbara Barletta
Professor, School of Art and Art History, College of Fine Arts
barletta(@UFL.EDU
Donna Cohen
Assistant Professor, School of Architecture, College of Design, Construction and Planning
dcohen(aUFL.EDU
Bob Hatch
Associate Professor and Interim Director of the Center for the Humanities and the Public
Sphere, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
ufhatch&@UFL.EDU
Pramod Khargonekar, co-chair
Eckis Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Dean, College of Engineering
ppk(@.UFL.EDU
Ruth Lowery
Associate Professor, School of Teaching and Learning, College of Education
rlowery(@COE.UFL.EDU
John Leavey, co-chair
Professor and Chair, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
jpIl(ENGLISH.UFL.EDU
Kirk Ludwig
Professor, Graduate Coordinator, Department of Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences
kludwig(@PHIL.UFL.EDU
Charles Mason
Chair, Curatorial Department, Harn Museum of Art
cmason&@HARN.UFL.EDU
Winston Nagan
Samuel T. Dell Research Scholar Professor of Law, Affiliate Professor of Anthropology,
Founding Director, Institute for Human Rights and Peace Development, Levin College of
Law
nagan@LAW.UFL.ED U
Vasudha Narayanan
Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of Hindu Traditions, Department of
Religion, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
vasu(RELIGION.UFL.EDU
Leonardo Villal6n
Associate Professor and Director of the Center for African Studies, Department of Political
Science, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
villalon(@AFRICA.UFL.ED U
Brigitte Weltman-Aron
Associate Professor, Department of Romance Languages and Literature, College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences bweltman(@RLL.UFL.EDU









Appendix B


AAU Report Recommendations

Recommendations and Ongoing Activities at AAU Universities

Renewal of the humanities can lead to institutional renewal, and vice versa. The question is how best
to achieve this change. In this section, AAU makes ten recommendations for emphasizing the
humanities, based on an extraordinary range of activities taking place on AAU campuses. Many have
already considered ways to improve the state of the humanities at their own institution, and the
AAU Executive Committee felt that others would benefit from a sharing of successful practices.*

In the summer of 2002, the AAU surveyed member universities about the challenges, opportunities,
and new approaches to the humanities that they had encountered or were pursuing. Member
universities were asked to select and describe up to three successful initiatives undertaken on their
campus. All universities responded. The responses to the AAU survey indicated a wide range of
initiatives that are invigorating humanities research, scholarship, teaching, and outreach. The
activities and approaches featured in this report represent all AAU universities.

The following ten findings and recommendations were developed by drawing from the institutional
reports those factors that have been identified as critical to success.

RECOMMENDATIONS

1. University presidents and chancellors should make the humanities a major focus in institutional
strategic planning, and should regularly emphasize to the university and the broader community the
fundamental importance of the humanities.

2. Presidents, chancellors, provosts, and deans should seek out, enlist, and support faculty leadership
in building strong humanities programs, and should provide mechanisms for evaluating and
selectively funding faculty-driven initiatives.

3. Universities should strengthen the recruitment and placement process for humanities graduate
students and should seek ways to encourage undergraduate students to study the humanities.

4. University presidents, provosts, and humanities deans should provide flexible structures for
interaction and collaboration across humanities disciplines, and among the humanities and the social
and natural sciences and the professional schools.

5. Universities should promote successful programs in the humanities inside and outside the
institution, and build partnerships with K-12 schools and other educational and cultural
organizations.

6. Universities should seek new opportunities to strengthen foreign language and cultural
instruction.

7. University presidents, provosts, and humanities deans should support the development and use of
digital information and technology in the humanities.










8. University presidents, provosts, and humanities deans should take responsibility for sustaining the
vigor and quality of humanities scholarship and its dissemination and preservation through book
publishing and other appropriate communication mechanisms.

9. University presidents, provosts, and humanities deans should provide funding for selected
strategic initiatives in the humanities and encourage and support outside fundraising.

10. AAU and the leaders of its universities should work with other universities and organizations in
a concerted effort to increase funding for the humanities through the federal government and
private foundations. AAU's Task Force on the Role and Status of the Humanities strongly
encourages member universities to form campus-based task forces to plan ways to invigorate and
bolster the humanities in academic and national life. The task force would like to see the humanities,
both as a branch of knowledge and as a profession, become integrated into all scholarly pursuits of
knowledge, regardless of the discipline, and into human knowledge and the missions of the
university.


[NB: Spread throughout the subsequent text are the following expanded "bullet points" for AAU
Recommendations]


Recommendation 1: Provide Presidential Leadership

University presidents and 7.,. .:i should make the humanities a major focus in institutional strategicplanning,
and should regularly emphasize to the university and the broader community the fundamental importance of the
humanities.

Incorporate ideas concerning the humanities in university as well as arts and sciences
strategic planning.

Pursue opportunities to focus humanities scholarship and teaching on important issues in
contemporary society.

Leverage institutional strengths and relative advantages in the development of the
humanities.

Encourage collaborations across humanities disciplines, and among the humanities and the
social and natural sciences, professional schools, K-12 schools, and/or community agencies
and organizations.

Create or improve space dedicated to the humanities.

Ensure that evaluations provide specific feedback on the effectiveness of humanities
projects.

Provide special institutional funds for initiatives related to the humanities.









* Support the appropriate development and use of technology in the humanities.


Develop ways to convey to undergraduates and their families the importance and relevance
of the humanities.

Encourage undergraduates to pursue study in the humanities through funding and research
opportunities.

Work with other university presidents to increase government and foundation funding of
the humanities.


Recommendation 2: Enhance Opportunities for Faculty

Presidents, :,,. :C.;, ', provosts, and deans should seek out, enlist, and support facul leadership in building strong
humanities programs, and should provide mechanisms for evaluating and selective funding,. i- .'' initiatives.

Challenge provosts and humanities deans to develop plans that tap into and reflect the
strategic priorities of the university.

Provide incentives for faculty to participate in humanities programs and to develop new
ones-for example, the opportunity to teach smaller classes with more motivated students,a
lowered teaching load, or increased sabbatical time to develop new ideas for humanities
courses or to follow new paths in research.

Create faculty groups for brainstorming and idea generation.

Allow senior humanities faculty to undertake through special contracts specified outreach
activities as a larger portion of their responsibilities than normally expected, and reward
them accordingly.

Ensure that the university reward structure doesn't penalize the crossing of departmental
lines and that organizational and outreach activities are recognized.

Provide support for junior humanities faculty and limit their non-scholarly responsibilities
in order to allow them to establish themselves in their disciplines.

Promote close communication between senior women and minority faculty and
department heads, deans, and higher administration officials to prevent gender and racial
inequities in salary recommendations.


Recommendation 3: Encourage Student Participation

Universities should .... ... the recruitment andplacementprocess for humanities graduate students and should seek
ways to encourage undergraduate students to study the humanities.









Develop partnerships between AAU institutions and industry to establish internships for
PhD graduates.

Develop postdoctoral-like humanities positions within AAU universities in partnership
with business, government, and not-for-profit agencies.

Consider admitting graduate students in subject clusters rather than in traditional
departments.

Provide clearly defined support for humanities graduate students, including awards other
than teaching assistantships.

Develop broader-based graduate programs that include non-academic jobs as distinct and
desirable alternatives to academic employment.

Develop humanities certificates or minors geared toward business, engineering, technology,
social science, and health science majors.

Consider supporting funding and research opportunities to encourage other
undergraduates to pursue study in the humanities.

Encourage undergraduate students to explore research opportunities in the humanities.


Recommendation 4: Provide Flexible Structures

Universitypresidents, provosts, and humanities deans shouldprovideflexible structures for interaction and
,*. I...'' j,.',..- across humanities disciplines, and among the humanities and social and natural sciences and the
professional schools.

Charge provosts and humanities deans with supporting faculty and department interaction
with other units-for example, by promoting interdisciplinary, collaborative research or by
developing courses with faculty from other departments.

Establish centers, institutes, or discussion groups that can help faculty interact with
colleagues from different departments (including non-humanities).

Allocate space in such a way that departmental and/or disciplinary isolation is broken and
interaction encouraged. This may include distributing office space across departmental
boundaries where feasible, or encouraging regular interdepartmental events at lunches,
seminars, and other gatherings.

Develop courses and core course curricula in which multiple departments combine their
expertise to develop common themes. Collaborations with Other Units Within the
University.









Recommendation 5: Promote the Humanities and Build Partnerships

Universities shouldpromote successfulprograms in the humanities inside and outside the institution, and build
partnerships with K-12 schools and other educational and cultural o g~:':'i:. .

Publicize humanities research and projects in campus and community media.

Build a base of support within the larger community for humanities programs.

Build partnerships with K-12 schools, state humanities councils, and other community
organizations.


Recommendation 6: Strengthen Foreign Language and Cultural Instruction

Universities should seek new opportunities to ,.. -,'. foreign language and cultural instruction.

Seek funding from Congress and government agencies for improvement of foreign
language instruction, particularly in areas of national need.

Emphasize that the current need for expertise in high-sensitivity areas is not a matter of
language instruction only, but must also include studies in history, religion, and culture.

Explore administrative structures that would increase the visibility of Less Commonly
Taught Languages (LCTLs) and increase student participation in such programs.


Recommendation 7: Support Digital Information and Technology

University presidents, provosts, and humanities deans should support the development and use of digital information
and..' in the humanities.

Make digital information and technology integral to strategic planning for humanities
programs.

Promote collaborations between humanists and computer scientists.

Provide resources for archiving efforts.

Give full consideration to work with digital information and technology during the tenure
and promotion process.

Ensure that faculty understand the implications of copyright laws for digital work.









Recommendation 8: Focus on Libraries and Books


University presidents, provosts, and humanities deans should take responsibility for sustaining the vigor and quality of
humanities scholarship and its dissemination andpreservation through book publishing and other appropriate
communication mechanisms.

Provide subventions to junior faculty as the equivalent of science faculty start-up costs.
Faculty members could elect to use such allowances to help finance first books published by
university presses.

Promote efforts to reduce the costs of scientific, technical, and medical (STM) journals,
thereby freeing up library budgets to restore their capacity for book purchases.

Work with university presses to explore new ways of digital publishing that may
significantly reduce costs and facilitate dissemination and use of scholarly works.




Recommendation 9: Provide Funding

University presidents, provosts, and humanities deans should provide funding for selected strategic initiatives in the
humanities and encourage and support outside fundraising.

Establish humanities research funding programs.

Develop startup packages for humanities faculty.

Provide funding for pilot programs.

Ensure that successful pilot programs get continued funding.

Aggressively seek outside funds for humanities programs from government, corporations,
foundations, and individual donors.



Recommendation 10: Work with Other Organizations

AA U and the leaders of its universities should work with other universities and oi'-;.:. :'j:rt in a concerted .... to
increase fundingfor the humanities ,'... the federal government and private foundations.

In collaboration with appropriate other organizations (such as the ACLS, the MLA, the
Humanities Alliance, the Federation of State Humanities Councils, and the American
Association of Museums), draft a set of important national objectives for the humanities,
including identification of ongoing projects and activities that need additional and sustained
support, and new areas of high priority.









* Convene a national summit of leaders from universities, foundations, professional
associations, and humanities support groups and councils to review the proposed objectives,
and-with appropriate revisions-adopt them as goals for joint efforts to acquire public and
private funding.

* Seek significant increases in funding for the National Endowment for the Humanities.

* Seek significant increases in funding for language and area studies under the Department of
Education's Title VI program, the Department of Homeland Security, and other suitable
venues.

* Encourage foundations to provide new or increased funding for the humanities.

* Assess progress on funding for the humanities every two years, and renew and revise
efforts as appropriate.

* Work with university presses, scholarly societies, and libraries to develop community-wide
responses to current problems in scholarly communication in the humanities.




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