Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090931/00003
 Material Information
Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
Series Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida Foundation
Publisher: University of Florida Foundation
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: Summer 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090931
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UF PROFESSOR PROMOTES GREEN CONSTRUCTION

With help from a $3 million endowment, Charles Kibert teaches builders to be more environmentally responsible.


Charles Kibert knows going green means building with a conscience. "Building
construction is really important," Kibert says. "Buildings consume 40 percent
of the energy out there."
Kibert, who holds the Dick and Joan P. Holland Professorship in the College of Design,
Construction and Planning, has spent almost 20 years promoting sustainable construc-
tion at UF and educating the building community about ways to lessen its impact. His
fervor has helped grow a crop of more than 20 green buildings at UF.
Kibert founded the Powell Center for Construction and Environment, which promotes
sustainable principles in construction. He also obtained a $3 million endowment for the
center where he is now the director.
As the overseer on construction of M.E. Rinker Sr. Hall, Kibert helped create UF's most
sustainable building and the first gold-level building in Florida under the Leadership in En-
ergy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. The air-conditioning
system alone saves 50 percent more energy than the minimum standards required by the
American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers.
"We demonstrated that you can actually do this in the real world," he says.
Kibert's principles have also influenced campus construction. UF committed to
smarter building practices by adopting the LEED criteria for all major new construction
and renovation projects. To date, UF has two gold-certified projects-Rinker Hall and
Library West-eight certified buildings, six buildings submitted for certification and
nine registered buildings.
Kelsey McNiel (4JM)
TO LEARN MORE AND TO SUPPORT THE POWELL CENTER FOR CONSTRUCTION AND ENVIRONMENT,
VISIT WWW.CCE.UFL.EDU.



Florida


Professor Charles Kibert looks over drawings for the historic Cotton Club in east Gainesville with UF
graduate student and project manager Donna Isaacs. Using guidelines for historic preservation and
green building, the Powell Center is working with community partners to restore the building for use
as a museum, gift shop and neighborhood center. Photo by Kris Nichols/UF News Bureau





SCHOLARSHIP ALLows STUDENT TO

EXPLORE HER LEADERSHIP POTENTIAL

Sayra Suarez works to help others thanks to the help she received
from her Florida Opportunity Scholarship.
S ayra Suarez's parents cry each time she brings home her grades. "They can't
believe I'm a college student," says Suarez (3CLAS), a Colombian immi-
grant. "It's their effort combined with my work, and it's paying off."
Thanks to the Florida Opportunity Scholarship, which provides full funding
for first-generation college students, Suarez can pursue her dream-a college
degree-free from financial stresses.
"It gives me a clear mind to focus on studying
instead of the economic hardships my parents might
be facing or having to think about applying for a job
or asking for a loan," says Suarez, who majors in psy-
chology and minors in leadership.
Suarez pours herself into four different clubs-on top
of attending classes and studying-in order to main-
tain her cultural ties and help other students at UF.
"Some people tell me that I do too much, but I
wanted to make a difference in each of those things,"
Suarez says.
She plays intramural soccer and is the secre-
tary of the Colombian Student Association and the
Coalition of Hispanic Speakers Helping Through
Advocacy and Service. She also dances meren-
gue and hip hop in a Hispanic Student Association
dance team called Sabor Latino.
The organizations helped her with her transition
to UF because she established roots in the UF
Hispanic community.
"You stay grounded with your own culture, but at
the same time you're partaking in activities that ben- Florida Opportunity scholar Sayra
parents never attended college, we
efit you and the university community," she says. and help other UF students. Photo
and help other UF students. Photo


Suar


She often speaks to other students in her classes about her activities, exposing them
to the Hispanic culture and getting them interested in their own heritage.
Last year, an officer in the Colombian Student Association encouraged Suarez to run
for secretary, and she was elected in her sophomore year.
"It sparked something in me," says Suarez, who now plans to run for club president in
order to bring in more members and infuse the club with
a full-bodied Colombian identity.
"As president, you're the face of that organization to the
Gainesville and UF communities," Suarez says. "It inspires
a confidence you can pass on to others."
In fact, Suarez already inspired a younger student who
ran another Hispanic cultural club.
.1. l"She called me her mentor," Suarez says. "I just gave
F her guidance to run her own club."
Due to the encouragement Suarez received from her
fellow students and her mentor at UF, Vice President
for Student Affairs Patricia Telles-lrvin, Suarez now sees
potential in herself. She plans to earn a master's in indus-
trial and organizational psychology and a doctorate in
counseling psychology.
Suarez says she is thankful the Florida Opportunity
Scholarship program saw potential in her, as well. Her edu-
cation at UF has inspired her to be a leader in her field.
"My parents didn't get past high school," Suarez says.
"I think every generation should surpass the one before."
Elizabeth Hillaker (BSJ '08, BA '08)
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SUPPORTING FLORIDA OPPORTUNITY SCHOLARSHIPS,
rez, a Colombian immigrant whose VISIT WWW.UFF.UFL.EDU/SCHOLARSHIPS/FOS.


works hard to maintain her cultural ties
by Derek Cole












The $125 million University of Florida Proton Therapy
Institute provides pinpoint-accurate treatment for
hard-to-reach tumors.

hen radiation oncologist Nancy Mendenhall suggested
that UF build a proton therapy facility to help treat
cancer, she expected to hear a chorus of "no." "Too
expensive," was the argument she expected. "Too experimental."
Instead, she heard a "yes." And an enthusiastic one, at that.
A decade later, the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute
in Jacksonville is one of only five such facilities nationwide, offering
specialized care for hard-to-reach cancers. And it's enjoyed the
fastest growth of any proton therapy facility so far, treating 100
patients a day just 19 months after it opened.
"This is a significant milestone for us and for our patients," says
Stuart Klein, the institute's executive director. "No other proton
therapy treatment center has accomplished this goal in such a
short period of time."


Proton therapy is the next generation of radiation treatment.
Unlike conventional X-ray radiation, which passes through a tumor
and damages healthy tissue in front of and behind it, proton therapy
can deliver radiation specifically to the tumor with less damage to
the surrounding tissue. As a result, proton therapy is often used for
treating tumors in sensitive locations such as the brain or prostate-
and with fewer side effects.
Since the therapy requires a large, powerful accelerator called
a cyclotron to set the protons in motion, building a facility can be
daunting. UF's institute, for instance, proved to be a $125 million
investment. Fortunately, a number of entities-including the UF
College of Medicine, the state of Florida, the city of Jacksonville
and Belgian equipment manufacturer Ion Beam Applications-
came together to make the Jacksonville facility a reality.
Built next to Shands Jacksonville, the institute began treating
patients in August 2006. It has grown from using one treatment
room to three, and a fourth room for the treatment of eye cancers
is expected to be operational by the end of the year.
Ultimately, however, doctors and nurses at the institute are working
to fulfill two goals Mendenhall- now the institute's medical director-
foresaw for proton therapy: improving patient care and furthering
cancer research.


"There is an expectation from society that we not only provide the
best in care to our patients but that we continue to search for better
ways of doing things," she says. "Through research, we can have an
impact way beyond this campus, way beyond the walls of the Proton
Therapy Institute. Our impact will be felt across the country by
cancer patients."
FOR INFORMATION AND TO SUPPORT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PROTON THERAPY
INSTITUTE, VISIT WWW.FLORIDAPROTON.ORG.


AS OF JUNE 30, 2008


TOTAL RAISED:
$694,578,267


PROGRESS














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UNIT AMOUNT RAISED (GOAL)
athletics $9,403,857 ($30,000,000)
warrington college of business administration $64,425,101 ($112,000,000)
dentistry $12,027,059 ($15,000,000)
design, construction and planning $7,940,089 ($31,000,000)
education $18,361,833 ($20,000,000)
engineering $40,791,796 ($80,000,000)
fine arts $1,154,817 ($6,000,000)
florida museum of natural history $9,306,848 ($30,000,000)
harn museum of art $23,111,738 ($30,000,000)
health and human performance $3,131,971 ($7,000,000)
institute of food and agricultural sciences (ifas) $68,570,866 ($100,000,000)
international center $127,744 ($1,000,000)
journalism and communications $10,965,730 ($27,000,000)
latin american studies center $399,522 ($7,000,000)
levin college of law $26,164,859 ($47,000,000)
liberal arts and sciences $42,450,885 ($65,000,000)
smathers libraries $10,026,510 ($20,000,000)


nrn


















PROGRESS
a )
n )


mcknight brain institute $3,253,924 ($25,000,000)
medicine $108,288,295 ($315,000,000)
nursing $7,465,284 ($14,000,000)
uf performing arts $2,924,064 ($5,500,000)
pharmacy $7,743,032 ($19,000,000)
public health and health professions $4,478,195 ($13,000,000)
student affairs $7,808,697 ($10,000,000)
uf & hands $27,883,101 ($75,000,000)
veterinary medicine $25,964,514 ($40,000,000)
whitney laboratory for marine bioscience $1,481,545 ($4,000,000)
campuswide initiatives $148,926,390 ($351,500,000)


PURPOSE AMOUNT RAISED (GOAL)
faculty support $78,967,631 ($433,770,000)
graduate support $41,708,262 ($197,950,000)
undergraduate support $2,984,768 ($67,830,000)
campus enhancement $109,042,258 ($254,000,000)
program support & research $461,875,348 ($546,450,000)


Andrew Blakeslee enjoys some playtime with his daughters, Alexandra, 8,
and Sarah, 5, at his home in Asbury Lake, Fla. Photo by Lans Stout


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I
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Puzzle directions
Fill in the blank small triangles
with a number: 1, 2, 3 or 4. Each
number can appear only once in
each side, inner triangle and
colored crossbar. To solve
more puzzles, visit
www.trizmpuzzle.com.


answer


Andrew Blakeslee's new book could help the College of
Medicine find a cure for his uncommon heart disease.

A ndrew Blakeslee (MBA'04) wants a solution. He's moved
beyond Sudoku. He played the game for seven months
while he was on bed rest recovering from heart failure in
2004. Now Blakeslee wants to solve something bigger: cardiac
sarcoidosis, the disease that caused his heart to fail.
His solution is a puzzle in itself. After receiving a heart transplant at
Shands at UF in October 2007, Blakeslee, an information technology
project manager at UF, created Trizm, a competitor for Sudoku that
uses triangles and bright colors. With a Web site launched in
December for promoting his book of brain-busters, "The Trouble With
Trizms," Blakeslee is ready to give back to those who helped him.
"I have been through the experience, and I know it can be pretty
traumatic," he says. "My heart failure was due to a rare condition,
so my hope is to get some research into sarcoidosis."
Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease that can affect any organ,
including the heart, according to the Foundation for Sarcoidosis
Research. It can cause abnormal heartbeats, blockages, valve prob-
lems, heart attack or heart failure. A cause for the disease has not
been found.
To help further research, nearly 50 percent of the proceeds from
Blakeslee's book will go into an endowed research fellowship at
the College of Medicine. The money will allow for more physician-
scientists in the field who are specifically trained in the areas of
heart transplant and cardiac sarcoidosis.
"I think people that have the disease know that
it's under-researched and rare," says Karen Pastos
4 (BSA '90, MEd '02), director of development at
the college. "I guarantee you they want to know
why they have it."
The endowed fellowship is another way for
people who are interested in Blakeslee's story
to contribute in addition to buying the book,
Pastos says, noting that the puzzles are
worth looking into. Pastos admits she
3 and her kids have become addicted
to the new game.
For Blakeslee, the difference
made by the new fellowship
4 1 will be a little less trivial.
"I've been given a second
chance at life," he says.
Copyright 2008 by The Trizm Puzzle Company, LLC
reprinted with permission "Now it's my chance to give
back by supporting the organizations that helped me and by working
to improve the survival rates of those battling cardiac sarcoidosis."
Kelsey McNiel (4JM)
FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE ENDOWMENT FUND AND TO SUPPORT
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, VISIT WWW.MED.UFL.EDU.


$2 million Grant received from Trellis Fund, a foundation
chaired by Betsy Karel, to establish the Frank Karel Chair in Public Interest
Communications. The grant, which is eligible for a 100 percent match from
Florida's Trust Fund for Major Gifts, creates the first endowed chair in the
nation that will focus on public relations for public service organizations.


$100,000 Minimum endowment necessary to qualify for state
matching funds, which start at 50 percent and rise to 100 percent based
on the size of the gift.


4,566 Separate funds maintained by the UF Foundation to hold gift money.


$1 million Amount donated by Irma and Norman Braman of Miami to
help establish an endowed chair at UF's Center for Jewish Studies. The donation
will allow the center to hire a national authority on the Holocaust.


The $9.3 million George Steinbrenner Band Building includes practice space,
storage and offices.

For years, the UF campus reverberated with the sound of drums and brass when the marching band
rehearsed outdoors in the rain or the blistering sun. Soon they will be able to practice their instru-
ments inside with the completion of the George Steinbrenner Band Building in July. The entire
band will be able to practice in the 5,600-square-foot band rehearsal room.
The $9.3 million band building, located on Inner Road next to the School of Music, was constructed
with donations from New York Yankees owner and Gator parent George Steinbrenner, UF alumnus Ste-
phen Stills of Crosby, Stills and Nash, the UF Athletic Association and other friends of music. The building
represents the first phase of an ongoing project to install state-of-the-art facilities at the
School of Music to serve UF's students, faculty and community.
In addition to the large rehearsal space, the building will house individual studios for practicing,
a band library, instrument and uniform storage, administrative offices, a conference room and two
large lobby areas.
The much-needed space will help accommodate more than 600 students from across campus who
participate in the band program. The program has a proud history of providing high-quality service to the
university, including appearances at national sporting championships and practical training
for musicians who will contribute to the music profession as a whole.
Elizabeth Hillaker (BSJ '08, BA '08)
FOR INFORMATION AND TO SUPPORT UF'S BAND PROGRAM, VISIT WWW.UFBANDS.UFL.EDU.


Photo by lan Bradshaw


THE FLORIDA TOMORROW CAPITAL CAMPAIGN IS
REACHING THROUGHOUT THE NATION WITH THESE
REGIONAL KICKOFF EVENTS:

September 9 . . .. Tampa

October 21 . . . . Chicago

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE REGIONAL CAMPAIGNS,
VISIT WWW.FLORIDATOMORROW.UFL.EDU/REGIONALS.




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