Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090931/00004
 Material Information
Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
Series Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida Foundation
Publisher: University of Florida Foundation
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: Fall 2008
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Bibliographic ID: UF00090931
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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NEW SCIENCE BUILDING TO PROMOTE CROSS-DISCIPLINE RESEARCH


THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE UNIVE


An $850,000 donation boosts construction of UF's
Biomedical Sciences Building.

ome of the greatest works of human genius sprang from collabo-
ration. Think Lewis and Clark, Watson and Crick, and McCartney
and Lennon. The UF Biomedical Sciences Building now under
construction will create an environment where collaboration between
experts in the biosciences and medicine and biomedical engineering
can flourish. The building will provide the synergistic setting needed to
establish UF as a leader in interdisciplinary biomedical science, engi-
neering, technology and technology transfer.
Located on Center Drive and slated for completion in summer 2009,
the 160,000-square-foot building is intended to create the physical and
intellectual infrastructure required to place UF among the top research
institutions in the country.
One highlight of the building will be its atrium. The 3,400-square-foot
open area which was expanded thanks to a $850,000 donation from
the Shepard Broad Foundation is intended to facilitate collaboration
between UF's researchers in biomedical engineering, sciences and ani-
mal resources.
"From little seeds will grow big projects that will help the world," says
Ann Bussel, a trustee of the Miami-based foundation co-founded by her
late father and mother, Shepard and Ruth Broad. "I hope that many of the A gift front
seeds are planted in the atrium." hopes tha
this sumnr
In recognition of the gift, UF officials are requesting the atrium be
renamed the Broad-Bussel Atrium. The gift is also eligible to be matched by the
state's Alec P. Courtelis Facilities Enhancement Challenge Grant Program, which
would increase the amount of the gift to $1.7 million.
"This space will allow us to enhance creativity by building an exciting envi-
ronment for our faculty and students, where they will create important new
technologies that solve pressing biomedical problems," says Pramod Khargonekar,
dean of the College of Engineering.
Elizabeth Hillaker (BA'08, BSJ '08)
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO SUPPORT THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES PROGRAM VISIT HTTP://IDP.MED.UFL.EDU.


m the Shepard Broad Foundation expanded the Biomedical Sciences Building's atrium by more than 200 percent in
t this space will encourage collaboration and communication among researchers. The building should be finished
er. Illustration by Ellenzweig Associates


Florida


SCHOLARSHIP STUDENT GRATEFUL FOR CHANCE

TO REINTERPRET HIS DREAMS

Florida Opportunity Scholar Austin Eklund plans to help the world
find understanding through translation.


Austin Eklund doesn't just see the cup as
half full. He sees it overflowing. "I grew
up very, very poor," says sophomore
Eklund, who studies linguistics at UF. "I think you
have to be optimistic to maintain your sanity. At
this point in my life, there's no reason not to be
optimistic I'm going to a wonderful university."
Eklund is optimistic he can bridge gaps
between people by working with languages. He
was a sign language interpreter for the Florida
School for the Deaf and Blind in his hometown
of St. Augustine before coming to UF to work for
the English Language Institute, which helps for-
eign students acclimate to American life and
language. Already fluent in Spanish, he is study-
ing French this fall.
"I think there's a lot of disharmony on this
planet," says Eklund, who would like to be either
a foreign-language translator for the United
Nations or a transnational company or an inter-
national relations lawyer. "I can't imagine any
job more rewarding than one that helps people
understand one another whether through for-
eign-language translation or diplomacy."
The Florida Opportunity Scholars program,
which provides full-funding for low-income, first-
generation college students, gave Eklund yet
another reason to be optimistic about his future.
The scholarship allowed him to experience life


Thanks to the Florida Opportunity Scholars program, sophomore Austin Eklund
says he can fulfill his dream of becoming either a United Nations translator or an
international relations lawyer. Photo by Kristen Bartlett Grace (BSJ '03)


in a bigger town with more cultural and language
resources than the local community college he had
planned to attend.
"I wouldn't be at UF were it not for the Florida
Opportunity Scholars program," Eklund says. "It's the
most pragmatic scholarship. It's the one that helps
me day-to-day."
The adjustment period at UF was difficult for Eklund
because he frequently traveled home on the weekends
to care for his ailing single mother.
After the first difficult months, Eklund says he fell in
love with campus, the faculty, the other students and
Gainesville's bustling atmosphere.
"Because it's such a large school, there is infinite
potential for social interaction and academic pursuits,"
Eklund says. "There's a sense of endless possibility."
Eklund says he knows the only reason he has
been able to take advantage of all these opportuni-
ties is the generosity of donors who fund the Florida
Opportunity Scholars program.
"I think sometimes people give and they don't
know where the money goes, but it goes to me and
to people like me," Eklund says. "I can't imagine
myself anywhere else."

Elizabeth Hillaker (BSJ '08, BA '08)
To FIND OUT HOW TO SUPPORT THE FLORIDA OPPORTUNITY SCHOLARS
PROGRAM VISIT WWW.UFF.UFL.EDU/FOS.







SCIENTIST INVESTS IN THE FUTURE OF DRUG DISCOVERY AT UF


A $600,000 professorship gift from Professor Emeritus Nicholas Bodor will provide the
College of Pharmacy the resources to hire a topnotch mentor for the next generation of
drug researchers. Sarah Kiewel (BSJ '05)


Nicholas Bodor passes his research torch on to next
generation by creating pharmacy professorship.

Nicholas Bodor, an internationally recognized scientist

and UF professor emeritus whose 40-year career in drug
design and delivery has resulted in numerous discoveries
and current market medications, has once again furthered his field
of expertise.
Bodor and his wife, Sheryl, have created a professorship in
drug research at UF to continue the teaching and research that
he enjoyed for nearly 25 years at UF's College of Pharmacy. Their
$600,000 gift is eligible for state matching funds that could result
in a $1 million endowment.
The potential of the Bodors' gift is immeasurable.
"Dr. Bodor has enriched graduate student education in our college,
mentoring so many young researchers who are now developing their
own distinguished careers worldwide," William Riffee, dean of the
College of Pharmacy, says. "His gift goes far beyond his contributions
as an educator and researcher; it strengthens the future of the college
to be among world leaders in drug discovery."
Although Bodor is retired from teaching, he continues to serve as
director of UF's Center for Drug Discovery, which he founded in 1986.
There, and in his other teaching duties, he supervised the training of


more than 150 graduate and post-doctoral students. Bodor contends
that this mentoring is what keeps the future of drug discovery alive.
Marcus Brewster, a distinguished research fellow at Johnson &
Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development in Belgium who
was a graduate student under Bodor in the 1980s, says his experience
at UF was invaluable.
"I learned so much working with Dr. Bodor. The science was the
most important, but he provided the full package for a future scien-
tist, including how to present your work and influencing people on
your points of view." Brewster says. "I learned networking and how to
problem solve."
The fruits of Bodor's labor and mentoring only begin with his stu-
dents. He has published more than 500 research articles, has more
than 180 patents and serves on the editorial boards of several inter-
national scientific journals.
Just a few of his awards include the Gold Cross of Merit of
the Hungarian Republic, the country's highest state honor; the
Distinguished Pharmaceutical Scientist Award from the American
Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists; and the creation of an
annual international conference based on his research findings.
Bodor says establishing this professorship is particularly mean-
ingful. He's grateful for being able to pass the torch on to the next
generation of drug researchers.
Linda Homewood (BSPR '93) and Liesl O'Dell (BSJ '92)
TO FIND MORE INFORMATION AND TO SUPPORT COLLEGE OF PHARMACY RESEARCH
AND PROGRAMS VISIT WWW.COP.UFL.EDU/CENTERS/CDD/INDEX.HTM.


CAMPAIGN Progress
AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2008


BY UNIT
PROGRESS

















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WEK


InzD
4001:
40000


WZZD



4000
4000011



00


TOTAL RAI EC
$758,593,63 4 -


UNIT AMOUNT RAISED (GOAL)
athletics $9,501,377 ($30,000,000)
warrington college of business administration $71,154,915 ($112,000,000)
dentistry $12,433,014 ($15,000,000)
design, construction and planning $8,333,553 ($31,000,000)
education $18,535,845 ($20,000,000)
engineering $41,871,757 ($80,000,000)
fine arts $1,268,446 ($6,000,000)
florida museum of natural history $9,523,696 ($30,000,000)
harn museum of art $23,530,075 ($30,000,000)
health and human performance $3,296,245 ($7,000,000)
institute of food and agricultural sciences (ifas) $70,696,551 ($100,000,000)
international center $127,954 ($1,000,000)
journalism and communications $11,375,055 ($27,000,000)
latin american studies center $402,217 ($7,000,000)
levin college of law $26,907,104 ($47,000,000)
liberal arts and sciences $44,425,420 ($65,000,000)
smathers libraries $10,075,586 ($20,000,000)


S ~) mcknight brain institute $4,480,349 ($25,000,000)
ZD medicine $135,643,738 ($315,000,000)
D) nursing $7,736,661 ($14,000,000)
) uf performing arts $2,997,488 ($5,500,000)
COME pharmacy $8,091,042 ($19,000,000)
MEZ= public health and health professions $4,638,443 ($13,000,000)
student affairs $8,352,371 ($10,000,000)
ZZ hands healthcare $28,993,153 ($75,000,000)
Z veterinary medicine $28,784,465 ($40,000,000)
ZI Z whitney laboratory for marine bioscience $1,483,462 ($4,000,000)
400 campuswide initiatives $163,933,663 ($351,500,000)

BY PURPOSE
PROGRESS PURPOSE AMOUNT RAISED (GOAL)
S D) faculty support $81,500,254 ($433,770,000)
m ~) graduate support $43,763,998 ($197,950,000)
( ) undergraduate support $3,015,657 ($67,830,000)
00[ campus enhancement $122,026,556 ($254,000,000)
) program support & research $508,287,179 ($546,450,000)


RESEARCHER FINDS HEALTH

MAY BE MATTER OF TASTE

Linda Bartoshuk hopes to make healthy choices more
palatable, especially for the sick.

t wasn't the hair loss, constant nausea or fatigue. It was those lit-
tle pink buds buried in his tongue.
When Linda Bartoshuk's father was suffering through lung
cancer, his most memorable complaint was that he didn't like the
taste of food.
Back then, Bartoshuk was a baffled college student. Now, decades
later as a presidential endowed professor in the College of Dentistry,
she and her colleagues are engaged in research that would allow
medicine to help cancer patients enjoy the taste of food again.
Bartoshuk, who is also the director of human research at the UF
Center for Smell and Taste, is leading research to correct taste and
olfactory dysfunction. Her work is paving the way for many answers
that reach beyond taste, including obesity and colon cancer.
Through her work, Bartoshuk aims to solve the problems of peo-
ple who are born with pesky palates. She performs tests to determine
whether nature has destined her subjects to be supertasters those
who are strongly affected by things such as the bitterness of coffee
and the spicy burn of hot peppers medium tasters or non-tasters.
"Your taster status not only influences your food choices, but it
also affects your health," says Bartoshuk, a member of the presti-
gious National Academy of Sciences and the first female academy
member at UF.
No matter how healthy a food may be, if it's distasteful or pain-
ful to eat, it's not likely a person will consume it. Supertasters, who
experience this intense tasting due to a higher number of taste
buds, are at risk for colon cancer, for instance, because they are less
drawn to bitter green vegetables.








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SANIBEL COUPLE HOPES TO SPARK NEW IDEAS WITH $6 MILLION GIFT


REGIONAL KICKOFF
EVENT DATES
THE FLORIDA TOMORROW CAPITAL CAMPAIGN IS
REACHING THROUGHOUT THE NATION WITH THESE
REGIONAL KICKOFF EVENTS:

Chicago . . . . .. Oct. 21

Broward County . . . ..Feb. 4

Jacksonville . . . ... April 23
FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE REGIONAL CAMPAIGNS VISIT
WWW.FLORIDATOMORROW. U FL.EDU/REGIONALS.




UF FLORIDA
THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


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Jon and Beverly Thompson offer combined gifts to help
students, faculty solve problems together.

on Thompson (BS '61, MS '62) graduated from UF with a focus
in geology.
"I thought I wanted to be an engineer, and I took a course in
geology, and a lightbulb went off," Thompson says. "Geology com-
bined both fields I was interested in."
Thompson and his wife of 45 years, Beverly (MEd '62), have given
almost $6 million to UF to help first-generation students receiving
Florida Opportunity Scholarships, researchers in the McKnight Brain
Institute, and professors linking work in the Department of Geological
Sciences and the Florida Museum of Natural History.
"It's amazing the continual discovery of things and the curiosity
that these Florida Opportunity Scholar students have," he says. "They
just continue to blossom and learn."
The Thompsons chose to contribute to a chair in the Department
of Geological Sciences and a chair at the Florida Museum of Natural
History to link the two in research.


"We were looking to move those two areas closer and encourage
them to work together. I've had a long-standing interest in paleon-
tology," Thompson says. "That was a natural fit."
The Thompsons also contributed to the Regeneration Project at
the McKnight Brain Institute. Beverly, who has a family member diag-
nosed with multiple sclerosis, hopes the project's work with adult
stem cells will eventually cure movement disorders.
It was the "natural fit" of the programs at UF that motivated the
Thompsons to give a calling that Thompson hopes other philan-
thropists will encounter.
"We love giving more young bright students the opportunity to
come and get an education in whatever they want; that's a reward
right there," Thompson says. "It gives you a really good feeling to be
able to give back to the university, and really, the world."
Kelsey McNiel (4JM)
To SUPPORT UF SCHOLARSHIPS, PROFESSORSHIPS, AND RESEARCH VISIT
WWW.UFF.UFL.EDU/HowToGIVE.


College of Dentistry professor Linda Bartoshuk is leading research to correct taste
and smell dysfunctions. Her results could directly impact those battling obesity,
colon cancer and the side effects of cancer treatments. Sarah Kiewel (BSJ '05)

Bartoshuk is also interested in those who acquire a less-than-tasty
existence. The 2 million Americans with chemosensory disorders
- those who develop problems based on experiences such as ear
infections or cancer treatment could see changes in their lives
because of Bartoshuk's research.
Bartoshuk's main goal, therefore, is to improve health through taste.
Working with the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, she is
studying the taste properties of plants to make them more palatable.
"Improving the sense of taste can have an economic and nutritional
effect," says Bartoshuk, adding that making a plant taste better can
improve a person's health and combat starvation and poverty.
Kelsey McNiel (4JM)
TO FIND MORE INFORMATION AND TO SUPPORT THE CENTER FOR SMELL AND TASTE
VISIT WWW.UFBI.UFL.EDU/-UFCST.





GO Figure

$2 million Gift from Ellie and Bob McCabe to
establish the Robert F. and Eleonora W. McCabe Eminent
Scholar Chair in Psychiatry and Community Mental Health
in the College of Medicine. The gift will be used to develop
a satellite academic department in Vero Beach to enhance
mental health care in Indian River County.

3 percent Return realized on the endowment pool
for UF in the 2007-08 fiscal year.

$298 million Amount raised to date for the
Faculty Challenge initiative, which helps pay for competitive
salaries to attract and retain faculty.

$3.7 million Total Florida Opportunity Scholars
monies awarded in the program's first two years. The
program helps first-generation students from economically
disadvantaged backgrounds attend UF.

1,100 Total UF students whose books, fees, meals,
housing, transportation and miscellaneous expenses are paid
through the Florida Opportunity Scholars program.

$1 million Donation by Debbie and Robert Forbis
in honor of their grandson, who has a blinding disease.
The gift will establish the Taylor Forbis Optic Nerve
Hypoplasia research fund in the College of Medicine's
Department of Ophthalmology.




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