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Title: GCRC news
Series Title: GCRC news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: General Clinical Research Center, University of Florida
Publisher: General Clinical Research Center, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: Spring 2004
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Volume ID: VID00003
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Geea Volumea Resarc Issuee1


Volume 11, Issue 1
Spring 2004


From the Director 1-2


GCRC Research Focus


Scatterbed Research?


New Research Resources


Biostatistical Corner


Recent GCRC Publcations


GCRC Training in Clinical
Investigation

Science of Clnical Research
Course


6-7


8-9


10


11-12


GCRC NEWS



FROM THE DIRECTOR

Peter W. Stacpoole, PhD, MD


The NIH Roadmap

Considerable hoopla has surrounded the recent presentation of Director Elias
Zerhouni's "Roadmap," that seeks to make substantive changes in the way NIH
does business (Science 302:63, 2003). A major Roadmap initiative is
"Reengineering the Clinical Research Enterprise," by which NIH proposes to
facilitate translational research and training, in part through new extramural
funding opportunities. One of these, known popularly as an "Institutional K-
12", provides considerable support for developing a cadre of Clinical Research
Scholars from varied health disciplines through combined didactic course work
and clinical research mentoring. It is similar to our extant K-30 Advanced Post-
graduate Program in Clinical Investigation, with the important added distinction
of providing virtually full salary support for committed trainees from colleges of
medicine, nursing, dentistry and other health related professions. Mainly
through the outstanding efforts of Betsy Shenkman, Associate Professor, Depart-
ment of Health Policy & Epidemiology and Director of the Institute for Child
Health Policy, UF is competing for this award, so stay tuned.

A Roadman to the GCRC


Many faculty and trainees, especially those new to UF, may not be aware of the
GCRC or how to tap its resources in a facile manner. First, check us out on our
Web site (www.gcrc.ufl.edu). Second, if you're still wondering whether or how
the Center can work for you, schedule a meeting with me
(stacpool@gcrc.ufl.edu), Mark Brantly (mark@alphaone.ufl.edu) or Desmond
Schatz (schatda@peds.ufl.edu) to toss around your ideas and see if the GCRC
can help turn them into reality. For more focused queries, contact Ann Coutu
(coutua@gcrc.ufl.edu) for administrative and financial matters; Teresa d'Angelo
(dangelot@gcrc.ufl.edu) about nursing resources; Barbara Frentzen
(frentzen@gcrc.ufl.edu) for federal guidelines for human subjects protection; Jon
Shuster (j shuster@biostat.ufl.edu) or Doug Theriaque (theriaqu@gcrc.ufl.edu)
concerning study design, power calculations or other statistical considerations;
George Henderson (hendegn@medicine.ufl.edu) to discuss what our Core Labo-
ratory provides by way of assays and Meena Shankar (shankarm@gcrc.ufl.edu)
about specialized diets and other nutrition-oriented questions.
(continued on page 2)


. . . ..' 1 . . . .








Page 2 Volume 11, Issue 1


'Why use
GCRC?

Consider it your

laboratory -

a human

laboratory . .


FROM THE DIRECTOR (CONTINUED)


The Web site shows how you can submit the same proposal to the Institutional
Review Board (which meets every other week) and the GCRC Scientific Advi-
sory Committee (which meets monthly), and any of us are glad to help steer
you through this process.

Why use the GCRC? Consider it your laboratory a human laboratory in
which you can test your own original hypothesis involving human subjects,
while we pay the costs of 24/7 room and board and the services of research
nurses, dietitians and laboratory technicians. We even cover many, if not all,
clinical chemistry lab charges, give you access to on-site computer work sta-
tions and a conference room for meetings of your research team.

With the GCRC you can do:
Sleep research with video monitoring
Exercise physiology studies using an exercise bike, treadmill, and meta-
bolic cart
Behavioral and psychiatric research
Genetics research
Pulmonary function studies and bronchoscopies
Liver or kidney biopsies
Pharmacokinetics
Pain research
Alternative and complementary medicine
Long-term feeding studies, involving specialized diets
Stable isotope experiments
Industry-sponsored multi-center trials (Phase 1-4)
Studies off the Center (ICU, ER, OR, you name it!)
Research on rare diseases, common diseases or no diseases (healthy
volunteers)
Investigations involving as many subjects of either gender and of any
age, race, nationality, creed, or place of origin, for as long as it takes
you to test your hypothesis!

Having the resources of the GCRC helps you leverage your existing extramural
funding and obtain new grants, especially those coming from the NIH Road-
map.

If this all seems too good to be true, visit the Center (3rd Floor, Shands Hospi-
tal, 265-0032 or 265-8909) and take a free tour.


Now, read more about us ...


Page 2


Volume 11, Issue 1








GCRC News Page 3


GCRC RESEARCH FOCUS
DOUGLAS THERIAQUE, MS


In this issue, we turn our attention to the GCRC Nursing Core. What services do
we offer and how are they unique and helpful to the research community?

The GCRC Nursing Core is overseen by Teresa d'Angelo, RN, BSN, CCRC,
who functions as the Nurse Manager and directs all day-to day activities of the
15 nursing FTEs that work within the Center. She also oversees the clerical
staff who facilitate patient scheduling, specimen transport to hospital laborato-
ries, inpatient and outpatient chart maintenance and the conduct of related tasks.
She is assisted by Trilla Bass, RN, CCRC, the GCRC Unit Practice Coordinator.

Our RNs are specially trained to assist in inpatient and outpatient research on
the GCRC. Several of the RNs assist with research throughout the hospital as
part of our scattered program. In addition to meeting the high standards set by
Shands Hospital, the University of Florida and JCAHO, our RNs average 12.5
years of research nursing experience. These full and part-time RNs provide 24
hour, 7 day a week coverage for inpatient and outpatient studies conducted in
the GCRC. Besides the typical nursing care provided to patients in the hospital,
our RNs:

Perform pharmokinetic testing
Administer conscious sedation
Administer and monitor investigational agents
Monitor and document adverse events
Uphold Good Clinical Practice standards
Process and store research specimens
Monitor compliance with informed consents and blood draw
amounts

One unique aspect of the Nursing Core involves our Protocol Nurse Liaison
(PNL) program. In use since 2000, this program ensures that a staff nurse is as-
signed to each GCRC study as the primary liaison. The PNL works closely with
the investigator and his or her staff to coordinate various aspects of the research
study, including developing information sheets, procedure work sheets and pre-
printed orders. In addition, PNLs are responsible for coordinating information
on lab processing, special testing, managing contact information (e.g., pager and
phone numbers) and other study essentials.

In summary, the GCRC Nursing Core provides the personnel and resources
which facilitate high quality research both within and outside the GCRC. Con-
tact Teresa d'Angelo (danget@shands.ufl.edu) or Trilla Bass
(basspa@shands.ufl.edu) to discuss how the Nursing Core can assist you in con-
ducting top-notch research in the GCRC.


Teresa
d'Angelo,

RN

GCRC Nurse
Manager
D ..,.. .' v.. ,.

ufl edu

265-0032


GCRC News


Page 3










WHAT IS SCATTERED RESEARCH?


We strongly encourage you to submit protocols to the GCRC Scatterbed re-
search program, overseen by Associate Program Director, Desmond Schatz,
MD. The program provides experienced research nurses who assist the Prin-
cipal Investigator and his or her team in implementing protocols in settings
outside of the GCRC unit. The program is ideal for allowing investigators
to enroll research subjects who are not appropriate for the GCRC inpatient or
outpatient venue or who are admitted to the hospital for their routine medical
care. Patients come from such diverse settings as off-site clinics, neonatal
intensive care units, labor and delivery, post-partum, well baby nursery, sur-
gical intensive care and the operating room.

Currently, the GCRC has two full-time scattered nurses: Pam Connolly,
i RN and Ann Cothran, RN. Both Pam and Ann have a wide range of nursing
experience and have worked with neonates, infants, children, adolescents and
geriatric populations. They are knowledgeable about Good Clinical Practice
Standards and federal regulations involving human subject protection. They
help coordinate and obtain research specimens and data and submit and
maintain regulatory documents.
(continued on page 5)




Des Schatz on the GCRC








GCRC Scatterbed nurses Pam Connolly (L) and Ann Cothran.




We are proud to announce that Desmond Schatz, MD is the
winner of the 2005 College of Medicine's Clinical Research
Award!

In fact, the last three years' recipients of this award have
been GCRC investigators.


Page 4


Volume 11, Issue I








GCRC News Page 5


WHAT IS SCATTERED RESEARCH?
(CONTINUED)

Current scattered activities include:
-Obtaining placental cord and other blood samples
-Obtaining pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic research samples
-Assisting with collecting data in observational and interventional studies
-Pre-screening and screening subjects for studies
-Creation of data collection worksheets
-Completion of case report forms
-Preparing specimens for processing and shipping
-Entering data

For further information about the Scatterbed program, please contact Teresa
d'Angelo at 265-0032 or Desmond Schatz (schatda@peds.ufl.edu).



NEW RESEARCH RESOURCES
TERESA d'ANGELO, RN, BSN


In an effort to meet the growing needs
of Investigators, the GCRC has ac-
quired new equipment and expanded
its available research resources. One
of the outpatient areas has been desig-
nated as an Exercise Physiology Lab.
Equipment available in the lab in-
cludes a metabolic cart, an ergometer
and a treadmill. The ergometer, an
Ergomedic Monarch Model 839E, is
computer interfaced and can provide
work test results. Changes in circula-
tion, respiration and metabolism can
be studied during and after exercise.
The ergometer can be adapted for pe-
diatric subjects.

The treadmill, a Trackmaster Model
13620, is also computer interfaced
and can operate at speeds up to 12
miles per hour and elevations of up to
25%. Display options include speed,
elevation, distance, heart rate and es-
timated oxygen consumption.


The ergometer and the treadmill can
both be operated in conjunction with
the metabolic cart to determine en-
ergy expenditure.

The existing Sleep Lab has ex-
panded its equipment to include an
end tidal C02 monitor, a thermistor
airflow sensor, a snore sensor, a na-
sal pressure monitor, and an event-
monitoring device. These additions
make the sleep lab functional for
adult and pediatric sleep and EEG
studies.

Nurses on the GCRC are currently
working towards obtaining chemo-
therapy certification. Chemotherapy
certified nurses will be available on
all shifts and through our scattered
program to assist with protocols in-
volving chemotherapeutic agents.


GCRC Web site:

www.gcrc. ufl edu

Phone:
265-8909
FAX:
265-8910

Administrative
0';
Room 3206
Third floor of
Shands


GCRC News


Page 5










BIOSTATISTICAL CORNER 2.0:

CORRELATION BY JONATHAN J. SHUSTER, PH.D.

This is the second in a series of biostatistics articles for the UF GCRC Newslet-
ter. There is considerable confusion surrounding correlation. There are three
uses of correlation that are vastly different. Firstly, correlation can be used to
answer the question: Do these two variables have more than a chance relation-
ship with each other? Secondly, correlation can be used to tell us if one vari-
able is a useful predictor of another. Finally, correlation is used to determine
whether one variable can be used as a surrogate for another variable. The last
case is especially useful if one measure involves a non-invasive, simple or in-
expensive measure while the other (the gold standard) is invasive, technically
complicated or expensive. The burden of proof in the second and third in-
stances are successively far greater than that in the first. We shall use data
from Bland and Altman, Lancet 1986, 1:307-310 to illustrate correlation.
Thanks go to Dr. Michael Froelich for the reference. There are N=17 paired
observations from 17 individuals.

X=Mini Wright Peak Y=Wright Peak. Fitted Y=11.5+.97X (By Least Squares)
X 512 430 520 428 500 600 364 380 658 445 432 626 260 477 259 350 451
Y494 395 516 434 476 557 413 442 650 433 417 656 267 478 178 423 427
Fitted Y 508 429 516 427 497 594 365 380 650 443 431 619 264 474 263 351 449
Error -14 -34 00 07 -19 -37 48 62 00 -10 -14 37 03 04 -85 72 -18

The medical question in this example is whether or not X is a good surrogate
for Y.

" ... correlation In this example, the correlation coefficient between X and Y is r=0.94,
can be usefl to P<.0001, two-sided.

demonstrate With near certainty, we can reject the null hypothesis that X and Y are stochas-
relationships tically independent. That is, we can conclude that there is a tendency for Y to
be higher than average when X is higher than average.
beyond chance.
Consider these two measures of variation:


(1) The standard deviations amongst the Y-values (We add up the squared
deviations of Y about the best predictor that does not use the X values, namely
the Mean Y=450.4, and divide this result by the "degrees of freedom", N-1=16,
and then take the square root) to yield SD(Y)=116. This is really a standard
error of prediction of a future Y based only on the Y data (ignoring the X data).
(2) The Standard of Prediction using the X values is taken as a kind of root
mean square of the errors. (We first add the squares of the Error terms in the
table above, and divide this by "degrees of freedom", N-2=15, to obtain the
value of SE(Prediction)=40.


Page 6


Volume 11, Issue 1








GCRC News Page 7


BIOSTATISTICAL CORNER 2.0 (CONTINUED)

Despite the high correlation between the X and Y values, there is still consid-
erable variation between Y (Wright Peak) and the value predicted by the
Mini Wright Peak. We have only been able to reduce the natural errors of
prediction (that ignore X) by about two-thirds (based on using X). This is a
considerable reduction, but the resulting variation would make the use of the
Mini-Wright Peak an unacceptable surrogate for the Wright Peak. It does
have useful predictive value, but not enough to use as a surrogate.

In summary, correlation can be useful to demonstrate relationships beyond
chance (i). But more sophisticated analysis is needed to determine whether
or not a variable is a clinically important predictor of another (ii), or whether
it can be used as a non-invasive replacement for an invasive test (iii). The
strength of association has successively higher standards for each of the three
issues raised.

For those curious, non-linear models fitting Y on X can only marginally im-
prove the prediction error over the linear model. The inherent variation in the
relation between Y and X is such that the standard error of prediction cannot
get much below 40.





GCRC VISITING SCIENTIST PROGRAM



As many of you know, each year the GCRC hosts or co-hosts visits by several
outstanding clinical investigators or senior health policy leaders to the Health
Science Center. Visitors deliver a grand rounds and research seminar and meet
with trainees and faculty. If you would like to nominate someone for consid-
eration as a GCRC Visiting Scientist, email Ann Coutu (coutua@gcrc.ufl.edu).
The next two Visiting Scientists are:


November 3-5, 2004





January 19-21, 2005


STEVEN COLAN, MD
PROFESSOR OF PEDIATRICS
DEPARTMENT OF CARDIOLOGY
CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL BOSTON

PAUL WATKINS, MD
PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA


jshuster@
gcrc.ufl.edu

294-0004
PO Box
J200212


GCRC News


Page 7








Page 8 Volume 11, Issue 1


RECENT PUBLICATIONS FROM

THE GCRC


1. Abdelmalek M, Firpi R, Soldevila-Pico C, Reed A, Hemming A, Liu C,
Crawford J, Davis G, Nelson D. Sustained viral response to interferon and ri-
baviron in liver transplant recipients with recurrent hepatitis C. Liver Trans-
plantation 10:199-207, 2004
2. Bennett Johnson S, Baughcum A, Carmichael S, She J-X, Schatz D.
Maternal anxiety associated with newborn genetic screening for Type 1 diabe-
tes. Diabetes Care 27:392-397, 2004
3. Bray C, Cahill K, Oshier J, Peden C, Theriaque D, Flotte T, Stacpoole P.
Methylphenidate does not improve cognitive function in healthy sleep-
deprived young adults. JlnvestMed 52:1-10, 2004
4. Davis S, Stacpoole P, Williamson J, Kick L, Quinlivan E, Coats B,
Shane B, Bailey L, Gregory J Tracer-derived total and folate-dependent homo-
cysteine remethylation and synthesis rates in humans indicate that serine is the
main one-carbon donor. Am JPhysiolEndocrinolMetab 286:E272-E279, 2004
5. Duncan GE, Perkins LA, Theriaque DW, Neiberger RE, Stacpoole PW.
Dichloroacetate therapy attenuates the blood lactate response to submaximal
exercise in patients with defects in mitochondrial energy metabolism. J Clin
EndocrinolMetab 89:1733-1738, 2004
6. Ehlers S, Rodrigue J, Widows M, Reed A, Nelson R. Tobacco use
Before and after liver transplantation: A single center survey and implications
for clinical practice and research. Liver Transplantation 10: 412-417, 2004
7. Flotte TR, Brantly ML, Spencer LT, Byrne BJ, Spencer CT, Baker DJ,
Humphries M. Phase I trial of intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-
associated virus alpha 1-antitrypsin (rAAV2-CB-hAAT) gene vector to AAT-
deficient adults. Hum Gene Ther 14:93-128, 2004
8. Fuehrlein B, Rutenberg M, Silver J, Warren M, Theriaque D, Duncan G,
Stacpoole P, Brantly M Differential metabolic effects of saturated versus
polyunsaturated fats in ketogenic diets. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 89:1641-
1645, 2004
9. Juul S, McPherson R, Farrell F, Jolliffe L, Ness D, Gleason C. Erythro-
poietin concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of nonhuman primates and fetal
sheep following high-dose recombinant erythropoietin. Biol Neonate 85:138-
144, 2004
10. Loiler S, Conlon T, Song S, Tang Q, Warrington K, Agarwal A, Kap-
turczak M, Li C, Ricordi C, Atkinson M, Muzyczka N, Flotte T Targeting re-
combinant adeno-associated virus vectors to enhance gene transfer to pancreatic
islets and liver. Gene Ther 10:1551-1558, 2003
11. Manavalan S, Valiando J, Reeves WH, Arnett F, Necker A, Simantov R,
Lyones R, Satoh M, Posnett D. Genomic Absence of the Gene Encoding T Cell
Receptor Vp 7.2 is Linked to the Presence of Autoantibodies in Sjogren's Syn-
drome. A/ i1/ ii\ Rheum 50:187-198,2004


Page 8


Volume 11, Issue I








GCRC News Page 9


GCRC PUBLICATIONS (continued)


12. Moss R, Rodman D, Spencer LT, Aitken M, Zeitlin P, Waltz D, Milla
C, Brody A, Clancy J, Ramsey B, Hamblett N, Heald A Repeated adeno-
associated virus serotype 2 aerosol-mediated cystic fibrosis transmembrane
regulator gene transfer to the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Chest
125:509-521, 2004
13. Nelson D, Tu Z, Soldevila-Pico C, Abdelmalek M, Zhu H, Xu Y,
Cabrera R, Liu C, Davis G Long-term interleukin 10 therapy in chronic hepati-
tis C patients has a proviral and anti-inflammatory effect. Hepatology 38: 859-
867, 2003
14. Planche T, Agbenyega T, Bedu-Addo G, Ansong D, Owusu-Ofori A,
Micah F, Anakwa C, Asafo-Agyei E, Huston A, Stacpoole P, Krishna S A pro-
spective comparison of malaria with other severe diseases in African children:
prognosis and optimization of management. Clin Infect Dis 37:890-897, 2003
15. Poirier A, Campbell-Thompson M, Tang Q, Scott-Jorgensen M, Combee
L, Crawford J, Song S, Flotte T. Toxicology and biodistribution studies of a
recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV2)-alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) vec-
tor. Preclinica 2:43-51, 2004
16. Schatz D, Gale E, Atkinson M Why can't we prevent Type 1 diabetes?
Diabetes Care 26:3326-3328, 2003
17. Shelnutt K, Kauwell G, Chapman C, Gregory J, Maneval D, Browdy A,
Theriaque D, Bailey L Folate status response to controlled folate intake is
affected by the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677C-T polymorphism.
JNutr 133: 4107-4111, 2003
18. Song S, Goudy K, Campbell-Thompson M, Wasserfall C, Scott
Jorgensen M, Wang J, Tang Q, Crawford J, Ellis T, Atkinson M, Flotte T
Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV2) mediated alpha 1-antitrypsin
gene therapy prevents type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. Gene Ther 11:181-186,
2004
19. Spencer LT, Paone G, Krein P, Rouhani F, Rivera-Nieves J, Brantly M.
Role of human neutrophil peptides in lung inflammation associated with alpha-
1-antitrypsin deficiency. Am JPhysiolLung Cell MolPhysiol 286:L514-L520,
2004


This
publication is
supported by
General
Clinical
Research
Center
Grant MO -
RR00082


GCRC News


Page 9







Page 10 Volume 11, Issue 1


MD/PHD
program -
Introductory
Experiment in
Clinical
Investigation




APPCI -
Advanced
Postgraduate
Program in

Clinical
Investigations


PRESENTATION AT ANNUAL

CONFERENCE


L to R: MD/PHD students Philip Scumpia, Pui Lee and Joanne Byars
present their abstract, "Short-Term Atorvastatin Therapy Increases Specific Anti-
body Production to Tetanus Toxoid Vaccination in Normal, Healthy Volunteers"
at the 2004 NIH/GCRC Conference held April 14-18 in Chicago.



TRAINING FOR CLINICAL

INVESTIGATORS

The NIH supported K-30 Advanced Postgraduate Program in Clinical Investi-
gations is now accepting applications for senior fellows and faculty in any
Health Science Center college who are interested in developing academic clini-
cal research careers. For further details, contact APPCI's Program Assistant,
Eve Johnson (evel l@ufl.edu or 846-1228).

The first required course of our K-30 program is the Science of Clinical Re-
search. Developed by the GCRC and now in its ninth year, the SCR is a 2-
week, 30-hour course offered each October that is free to anyone on a first-
come, first-served basis. Taught by many UF faculty, it provides an overview
of topics especially relevant to the clinical investigator. A formal announce-
ment regarding SCR 2004 will be forthcoming this summer. Last year's course
topics are listed on the next two pages:


Page 10


Volume 11, Issue 1









NINTH ANNUAL

SCIENCE OF CLINICAL RESEARCH COURSE
SEPTEMBER 27-OCTOBER 8, 2004


2003 COURSE AGENDA TOPICS INCLUDED:
Course Introduction Challenges and Opportunities
for the Physician-Scientist
* Goals and Overview of Course
* Integration with UF's Advanced Postgraduate Program
in Clinical Investigation
* Perspective of a College Dean
* GCRC Advisory Committee
* GCRC-based Research and Awards
* Perspective of a Junior Investigator
* Description of Student Project
Grants and Grantsmanship, Part I-
Where the Money Is and How to Keep It
* Structure and Function of NIH
* Writing a Competitive Grant
* Understanding the Grant Review Process
Epidemiology Methods, Part I
* Overview of Study Design
* Cross-sectional and Ecological Studies
* Case-control Studies
* Cohort Studies
Epidemiology Methods, Part II
* Screening in the Detection of Disease
* Measures of Association/causality
Study Design and Analysis in Patient-oriented Research-
Clinical Trials
* Types of Trials and Protocol Development
* Blinding and Placebos
* Study Design
* Randomization
* Sample Size/Power


SCR-

SCIENCE
OF

CLINICAL

RESEARCH

COURSE


GCRC News


Page 11








NINTH ANNUAL
SCIENCE OF CLINICAL RESEARCH COURSE
SEPTEMBER 27-OCTOBER 8, 2004


Statistical Methods in Data Analysis in Patient-Oriented Research (POR)
Overview of Statistical Methods
Intention to Treat vs. Per Protocol
Multiple Significance Testing
Introduction of Web-based Research Approach to Clinical Trials
Meta Analysis
Grants and Grantmanship, Part II
Alternatives to NIH
Finding Private Funding
Intellectual Property and Confidentiality
Conflicts of Interest and Ethics in Medical Research
Federal Guidelines and Scientific Integrity in POR Rules to Know Up Front
IRBs and Informed Consent
Data and Safety Monitoring for Clinical Trials
"Ownership" of Human Tissues and Fluids
HIPAA
FDA Governance of New Product Development
Special Topics in POR
Biotechnology Program
Pharmacogenetics
Critique of Student POR Proposals
Grants and Grantsmanship Redux Student POR Proposals for the Physician-
Scientist
Critique of Student POR Proposals




SCIENCE OF CLINICAL RESEARCH COURSE
SEPTEMBER 27-OCTOBER 8, 2004 2:00-5:00PM DAILY
To be held in the Communicore Bldg. (Room TBA)

On-line registration will be available in July through the GCRC website: www.gcrc.ufl.edu
For more information, please contact:
GCRC office at 265-8909 or sanderse@gcrc.ufl.edu or fax: 265-8910




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