Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
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Title: Florida Tomorrow campaign newsletter
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Language: English
Creator: University of Florida Foundation
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Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
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Faculty, students and research will benefit from UF's $1.5 billion capital campaign.


THE CAMPAIGN FO'THE UNIVERSITY OF F ORIDA


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THE CAMPAIGN CO-CHAIRS he future, as someone once
Said, begins today. This fall,
UF officially kicked off its
$1.5 billion capital campaign, ap-
propriately called Florida Tomorrow.
Dollars raised will set the stage for
a healthier, better educated, more
i promising future for all humankind.
More than 1,000 people gathered
on campus on Sept. 28 to celebrate
Beth McCague (BA'74) Earl Powell (UF'57-'60) their shared vision of tomorrow and
the University of Florida's role in shaping it. It was President Bernie Machen who
best explained the importance of the campaign.
"For the University of Florida to continue in its track of excellence, and to continue
to provide a valuable service and produce life-improving and life-changing research,
we emphatically need a private fundraising effort of this magnitude," he said. "This
capital campaign is the future of this university and the state."
The campaign is focused on three principal areas: support for faculty, students
and research. It addresses the fundraising needs of more than 28 UF colleges, units
and research centers. The campaign is slated for completion in fall 2012, and more

CAMPAIGN STEERING COUNCIL
Jerry W. Davis Elizabeth Ayers McCague, Co-chair
Donald R. Dizney Earl W. Powell, Co-chair
Gary R. Gerson James H. Pugh Jr.
William R. Hough Joan D. Ruffier
Allen L. Lastinger Jr. Beverly Ann Thompson
Delores T. Lastinger Jon Thompson
J. Bernard Machen A. Ward Wagner Jr.





STUDENT STUDIES MEDICINE DESPITE

A SHOE-STRING BUDGET
UF's scholarships and loans are making Megan Johnson's dreams
of doctoring a reality.


than $502 million was raised during the two-year "leadership phase" of the campaign
that began in July 2005.
Paul Robell, UF's vice president for development and alumni affairs, praised the philan-
thropists and volunteers who were part of the campaign's first two years.
"This university has tremendous momentum going into the public phase of this cam-
paign," he said. "We're off to a very promising start."
Those of us committed to the university believe this campaign is critical not just to
the University of Florida, but to the state of Florida and the rest of the world. To us, Florida
Tomorrow is a place where professors and researchers change lives for the better; it's a
day when UF's alumni and students touch and improve all aspects of modern life; it's a
belief that the University of Florida is a conduit to a brighter, more promising tomorrow
for our children and grandchildren.
This newsletter, which will be produced several times during the year, has been cre-
ated to keep you informed about the progress of the university's capital campaign. We
hope you'll find it informative and inspiring. This campaign gives us all an opportunity to
make a real difference in the lives of our families, friends, fellow Gators and people we'll
never know. Thank you for being part of such a marvelous aspiration.
Beth McCague and Earl Powell, co-chairs, campaign steering council





Florida


By Elizabeth Hillaker (4JM)


M egan Johnson grew up in UF's
shadow, living in Ocala and
dreaming of someday becoming
a Gator.
"I knew this is where I wanted to go," says
Johnson. Her parents had always encouraged
her to earn her college degree, because they
knew higher education opened doors only
one of her parents graduated high school.
Through a scholarship and loans, Johnson
attended the University of Central Florida be-
cause she was interested in acting. After her
first year she missed science classes, so she
aimed her sights at becoming a doctor.
When it came time to apply for medical
school, Johnson wanted only to be at UF, but
her parents didn't have the ability to pay for her
graduate work. With the help of the College of
Medicine H. M. Hill Scholarship, the Hugh and
Mabel Wilford Loan and other financial aid,
she has been able to make ends meet despite
the debt from her undergraduate work and
having no money saved for graduate school.
"Everything I get, I need," she says.
Between medical lectures and studying,
Johnson finds time for one of her first loves -
acting with the White Coat Co., an acting
troupe made up of mostly first- and second-


year medical students. This year she co-directs
and acts in "Beauty and Beast," which will be
performed for her fellow medical students and sick
youngsters in local hospitals.
Johnson's enthusiasm shines through most
clearly when she discusses the education she is
getting at UF. She is considering studying obstet-
rics and gynecology.
"I am so proud of being a Gator," she says, noting
that her father is equally thrilled.
"My dad thinks I'm going to end up taking care
of him," she says. "When I call, he always says,
'Aren't you a doctor yet?'"
While Johnson has two more years before she
earns her medical degree and then a residency on
top of that, she is happy to be pursuing her dreams
in the Sunshine State. With family close and roots
that run deep in central Florida, Johnson doesn't
expect to join the ranks of the medical brain drain,
in which students are educated here and find jobs
in other states.
"I don't think I'll ever leave Florida," she says.
"I've always just wanted to end up here."
TO LEARN ABOUT ESTABLISHING SCHOLARSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS OR
SIMILAR FUNDS, VISIT WWW.UFF.UFL.EDU/SCHOLARSHIPS.


Megan Johnson


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$6 MILLION GIFT PUTS

PUGH HALL ON UF MAP
New building, funded largely by Jim and Alexis Pugh, will
house three programs.
When Pugh Hall opens in January, it will fulfill three College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences needs with a single giving
gesture. The 40,000-square-foot hall will house the Sam
Proctor Oral History project, the Asian and African Language offices
and the Bob Graham Center for Public Service. It represents Jim (BBC
'63) and Alexis Pugh's dedication.
The venue will give the oral history program space and prominence,
gather the language units into one area, and offer a state-of-the-art
venue for longtime public official Bob Graham (BA'59) to teach
budding public servants leadership skills, connect them with current
policymakers and offer courses in languages and world cultures.
The Pughs, who donated $5 million to the project, are thrilled with
Graham's use of the facility, since Jim Pugh and Graham have been
friends for more than 50 years. The two were UF Sigma Nu fraternity
brothers in the 1950s before Graham served 12 years in the Florida
Legislature, two terms as Florida's governor and three consecutive
terms in the U.S. Senate. And it was before Pugh became successful
in real estate management and construction.
The facility will be dedicated Feb. 9.
KEEP UP WITH CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS THROUGH THE PUGH HALL WEBCAM,
UFL.OXBLUE.COM/GRAHAMCENTER.


UNIT AMOUNT RAISED OAL
athletics $8,447,786 (30,000000)
warrington college of business $57,118,515 (112,000,000)
dentistry $11,127,000 00)
design, construction and planning $7,570,835 ( 000000
education $12,685,795 ($20,000,000)
engineering $35,431,394
fine arts $556,038 000000)
florida museum of natural history $8,106,877
ham museum of art $11,685,989 30,000,000
health and human performance $2,963,463 ,000000)
institute of food and agricultural sciences (ifas) $61,793,723
international center $97,648 ($,000,000)
journalism and communications $7,388,440 ,000,000)
latin american studies center $381,592 000000


U


WAYS to Give
You don't have to be Donald Trump with mountains of cash to support UF.
Here are a few ways others have done it:


Pass on historical materials to UF's
libraries. Some of UF's greatest
assets, such as original letters from
authors Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
and Zora Neale Hurston, early UF
memorabilia, rare books and even a
vintage film collection have inspired
research for students and faculty.
2Through a bequest, possessions
or proceeds could be left to UF in
a will.
When you renew your license
plate, select a UF tag. Proceeds are
pooled to support academic programs
and scholarships.


4 Stocks or bonds.

5 Many companies have matching
gift programs. Pairing a few dollars
each pay period with your company's
match can add up over time to create a
lasting effect.
6 Make UF a beneficiary
on your 401K or life
insurance plan.
7 Help students learn
with updated technology and
equipment by donating software or
computers to any college or unit.


8 Giving your boat or
yacht to UF has never
been easier with UF's vessel
donation program.
9From cattle to corn, the College of
Veterinary Medicine and IFAS have
many livestock-related units that could
be supported with your agricultural gift.
FOR INFORMATION ON ANY OF THESE PROGRAMS, OR
TO TALK WITH A DONATIONS EXPERT, CALL THE UF
FOUNDATION AT 352-392-1691 OR VISIT
WWW.UFF.UFL.EDU/HowToGIVE.


BY PURPOSE


UNIT AMOUNT RAISED (GOAL
levin college of law $24,321,131 000,000)
liberal arts and sciences $32,837,642
smathers libraries $9,201,203 ($20,000,000)
mcknight brain institute $3,214,554
medicine $80,409,980 ($3000000)
nursing $6,935,119 ( 000000)
uf performing arts $2,357,171 5,500,000
pharmacy $6,831,895
public health and health professions $3,713,173
student affairs $6,044,773 ($0,000,000)
uf & shands $26,328,219
veterinary medicine $17,165,863 ($40000000)
whitney laboratory for marine bioscience $1,317,944
campuswide initiatives $107,233,893 351 000)


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% OF TOTAL RAISED
11% faculty support
6% graduate support
.4% undergraduate support
15% campus enhancement
67% program support & research

PURPOSE AMOUNT RAISED (GOAL)
faculty support $61,674,373 (43370,000)
graduate support $35,368,602 (197950000)
undergraduate support $2,436,345 ($67830
campus enhancement $83,846,817 (254000
program support & research $369,941,514


DONORS: KEY TO

BEATING ADDICTION IS

PREVENTING ADDICTION

$1.5 million Don and Irene Dizney gift establishes
psychiatry chair in addiction medicine.

There's a better way to treat the health problems that plague
many Americans, Don Dizney believes. It's called prevention.
"It is critically important to transform our medical centers
from disease centers to health and prevention centers," he says.
The University of Florida will be a leader in that movement thanks
to a $1.5 million gift from Dizney and his wife, Irene, to the College
of Medicine's Department of Psychiatry to establish the Donald R.
Dizney Chair in Addiction Medicine.
"We hope ... [that] by understanding the progression of addic-
tive disease in the brain we can identify and treat the cause rather
than wait until we need to treat the debilitating and often fatal conse-
quences," Dizney says.
The Dizneys' gift will help UF address major health challenges facing
Americans, including smoking, overeating and obesity, secondhand
smoke, drugs and alcohol.
"This gift means that research, treatment and prevention of the
nation's top five causes of death will accelerate here at UF and
remain an integral part of UF's College of Medicine," says Dr. Mark
Gold, chief of the college's Division of Addiction Medicine.
UF scientists have an international reputation for cutting-edge
research and have developed new theories and tested new treat-
ments for people who are addicted to cigarettes, alcohol and food. It
was the first medical school in the United States where all students
learn to evaluate and treat alcoholics and addictions in academic clin-
ical addiction treatment facilities, just as they learn other clinical
skills, such as obstetrics, surgery and cardiology.
The endowment created by the Dizneys, Gold says, "makes it pos-
sible for us to make investments in addiction research scientists and
emerging technologies that will not only allow us to develop new
treatments, but possibly reverse the effects of drugs of abuse on
individual cells and systems within the brain."
The gift is eligible for $1.2 million in matching funds from the state
of Florida's Major Gifts Trust Fund.


AIDS RESEARCHER STUDIES How TO REACTIVATE IMMUNITY

Thanks to a $4 million research endowment, Maureen Goodenow has pinpointed how AIDS and HIV affect
the immune system. She hopes further study can lead to better treatments and maybe a cure.


650+ Number of volunteers engaged in the
Florida Tomorrow capital campaign.

28 Number of UF buildings named after donors. Among the newest are Pugh
Hall, which will house several College of Liberal Arts and Sciences programs, and
Steinbrenner Music Hall, which will provide practice facilities for UF's bands.

$1.2 billion UF's total endowment.

90,436 Number of UF specialty license plates sold in Florida in 2006,
making UF's the most popular specialty plate in the state. The plates, which cost
an extra $25 each, benefit scholarships and academic advancement.

$30 m i llion Largest single gift ever received by the university.
William and Hazel Hough made the donation last year to help support
graduate business programs.


Maureen Goodenow is certain she's fighting a
winnable battle.
S* She founded UF's AIDS research program in 1988
when the outlook for those with HIV was much different than today.
At that time 40 percent of HIV-infected women in the Gainesville
area gave birth to HIV-infected babies.
"Now you're looking at a mother-to-child transmission rate of less
than 5 percent in Western countries," she says.
In August she became head of the Florida Center for AIDS Research.
With the ever-expanding number of antiretroviral drugs such as
protease inhibitors, entry inhibitors and integrase inhibitors, "it's now
possible to live a productive life while HIV-infected," Goodenow says.
While these developments are a long way from a cure, she believes
an HIV vaccine is just over the horizon.
Since 2005, her work has been helped by John Holloway of Orlando,
who donated $1 million to UF's AIDS research. His gift triggered
another $1 million in state support. Together with an additional $2 mil-


lion from UF's pathology department endowment fund, Holloway's
generosity resulted in a $4 million research endowment.
"With the assistance of the Holloway funds, we found that HIV
has a novel way to cause failure of the human immune system,"
Goodenow says. "We are studying how this happens to identify ways
that we can reactivate immunity and help infected individuals control
the virus."
Holloway says Goodenow's international stature and genuine pas-
sion for AIDS research were the key factors in choosing UF's program
for his gift.
"Dr. Goodenow is an incredible person," Holloway says. "Talking to
her really made me feel there's a chance of defeating AIDS."
To LEARN MORE ABOUT GOODENOW, VISIT WWW.PATHOLOGY.UFL.EDU/-GOODENOW.
TO LEARN ABOUT UF's AIDS PROGRAM, GO TO WWW.MED.UFL.EDU/PATH.
TO SUPPORT AIDS RESEARCH, CONTACT TIM WOOD AT TWOOD@UFF.UFL.EDU OR CALL
352-392-8078.


REGIONAL KICKOFF EVENT
DATES
THE FLORIDA TOMORROW CAPITAL CAMPAIGN
IS REACHING OUT THROUGHOUT THE NATION
BEGINNING WITH THESE REGIONAL KICKOFF EVENTS:
Jan. 24 . . . . M iami

April 2 . . . . Orlando

May 15.......... New York

September . . ..Tampa

October . . . Chicago


U FLORIDA
CAMPAIGN FTOMORRR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Maureen Goodenow


CAMPAIGN Progress
AS OF NOVEMBER 30, 2007


CoJL
$1.5 BILLION












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