Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090931/00002
 Material Information
Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
Series Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida Foundation
Publisher: University of Florida Foundation
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: Spring 2008
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Bibliographic ID: UF00090931
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA




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TE W R WI,7E







THE WAR ON CANCER
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New facilities, partnership bring UF closer to a cure.

More than three decades ago, in December 1971, President Richard Nixon signed the
National Cancer Act to fund research and declared war on cancer. "I hope in the years
ahead we will look back on this action today as the most significant action taken during
my administration," Nixon said at the time.
That's how important he considered the mission to cure cancer. In the years since,
doctors and scientists have discovered better ways to detect, prevent and treat the dis-
ease. Cancer patients are living longer, healthier lives now than when Nixon was in the
White House.
But there's still much to do. Doctors still aren't sure what causes cancer though we can
pinpoint some of the triggers. We don't have a cure. It hasn't been eradicated.
Here at the University of Florida, our researchers and doctors are looking deeply into
the cancer and genetics puzzle. At our Cancer-Genetics Research Complex, for instance,
talented researchers from across disciplines are working together to create cancer treat-
ment therapies and technologies. To improve care for all Floridians, Shands at UF will
open an innovative 500,000-square-foot cancer hospital in 2009; and this winter, the
internationally respected Moffitt Cancer Center joined with Shands Healthcare and the
university to develop world-class programs in cancer care, research and prevention.
"This partnership will enhance Florida's national and international reputation in cancer
care and research, and ultimately contribute to improving the overall standard of cancer
care in Florida and increase the state's profile in cancer care and research," Moffitt's pres-
ident and CEO Dr. William Dalton said when the alliance was announced.
The war on cancer hasn't been won, scientists agree; but now a third of a century
after the declaration of war Nixon's intent to stop cancer doesn't seem so far out of
reach. With private resources specifically designated to provide more weapons in the
fight, UF's Florida Tomorrow capital campaign will take the battle against cancer to a
new level.
Bernie Machen, president, University of Florida
To HELP SUPPORT CANCER RESEARCH AT UF AND FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AT
WWW.MED.UFL.EDU AND UF SHANDS CANCER CENTER AT WWW.UFSCC.UFL.EDU.


Above: UF researchers created this computer-generated image of an enzyme commonly
called PDK2, a protein essential for energy regulation in cells. College of Medicine scientists
have identified several drugs (depicted here as red spheres) that inhibit PDK2. Evidence sug-
gests many types of cancer can be treated by targeting this enzyme.




IFI FLORIDA

THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
P.O. BOX 14425 GAINESVILLE, FL 32604-2425












FLORIDATMOO I WWW.FLORIDATOMORROW.UFL.EDU


GIFTS FOR HOUGH HALL


EXPAND GRADUATE


BUSINESS PROGRAMS

Three couples follow the Houghs' example by pledging support.


The need was clear: graduate courses were scattered among three different build-
ings, no space existed for corporate recruiters to hold job interviews, graduate
students had no place to hold group project meetings, there were
no rooms equipped for students to trade stocks and bonds, and the list went on.
The Warrington College of Business Administration's 1,400 graduate students, about
100 faculty and almost 40 staffers needed some relief. Dean John Kraft put out the call.
Bill (MBA '48) and Hazel Hough of St. Petersburg answered that call in 2007 with a
$30 million gift $5 million of that will help build William R. Hough Hall to house the
Hough Graduate School of Business. The other $25 million will enhance and expand
graduate business programs.
Now, three more couples have followed suit, each giving $1 million to enhance Hough
Hall's three floors. They are Tommy (BSBA '66) and Kathy Shannon (BAE'67) of Tampa,
John (BSIE '66, MBA '70, JD '73) and Mary Lou Dasburg (JD '80) of Miami, and Jean
Wittner of St. Petersburg in memory of her late husband, Ted Wittner (BSBA'50). Each
floor will, in turn, be named for its benefactor.
"Check any of the rankings," says Shannon. "UF's College of Business is at the top of
many of them. It's a top-quality program and our hope is that our gift will enhance it
even more."
Plans for the 57,000-square-foot facility include mostly classrooms and program
offices. However, additional lounges and meeting rooms are also planned to answer
some of the needs other business buildings could not provide. Construction is slated to
begin in late 2008 and last about one year.
"I consider this a very important step that will help us move into the ranks of the top
25 business schools in the country," says Selcuk Erenguc, associate dean for graduate
programs in the college. "We're so grateful to Mr. and Mrs. Hough for getting the ball
rolling, and to many alumni and friends who are investing in this project."
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO SUPPORT THE WARRINGTON COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION,
VISIT WWW.CBA.UFL.EDU.




Florida


Hazel and William Hough donated $30 million, the largest gift in UF history, to the Warrington College of
Business Administration. Photo by Tracey Johnson


FAMILY FINDS INSPIRATION

IN SON'S SCHOLARSHIP

A Florida Opportunity Scholarship didn't just help Stephen Dukes III
attend college. It made college an attainable goal for his siblings and
parents, too.

Where Stephen Dukes III is from, college is like Disneyland. Every kid
is supposed to go and wants to go, but some parents just don't have
the money.
"When you're in poverty, living in violence, college is something you see on TV,"
Dukes says.
Attending school in West Palm Beach, Dukes knew he was smart enough to go to
college, but it seemed unfeasible. So, instead of spending four hours a day study-
ing, he shot baskets. He banked on basketball being his ticket out until he broke his
ankle twice in two years.
"I realized that anything can be taken away from you, but not your education," Dukes
says. "So I poured the same dedication that I put into basketball into academics."
He raised his GPA and won the science fair. But even after he was accepted to UF,
he didn't know how he would pay for tuition, let alone books and housing.
With a Florida Opportunity Scholarship, which provides full funding for first-
generation college students, Dukes is able to concentrate on school. He spends
15-24 hours a week studying.
In many ways, Dukes says he is a role model to his two younger brothers.
Although he didn't grow up with them after fifth grade, Dukes lived with various
relatives in the Southeast to ease the financial strain on his single mother, who was
16 when he was born he often bought his brothers clothing and haircuts.
"I just wanted some stability, and with three kids it was hard for her to make
things work," he says. In West Palm Beach, his grandfather took his absentee
father's place, instilling in Dukes a sense of diligence and perseverance.
Now that Dukes is a college freshman, his siblings realize higher education is a
goal they can strive for, he says.
Dukes' mother and father, with whom Dukes has become reacquainted, were
both so inspired by their son that they enrolled in community college.
"Where I'm from, people think they're going to get money three ways: playing
sports, being a musician and doing illegal things," he says.


Florida Opportunity Scholar Stephen Dukes is pursuing a double major in psychology and sociology. Photo by
Casey Anderson

College is like an ephemeral joke, he says. When he told his high school teammates he
wanted to be a psychologist, they laughed.
But at UF, Dukes is not only pursuing a double major in psychology and sociology, this
summer he will be studying in Capetown, South Africa, through the scholarship pro-
gram. For Dukes, going to Africa is "just like the top of the world," he says.
The Florida Opportunity Scholarship, Dukes says, not only changed his life, but his
entire family's.
"I could've been just another sad story," he says. "I can't thank [donors to the schol-
arship] enough."
Elizabeth Hillaker (4JM)
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SUPPORTING FLORIDA OPPORTUNITY SCHOLARSHIPS,
VISIT WWW.UFF.UFL.EDU/SCHOLARSHIPS/FOS/







UF MICROBIOLOGIST

CREATES ALTERNATIVE

FUEL SOURCE

Ethanol may be a good fuel alternative, but corn isn't.
Fortunately, researcher Lonnie Ingram has another
homegrown alternative.

After an energy crisis struck in the late 1970s and early
1980s, microbiologist Lonnie Ingram looked at rising
gas prices and thought, "I know we can change this."
More than two decades later as gas prices again soar to ever-
increasing heights, Ingram sits poised to offer a fuel solution. And
the answer may be sitting by your curb right now.
"Estimates are that we could make as much as 10 billion gal-
lons of ethanol a year from biomass resources, and much of that
would be material that is currently going to landfills, like yard
waste," says Ingram, a distinguished professor and director of
UF's Florida Center for Renewable Chemicals and Fuels.
Ethanol, long touted as a fuel alternative, is usually made by
mixing corn starches with enzymes that separate out glucose.
The glucose is then fermented with yeast to make alcohol.


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Using corn, however, is fraught with pitfalls, Ingram says. Corn
is a major food staple, for instance, both for humans and livestock.
Increased use of corn for fuel production can therefore lead to
rising prices not only for ethanol, but also for everything from corn-
fed meats to corn-syrup-sweetened sodas to Corn Pops. That's not
to mention the large amount of energy it takes to grow and trans-
port the corn.
Ingram's solution is to use non-edible plant fibers that would
otherwise go to waste, such as orange peels from citrus juic-
ers and trimmings from average yards. Sugars in other plants can
be difficult to extract, so he and his colleagues genetically engi-
neered a new organism that can break down the complex sugars
so they can be converted to ethanol.
A Japanese facility has already started producing cellulosic eth-
anol based on Ingram's technology, and new demonstration plants
in Florida and Louisiana are expected to begin U.S. production later
this year.
"For the most part, I think, we're done asking 'what if?'" Ingram
says. "Now it's just a matter of getting how we're going to do this
so that it really makes a difference."
g TO LEARN MORE AND TO SUPPORT THE FLORIDA CENTER FOR RENEWABLE
CHEMICALS AND FUELS, VISIT HTTP://FCRC.IFAS.UFL.EDU.
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UF researcher Lonnie Ingram works with equipment in the new ethanol pilot plant in Rogers
Frazier Hall. Photo by Tyler Jones


CAMPAIGN Progress
AS OF MARCH 31, 2008


FBY UNIT


PROGRESS












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UNIT AMOUNT RAISED (GOAL)
athletics $8,991,079 ($30,000,000)
warrington college of business administration $62,946,400 ($112,000,000)
dentistry $11,555,671 ($15,000,000)
design, construction and planning $7,748,815 ($31,000,000)
education $13,251,423 ($20,000,000)
engineering $39,277,513 ($80,000,000)
fine arts $702,965 ($6,000,000)
florida museum of natural history $8,618,081 ($30,000,000)
harn museum of art $22,388,057 ($30,000,000)
health and human performance $3,041,747 ($7,000,000)
institute of food and agricultural sciences (ifas) $65,225,343 ($100,000,000)
international center $127,403 ($1,000,000)
journalism and communications $10,504,958 ($27,000,000)
latin american studies center $394,397 ($7,000,000)


PROGRESS






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UNIT AMOUNT RAISED (GOAL)
levin college of law $25,483,025 ($47,000,000)
liberal arts and sciences $37,490,834 ($65,000,000)
smathers libraries $9,714,130 ($20,000,000)
mcknight brain institute $3,251,229 ($25,000,000)
medicine $91,095,600 ($315,000,000)
nursing $7,287,797 ($14,000,000)
uf performing arts $2,652,888 ($5,500,000)
pharmacy $7,641,771 ($19,000,000)
public health and health professions $3,989,720 ($13,000,000)
student affairs $7,586,898 ($10,000,000)
uf & shands $27,694,126 ($75,000,000)
veterinary medicine $25,043,277 ($40,000,000)
whitney laboratory for marine bioscience $1,449,975 ($4,000,000)
campuswide initiatives $121,744,561 ($351,500,000)


Top 8 reasons to give

Individuals who donated gifts to universities in 2002 were
surveyed about why they gave. The following responses
were most commonly used among them. The percentage
refers to how many of those surveyed said the phrase
applied to their rationale.

1 Desire to support worthwhile causes (79%)

2 Responsibility to share good fortune (69%)

3 Meet community's crucial needs (63%)

4 Set an example for children (46%)

5 Fill (funding) gaps left by the government (29%)

6 Tax benefits (11%)

7 Help organization that benefited self or family (5%)

8 Respect and recognition (4%)


BY PUIRIPOSE


PROGRESS PURPOSE AMOUNT RAISED (GOAL)
11 faculty support $71,604,442 ($433,770,000)
II graduate support $39,792,965 ($197,950,000)
S undergraduate support $3,074,465 ($67,830,0
I campus enhancement $103,736,064 ($254,00
Program support & research $408,691,747 ($E


00)
0,000)
546,450,000)


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Former U.S. Sen. and Florida Gov. Bob Graham (right) talks with a student at the
March 5 dedication of the Bob Graham Center for Public Service. Photo by Sarah
Kiewel (BSJ '05)


Civics, PUBLIC SERVICE

SPOTLIGHTED AT

BOB GRAHAM CENTER

Former governor, U.S. senator establishes UF center
to groom civic leaders.

Bob Graham's career was dedicated to public service first
in the Florida Legislature, then as Florida's governor and later
as a U.S. senator. So it made sense to him that even in retire-
ment he'd do his part for his state and nation.
That commitment to civic responsibility led to the creation of the
Bob Graham Center for Public Service, located in recently constructed
Pugh Hall. The center is designed to prepare students interested in
politics and public service for the challenges of leadership.
To help make that possible, Graham along with his brother,
William (BS '49), and the Philip L. Graham Fund pledged $1.5 mil-
lion to establish the Philip L. Graham Program Fund for the Graham
Center. The fund supports graduate and undergraduate programs in
public leadership, as well as research, teaching and the advancement
of civic education at all educational levels in Florida through programs
at the center.
"We have an opportunity and an obligation to provide the founda-
tion for ethical and well-prepared civic and public leaders," explains
Graham (BA'59). "The Graham Center, and this newly established
fund, will be a catalyst from which the University of Florida can do so."
The Graham Center seeks solutions to public problems in the areas
of public leadership, the Americas and homeland security. The cen-
ter addresses these issues by giving students opportunities to train
for future leadership positions, meet with current policymakers and
take courses in critical thinking, language and world cultures. These
opportunities allow students to confront issues that are important
for the advancement of Florida and the nation.
The Philip L. Graham Program Fund is named for the Grahams'
late brother, Philip (BA '36), who was publisher of The Washington
Post and president of The Washington Post Companies until his
death in 1963.
To LEARN MORE AND TO SUPPORT THE BOB GRAHAM CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE,
VISIT WWW.GRAHAM.CENTERS.UFL.EDU.


GO Figure

$30,000 Minimum gift necessary to establish an endowment.

$6 million Largest private gift received by the College of Veterinary
Medicine. The combined bequests were made by cattle ranch owners Harriet
Weeks and her daughter, Robin Weeks, to support bovine medicine.

4 stories Height of a new 65,000-square-foot building UF plans to
build on its Eastside Campus in Gainesville. The $15 million project will provide
administrative office space for UF while helping to revitalize the neighborhood.


urators at UF's Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art have for years l.:.. I..:, ble,.ni
with the Asian art collection: it was too extensive to display. TIh 1 illinmi.:i
will soon be solved thanks to David and Mary Ann Cofrin.
The Cofrins whose philanthropy has already transformed the Hai .
into one of the finest university art museums in the nation donated
$10 million to fund a new wing to the museum, this one dedicated
specifically to Asian art. Construction could begin in the fall. .
"Mary Ann and I believe in the Ham's mission and support its
commitment to sustain and transform the museum facilities and A
grounds," David Cofrin says. "Our gift for an Asian art wing will !4 -
continue to make the Harn a place where art inspires and educates
people of all ages and backgrounds." '.
Plans are for the wing to be on the northwest side of the museum,
near Southwest 34th Street and Hull Road. It will have two levels and
22,000 square feet, Asian art galleries, a mezzanine suite on the upper
level for curatorial and museum activities, and art storage and conserva-
tion space for the Asian collections on the lower level. An Asian garden. il1
be accessible from the west side of the wing.


TIh.- ,i :iiI.i I -sian art collection -with nearly 1,300 works is one of the largest
.:al it H.: 11 Tle collection's s strength is Chinese art ceramics, jades, bronzes, sculp-
,.ii e_ I.i:.lujers, glass and literati paintings. It also features artwork from Japan,
Rkl:.i.: Tibet and South and Southeast Asia.
The new wing will enable the Harn to continue to establish itself
.. -ias a recognized leader for the collection, display and critical study
S of exceptional works of Asian art," says Jason Steuber, the Cofrin
Curator of Asian Art at the Harn. "The Ham's commitment to
further education and understanding of Asian art will continue
.:.. i,-. to prosper thanks to the Cofrin family's generosity and vision."
Photo: Chinese, Moonflask with Buddhist Motifs from Ming Dynasty (1368-1644),
17th century, cloisonne enamels on copper
FOR INFORMATION AND TO SUPPORT THE HARN MUSEUM OF ART,
VISIT WWW.HARN.UFL.EDU.


REGIONAL KICKOFF
EVENT DATES
THE FLORIDA TOMORROW CAPITAL CAMPAIGN IS
REACHING THROUGHOUT THE NATION WITH THESE
REGIONAL KICKOFF EVENTS:

May 15 . . . . New York

September 9 ...... Tampa

October 21........ Chicago



U FLORIDA

THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FOR THE LOVE OF ART
Cofrin family donates $10 million for Asian wing
at the Ham Museum of Art.


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