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Title: Spanish graduate student handbook
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Title: Spanish graduate student handbook
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Language: English
Creator: Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, University of Florida
Publisher: Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Introduction
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    Main
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Full Text








SPANISH


GRADUATE STUDENT


HANDBOOK
( Fall 2007 Edition)






Department of Romance Languages and Literatures
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida












TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introdu action ............................................. ........ .... ...................................... 3

RLL Mission Statement ....................................... .......... 4

Spanish Section Mission Statement ................ ...................... 5

Guidelines for Assignment of GTA's ............ ......... ....... .. ....... 6-7

T each in g C o n tracts.................................................................................................. 7

Master of Arts Program .................................................................................... 8-13

Transition From M.A. to Ph.D Program.................. ........................... 14

Tim etable For the M .A D egree ........................................... ..... ....... .... ... 15

Semester Registration Record (sample) ........................................................... 16

Record Sheet (M.A., Literature Track)..... .................................. ......... 17-19

Record Sheet (M.A., Linguistics Track).............. ........................ 20-22

Reading List (M.A., Literature Track). .................................. .......... 23-27

Reading List (M.A., Linguistics Track)........... ..................................................... 28-32

Ph .D Program ................. .......................................................... .... ......... ... ............. 33-39

Timetable for the Ph.D (6 Year Support) ................ ............................. 40

Timetable for the Ph.D. (5 Year Support) ... ....................... ................................ 41

Timetable for the Ph.D ( 4 Year Support)................................................................. 42

Record Sheet (Ph.D. Literature Track)................................ ............... ....... 43-46

Record Sheet (Ph.D. Linguistics Track)............................................................ 47-48

S P W 6 9 0 5 P roto co l................................................................................. ............... 4 9

SPW 6945 RLL Shadowing Contract ................ ... ......... ............... ......... 50










INTRODUCTION




The Spanish M.A. and Ph.D. in Romance Languages is administered by the faculty of the Spanish
Section of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and awarded through the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences. The program aims to give graduate students a full understanding of the
language, the culture, and the literature of Spanish-speaking countries. The flexible nature of the Spanish
graduate degrees allows the students to design their fields of specialization across a range of
concentrations in linguistics, literature, cultural studies and women's studies, in both Latin American and
Peninsular areas.

This Handbook should be used in conjunction with a current copy of the UF Graduate Catalog.
Consultation with the Graduate Coordinator and the student's Supervisory Committee Chair is also
recommended to clarify any doubt about requirements and procedures related to an M.A. or Ph.D. degree
in Spanish.









MISSION STATEMENT
Department of Romance Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
The University of Florida

The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures exists to achieve excellence in research,
teaching and public service related to the languages, literatures, and cultures of the areas and countries
where French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish are spoken, in addition to such other associated languages
as Catalan, Haitian Creole, Occitan, Rumanian, or any other the faculty may determine. Research,
teaching, and service are interrelated pursuits with common goals. The Department strives to maintain
effective programs of undergraduate and graduate instruction whose quality is sustained by the constant
intellectual and professional development of the Department's faculty, as well as by their strong
commitment to service. Consistent with UF's mission statement, research should contribute "to the
international public conversation about the advancement of knowledge."

The Department believes that an essential part of a College education is the study of a foreign
language, which enhances students' overall capacity to communicate by providing the essential means of
access to other cultures. To learn another language is to acquire a different system of communication.
This process increases understanding of one's own language; facilitates comprehension of how language
structures human consciousness; and increases awareness of language in interaction with other social
institutions. The Department believes in the value of literature as a significant field in teaching and
research, appreciating both its role in cultural advancement and the contribution it makes to intellectual
life. The Department's undergraduate and graduate programs help meet the university-wide goal of
encouraging students to appreciate their own culture and others, affording students opportunities to
understand how ways of knowing are produced and conditioned by a variety of cultures.

The courses offered by the Department in language, linguistics, literature, film, and culture enrich
such related major fields as, among others, Anthropology, Art History, Business, Health Sciences,
History, International Relations, Journalism, Law, Music, Political Science, Sociology, and other foreign
languages and literatures. With the expansion of dynamic minority populations in the U.S. and the
prospect of closer and more complex relationships between the U.S. and French-, Italian-, Portuguese-,
and Spanish-speaking countries around the world, the language, literature, and cultural studies in the
Department will increasingly have practical and intellectual value as part of the University of Florida's
curricular opportunities.


The Department strives to maintain the quality and breadth of all its programs: beginning and
intermediate language instruction, undergraduate major and minor, and graduate (M.A. and Ph.D.).
Activities of the Department include but are not necessarily limited to: (a) research in language
pedagogy; linguistics; literary criticism, history, and theory; and studies in film, culture, and civilization;
(b) courses, programs, and training leading to B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees; and (c) sponsorship of
scholarly and cultural events appropriate to these areas of concern. The Department also encourages
association of the faculty with other units of the University of Florida having related interests.














MISSION STATEMENT
Spanish Section
Department of Romance Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
The University of Florida

The Spanish section of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures is constituted by
faculty who study and teach the languages, cultures and literatures of the Spanish-speaking countries of
Europe and the Americas. As scholars, we are dedicated to engaging in significant research on Spanish
and Spanish-American literature, linguistics and culture. By means of scholarly exchange and
publication, we increase understanding both within our fields and in the broader areas of the humanities,
history and the social sciences.
The State of Florida is home to an important Spanish-speaking population and is a center of
social, commercial, cultural and professional activity that is conducted either entirely in Spanish, or
bilingually in Spanish and English. As University of Florida teachers, our mission is to furnish our
students with the intellectual and communicative tools necessary to live and work effectively in a
bilingual world. In keeping with the intellectual aspect of our mission, we engage students in the
processes of critical reading and writing, taking as our object of study the literary and linguistic heritage
of Spain and Latin America. To develop students' communicative skills, we provide programs of
instruction that assist them in acquiring and refining the ability to speak, understand, read and write the
Spanish language.
The activities of the Spanish Section reflect the immense diversity of the Spanish-speaking
community, both at home and abroad. In the interest of enriching the cultural life of our campus, region
and State, we sponsor a variety of conferences, cultural events, invited lectures and visiting
professorships. We also work closely with the Office of International Studies and Programs to encourage
majors, minors and other interested students to study in a Spanish-speaking country.


(Rev. 8/02)








Guidelines for the Assignment of Graduate Teaching Assistants to courses other
than SPN 1130/1131 & 1180/1182



GTAs in Spanish are normally assigned to teach the appropriate number of sections of the basic 5-credit
course, SPN 1130 or 1131. Other courses may also be staffed by GTAs, as needed by the department.
Note that a .5 FTE contract specifies teaching 12-15 semester hours per AY. This usually entails teaching
3 five-credit courses, or 4 three-credit courses during the academic year.


SPN 1180/1182

Assignments to teach SPN 1180/1182, meeting three times/week, are made to lighten the load of the
students at particularly demanding moments of their graduate studies.

Qualifications for teaching SPN 1180/1182:
GTAs who have successfully taught 1130/1131 (i.e. have received good to excellent student and
supervisor evaluations), and performed all tasks assigned by their supervisor to the latter's satisfaction,
are qualified to teach 1180/1182.

Priorities for assigning SPN 1180/1182:
1. PhD students during semester of Qualifying examination if they would otherwise be teaching two
5-credit sections.
2. MA students during semester of Comprehensive examination if they would otherwise be
teaching two 5-credit sections.
3. PhD students writing dissertation (maximum: two semesters).
4. MA students writing thesis (one semester).
5. Seniority, with PhD students taking priority.


Courses above the 1000 level
Since intermediate and higher courses are the gateway to the major and minor in Spanish, many
factors must be weighed in choosing the GTAs best qualified to teach them. Each spring, the
Directors of the Beginning and Intermediate Spanish programs and the coordinator of the 3000-
level grammar sequence meet with the chair of the department to discuss which GTAs have best
satisfied the criteria indicated below and who is eligible and capable of teaching at higher levels.
If possible GTAs will progress through the intermediate sequence in order, but this will not
always be possible.

SPN 2200, 2201, 2240: Different criteria are used to select GTAs to teach Intermediate Spanish
courses. These classes meet three days/week, but require more preparation and grading than
courses at the Beginning level. Thus they are not assigned to lighten loads but to broaden the
GTA's pedagogical experience as well as to benefit the Spanish program. Qualifications for
teaching in the Intermediate Spanish Program include:
Satisfactory academic progress (i.e. a minimum GPA of 3.5, no Incompletes, on schedule
for Comps/Quals or thesis/dissertation proposals and writing)
Advanced skills in Spanish (comparable to skills required for ACTFL Advanced
Proficiency Level, see http://www.actfl.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3325)
Above average course evaluations by students
Above average teaching evaluations by supervisors







Demonstrated interest in target culture and n the department (i.e., attendance at lectures
and cultural events, participation in the Mesa de Espahol and Sigma Delta Pi activities,
etc.)
Basic knowledge of major/minor and study abroad programs in order to preliminarily
advise students in class

FLAC: Each year a number of GTAs have the opportunity to teach one-credit conversation-type
content courses in the Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum (FLAC) program. During the
spring semester, the FLAC Director solicits applications from those GTAs interested in teaching
FLAC sections during the upcoming academic year. The FLAC Director then consults with
faculty who have supervised the graduate student during his/her time at UF (e.g. Department
Chair; 1000, 2000 and/or 3000-level Program Directors; Main advisor). GTAs eligible to teach
FLAC courses are those who have taught Intermediate Spanish (i.e., 2200, 2201 or 2240) at UF
or elsewhere and/or GTAs who will be in their third year at UF the year to FLAC course is
taught. Assignments are made based on these general criteria: seniority; teaching evaluations;
linguistic competence; and potential expertise in the content area.

SPN 3300, 3301: GTAs chosen to teach at the 3000-level must satisfy all the requirements
mentioned above for the Intermediate Spanish courses; normally, they will have taught at the
Intermediate level. They must have superior proficiency in Spanish, particularly in written
expression, and should have advanced mastery and understanding of Spanish grammar and
stylistic conventions.

SPN 3412, 3414: In some cases, GTAs are asked to teach the 3000-level conversation courses. In
order to be eligible for this assignment, they must have satisfied all the above requirements and
demonstrate superior proficiency in spoken discourse. Further, they must have previously taught
SPN 2240.

Bilingual program: Although it is not common, GTAs are occasionally asked to teach in the
Bilingual program, when it is determined that such an assignment would benefit both the
program and the GTA. Those chosen to teach the Bilingual track must satisfy all the
requirements mentioned above for the Intermediate and 3000-level Spanish courses and will
have taught at the Intermediate level.

Advanced 3000-level courses: Courses at the advanced level (i.e. SPN 3700, SPN 3510, 3520,
SPW 3030, SPW 3031, SPW 3100, SPW 3101) are normally taught by faculty. However,
students who have successfully completed the Shadowing process (see "Restricted Enrollment
Courses" section) may be considered to teach these classes.

Teaching Contracts


A. .3 FTE appointee: 2 five-credit courses/AY

B. .5 FTE appointee: 12-15 hours/AY. Depending on how advanced the student is, this
translates into the following assignments:

3 five-hour courses (1130/1131) = 15 hours (typical in years 1 & 2)

4 three-hour courses (1180/1182, 2200/2201) = 12 hours/AY
(typical for advanced students, in years 3-5)


(8/01)









MASTER OF ARTS PROGRAM



Programs: Two programs are available: the MA and the MA with thesis. Both require a
minimum of 30 credits and the successful completion of the MA Comprehensive Exam.
The MA degree is recommended for students who will finish their studies with that
degree, as well as for those who aspire to a PhD in Spanish. MA students who wish to continue
toward the PhD at UF will be required to present an expanded class paper shortly after taking the
Comprehensive Exam; as soon as they have decided to continue, and in no case later than
February 1 of their first year of MA studies, they must so inform both their main advisor and the
graduate coordinator of Spanish. This notification must be done in writing.
The MA with thesis degree is reserved for students who have shown a capacity for
original research in a clearly demarcated area, and who have found an appropriate faculty
member willing to supervise the thesis.

Definition and characteristics of the expanded class paper:

An expanded/refined class paper is, as its name implies, the elaboration of a
paper written for a graduate course. It should demonstrate a student's ability for
original thinking and clear writing on a well-defined topic.
Length: for literature students, 20-25 pages, plus bibliography
for linguistics students, 20-40 pages, plus bibliography
Readers will compare the original and final versions of the paper, assessing the
student's ability to produce a significantly improved piece, either independently or
in accord with any written suggestions by the professor of the original course.
Students are encouraged to consult with that professor before beginning their
revision and expansion.
Deadline for the submission of the expanded paper is two weeks afer completion of
the M.A. exams.

Graduate credit for work in and outside major field: Graduate credit is awarded for courses numbered
5000 and above. The work in the major field must be in courses numbered 5000 or above. Undergraduate
courses (1000-2999) may not be used as any part of the graduate degree requirement. Undergraduate
courses (3000-4999) may be used for minor credit, not to exceed 6 credits, or for support course work
outside the major when taken as part of an approved graduate program, and the grade is a C or better.
(Graduate Council, 2006).

Tracks: Two tracks are available: literature and linguistics. Each track has separate course requirements
and reading lists.

Course Requirements: All MA candidates who are Teaching Assistants in the program must take SPN
6940/6943, Methodology in Romance Language Teaching, unless exempted by the Graduate Coordinator
and the Director of the Beginning Spanish Program. Requirements are waived only after careful review
of each situation by the main advisor and/or Supervisory Committee, in consultation with the Graduate
Coordinator. This includes a perusal at each level of supporting information, such as transcripts,
description of courses taken, etc. Since every case is different, no across-the-board policy can be spelled
out in the list of requirements. Students wishing to discuss their specific situations should do so with their
main advisor, Supervisory Committee (if constituted), and/or the Graduate Coordinator. They should
bring with them to any such discussion complete evidence supporting their request for a waiver.







SPN 6940/6943 emphasizes the practical issues related to the teaching of foreign languages at the college
level and focuses on developing the skills necessary to succeed in this endeavor. The focus is
pedagogical rather than theoretical or linguistic and therefore may not be taken to fill a linguistics course
requirement.

SPW 6806: This required course is designed for first-semester M.A. Literature Track students as an
introduction to: 1) Methodologies of study and research in Spanish, Spanish American, and
Hispanic/Latino literature; 2) Mechanics of academic writing, for papers, reports bibliographies, thesis,
and dissertations; 3) Aspects of the teaching and research university career in Spanish and Spanish
American literature. SPW 6806 is not a literature course per se, and does not fulfill the requirement of
one literature course in the M. A., linguistic track.


General recommendation: Students in the literature track should take as many Spanish and Spanish
American literature courses as possible, the better to prepare themselves for the MA comprehensive exam
and for future teaching positions.

Students who choose to focus primarily on literature must take:
* SPW 6806, Introduction to Graduate Study & Research;
* At least one language/linguistics course selected from any of the following SPN 6785 "Advanced SP
Phonetics"; SPN 6735 "Introduction to Graduate Studies & Research in Linguistic;" other courses
except SPN 6943/6940 "Romance Language Teaching Methods".
* Literature courses: at least one course in each of the following six literature areas: Spanish:
Medieval/Renaissance/Golden Age, 18th and 19th Centuries, 20 and 21st Centuries; Spanish
American: Colonial, 19th, 20 and 21st Centuries.

Students who elect to focus primarily on linguistics must take:
* One literature course to be chosen from any of the six literature areas
* At least one course in each of five areas of Spanish linguistics: phonetics and phonology, history of
the language, language variation, second language acquisition, morphology and syntax.

Registration: During pre-registration, students discuss their selection of courses for the following term
with their main advisor. They must clear these courses with the main advisor before actually registering;
new students usually discuss first term registration with the Graduate Coordinator. After completing the
consultation, students must fill out a Semester Registration Record (see copy) and return it to the
secretary for the Graduate Coordinator. Pre-registration dates for the Summer and Fall terms are usually
in March-April; for the Spring term, in November.
In either case, the remaining courses will reflect the chosen specialization. The Graduate Coordinator
may allow certain senior-level courses to satisfy the course (but not credit) requirements outlined above.

Restricted Enrollment Courses:

S SPW 6905 (Individual Work): Graduate School regulations stipulate that only three SPW 6905
courses are permitted in the student's entire graduate career. This course may not be taken in
lieu of regular courses offered in the Department, unless it serves as a substitute for a required
course not being offered in time for graduation. Students are advised that Individual Work
projects will only rarely be approved because staffing shortfalls make it necessary to rationalize
professors' workloads. Students who take this course will work independently under guidance of
the professor. Professor and student must agree on a project, work schedule and on the type of
final product for the course. Student must write up description of project (250 words minimum)
to submit with the application form (see SPW 6905 Protocol in this Manual). The application
form and project description must be submitted to the professor and Chair for approval before
actual registration.







SPW 6910 (Supervised Research): M.A. and Ph.D. students may register for 1-5 semester
credits of 6910, up to a maximum of 5 semester credits at the University of Florida. No funding is
given for hours beyond the 5 credits. M.A. students who hold a teaching assistantship may take
up to 3 credits of SPW 6910 in the semester when they are taking the Comprehensive
Examinations (second Spring or fourth semester), if all course requirements have been already
met. Ph.D students who hold a teaching assistantship may take up to 5 credits in the semester
when they are slated to take their Qualifying Examination, if all course requirements have been
already met.

SPW 6945 (Practicum in Advanced College Teaching/Course Shadowing 2hrs;
max 6). Practical training for advanced doctoral students in teaching 3000-level courses
(i.e., SPN 3700, SPN 3510/3520, SPW 3030/3031/3100/3101). Enrollment limited to
doctoral students who have passed the Qualifying Exam or who will be taking it during
the semester in which the shadowing will take place. Students who wish to enroll in SPW
6945 must consult with their main advisor and obtain permission from the professor
whose course is to be shadowed. Please refer to the "RLL Shadowing Contract" for
further information.

SPW 6971 (Research for Master's Thesis): M.A. students preparing their thesis may register
for up to 6 credits in this course; at least 3 credits of SPW 6971 must be taken in the fifth
semester. Doctoral students may not register for 6971 in lieu of 7980. Ph.D. students should
register for 7979.

SPN 6900 MA Directed Readings in Spanish: (3 credits; S/U; max. 6) Pre-requisite: successful
completion of one semester of MA study. Co-requisites: enrollment in two 3-credit courses of
approved MA study and approval by the student's faculty advisor (Chair of Supervisory
Committee). The student, in consultation with his/her advisor will develop a reading syllabus
according to his or her needs. Students will meet at mutually convenient intervals with the
professor whose specialization covers the areas) that the student is studying. That professor will
assign a grade of S/U on the basis of those meetings. Elective credit.

SPW 7979 (Advanced Research), SPW 7980 (Research for Doctoral Dissertation): not open
for M.A. students.

Language Competence: All entering graduate students must demonstrate competence in oral and written
Spanish. Native and non-native speakers of Spanish may be asked to take SPN 6315 (Writing for the
Profession) if their main advisor or the Graduate Faculty so recommend. International students are
required by state law to demonstrate competence in English by satisfactory performance on the Test of
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and, if they wish to teach, the Test of Spoken English (TSE, or
Speak Test).

Second Foreign Language: Functional knowledge of a second foreign language is recommended for MA
students. Those who plan to do doctoral work in Romance Languages at the University of Florida should
achieve functional knowledge of another language (usually Romance). The Graduate Coordinator and the
student's Supervisory Committee will appraise the student's goals and advise accordingly. Minimum
level of achievement: a grade of B in a 3000-level course approved by the advisor and the Graduate
Coordinator, or proven proficiency at that level. In Portuguese, this may be satisfied by taking both POR
3010, Introduction to Portuguese and Brazil (accelerated), and one additional course at or above the 3000
level. In French this may be satisfied by taking both FRE 3070, Accelerated Introduction to French, and
one additional course at or above the 3000 level. In Catalan this may be satisfied by taking both CAT
3180 and CAT 3181.

Teaching: Every Master's student will be given the opportunity to gain teaching experience through a
teaching assistantship.







Minor: By University policy, minors can only be earned in subjects outside the student's home
department. Part of the 30 hour requirement may consist of a minor, i.e., at least six semester hours at the
3000-level or above in a field approved by the student's committee or advisor.

Secondary Specialization: The department allows students to have a secondary specialization. The
secondary specialization is functionally equivalent to a minor and has the same requirements. If a student
wishes to develop a sub-field in another of the languages in the department, this may be done as a
"Secondary Specialization," since the University only allows a "minor" to be earned in a department or
program that is not the major department. In some ways the "Secondary Specialization" is like a minor: it
has the same requirements as a courses taken (see Minor above). It is granted for specialized study in
another area within RLL such as French or Portuguese. But since it is a departmental designation, by
University policy, this specialization will not appear on the transcript, nor will the student be examined on
it during the MA comprehensive exams.

Committee: The Supervisory Committee for an MA degree without a thesis may consist of one member
of the graduate faculty; for an MA degree with a thesis the SC must consist of at least two members
selected from the graduate faculty. No later than the beginning of the second semester in residence, and
in consultation with the main advisor and the Graduate Coordinator, the student will choose a Supervisor
(MA without thesis) or a Supervisor and one Supervisory Committee member. The duties of the SC are
to advise the student, to check on the student's qualifications and progress, and to supervise the
preparation of the comprehensive examination and of the thesis.

Performance: Graduate students are expected to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher, and to make
satisfactory progress toward degree. Both the UF Graduate Catalog and the UF Graduate Student
Handbook note that "grades of I (incomplete) carry no quality points and lower the overall grade point
average. Students with less than a 3.0 GPA may not hold an assistantship or fellowship; the use of I
grades may put that employment or fellowship in jeopardy"(section on Incomplete Grades). In another
section titled "Unsatisfactory Scholarship," these two publications also state that "Any graduate student
may be denied further registration in the University or in a graduate program should scholastic
performance or progress toward completion of the planned program become unsatisfactory to the
department, college, or Dean of the Graduate School."

Comprehensive Examination: In the fourth semester of study, all MA candidates will take a
comprehensive written examination based upon a departmental reading list (Literature 23-27 &
Lingusitics 28-32): Students must have completed or be in the process of completing their out-of-field
course during the semester in which they take the Comprehensive Examination.


A. Characteristics and Format of the Written Part:

1. Length and Administration:
1.1 Literature track. One hour per section, for a total of 6 hours (7 with minor). The exam will
be taken over two days, with 4 hours the first day and 3 the second (4 with minor)

1.2 Linguistics track. Over two days, students will take 90-minute exams in four of the following
five areas: phonetics and phonology, history of the language, language variation, second language
acquisition, morphology and syntax. Students with minors add a one-hour exam on the second day.
Total: 6 hours (7, with minor).

The Chair of the MA Examination Committee will make arrangements for room and hour, and
will distribute questions and paper (8- 1/2 by 11 inches) to students. Only black ink may be used.








2. Questions:

2.1 Type of questions:

(a) Literature: To be coordinated by the Committee in order to provide varied types of questions
(essay, short answer, identification, etc.), approaches (history of literature, textual analysis, etc.), and full
coverage of literary genres.

(b) Linguistics: To include varied types of questions (essay, short answer, identification,
transcriptions, text analyses, etc.), with full coverage of the linguistic components.


B. Grading:

1. The written examination is not accorded a grade, but is judged either Pass, Pending Oral Exam,
Pending Rewrite and Oral Exam, or Unsatisfactory.

Pass. The student has provided satisfactory answers to all sections of the exam, and has successfully
completed the Comprehensive Exam requirement for the M.A. degree. There will be no oral
Exam.

Pending Oral Exam. The student has responded satisfactorily to most section, but some answers may
need to be further clarified or amplified in and oral exam, to take place within a week of the
announcement of the results of the written exam. During the oral, to which all members of the
Spanish faculty are invited, the Committee may pose other more general questions not covered in
written exam. If the results of the oral exam are satisfactory, the student, will be accorded a Pass
on the Comprehensive Exam. If the results are not satisfactory, the exam as a whole is deemed
Unsatisfactory, and the student will have to retake the Comprehensive Exam on it next regularly
scheduled date.

Pending Rewrite and Oral Exam. The student has provided satisfactory answers to at least 50% of the
sections, but other answers were unsatisfactory. The student will be allowed the opportunity to
rewrite the deficient sections) once. To prepare for the rewrite, which will be scheduled
approximately two weeks after the results the written exam are announced, s/he should consult
the professors) in the area of the deficiency.

If the rewritten sections are satisfactory, the student will be scheduled for an oral exam.
If any one of the rewritten sections is judged deficient, the written exam as a whole is deemed
Unsatisfactory. The student will have to retake the Comprehensive Exam on its next regularly
scheduled date. The exam can be retaken only once.

Unsatisfactory. The student has provided satisfactory answers to fewer than 50% of the sections of the
Written wxam and must retake the Comprehensive Exam on its next regularly scheduled date.
The exam can be retaken only once.

N.B. MA students without thesis are only guaranteed four subsidized semesters. If no assistantship is
Available for the semester of the retake, the student will have to pay 3 credits for "Final Term
Registration" (see UF Graduate Catalog, under Registration Requirements).








2. The professor who prepared a particular question will grade the reply to that question. Additionally,
the Committee will evaluate the examination as a whole. Upon recommendation of any one of the
professors or acting as a whole, the Committee may declare one or several sections deficient, in which
case the student must retake the deficient sectionss. Students affected by such a judgment will contact the
professors) in the area of the deficiency in order to prepare themselves to retake their exam. The student
who fails any sections) is permitted to request one retake of the unsatisfactory sectionss. To pass this
second examination, the student must answer all questions on the retaken sections) in a satisfactory
manner. If the student's answers are judged unsatisfactory, s/he will not be granted the M.A. degree. The
retake will be scheduled no sooner than two weeks after the original exam, and no later than the next
scheduled Comprehensive Exam date. The examination can be retaken only once (either some sections or
as a whole). M.A. students without thesis are only guaranteed four subsidized semesters, so that retaking
the exam in a later semester will incur tuition charges to the student.

C. Examination Dates

The MA Comprehensive Exam is offered in the Spring first two weeks of April. Under exceptional and
justified circumstances it may be given in the Fall. Students who need to schedule a Fall exam must
submit, no later than the first week of the Fall semester, a written petition to the Graduate Coordinator
stating the reasons for the request.

D. Evaluation

Both the Comprehensive examination and the M.A. Thesis are evaluated as pass or fail. The Department
does not grant distinctions such as cum laude, magna cum laude, or any others.










TRANSITION FROM MA TO PHD PROGRAM



Some students who were initially admitted to the MA program may wish to continue into the PhD
program. In order to start the process of application for transition from the MA to the PhD program,
students who wish to be considered for the PhD program should, after consultation with their advisor,
submit a letter of application and a one-page statement of purpose to the Graduate Coordinator. In order
to ensure full consideration of the request, and to secure an assistantship for the following year, the
students must submit these documents to the Graduate Coordinator by November 1 (student's third
semester). The Graduate Coordinator will place these documents in the departmental office for
examination by the Spanish ranked faculty before the following meeting of the Spanish section.
Petitioning students will be assessed by the Spanish faculty on several qualities considered necessary for
the successful completion of a PhD and subsequent job placement. Students should be judged superior in
most of the following categories:

a) performance in courses taken (GPA of 3.6 or above);
b) performance on MA exams;
c) quality of written work (papers, reports, thesis proposals, etc.);
d) research potential as indicated by ability to identify research topics which have a
potential to contribute to knowledge in the field;
e) written and spoken Spanish;
f) teaching performance (if applicable)

Students admitted to the PhD program will be notified in writing by the department within two
weeks of the evaluation meeting, and a copy of the notification will be placed in the student's main file.
At this stage, the admission is still conditional, pending the satisfactory completion of the MA
Comprehensive Examinations and successful defense of the MA thesis or an expanded class paper. For
those students applying to the PhD program from outside, at the time of application it is necessary to
include a significant writing sample of research.


(Rev 01/06)












Timetable for the Masters of Arts Degree

All MA Students

Coursework, begin reading list





45


Fall #1


MA with Thesis/Expanded Paper*


Coursework, continue reading list
February: Inform advisor in writing
of desire to pursue MA with thesis* or
expanded paper
April: If applicable, begin identifying thesis topic
and select 2nd member of supervisory committee;
alternatively, begin to identify class paper for expansion
April: Discuss plans to continue Ph.D. with S.C. chair

Coursework, continue reading list
Submit first draft of thesis proposal to S.C. chair or of
class expanded paper to course professor
October: Submit letter of application to
transfer to Ph.D. program to Graduate Coordinator


MA no Thesis


Coursework, continue reading list








Coursework, continue reading list


November: Conditional acceptance for Ph.D. or I > November: Not accepted for Ph.D.


Coursework, continue reading list
January: Defend thesis proposal or continue work on
class expanded paper

February: (minors only) Give GC name
minor advisor
April: MA Comprehensive Examination

Submit expanded class paper


Complete coursework
Continue reading list
January: Apply to Registrar for
graduation
February: (minors only) Give GC name of
of minor advisor
April: MA Comprehensive
examination

May: Graduate


Fall # 3 (For students on the thesis option)
Complete coursework
September: Apply to Registrar for i i. h.r ,,,
November: Defend Thesis
December: Graduate

* It is recommended that students who wish to continue to the PhD pursue the "expanded class paper"
option. The definition of an "expanded class paper" appears on pg. 8 of this Handbook.


Spring # 1









Fall # 2


Spring # 2












SEMESTER REGISTRATION RECORD


SEMESTER


YEAR


NAME


COURSES


NUMBER TITLE


CREDITS INSTRUCTOR DAY/PERIOD


Main Advisor Signature


(01/06)







RECORD SHEET (MA, Literature Track)

NAME OF STUDENT:

NAME OF ADVISOR:

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS:



Course Requirements: The MA may be earned either with or without a thesis. Students planning to
continue with the PhD at the University of Florida will write an MA Thesis or produce an expanded class
paper for evaluation. A copy of the thesis will be retained in the student's departmental file. MA
candidates must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours, six of which may be allotted to thesis work
(SPW 6971, "Research for Master's Thesis").

Normally, literature students at the MA level take the following three courses during the first semester:
SPN 6940/6943, SPW 6806, and one literature course. In subsequent semesters, the Spanish faculty
recommends that these students limit their enrollment to no more than two literature courses per
semester, as this will enable them to deepen their understanding of the substantial readings assigned at
this level, and to broaden their knowledge of critical theories. Students are encouraged to dedicate the
third course each semester to other requirements or recommendations (linguisitic, pedaigogy, a second
foreign language), to the completion of a minor, or to the preparation of the reading list for the
comprehensive examination (SPN 6900, MA. Directed Readings in Spanish). Under certain
circumstances it may be necessary or desirable for students to take three literature courses in a single
semester. This will be decided between student and advisor

General recommendation: Students should take as many Spanish and Spanish American literature
courses as possible, the better to prepare themselves for future teaching positions.

A. SPW 6806 "Introduction to Graduate Studies and Research"

Date Taken Grade

B. The following six literature areas are obligatory. List the courses taken in each area:

Spanish (Peninsular)

1. Medieval/Renaissance/Golden Age: Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

2. 18th and 19th Centuries: Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

3. 20th and 21st Centuries: Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Spanish American

4. Colonial: Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade


5. 19th Century:


Date Taken


Grade







Date Taken


6. 20th and 21st Centuries:


Date Taken


Date Taken


Grade


Grade

Grade


C. At least one language/linguistics course. This course, selected from any of the following, must be
completed by the end of the fourth semester of study.


1. SPN 6785 "Advanced Spanish Phonetics"

2. SPN 6735 "Intro Grad. Studies in Ling."

5. Other


Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade

Grade


D. Second foreign language: Functional knowledge of a second foreign language (usually Romance)
is recommended for terminal MA students, and required for students pursuing the PhD. The
Graduate Coordinator and/or the student's Supervisory Committee will appraise the student's
goals and advise accordingly. Minimum level of achievement: a grade of B in a third-year course
(3000-level or above) approved by the Graduate Coordinator, or proven proficiency at that level.
In Portuguese, this may be satisfied by taking both POR 3010, Introduction to Portuguese and
Brazil (accelerated), and one additional course at or above the 3000 level. In French this may be
satisfied by taking both FRE 3070, Accelerated Introduction to French, and on additional course
at or above the 3000 level. In Catalan this may be satisfied by taking both CAT 3180 and CAT
3181.

E. Language Competence: All entering graduate students must demonstrate competence in oral and
written Spanish. Native and non-native speakers of Spanish may be asked to take SPN 6315
(Writing for the Profession) if their main advisor or the Graduate Faculty so recommend.
International students are required by state law to demonstrate competence in English by
satisfactory performance on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and, if they
wish to teach, the Test of Spoken English (TSE, or Speak Test).

F. Minor or Secondary Specialization: Part of the 30 hour requirement may consist of a minor, i.e.,
at least six semester hours at the 3000-level of above in a field approved by the student's
committee or advisor.


Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken


Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken


G. Electives:


Grade

Grade

Grade


Grade

Grade

Grade


Supervisory Committee: The student's SC should be appointed in no case later than the second semester
of graduate study. MA degree with a thesis: at least 2 members selected from the graduate faculty. MA
degree without a thesis: one member of the graduate faculty. If a minor is chosen, the committee must
include one graduate faculty member from the minor.





19



Graduate credit for work in and outside the major field: Graduate credit is awarded for courses numbered
5000 and above. The work in the major field must be in courses numbered 5000 or above. For work
outside the major (minor, secondary specialization, second foreign language requirement) courses
numbered 3000 or above, not to exceed 6 credits, may be taken provided they are part of an approved
plan of study (Graduate Council, 2006).









RECORD SHEET (MA, Linguistics Track)


NAME OF STUDENT:

NAME OF ADVISOR:

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS:



Course Requirements: The MA may be earned either with or without a thesis. Students planning to
continue with the PhD at the University of Florida will write an MA Thesis or produce an expanded class
paper for evaluation. A copy of the thesis will be retained in the student's departmental file. MA
candidates must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours, six of which may be allotted to thesis work
(SPW 6971 "Research for Master's Thesis").

A. SPN 6943/6940 "Methodology in Romance Language Teaching"


Date Taken


Grade


B. At least one course in each of five areas of Spanish linguistics:

Phonetics and Phonology


Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade


Morphology and Syntax


History of the Language


Language Variation


Language Acquisition


Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade


Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade


Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade


Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade









C. At least one course to be completed by the
following six literature areas:


end of the fourth semester of study selected from any of the


Peninsular


1. Medieval/Renaissance/ Golden Age:


2. 18th and 19th Centuries:


3. 20th and 21st Centuries:


Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade

Grade

Grade

Grade

Grade


Spanish American


4. Colonial:


5. 19th Century:


6. 20th and 21st Centuries:


D. Second Foreign Language: Functional knowledge of a second foreign language is recommended
for MA students. Those who plan to do doctoral work in Romance Languages at the University of
Florida should achieve functional knowledge of another language (usually Romance). The Graduate
Coordinator and the student's Supervisory Committee will appraise the student's goals and advise
accordingly. Minimum level of achievement: a grade of B in a 3000-level course approved by the advisor
and the Graduate Coordinator, or proven proficiency at that level. In Portuguese, this may be satisfied by
taking both POR 3010, Introduction to Portuguese and Brazil (accelerated), and one additional course at
or above the 3000 level. In French this may be satisfied by taking both FRE 3070, Accelerated
Introduction to French, and one additional course at or above the 3000 level. In Catalan this may be
satisfied by taking both CAT 3180 and CAT 3181.

E. Language competence: All entering graduate students must demonstrate competence in
oral and written Spanish. Native and non-native speakers of Spanish may be asked to take SPN 6315
(Writing for the Profession) if their main advisor or the Graduate Faculty so recommend.
International students are required by state law to demonstrate competence in English by satisfactory
performance on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and, if they wish to teach, the Test
of Spoken English (TSE, or Speak Test).

F. Minor or Secondary Specialization: Part of the 30 hour requirement may consist of a minor, i.e., at least six
semester hours at the 3000-level or above in a field approved by the student's committee or advisor.


Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade


Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade

Grade

Grade

Grade

Grade










G. Electives:


Date Taken


Date Taken

Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade


Grade

Grade

Grade


Supervisory Committee: The student's S. C. should be appointed in no case later than
the second semester of graduate study. MA degree with a thesis: at least 2 members selected from the
graduate faculty. MA degree without a thesis: one member of the graduate faculty. If a minor is
designated, the committee must include one graduate faculty member from the minor department.

Graduate credit for work in and outside the major field: Graduate credit is awarded for courses numbered
5000 and above. The work in the major field must be in courses numbered 5000 or above. For work
outside the major (minor, second foreign language requirement) courses numbered 3000 or above, not to
exceed 6 credits, may be taken provided they are part of an approved plan of study (Graduate Council,
3/6/09).









READING LIST for the COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
M.A. IN SPANISH (Literature Track)

This list serves as the minimal set of readings required of all MA students in Spanish who are pursuing
the literature track, and, as such, as the basis for the Comprehensive Examination.

Students are expected not only to read the works listed but also to read ABOUT them. Appropriate
sources of information are listed under "Obras de Consulta" in each section.

Students should consult professors in each field well before taking the examination in order to inquire
about any suggested additional readings or bibliography.

N.B. If no specific edition of a work is listed, students may use any edition available.


SPANISH LITERATURE

MEDIEVAL/RENAISSANCE/GOLDEN AGE

El poema de mio Cid
Romancero: Gaiferos y Melisenda; El Conde Olinos; La doncella guerrera
Berceo, Gonzalo de. Milagros de nuestra sefiora: Introducci6n, Milagros 2, 11
Manuel, Juan. El Conde Lucanor: Introducciones, ejemplos 11, 35
Ruiz, Juan. El libro de buen amor: Prop6sito, coplas 44-70; De c6mo el Amor visit al Arcipreste
cc 181-549; Cuarta Dama cc 580-891; S6ptima Dama cc 950-971; D6cimotercera Dama
cc 1331-1507; Gozos de Santa Maria cc1642-1649
Manrique, Jorge. Coplas a la muerte de su padre
Rojas, Fernando de. La Celestina (ler acto)
Lazarillo de Tormes
Jesus, Teresa de. La vida
Zayas, Maria de. Desengafios amorosos: Introducci6n, conclusion, Desengafio V
Cervantes, Miguel de. Don Quijote I; Novelas eiemplares: "Al lector", "El celoso extremefio"
Dos de las siquientes comedies. Vega, Lope de: Fuenteoveiuna; Calder6n de la Barca, Pedro:
La vida es suefio; Molina, Tirso de: El burlador de Sevilla
Vega, Garcilaso de la. Egloga I; Soneto I ("Cuando me paro"); Soneto XXIII ("En tanto que..")
Le6n, Fray Luis de. Oda I ("Vida retirada"); "Al salir de la circel"
Cruz, San Juan de la. Canci6n II ("En una noche oscura"); Copla I ("Entreme donde no supe")
Vega, Lope de. CLXXXVII ("Suelta mi manso"); Rimas Sacras I ("Cuando me paro"); Soneto
de repente ("Un soneto me manda")
Quevedo, Francisco de. Salmo XVII ("Mire los muros"); "Poderoso caballero"; "En crespa
tempestad"
G6ngora, Luis de. Soneto LXXXII ("La dulce boca"); Fibula de Polifemo y Galatea; Romancillo
XLIX ("La mis bella nifia")

EIGHTEENTH AND NINETEENTH CENTURIES

Cadalso, Jos6. Dos de las siguientes cartas: Cartas marruecas, VII, XII, XXI, LXXXIII
Feijoo, Benito. Teatro critic universal I: Pr6logo; "Voz del pueblo"
Una de la siguientes cuatro fibulas. Iriarte, Tomas de: "Los huevos"; "La musica de los animals" o
Samaniego. "La zorra y las uvas"; "El pastor y el fil6sofo"
Fernndez de Moratin, Leandro. El si de las nifias o La comedia nueva
Jovellanos, Gaspar Melchor de. Memoria sobre especticulos. Segunda Parte
Una de las siguientes obras. Saavedra, Angel de (Duque de Rivas): Don Alvaro o la fuerza del
sino o Espronceda, Jos6 de. El estudiante de Salamanca
Zorrilla, Jos6. Don Juan Tenorio
Espronceda, Jos6 de. "Canci6n del pirata," "El reo de muerte," "A Jarifa en una orgia"







B6cquer, Gustavo Adolfo. Rimas I, IV, VII, XXI, LIII; Leyendas: "El rayo de luna," "Los ojos
verdes"
Castro, Rosalia de. En las orillas del Sar: "Cenicientas las aguas"; "Era la illtima noche"; "Yo no
s6 lo que busco"
Larra, Mariano Jos6 de. Dos de los siguientes ensayos: "El castellano viejo"; "La Nochebuena de
1836"; "Literatura"
Alas, Leopoldo (Clarin). La regent
Perez Gald6s, Benito. Fortunata v Jacinta (primera opci6n) o Misericordia y Tristana (segunda
opci6n)
Pardo Bazin, Emilia. Una de las siguientes novelas: Los pazos de Ulloa o La madre naturaleza
Bohl de Faber, Cecilia (Fernan Caballero). La gaviota

TWENTIETH CENTURY

Unamuno, Miguel de. En tomo al casticismo: "La tradici6n eterna"; Mi religion v otros ensavos:
"Mi religion"; Niebla; San Manuel Bueno. Martir
Martinez Ruiz, Jos6 (Azorin). Uno de los siguientes capitulos: Castilla: "Las nubes" o "Una
ciudad, un balc6n"
Baroja, Pio. Una de las siguientes novelas: El arbol de la ciencia o La busca
Valle-Inclan, Ram6n del. Una de las siguientes obras: Luces de Bohemia o Sonata de otofio
Machado, Antonio. Soledades: "El viajero"; "Yo voy sofiando caminos"; Campos de Castilla:
"Retrato"; "Campos de Soria 1, 2"; "A Jos6 Maria Palacio"; "El mafiana efimero"
Jim6nez, Juan Ram6n. ",Soy yo quien anda?";"El viaje definitive"; "iInteligencia...!"; "Vino,
primero, pura..."; "iC6mo, muerte...?"; "El otofiado"
Ortega y Gasset, Jos6. Meditaciones del Quiiote: "Querido Lector"; "Meditaci6n preliminary"
(primera opci6n) o La deshumanizaci6n del arte: "Arte artistico; "Sigue la
deshumanizaci6n del arte" (segunda opci6n)
Garcia Lorca, Federico. Bodas de sangre o Yerma. Poema del cante jondo: "Sorpresa";
Romancero gitano: "Romance de la luna, luna"; "Romance sonambulo"; Poeta en Nueva
York: "Nc'\\ York (Oficina y denuncia)"; Llanto por Ignacio Sanchez Mejias: "Alma
ausente"; Sonetos del amor oscuro: "El poeta pide a su amor que le escriba"
Aleixandre, Vicente. Dos poemas: "Unidad en ella" o "Ven siempre, ven"; "Ciudad del paraiso"
Ceruda, Luis. Dos poemas: "Dir6 c6mo nacisteis" o "Donde habite el olvido I" o "Quisiera estar
solo en el sur"; "1936"
Salinas, Pedro. Dos poemas: "Para vivir no quiero" o "Nombre"; "Qu6 alegria vivir" o "iSerds,
amor?"
Guillen, Jorge. Tres poemas: "Mis alli--VI"; "Naturaleza viva" o "Beato sill6n"; "Equilibrio"
Buero Vallejo, Antonio. El tragaluz
Uno de los siguientes dramas: Ruibal, Jos6. Los ojos o Arrabal, Fernando. El laberinto
Dos novelas, una de cada grupo, incluyendo una de Cela:
Laforet, Carmen. Nada o Cela, Camilo Jos6. La familiar de Pascual Duarte
Snchez Ferlosio, Rafael. El Jarama o Cela, Camilo Jos6. La colmena
Martin-Santos, Luis. Tiempo de silencio
Martin Gaite, Carmen. El cuarto de atris
Matute, Ana Maria. Una de las siguientes obras: Primera memorial o Algunos muchachos
Rodoreda, Merce. Una de las siguientes: La plaza del Diamante o dos cuentos: "La salamandra,"
"Mi Cristina"
Uno de los siguientes cuentos: Ayala, Francisco. "La vida por la opinion" (La cabeza del cordero)
o Calders, Pere. "El batall6n perdido"
Uno de los siguientes autores: Riera, Carme. "Te dejo la mar en prenda" o Atxaga, Bernardo.
Obabakoak: "Exposici6n de la carta del can6nigo Lizardi" o Rivas, M. "El navegante
solitario" y "El Ingl6s"

Moix, Ana Maria. Las virtudes peligrosas: "Erase una vez"
Hernindez, Miguel. "No cesard este rayo"; "iQu6 quiere el viento?"; "Sepultura de la
imagination"
Otero, Blas de. "A la inmensa mayoria"; "Hombre"
Dos poemas de uno de los siguientes poetas. Gil de Biedma, Jaime. "Contra Jaime Gil de







Biedma"; "Barcelonaja no 6s bona, o mi paseo solitario en primavera" o Gonzalez, Angel
(dos poemas). "Para que yo me Ilame Angel Gonzalez"; "Ayer"; "La palabra"; "Me basta
asi"; "Esperanza"
Goytisolo, Juan. Libertad. Libertad. Libertad: "In Memoriam FFB 1982-1975"
Dos poemas de uno de los siguientes poetas. Rossetti, Ana. Indicios vehementes: "A un joven con
abanico"; Punto umbrio: "Por qu6 mi came no te quiere verbo..."o Atencia, Maria Victoria.
El mundo de M. V.: "Suefio de Churriana"; "Godiva en blue-jean"
Uno de los siguientes poetas: Gimferrer, Pere. Arde el mar: "Pequefio y triste pelirrojo"; "Puente
de Londres"; o Garcia Montero, Luis. El jardin extranjero: "Despu6s..."; "Aqui..."; o
Camero, Guillermo. Dibujo de la muerte: "Oscar Wilde en Paris"; Variaciones y figures
sobre un tema de La Brumyre: "Santa Maria della Salute"


REFERENCE WORKS

Blanco Aguinaga, Carlos, Julio Rodriguez Pu6rtolas, and Iris Zavala. Historia social de la
literature espafiola (en lengua castellana). 2 ed. Madrid: Castalia, 1986. 3 vols.
Rico, Francisco. Historia v critical de la literature espafiola. Barcelona: Critica, 1984. 8 vols.
Graham, Helen and Jo Labanyi. Spanish Cultural Studies: An Introduction: The Struggle for
Modernity. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

Readings in Medieval and Early Modern Literary History:

Canavaggio, Jean. Historia de la literature espafiola I, II, III. 1994.
McKendrick, Melveena. Teatro en Espaia. 1994



SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE

PRE-HISPANIC AND COLONIAL

Popol Vuh. Libros I y II (Se recomienda la traducci6n de Dennis Tedlock).
Col6n, Crist6bal. "Carta a Luis de Santangel" (1493)
Nufiez Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar. Naufragios (1542-55): Proemio-capitulo XVII (inclusive);
capitulos XXXVI-XXXVIII
Vega, Garcilaso de la. Comentarios reales (1609/17): Libro I, "Proemio al lector",
Advertencias"; Libro II
Cruz, Sor Juana In6s de la. Respuesta a Sor Filotea de la Cruz (1691):"Esta tarde, mi bien, cuando
te hablaba"; "D6tente sombra de mi bien querido"; "Este que ves, engafio colorido"; "En
perseguirme, mundo, iqu6 interesas?"; "Hombres necios..."
Rodriguez Freile, Juan. El Camero (1636): "Amigo lector"; "El caso de Juana Garcia" (capitulos
VIII y IX)

NINETEENTH CENTURY

Bello, Andr6s Bello. "La agriculture de la zona t6rrida" (1826)
Bolivar, Sim6n. "Carta de Jamaica" (1815)
Echeverria, Esteban. "El matadero" (1838)
Sarmiento, Domingo F. Facundo (1845): Introducci6n, Primera parte, capitulos 1-2 (inclusive).
Hemandez, Jos6. Martin Fierro (1872/79): Primera parte, I,III, VI, VII y XIII; segunda parte, VI,
VII, VIII, IX y XXXIII
Marti, Jos6. "Nuestra America" (1891); "Mi raza" (1893); "Carta a Manuel Mercado" (1893?) y
los siguientes poemas. De Ismaelillo (1882): "Mi caballero" y "Sobre mi hombro"; de
Versos sencillos (1891): I ("Yo soy un hombre sincere"), V, VII, IX ("La Nifia de
Guatemala"), X ("La bailarina espafiola"), XVI, XXXIX ("Cultivo una rosa blanca"),
"Dos patrias" y "Copa con alas"
Dario, Rub6n. De prosas profanas (1896):"Palabras liminares", "Ama tu ritmo", "Sonatina", "El







cisne", "Ite, misa est"; de Cantos de vida v esperanza (1905):"Yo soy aquel...", "A
Roosevelt", "Lo fatal", "Los cisnes", y "Marcha triunfal"
Casal, Julian del. De Hojas al viento (1890):"Soneto Pompadour"'; de Nieve (1892): "Elena"; de
Bustos y rimas (1893): "Neorosis"

TWENTIETH CENTURY

Rod6, Jos6 Enrique. Ariel (1900): Apartados I, V y VII
Quiroga, Horacio. "A la deriva" (1912); "El almohad6n de plumas" (1907); "El hombre muerto"
(1920); "El hijo" (1928); "Decilogo del perfect cuentista" (1925)
Agustini, Delmira. De Cantos de la mariana (1910): "Lo inefable"; de Los calices vacios:
"Noctumo"; de El rosario de Eros: "Mis amores"
Mistral, Gabriela. De Desolaci6n (1922): "Los sonetos de la muerte"; de Temura (1924):"Suefio
grande"; de Tala (1938): "Pan"; de Lagar (1954): "La otra"
Azuela, Mariano. Los de abajo (1915)
Maridtegui, Jos6 Carlos. Siete ensavos de interpretaci6n de la realidad peruana (1928):"E1
problema del indio"
Huidobro, Vicente. Espejo de agua (1916): "Arte po6tica"
Vallejo, C6sar. De Los heraldos negros (1918):"Los heraldos negros", "Espergesia"; de Trilce
(1922):"He almorzado solo ahora..."; de Poemas humans (1939): "Me viene, hay dias,
unas ganas ub6rrimas, political", "Considerando en frio, imparcialmente", "Piedra negra
sobre piedra blanca", "Masa"
Neruda, Pablo. De Veinte poemas de amor (1924):"Puedo escribir los versos mas tristes esta
noche"; de Residencia en la tierra (1935):"Walking around", "Josie Bliss"; de Canto
general (1950):"Alturas de Macchu Pichu"; de Cien sonetos de amor (1959):"Primer

soneto"; de Odas elementales (1954): "Oda a la cebolla"; de Libro de preguntas (1974):
Poema VII
Uno de los siguientes poetas. Guillen, Nicolas. De Motivos del son (1930):"Bucate plata"; de
West Indies LTD (1934): "Sensemaya", "Balada de los dos abuelos"; de Cantos para
soldados (1937):"No s6 porque piensas tu"; de Tengo (1964):"Tengo" o Pal6s Matos,
Luis. De Tuntun de pasa y griferia (1937): "Danza negra", "Canci6n festival para ser
llorada", "Nafiigo al cielo"; de Poesia (1957):"El llamado" y "Puerta al tiempo en tres
voices"
Borges, Jorge Luis. Ensayos: Discusi6n (1932): "El escritor argentino y la tradici6n"; Historia de
la etemidad (1936): "Arte de injuriar"; Otras inquisiciones (1952): "Kafka y sus
precursores"; El hacedor (1960): "Borges y yo". Cuentos: Ficciones (1941): "Tlon, Uqbar,
Orbis Tertius", Las ruinas circulares"", "El sur"
Carpentier, Alejo. Pr6logo a El reino de este mundo (1949); "Viaje a la semilla" (1958)
Paz, Octavio. Los hijos del limo (1974): "El circulo se cierra"
Cardenal, Eresto. De Antologia (1971): "Salmo 103", "Oraci6n por Marylin Monroe", "Coplas a
la muerte de Merton"
Cortazar, Julio. Bestiario (1951): "Casa tomada"; Las armas secrets (1959): "Cartas a mami"
Todos los fuegos el fuego (1973) y Final del juego (1964): "Axolotl"
Teatro de la Candelaria. Guadalupe afios sin cuenta (1976)
Rulfo, Juan. Pedro Paramo (1955)
Arguedas, Jos6 Maria. Yawar fiestas (1941)
Garro, Elena. Recuerdos del porvenir (1963)
Castellanos, Rosario. De En la tierra de enmedio (1972):"Autorretrato", "Poesia no eres tu";
de Album de familiar: "Lecci6n de cocina"; de Mujer que sabe latin (1973): "Notas al margen: el
lenguaje como instrument de dominio como posibilidad de liberaci6n"
Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. Cien afios de soledad (1966)
Poniatowska, Elena. Querido Diego, te abraza Quiela (1978)
Uno de los siguientes testimonios: Barnet, Miguel. Biografia de un cimarr6n (1967) o Menchu,
Rigoberta, selecci6n de Elizabeth Burgos (ed.). Me llamo Rigoberta Menchu v asi me naci6
la conciencia: "Introducci6n" (p.7-8); Cap. I "La familiar" (p.21-26); Cap. III "El nahual"
(39-41); Cap. XVI "Periodo de reflexi6n sobre la opci6n a seguir" (143-148); Cap. XVII
"Autodefensa en la aldea" (148-166); Caps. XX y XXI "Aprender el castellano" (179-188);







Cap. XXX "Sobre la mujer".
Una de las siguientes novelas: Puig, Manuel. El beso de la Mujer Arafia (1976) o Arenas,
Reinaldo. Celestino antes del alba (1965) o Eltit, Diamela. Lumperica (1983) o Sanchez,
Luis Rafael La guaracha del Macho Camacho (1976)
Rama, Angel. La ciudad letrada (1984): "La ciudad letrada"
Fernindez Retamar, Roberto. Calibin (1971): "Una pregunta", "Para la historic de Calibin",
"Nuestro simbolo", "Otra vez Marti", "Vida verdadera de un dilema falso"
Vega, Ana Lydia. Esperando a Lol6 v otros delirios generacionales (1994): "De bipeda impluma
a Escritora Puertorriquefia"
Monsivais, Carlos. Aires de familiar: Cultura v sociedad en America Latina (2000): De las
versions de lo popular"

LITERARY CRITICISM

Franco, Jean. The Modem Culture of Latin America.
Gonzalez Echaverria, Roberto y Enrique Pupo Walker. The Cambridge History of Latin
American Literature
Oviedo, Jose Miguel. Historia de la literature hispanoamericana
Sosnowski, Saul. Lectura critical de la literature americana


(Rev. 8/02)








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
SPANISH SECTION
LINGUISTICS TRACK
TOPICS LIST FOR M.A. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION


This list serves to inform students in the Linguistics track of the Spanish M.A. about the topic
areas to be tested on the various sections of the M.A. Comprehensive Examination, and the
minimal bibliography needed to prepare for each section. Students must also consult with
professors in each field well before taking the examination in order to inquire about any
suggested additional topics or readings.



History of Spanish

Areas
1. Mechanism of phonological change
2. Linguistic genealogy of Spanish: Indo-European, Italic branch, Latin, spoken Latin, Ibero-
Latin, ancient Hispano-Romance dialects, modem-day dialects.
3. Linguistic history of the Iberian Peninsula. Pre-Roman languages. Vulgar Latin / Classical
Latin; Romance languages.
4. Learned, semi-learned, and popularly derived words
5. Historical phonology of Castilian
a. Vowel development from Latin: tonic (including diphthongization and metaphony),
initial, final, intertonic
b. Consonantal development from Latin: palatalization, lenition, evoluci6n de las
sibilantes (incl. seseo, ceceo), yeismo,
6. Historical morphology of Castilian
a. Noun morphology
1) Latin noun morphology, including declensions and cases
2) Rise of definite article
3) Gender
4) Plurals, including originally neuter plurals
5) Pronouns: ille, voseo, ustedeo, historic de vosotros, leismo, se lo dieron
6) Comparative and superlative constructions
7) Demonstrative adjectives and pronouns
b. Verbal morphology
1) Latin verb morphology
2) Origin of compound tenses, passive voice
3) Evolution of future and conditional
4) Evolution of-ara (-iera) and -ase (-iese) forms
5) Future subjunctive
6) Analogical leveling in paradigms
7. Earlier stages of Castilian
a. Medieval Spanish
1) pronunciation, especially sibilants
2) principal morphological and syntactic features
3) analysis of text, e.g., from Poema de Mio Cid
b. Golden Age Spanish







1) pronunciation
2) principal lexical and morphological innovations
3) analysis of text, e.g., from Don Quixote de la Mancha

Suggested references
Lapesa, Rafael. 1983. Historia de la lengua espahola, 9a ed. Madrid: Gredos.
Lloyd, Paul. 1987. From Latin to Spanish. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society.
Penny, Ralph. 1993. Gramdtica hist6rica del espahol. Barcelona: Ariel. [O su version inglesa:
1991. A History of the Spanish Language. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.]

Spanish Sociolinguistics

Areas
1. Variationist methodology
2. Linguistic variation
a. Phonological, morphosyntactic, semantic
b. According to geographic space, socioeconomic class, age, sex/gender, or discourse style
c. Implications for language change
3. Linguistic variation in contact situations
a. For example, Spanish-English in the US; Spanish-Quechua in Peru; Spanish-Catalan in
Spain;
4. Discourse structure
5. Language attitudes.

Suggested references
[*This list will vary according to the interests and needs of particular students taking the M.A.
Exam each year. Some references may be withdrawn, while others not appearing here may be
added. Consultation with the respective faculty member is therefore imperative.]

General
Moreno Fernandez, F. 1998. Principios de v,,, illitigntii y sociologia del lenguaje. Barcelona:
Editorial Ariel.
Silva-Corvalan, C. 2001. .Si it lingititi, i y pragmdtica del espahol. Washington, DC:
Georgetown UP.

Spanish language variation
Alba, 0. 1988. Estudio sociolingiuistico de la variaci6n de las liquidas finales de palabra en el
espahol cibaefio. In R. Hammond & M. Resnick (Eds.), Studies in Caribbean Spanish
Dialectology (pp. 1-12). Washington, DC: Georgetown UP.
Caravedo, R. 1990. .S, itliiigtitiiia del espahol de Lima. Lima: Pontificia Universidad Cat6lica
del Peru.
Hasbun Hasbun, L. & M. Solis Hernandez. 1997. Analisis de los usos asimetricos de las formas
de tratamiento pronominal en una comunidad costarricense. Revista de Filologiay
Linguistica XXIII, 139-52.
Lafford, B. 1986. Valor diagn6stico social del uso de ciertas variantes de /s/ en el espahol de
Cartagena, Colombia. In R. Nufiez Cedefio, J. Guitart, and I. Paez Urdaneta, (Eds.),
Estudios sobre lafonologia del Caribe (pp. 53-74). Caracas: La Casa de Bello.
Lavandera, B. 1984. Variacin y significado. Buenos Aires: Libreria Hachette.
Martinez, M.-D., and J. A. Moya. 2000. Reacciones actitudinales hacia la variaci6n dialectal en
hablantes granadinos. Linguistica Espahola Actual XXII, 137-160.
Parodi, C., and 0. Santa Ana. 1997. Tipologia de comunidades de habla: del espahol rural al
estandar. Nueva Revista de Filologia Hispdnica XLV, 305-320.








Spanish language contact
Poplack, S. 1982. 'Sometimes I'll start a sentence in Spanish y termino en espahol': Toward a
typology of code-switching. In J. Amastae & L. Elias-Olivares (Eds.), Spanish in the
United States (pp. 230-263). Cambridge: Cambridge UP.
Roca, A. 2000. Research on Spanish in the United States: Linguistic Issues and Challenges.
Somerville, MA: Cascadilla.
Roca, A. & J. Jensen (Eds.). 1996. Spanish in Contact: Issues in Bilingualism. Somerville, MA:
Cascadilla Press.
Sanchez, R. 1983. Chicano Discourse. Rowley, MA: Newbury House. Reprinted in 1994 by Arte
Publico Press, Houston.
Silva-Corvalan, C. 1994. Language Contact and Change: Spanish in Los Angeles. Oxford:
Clarendon.
Silva-Corvalan, C. (Ed.). 1995. Spanish in Four Continents: Studies in Language Contact and
Bilingualism. Washington, DC: Georgetown UP.
Valdes, G. & M. Geoffrion-Vinci. 1998. Chicano Spanish: The problem of the 'underdeveloped'
code in bilingual repertoires. Modern Language Journal 82, 473-501.
Woolard, K. 1989. Double Talk: Bilingualism and the Politics ofEthnicity in Catalonia.
Stanford, CA: Stanford UP.
Zentella, A. C. 1997. Growing Up Bilingual: Puerto Rican Children in New York. Malden, MA:
Blackwell.


Second Language Acquisition

Areas
1. Overview of theories of SLA
a. Cognitive; Acculturation; Linguistic (UG), etc.
2. Critical Period Hypothesis
3. Cross-linguistic transfer
4. Monitor model
5. Evolution of L2 teaching methods
a. For example, ALM -> communicative -> task-based, etc.)
6. ACTFL guidelines/5 C's ("Standards")
7. Formal instruction and the acquisition of second languages
8. Focus on form
9. Input enhancement
10. Processing instruction
11. Input processing
12. The role of feedback in second language learning
13. The role of interaction in second language learning

Suggested references
Doughty, C. & J. Williams (Eds.). 1998. Focus on Form in Classroom Second Language
Acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.
Gass, S., & L. Selinker. 2001. Second Language Acquisition. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence
Erlbaum.
Ellis, R. 1999. Learning a second language through interaction. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Lee, J. & A. Valdman (Eds.). 1999. Form and Meaning: Multiple Perspectives. Boston: Heinle
& Heinle.
Omaggio Hadley, A. 2001. Teaching Language in Context, 3rd ed. Boston: Heinle &
Heinle.







VanPatten, B. 1996. Input processing and grammar instruction. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.
Gass, S., Mackey, A. & Pica, T. 1998. The role of input and interaction in second language
acquisition. The Modern Language Journal 82, 299-305.
Long, M. H. 1991. Focus on form: A design feature in language teaching methodology. In K. De
Bot, R. Ginsberg, & C. Kramsch (Eds.), Foreign language research in cross-cultural
perspective (pp. 39-52). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
Long, M. H. 1996. The role of the linguistic environment in second language acquisition. In W.
C. Ritchie & T. K. Bhatia (Eds.), Handbook of second language acquisition (413-468).
New York: Academic Press.
Lyster,R., & Ranta, L. 1997. Corrective feedback and learners uptake: Negotiation of form in
communicative classrooms. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 19, 37-66.
Mackey, A., & Philp, J. 1998. Conversational interaction and second language development:
Recasts, responses, and red herrings? The Modern Language Journal, 82, 338-356.
Spada, N. 1997. Form-focussed instruction and second language acquisition: A review of
classroom and laboratory research. Language Teaching, 30, 73-87.



Spanish Syntax and Morphology

Syntax areas
1. Sentence structure, constituents
2. Subcategorization
3. Tree structures
4. X-bar theory
5. Classification of simple sentences (according to speaker's intent and nature of the predicate)
a. Coordination
b. Subordination (nominal, adjectival, adverbial)

Morphology areas
1. Morpheme and allomorph
2. Lexical categories
3. Derivation and inflection
a. Nominal, adjectival and adverbial inflection
4. The pronominal system
5. Tense, aspect and mood
6. Compounding

Suggested references
Campos, H. 1993. De la oraci6n simple a la oraci6n compuesta: Curso superior de gramdtica
espahola. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.
Hualde, J. I., A. Olarrea & A. M. Escobar 2001. Introducci6n a la linguistica hispdnica.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
King, L. D., & M. Sufier. 1999. Gramdtica espahola: Andlisisyprdctica. McGraw-Hill.







Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

Areas
1. Classes of sounds
2. Articulation and classification of consonants, vowels
a. including organs and articulators of the articulatory tract
3. Syllable structure
a. i.e., vowel combinations, diphthongs, preferred structures, etc.
4. Phonetic rules
a. Phonemes and allophones
b. Distribution patterns
c. Phonetic transcription
5. Phonological processes (with appropriate examples):
a. Assimilation
1) regressive, progressive, mutual
b. Voicing/de-voicing
c. Elision
d. Weakening
e. Neutralization
6. Suprasegmental features
a. stress
b. intonation
c. rhythm
7. Basic phonetic variation across dialects and sociolects
8. General contrastive analysis of Spanish-English phonetic systems

Suggested references
Barrutia, R. & A. Schwegler. 1994. Foneticayfonologia espaiolas, 2nd edition. New York:
John Wiley & Sons.
Crystal, D. 1997. A Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics. Oxford: Blackwell.
Goldsmith, J. (Ed.). 1995. The Handbook ofPhonology. Oxford: Blackwell.
Hammond, R. M. 2001. The Sounds ofSpanish: Analysis and Application. Somerville,
MA:Cascadilla.


Revised (8/03)









PH.D PROGRAM


A range of specializations is available both in language and literature, with possibilities of minors in
several related fields. All beginning graduate students are expected to obtain the MA (thesis option or
expanded class paper) before going on to the PhD. Students may be admitted to the PhD program without
completing the requirements for the MA, at the discretion of the Spanish faculty:

1. At admission, if the student has a superior undergraduate preparation in the area of the
proposed PhD degree; or

2. After completion of two semesters of course work in the department with a grade of B+ or
better in all courses taken (recommendation by graduate professors on the basis of course work is
necessary).

Course Requirements: The Graduate School requires that doctoral candidates complete at least 90 hours
above the baccalaureate degree. A maximum of 30 credits is awarded for a transfer MA. Certain
requirements for a period of concentrated study also apply. Doctoral students in the Department may
choose to specialize either in the study of Spanish-language literature ("Literature Track") or in the study
of the Spanish linguistics ("Linguistics Track"). A description of the curricula and examination
procedures of these tracks follows.

Registration: During pre-registration, students discuss their selection of courses for the following term
with their main advisor. They must clear these courses with the main advisor before actually registering;
new students usually discuss first term registration with the Graduate Coordinator. After completing the
consultation, students must fill out a Semester Registration Record (see copy) and return it to the
secretary for the Graduate Coordinator. Pre-registration dates for the Summer and Fall terms are usually
in March-April; for the Spring term, in November.

Restricted Enrollment Courses:

SPW 6905 (Individual Work): Graduate School regulations stipulate that only three SPW 6905
courses are permitted in the student's entire graduate career. This course may not be taken in
lieu of regular courses offered in the Department, unless it serves as a substitute for a required
course not being offered in time for graduation. Students are advised that Individual Work
projects will only rarely be approved because staffing shortfalls make it necessary to rationalize
professors' workloads. Students who take this course will work independently under guidance of
the professor. Professor and student must agree on a project, work schedule and on the type of
final product for the course. Student must write up description of project ( 250 words minimum)
to submit with the application form (see SPW 6905 Protocol in this Manual). The application
form and project description must be submitted to the professor and Chair for approval before
actual registration.

SPW 6910 (Supervised Research): M.A. and Ph.D. students may register for 1-5 semester
credits of 6910, up to a maximum of 5 semester credits at the University of Florida. No funding is
given for hours beyond the 5 credits. M.A. students who hold a teaching assistantship may take
up to 3 credits of SPW 6910 in the semester when they are taking the Comprehensive
Examinations (second Spring or fourth semester), if all course requirements have been already
met.







SPW 6945 (Practicum in Advanced College Teaching/Course Shadowing 2hrs; max 6).
Practical training for advanced doctoral students in teaching 3000-level courses (i.e., SPN 3700,
SPN 3510/3520, SPW 3030/3031/3100/3101). Enrollment limited to doctoral students who have
passed the Qualifying Exam or who will be taking it during the semester in which the shadowing
will take place. Students who wish to enroll in SPW 6945 must consult with their main advisor
and obtain permission from the professor whose course is to be shadowed. Please refer to the
"RLL Shadowing Contract" for further information.

SPW 7979 (Advanced Research): For doctoral students before admission to candidacy, that is
before passing their Qualifying examination and after completion of all the required courses for
their doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to candidacy. Doctoral
students who have completed their required coursework may take up to 12 credits of SPW 7979
in the semester when they are slated to take their Qualifying Examination (see "Timetable for
Ph.D Students"). In exceptional cases a Supervisory Committee may allow a student to enroll in
up to 3 credits of SPW 7979 in the semester previous to the Quals. The Chair of the S.C. must
justify this approval in a letter to the Graduate Coordinator before the student enrolls in
SPW 7979.

SPW 7980 (Research for Doctoral Dissertation): Doctoral students may not register for 7980
until after they have been admitted to candidacy. No funding is given for 7980 credit hours taken
before the term in which admission to candidacy is attained.

SPW 6971 (Research for Master's Thesis): not open for Ph.D. students

Graduate credit for work in and outside the major field: Graduate credit is awarded for courses
numbered 5000 and above. The work in the major field must be in courses numbered 5000 or above. For
work outside the major (minor, second specialization, second foreign language requirement), see below.

Language Competence: All entering graduate students must demonstrate competence in oral and written
Spanish. With the application to the graduate program, an applicant will submit a taped sample of spoken
Spanish and a paper written in Spanish for a previous course. When available, the MA thesis or other
such document should also be submitted. Native and non-native speakers of Spanish may be asked to
take SPN 6315 (Writing for the Profession) if their main advisor or the Graduate Faculty so
recommend. International students are required by state law to demonstrate competence in English by
satisfactory performance on both the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of
Spoken English (TSE, or Speak Test).

Second and Third Foreign Languages: Before admission to the Qualifying Examination, candidates
must demonstrate functional knowledge of a second Romance language or of another foreign language
deemed appropriate to their scholarly specialization and approved by their supervisory committees.
Functional knowledge may be demonstrated by completion (with a grade of B or better) of a third-year
course (3000-level number) approved by the Graduate Coordinator, or proven proficiency at that level. In
Portuguese, this may be satisfied by both POR 3010, Introduction to Portuguese and Brazil (accelerated),
and one additional course at or above the 3000 level. In French this may be satisfied by both FRE 3070,
Accelerated Introduction to French, and one additional course at or above the 3000 level. In Catalan this
may be satisfied by both CAT 3180 and CAT 3181. The supervisory committee may require reading
knowledge of a third foreign language if such knowledge is judged appropriate for the candidate's
research. The third foreign language requirement can be satisfied in the same way, though proficiency
will be expected only in reading. Students cannot take their Quals without previously complying with
the prerequisite of a second foreign language (and a third, if it is required by the Supervisory Committee).

Teaching: At some time during the student's candidacy, s/he will be given the opportunity to gain
teaching experience through a teaching assistantship. Renewal of the assistantship is dependent upon
satisfactory performance as a teaching assistant and as a graduate student and availability of funds.







Minor: If a minor is chosen at least 12 semester credit hours must be in courses numbered 5000 or
higher. If two minors are chosen each must include at least 8 graduate semester credit hours. Graduate
students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in their minor for the minor to be valid. The minor department
must be represented on the supervisory committee.

Secondary Specialization: The department allows students to have a secondary specialization. The
secondary specialization is functionally equivalent to a minor and has the same requirements (see Minor,
above). It is granted for specialized study in another area within RLL such as French or Portuguese. By
University policy, this specialization cannot appear on the transcripts and is not subject to an extra hour of
examination during the Qualifying exams.


Residence and Study Abroad: It is strongly urged that the PhD candidate spend some time in residence
in a Spanish-speaking country. Up to six credit hours of graduate-level work done abroad in an approved
program may be applied toward the credit requirement. Consult the Graduate Coordinator and/or the main
advisor for details.


Transfer Students from other Institutions or Programs:

In consultation with the Chair of the Supervisory Committee, students with an MA in a subject
other than Spanish may choose to take the MA Comprehensive Examination (as described in the
"Graduate Study in Spanish--MA Program" and in "Spanish Master of Arts Comprehensive
Examination") in either their second or fourth semester of doctoral study.

Transfer students must submit a Master's thesis or other research paper at the time of application.
If the submitted writing sample was not a thesis or of equivalent length to a thesis (40 to 50 pages), they
will be required to turn in by the semester previous to the Qualifying Exams a research project equal to a
Master's thesis (40 to 50 pages),

Evaluation: Students' work and teaching will be evaluated annually by the graduate faculty. A summary
of the annual evaluation will be sent to the student before April 30 of each year, indicating, if applicable,
whether a reappointment as Graduate Teaching Assistant will be proposed. Any student whose average
falls below B (3.0) for two consecutive terms will be dropped from the program. Grades of "I"
(incomplete) will be given only for compelling reasons.

Supervisory Committee: All students are required to compose a Supervisory Committee by the end of
the second semester. The Committee comprises at least four members, all of whom must be on the
graduate faculty, and one of whom must be from another academic discipline, i.e., from outside the
Department of Romance Languages. In addition, one committee member must represent the area of the
student's minor, if any. The external member's responsibilities are to represent the interests of the
Graduate School and the University of Florida; be knowledgeable about Graduate Council policies; and
serve as an advocate for the student doctoral committee activities. The faculty member who represents a
minor on a student's committee may be appointed as the external member if s/he does not have a courtesy
graduate appointment in the student's major academic unit. Subject to certain Graduate School and
Departmental requirements, it is the student's Supervisory Committee which has the final authority to
determine the curriculum to be followed by the student, and to compose and administer the Qualifying
Examination, through which the student is advanced to candidacy and charged with writing a dissertation.

Performance: Graduate students are expected to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher, and to make
satisfactory progress toward degree. Both the UF Graduate Catalog and the UF Graduate Student
Handbook note that "grades of I (incomplete) carry no quality points and lower the overall grade point
average. Students with less than a 3.0 GPA may not hold an assistantship or fellowship; the use of I
grades may put that employment or fellowship in jeopardy"(section on Incomplete Grades). In another
section titled "Unsatisfactory Scholarship," these two publications also state that "Any graduate student
may be denied further registration in the University or in a graduate program should scholastic
performance or progress toward completion of the planned program become unsatisfactory to the
department, college, or Dean of the Graduate School."









LITERATURE TRACK

Course Requirements: In order to insure that students who choose the Literature Track develop a
sufficiently broad perspective, the Spanish section recommends that Supervisory Committees observe the
following 9 specific course requirements:

*Two courses in Literary Theory and Criticism such as FRW 6825 "French Critical Theory", or
equivalent courses approved by the Graduate Coordinator or the Supervisory Committee.

*One course from each of the following groups:
Spanish, Medieval, Renaissance, Golden Age
SPW 6400 "Old Spanish Literature"
SPW 6216 "Spanish Prose Fiction of the Golden Age"
SPW 6315 "Spanish Drama of the Golden Age"
SPW 6337 "Spanish Poetry of the Golden Age"
SPW 6606 "Cervantes"

Spanish, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
SPW 6269 "Spanish Novel of the 19th Century"
SPW 6535 "Spanish Enlightenment and Romanticism"
SPW 6729 "Generation of 1898"

Spanish, Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries
SPW 6276 "Spanish Post-War Narrative"
SPW 6325 "Contemporary Spanish Theater"
SPW 6345 "Twentieth-Century Spanish Poetry"
SPW 6724 "Generation of 27 to the Present"

Spanish-American, Early
SPW 6209 "Colonial"
SPW 6237 "Narrative from Origins to Criollismo"

Spanish-American, Narrative
SPW 6285 "Contemporary Narrative 1"
SPW 6286 "Contemporary Narrative 2"
SPW 6306 "Theater"

Spanish-American, Poetry
SPW 6356 "Poetry from Romanticism to Vanguardism"
SPW 6357 "Contemporary Spanish-American Poetry"
SPW 6366 "Essay"

Several (at least 4) Seminar or Special Study courses
SPW 6902 Special Study in Spanish or Spanish-American Literature
SPW 6934 Seminar in Spanish-American Literature and Culture
SPW 6938 Seminar in Spanish Literature and Culture

*In addition, it is recommended that candidates take any linguistics course that may be relevant to their
research interests









Qualifying Examination:

Reading List: The MA reading list will serve as the basic set of texts for the doctoral examination, to
which other readings made during the PhD course work may be added. Members of the Supervisory
Committee may add texts which they feel are necessary for adequate preparation for the dissertation,
including texts from other literatures as well as works on literary theory.

Since the reading list is focused on the dissertation topic, a dissertation "pre-proposal" must be discussed
with the Supervisory Committee and approved by all its members before the submission of the reading
list. This "pre-proposal" must be included as an introductory section of the reading list.

Students should present to their Supervisory Committee members, for approval, an additional reading list
with three main sections:

1. a corpus reasonably covering the history of the selected genre(s) and/or subgenre(s);

2. a list of works which would provide a sound theoretical framework for the dissertation research;

3. a list of readings which would reflect their knowledge of major figures and works (related or unrelated
to the selected genres and/or subgenres for their dissertation) in several periods of Spanish American or
Peninsular literary history.

Format: The Qualifying Examination will be a take-home, completed over several days off campus. An
oral examination will follow submission of the written section.

Examination Dates: There are two dates for the PhD written-oral examinations: one in the Fall semester
(first two weeks of November), and one in the Spring semester (first two weeks of April). Only under
exceptional and justified circumstances will the Faculty consider alternative dates. Students who need to
schedule their exam on an alternative date must submit a written petition to the Graduate Coordinator
stating the reasons for the request no later than the first week of the semester in which they are scheduled
to be examined.

Dissertation Proposal: Once the Qualifying Examination has been successfully completed, the candidate
must present his/her Dissertation Proposal. If the Qualifying Examination was taken in April, the
Proposal must be submitted before August 30; if taken in November, before March 30. The Proposal must
be 5-10 typewritten, double-spaced pages in length, plus the basic bibliography. If the Supervisory
Committee disagrees with partial aspects or with the totality of the Proposal, they may request another
presentation.

Evaluation: Both the Qualifying Examination and the Ph.D dissertation are evaluated as Pass or Fail.
The Department does not grant distinctions such as cum laude, magna cum laude, or others. The professor
who prepared a particular question will grade the reply to that question. Additionally, the Committee will
evaluate the examination as a whole. The examination can be retaken only once (see Graduate Catalog on
this matter).


(Rev 8/02)









LINGUISTICS TRACK


Course Requirements: In addition to any courses taken at the M.A. level, students must take courses in
the following five areas of Spanish linguistics: (1) phonetics and phonology, (2) morphology and syntax,
(3) history of the language, (4) language variation, and (5) acquisition of Spanish. As a minimum,
students must take six courses in Spanish linguistics at the Ph.D. level.

In addition, students are required to take the following three general linguistics courses: LIN 6323
"Phonology", LIN 6402 "Morphology" and LIN 6501 "Syntax". FOL 6735 "Introduction to Romance
Linguistics" is also highly recommended. Also it is recommended that candidates take any literature
course that may be relevant to their research interest.

Qualifying Examination: This examination comprises two parts, one written and one oral. It is designed
to cover the areas outlined above, plus the minor, with special emphasis on areas of special importance to
students' dissertation plans. Since the reading list is focused on the dissertation topic, a dissertation "pre-
proposal" must be discussed with the Supervisory Committee and approved by all its members before the
submission of the reading list. This "pre-proposal" must be included as an introductory section of the
reading list.

Examination Dates: There are two dates for the PhD written-oral examinations: one in the Fall semester
(first two weeks of November), and one in the Spring semester (first two weeks of April). Only under
exceptional and justified circumstances will the Faculty consider alternative dates. Students who need to
schedule their exam on an alternative date must submit a written petition to the Graduate Coordinator
stating the reasons for the request no later than the first week of the semester in which they wish to be
examined.

Dissertation Proposal: Once the Qualifying Examination has been successfully completed, the candidate
must present his/her Dissertation Proposal. If the Qualifying Examination was taken in April, the
Proposal must be submitted before August 30; if taken in November, before March 30. The Proposal must
be 5-10 typewritten, double-spaced pages in length, plus the basic bibliography. If the Supervisory
Committee disagrees with all or part of the Proposal, they can request another presentation.

Evaluation: Both the Qualifying Examination and the Ph.D dissertation are evaluated as Pass or Fail.
The Department does not grant distinctions such as cum laude, magna cum laude, or others.


(Rev 8/02)















QUALIFYING EXAMINATION PROCEDURES
LITERATURE TRACK AND LINGUISTICS TRACK



Each of the members of the Supervisory Committee will propose, in writing, one or more topics
related to the periods, areas, or genres from the final list established for the Qualifying Examination.
These topics will be developed by the candidate during a period to be fixed by the Supervisory
Committee, generally over a two week span.

The professor whose question was used will grade that question. Additionally, the Supervisory
Committee will evaluate the examination as a whole. Upon recommendation of any one of the professors,
or acting as a body, the Supervisory Committee may declare one or several sections deficient, in which
case the student must retake the deficient sections) again. Students affected by such a judgment will
contact the professors) in the specialty in order to prepare themselves to retake their exam. The
examination can be retaken only once (see Graduate Catalog on this matter).

The Supervisory Committee and the professors) in the specialty will set a prudent date for the
retake. If the candidate fails more than two sections or the section on his/her dissertation area, the entire
exam must be retaken.

The oral part is used (1) to clarify aspects not sufficiently developed by the student in the written
part, and (2) to pose other more general questions not covered in the written examination. Therefore, the
oral part serves as the final instrument for evaluating the student's preparedness.


(Rev. 8/00)








TIMETABLE FOR Ph.D. STUDENT
with 6 years of support
(student with Out-of-field M.A. taking comprehensive examinations)

Subsidized Semesters Timetable

Fall #1 Coursework; reading list

Spring #1 Coursework
April: MA Comprehensive Examination

Fall #2 Discuss with main advisor selection/preparation of second
foreign language (FL)

Spring #2 Begin study of second FL or make plans to do so in Summer # 2

Fall # 3 Discuss with Main Advisor selection of external member of Supervisory
Committee (SC)
Continue study of second FL

Spring # 3 Take course with prospective external member
Select, appoint SC
Begin preparation of Qualifying Exam reading list
Complete required coursework (or Fall #4); including second FL

Fall #4 Prepare dissertation pre-proposal and tentative reading list for
approval by all members of SC
Have second FL proficiency certified

Spring # 4 April: Qualifying Examination

Fall #5 September: Dissertation proposal defense
Apply for Dissertation Fellowship
Begin writing dissertation

Spring #5 Dissertation writing

Fall #6 Dissertation writing

Spring #6 Dissertation writing
January: Apply for graduation
March: Submit dissertation first submission to Editorial office
March or April: Defend dissertation
April: Submit final dissertation
May: Graduate








TIMETABLE FOR Ph.D. STUDENT
with 5 years of support
(students with non- UF MA degree)
Entering in: FALL #1


Subsidized Semesters


Timetable


Discuss with main advisor selection/preparation of second foreign
language (FL).

Begin study of second FL or make plans do so in Summer #1


Discuss with main advisor selection of external member of Supervisory
Committee (SC)
Continue study of second FL

Take course w/ prospective external member
Select, appoint S.C.
Begin preparation of Qualifying Exam reading list
Complete required coursework (or Fall #3), including second FL


Prepare dissertation pre-proposal and tentative reading list for
approval by all members of S.C.
Have second FL proficency certified


Qualifying Examination (April)


Dissertation proposal defense (September)
Apply for Dissertation Fellowship
Begin writing dissertation


Dissertation writing


Dissertation writing


Dissertation writing
Apply for graduation in January
Submit Dissertation to Editorial office in February
Dissertation defense by 1st week in April (graduation Spring #5)


FALL #1


SPRING #1


FALL #2


SPRING #2


FALL #3


SPRING #3


FALL #4


SPRING #4


FALL #5


SPRING #5







TIMETABLE FOR Ph.D. STUDENT
With 4 Years of Support
(Alumni/Presidential Fellows; Students with MA from UF)
Entering in: FALL #1


Subsidized Semesters


Timetable


Discuss with main advisor selection/preparation of second foreign
language (FL).

Begin study of second FL or make plans do so in Summer #1
Discuss with main advisor selection of external member of Supervisory
Committee (SC)

Continue study of second FL
Take course w/ prospective external member
Select, appoint S.C.
Begin preparation of Qualifying Exam reading list

Complete required coursework, including second FL
Prepare dissertation pre-proposal and tentative reading list for
approval by all members of S.C.


Have second FL proficency certified
Qualifying Examination (Nov)


Dissertation proposal defense (January)
Begin writing dissertation

Apply for Dissertation Fellowship
Dissertation writing

Dissertation writing
Apply for graduation in January
Submit Dissertation to Editorial office in February
Dissertation defense by 1st week in April (graduation Spring #4)


FALL #1


SPRING #1


FALL #2


SPRING #2


FALL #3


SPRING #3


FALL #4


SPRING #4









RECORD SHEET (PhD, Literature Track)



NAME OF STUDENT:

NAME OF ADVISOR:

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS:


MAJOR:


MINOR:


Course Requirements: The Graduate School requires that doctoral candidates complete at least 90 hours
(thesis and dissertation credits included) beyond the baccalaureate degree. The following courses are
specifically required of all doctoral candidates (the Supervisory Committee can, in exceptional cases,
recommend that the candidate substitute another course for one or more of these courses):


A. Two courses in Literary Theory and Criticism such as FRW 6825 "French Critical Theory" or
equivalent courses approved by the Graduate Coordinator or the Supervisory Committee.


Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade


B. General recommendation: Students should take as many Spanish and Spanish-American
literature courses as possible, the better to prepare themselves for future teaching positions.

Spanish Literature. As a minimum, every student must take one course in the following
Spanish Literature groups (i.e. at least 3 courses in Peninsular literature):

1. Medieval, Renaissence, Golden Age.


Date Taken


2. Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries Literature

Date Taken

3. Twenthieth and Twenty-First Centuries Literature


Grade


Grade


Date Taken


Grade









C. Spanish-American Literature. As a minimum, every student must take one course in the
following Spanish-American literature areas (i.e. at least 3 courses in Spanish-American
literature):


1. SPW 6209 "Colonial"


Date Taken


Grade


OR:


SPW 6237 "Narrative from Origins
To Criollismo"


2. SPW 6285 "Contemporary Narrative 1"


Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade


OR:


SPW 6286 "Contemporary Narrative 2"


Date Taken


Grade


OR:


SPW 6306 "Theater"


3. SPW 6356 "Poetry from Romanticism To
Vanguardism"


Date Taken


Date Taken


OR:


SPW 6357 "Contemporary Spanish
American Poetry"


Date Taken


OR:


SPW 6366 "Essay"


Date Taken


D. A minimum of 4 Seminar or Special Study courses:


Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade


Grade


Grade


Grade


Grade

Grade








E. Minor or Secondary Specialization: Part of the 90 hour requirement may consist of a minor, i.e.,
at least twelve semester hours at the 5000-level or above in a field approved by the student's
committee or advisor.

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade


F. Second and Third Foreign Languages: Before admission to the Qualifying Examination,
candidates must demonstrate functional knowledge of a second Romance language or of another
foreign language deemed appropriate to their scholarly specialization and approved by their
supervisory committees. Functional knowledge may be demonstrated by completion (with a
grade of B or better) of a third-year course (3000-level number) approved by the Graduate
Coordinator, or proven proficiency at that level. In Portuguese, this may be satisfied by both
POR 3010, Introduction to Portuguese and Brazil (accelerated), and one additional course at or
above the 3000 level. In French this may be satisfied by both FRE 3070, Accelerated
Introduction to French, and one additional course at or above the 3000 level. In Catalan this may
be satisfied by both CAT 3180 and CAT 3181. The supervisory committee may require reading
knowledge of third foreign language if such knowledge is judged appropriate for the candidate's
research. The third foreign language requirement can be satisfied in the same way, though
proficiency will be expected only in reading. Students cannot take their Quals without previously
complying with the prerequisite of a second foreign language (and a third, if it is required by the
Supervisory Committee).

G. Language Competence: All entering graduate students must demonstrate competence in
oral and written Spanish. Native and non-native speakers of Spanish may be asked to take SPN
6315 (Writing for the Profession) if their main advisor or the Graduate Faculty so recommend.
International students are required by state law to demonstrate competence in English by
satisfactory performance on both the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the
Test of Spoken English (TSE, or Speak Test).










H. Electives:

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade



Supervisory Committee: The Supervisory committee for a candidate for the doctoral degree shall consist
of no fewer than four members selected from the Graduate Faculty. At least two members, including the
chairperson, will be from the department recommending the degree, and at least one member will be
drawn from a different educational discipline. The chairperson and at least one additional member of the
committee must be members of the Graduate Faculty of the University of Florida. If a minor is chosen,
the Supervisory Committee will include at least one person selected from the Graduate Faculty from
outside the discipline of the major for the purpose of representing the student's minor. In the event that
the student elects more than one minor, each minor area must be represented on the Supervisory
Committee. A co-chairperson may be appointed to serve during a planned absence of the chairperson.

Graduate credit for work in and outside the major field: Graduate credit is awarded for courses numbered
5000 and above. The work in the major field must be in courses numbered 5000 or above.


(Rev 01/06)





47

RECORD SHEET (PhD, Linguistics Track)


NAME OF STUDENT:

NAME OF ADVISOR:

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS:




Course Requirements: The Graduate School requires that doctoral candidates complete at least 90 hours
(thesis and dissertation credits included) beyond the baccalaureate degree. Course requirements and
recommendations are as follows:

A. Required General Linguistics Courses:

1. LIN 6323 Phonology" Date Taken Grade

2. LIN 6402 "Morphology" Date Taken Grade

3. LIN 6501 "Syntax" Date Taken Grade


B. Romance Linguistics (recommended):

1. FOL 6735 "Introduction to Romance Linguistics" Date taken

C. Hispanic Linguistics (at least one course in each of five areas required,
M.A. level)

1. Phonetics and Phonology
Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

in addition to


any taken at the


Grade

Grade


2. Morphology and Syntax


3. History of the Language


4. Language Variation


5. Language Acquisition


Date Taken

Date Taken


Date Taken

Date Taken


Date Taken

Date Taken


Date Taken

Date Taken


Grade

Grade


Grade

Grade


Grade

Grade


Grade

Grade








D. Minor or Secondary Specialization: Part of the 90 hour requirement may consist of a minor, i.e.,
at least twelve semester hours at the 5000 level or above in a field approved by the student's
committee or advisor.

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

E. Second and Third Foreign Languages: Before admission to the qualifying examination, the
candidate must demonstrate functional knowledge of a second Romance language and reading
knowledge of a third language approved by his/her committee.

F. Language Competence: All entering graduate students must demonstrate competence in oral and
written Spanish. Native and non-native speakers of Spanish may be asked to take SPN 6315
(Writing for the Profession) if their main advisor or the Graduate Faculty so recommend.
International students are required by state law to demonstrate competence in English by
satisfactory performance on both the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the
Test of Spoken English (TSE, or Speak Test).

G. Electives (such as Spanish or Spanish American literature courses):

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade

Date Taken Grade


Supervisory Committee: The Supervisory Committee for a candidate for the doctoral degree shall consist
of no fewer than four members selected from the Graduate Faculty. At least two members, including the
chairperson, will be from the department recommending the degree, and at least one member will be
drawn from a different educational discipline. The chairperson and at least one additional member of the
committee must be members of the Graduate Faculty of the University of Florida. If a minor is chosen,
the Supervisory Committee will include at least one person selected from the Graduate Faculty from
outside the discipline of the major for the purpose of representing the student's minor. In the event that
the student elects more than one minor, each minor area must be represented on the Supervisory
Committee. A co-chairperson may be appointed to serve during a planned absence of the chairperson.


Graduate credit for work in and outside the major field: Graduate credit is awarded for courses numbered
5000 and above. The work in the major field must be in courses numbered 5000 or above. For work
outside the major (minor, second foreign language requirement: see below) courses numbered 3000 or
above, not to exceed 6 credits, may be taken provided they are part of an approved plan of study
(Graduate Council, 2/17/00).
(Rev. 8/02)





49


SPW 6905 Individual Work
PROTOCOL

(To be agreed upon during Advanced Registration:
by November for Spring Term, and
by February for Fall Term and Summer terms)

1. This course may not be taken in lieu of regular courses offered in the Department, unless it
serves as a substitute for a required course not being offered in time for graduation. Students are
advised that Individual Work projects will only rarely be approved because staffing shortfalls make it
necessary to rationalize professors' workloads.

2. Students who take this course will work independently under guidance of the professor.

3. Professor and student must agree on a project, work schedule and on the type of final product for the
course. Student must write up description of project ( 250 words minimum) to submit with this
application.

4. Application form and project description must be submitted to the professor and Chair for approval
before actual registration.

S T U D E N T : ....................................................................................

PROFESSOR: ................. ..............................................

SEMESTER/YEAR: .............. ...........................................

WORK SCHEDULE (meetings, periodicity, duration, objectives, etc.): .......................







TYPE OF WORK (paper, etc.) AND DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION:...............................







o Check here if you have attached description of project (250 words minimum)


Signature of Instructor Student Main Advisor Chair RLL

Copies to: 1) Instructor; 2) Student; 3) Main Advisor Student File; 4) RLL Student File

(Rev: 07/01)







Romance Languages & Literatures Shadowing Contract
2 credits, S/U

Procedures and Requirements
Upon approval from their main advisor and the professor to be shadowed, apprentice teachers
must meet with the professor to discuss this contract and its specific terms. A signed copy of the
contract must be given to the scheduler at the front desk of the RLL office, who will then enroll
the student in SPW 6945.

During the semester, the apprentice teacher must:
1) Attend all class sessions.
2) Meet regularly with the professor to discuss course design, content, delivery, and
student evaluation.
Other activities will vary, but may include:
1) Design and teach between one and four class sessions
2) Participate in the design of course quizzes, examinations, and writing assignments
3) Collaborate in the grading of assignments, under the supervision of faculty member.

At the end of the semester, apprentice teachers will submit two items to the professor:
1. A draft of a syllabus for the course, indicating schedule, units, dates for submission of
assignments and tests, point distribution for final grade, attendance policy, and a list of
readings and supplementary materials to be used.
2. A one-page rationale for the structure and content of the syllabus, and an explanation of the
course methodology to be employed.

The professor and the apprentice will meet to discuss the syllabus, and the apprentice teacher
will be responsible for incorporating any changes discussed. The final syllabus must be approved
by the professor before a grade is assigned for Shadowing, and before the apprentice is assigned
a section of the course to teach.

A satisfactory grade for Shadowing depends upon successful completion of the
requirements indicated above. Students will be assigned to teach a section of the shadowed
course when the Department is able to do so.






Signature of supervising professor Signature of apprentice teacher


Semester:


Date:




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