• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Request form
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Where do I apply?
 Can I get temporary cash assis...
 Other cash assistance
 Support services
 Transitional benefits
 Time limits
 Hardship exemptions
 Work requirements
 Sanctions
 Making welfare work for you
 Legal aid and legal services...
 Florida legistlators
 Regional workforce boards
 End notes






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Title: Making welfare work (for you!)
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Request form
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Where do I apply?
        Page 3
    Can I get temporary cash assistance?
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Other cash assistance
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Support services
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Transitional benefits
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Time limits
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Hardship exemptions
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Work requirements
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Sanctions
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Making welfare work for you
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Legal aid and legal services programs
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Florida legistlators
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Regional workforce boards
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    End notes
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
Full Text







Making
Welfare Work
(for you!)


Center for
Governmental Responsibility
Levin College of Law
UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA













Making Welfare Work


(for


you!)


by Elizabeth McCulloch, J.D.
















Acknowledgements

This manual is produced by the Making WAGES Work project. Making
WAGES Work is a project of the Center for Governmental Responsibility at
the Fredric G. Levin College of Law, University of Florida. It is funded by the
Children's Defense Fund and the Kellogg Foundation. Florida Legal
Services, Inc. is a partner in the project.
This manual could not have been produced without considerable information
and advice from Cindy Huddleston and Valory Greenfield of Florida Legal
Services. Thanks also go to Rena Danzey, who read the whole manuscript to
see if it was comprehensible, to Fran Morton, who helped with formatting, and
to Julie Beddingfield and Kali Blount, who helped gather information.
You can also find this manual on the Internet at www.law.ufl.edu/cgr/
publications.html If you copy all or part of it, please include information
about your source.
There are sure to be mistakes in this manual. If you spot any, or if you have
ideas about other information that I should include, please email me at
mcculloc@law.ufl.edu, subject line, "Making welfare work." You can call me at
352 392 2237, or write to me at:
Elizabeth McCulloch
Center for Governmental Responsibility
PO Box 117629
Gainesville, FL 32611-7629
Since the rules of welfare change often, we will update this manual periodi-
cally. I intend to update the Internet version each month. If you would like to
receive revised pages each year to insert in your notebook, please fill out and
send in the form on the next page.









Please send me yearly updates of "Making Welfare Work"


Your Name:


Your Mailing Address:





Mail form to: Elizabeth McCulloch
PO Box 117629
Gainesville, FL 32611
















Table of Contents

Introduction .................................... 1
What Is Welfare? ............................. 1
What Is This Book? ............................ 1
Using This Book .............................. 2
Where Do I Apply? ............................... 3
Can I Get Temporary Cash Assistance? .............. 4
Teen Parents ................................. 6
Cooperating With Child Support Enforcement ........ 6
Figuring It Out ................................ 7
Who do I count in my family? ......... 8
What counts as a resource. .......... 9
What do you count as income? ...... 10
Am I too rich for welfare? ........... 12
What do I deduct from income?
And how much money will I get? ..... 12
The payment standard ............. 14
Three-tier Shelter Payment Standard. 15
Other Cash Assistance .......................... 16
Relocation Help ............................. 16
Up-Front Diversion ........................... 16
Diversion to Strengthen Families ................. 17







Diversion to Prevent Child Abuse or Neglect ........ 18
Diversion for Domestic Violence Victims ........... 18
Teen Parent Diversion ......................... 18
Cash Assistance Severance Benefit ............... 19
The Poverty Level- Table ....................... 20
Support Services ............................... 21
Transportation ................................ 21
RITAs ...................................... 22
Other Services ............................. 23
Examples of Useful Services .................... 23
Transitional Benefits ............................. 25
Transportation .............................. 26
Child Care ................................. 26
Education and Training ......................... 26
Medicaid .................................. 27
Food Stamps .............................. 28
Time Limits .................................. 29
Does Everybody Have a Time Limit? .............. 29
Who Gets The Longer (36 Month) Time Limit? ....... 30
What If My At-A-Time Time Limit is Close
and I Don't Have a Job? ........................ 30
Reasons for an extension ........... 30
Should I ask for more time? ......... 31
Hardship Exemptions ............................ 32
Reason #1 Diligent Participation ................ 32
Reason #2 Significant Barriers .................. 32







Reason #3 Child Protection .................... 33
Reason #4 Domestic Violence .................. 33
Reason #5 Teen Parent ....................... 33
Reason #6 -Applying for Disability ................ 34
How Do I Ask For More time? .................... 34
Work Requirements ............................ 35
Who Has to Work? ............................ 35
Who is Exempt? ............................. 35
What Counts as Work? ......................... 36
Special programs for teen parents .... 38
Sanctions ..................................... 39
Work Requirements Sanctions ................... 39
Food Stamp Work Exemptions ................... 41
Child Support Sanctions ........................ 42
Summary: Exceptions to time limits, work
requirements, and sanctions ..................... 43
Making Welfare Work ForYou ....................... 44
To Prevent Mistakes ......................... 44
What if There is a Mistake? What if You
Disagree with What They Say? .................. 46
You can meet with your caseworker... 46
You can write a letter to your
caseworker ...................... 48
What if They Send Me a Letter Saying I Can't
Get Benefits, or I'm Being Sanctioned? ............ 50
Asking for a hearing ............... 50
Getting ready for a hearing.......... 50







If your case worker or supervisor
fixes your problem after you ask for
a hearing ........................ 5 1
When you go to the hearing ......... 51
Making W welfare Better ......................... 52
Who's in charge here? ............. 52
Regional Workforce Board, or
"RWB" ......................... 52
Department of Children and Families -
DCF. (Used to be called HRS) ....... 53
Case management contractor ....... 53
Workforce Florida, Inc.............. 54
Agency for Workforce Innovation ..... 54
Florida Legislature and the Governor. 54
Congress and the President......... 55
Making Welfare Work Better ..................... 55
What Could Your Welfare Program Do? ............ 57
Legal Aid and Legal Services Programs ............ 59
Florida Legislators ............................. 66
Regional Workforce Boards ....................... 91
End Notes .................................... 98












Introduction


What Is Welfare?

Welfare means lots of things. In this book we use it to mean the cash
assistance that families with children can get from the state of Florida. To get
that help, some people have to be in the "welfare transition program." In that
program, the state is supposed to help them find paying work so they won't
need to get cash assistance for a long time. The state is also supposed to
help with services they need so they can go to work.

Welfare in Florida has changed its name a lot of times in the past five
years. We used to have AFDC, and then we had WAGES. Now we have
temporary cash assistance (the monthly money) and welfare transition
services. But lots of people still use the old names.

Some of the rules in the new program are the same as AFDC and
WAGES, and some are different.


What Is This Book?

This book tells you what kind of help you can get from the welfare pro-
gram. It explains what you have to do to get that help. It tells you how to be
sure the program does what it is supposed to do for you. It tells you who
makes the decisions in the program. And it tells you how you can get the
people who make those decisions to listen to you. You are the real expert
about how a program can help make your life and your children's lives better.






We hope you will let your Regional Workforce Board, the new Workforce
Florida, Inc., and the Legislature that writes the law know what they can do to
help people.


Using This Book

We put special rules or definitions in a gray box so you can find them
easily. There are also empty boxes where you can write notes. At the end of
some sentences there are little numbers. If you look for the number in the
"Endnotes" section, you will find where that rule is in the Florida law books.

The welfare rules change every year, and there is sometimes news you
need to know about the program. There are two ways you can keep this
book up-to-date. This book will be on the Internet at www.law.ufl.edu/cgr/
publications.shtml and we will update it every month. If you don't use the
Internet, we can send you updated pages to put in this book. Just fill out the
form on p. v and send it in if you would like to keep your book up-to-date.

If you have problems or questions about welfare, we hope this book will
help you answer them. But you don't have to do it alone! Your legal aid
program can help you. Some programs are called Legal Aid, and some are
called Legal Services. In this book we call them all Legal Aid. We have a list
of these programs at the back of this book, in the "Directories" section.

Welfare rules are complicated. They have lots of details. If you have a
welfare problem and you want help from Legal Aid, take this book with you.
It can help them find the rule to help you. At the end of the book there are
end notes that tell where to find the rules.







Where Do I Apply?

Usually you will apply to get welfare help at the Department of Children
and Families office called DCF in your city or county. This office used to
be called HRS. A lot of people still call it that.

You should also be able to apply at the One Stop Career Center.1 There
should be a "One Stop" in your county. One Stops are where you go to get
help finding a job, learn about training programs, and get information about
cash assistance, and welfare transition services. Some One Stops don't
have all the services there yet. It makes sense to call DCF or the One Stop
first, before you go in, to find out the best place to go.



Notes:























\_______________________________













Can I Get Temporary
Cash Assistance?

Who can get welfare? People with children and not much money!2 In this
chapter we talk about "temporary cash assistance." In the next chapter we tell
about other kinds of cash assistance.

Temporary cash assistance is like the old AFDC. It is the money you get
every month from the state. They used to send you a check, but now they
give you a card, like an ATM card from a bank. It's called an electronic
benefits transfer card, but most people just call it an EBT card.

You can get money every month if:

* Your dependent children live with you.

* Your relatives who are dependent children live with you

* You don't have children living with you now, but you are in the last month
of pregnancy. (You can get monthly money in the last three months of
pregnancy if your doctor says you can't work.)3



If a child who lives with you is related to you by blood or marriage,
you can probably get money each month. This includes grandchildren,
great-grandchildren, cousins, brothers and sisters and nephews and
nieces, cousin's grandchildren all kinds of relatives!4
gr----cosi-sgrnd










*


Your income has to be below a certain amount, and your resources -things
like cars and bank accounts can't be worth more than a certain amount.
You also have to do the things that the program requires. (See Cooperating
with Child Support Enforcement on p. 6 and Work Requirements on
p. 35. You will have to give them proof that your children have been
immunized.6)


dv&1A ,


Maybe you share custody of your child with the other parent.
Then the parent who usually has the child can get welfare.5 If you
need help showing you are that parent, call your local Legal Aid
office, listed in the "Directories" section.


school, and is under 19. Children who are not in school are only
dependent until they are 18.


If your child is going to be away from your home less than 30
days, you can still get money for her. But if your child is going away
more than 30 days, you have to tell DCF as soon as you know. If you
don't tell them within five days, they can stop giving you money.7
|


Are you an immigrant? A lot of people think immigrants can't get cash
assistance. That's not true. It depends on what your immigration status
is, and how long you've had that status. Usually, if you are a long-term
lawful permanent resident, or a Cuban or Haitian, you will be able to get
cash assistance. If DCF says you can't get help because you are an
immigrant, ask Legal Aid for help. You might be eligible.8







Teen Parents9


If someone under 18 has a child she can get cash assistance for herself
and the child. The money won't be paid to her, but to an "alternative payee."
There are some special rules that apply to her:

* If she hasn't finished high school, she must go to school (or a training
program) after the child is 12 weeks old.

* She has to take parenting classes.

* She has to live with her parent, or guardian, or other adult relative.

But, if she might be harmed by living with them, and DCF decides it's not
in her best interest to live with them, they have to help her find some other
place to live, where she will have supervision. While they are doing this, they
have to go ahead and pay the cash assistance to the "alternative payee."



ALTERNATIVE PAYEE. Sometimes the money goes to somebody
other than the parent or person who is taking care of the child. Alternative
payees (lots of people call them "protective payees") are used sometimes
for children's benefits when a parent is sanctioned, or reaches their time
limits. They are also used when the parent is under 18. They have to use
the money for the child.


Cooperating With
Child Support Enforcement10

To get welfare you have to tell DCF who the other parent of your child is.
You might have to get a blood test. You need to keep appointments with the
child support office, and testify in court if they need you.






If it would be dangerous for you or your child to cooperate, then you can
be excused from this requirement. Be sure to tell your worker if it would be
dangerous. If you need help proving that, contact Legal Aid.

Sometimes a woman is scared of the real father, so she names somebody
else. This is a bad idea. A blood test will show it was not true. Then you will
not be able to get cash assistance until DCF finds the real father and tests
him. If you are scared of the children's father, ask to be excused from
cooperating. If your worker says no, Legal Aid may be able to help.


Figuring It Out

Do you wonder if you have too much money to get welfare? Do you want
to know how much you can get? Then grab a pencil and a calculator! You can
figure it out.

Remember that the law and DCF policy change often. And your situation
may be special. So be sure and check with your local Legal Aid office before
you do something based on what you figure out here.

The basic questions you'll answer to figure out if you can get monthly
money, and how much you'll get, are:

* Who do I count in my family?

* What counts as a "resource"?


SNotes:






* What counts as income?


* What do I deduct from income?

* What payment standard do I use?

This part of the book takes you step by step through answering those five
questions.

Who do I count in my family?11
You only count people who live with you. The people you count are the
people the state gives you money for. We say they are "included in the
grant." You never count people who get SSI because the state won't be
giving you money for them. They get their own money from SSI.

First, count the number of your children, or children who are your
relatives, who live with you. Only count children under 18, or children who
are 18 but are still in school.12 Do not count children who are not going to
get any money because of the "family cap." (See p. 9)

Next, if you are the parent of any of those children, count yourself. Both
parents count, if they live together.

What if you are the grandmother or the stepfather or some other relative?
If you are not the parent of any of the children, you can usually choose if you
want to be counted. But some stepparents have to be counted.

If you are counted, you might get more money, depending on your income.
But you will have a time limit, and work requirements.

If you are not counted, this will be called a "child only" case. The money
might be less, but there won't be any time limits or work rules.








"Family Cap" If a child is born more than ten months after you start
getting welfare, he is treated differently from the other children. This is
called the "family cap." For the first child born under the family cap you
will get half the usual amount of money. If you have more children after
that while you are on welfare, you will get no extra money for them.13





Special rule for stepparents: Even if none of the children are yours, if
your gross income is more than 185% of the federal poverty level for two
people, you will have to be counted.14 If it is less, you can choose.
Remember, if you are the parent of any of the children in the house, you
will have to be counted, even if you don't want money for your own kids.





Notes.












What Counts as a Resource15

If your family has more than $2000 worth of "resources" you are too rich
for temporary cash assistance! (But you may be able to get other kinds of
help. See Other Cash Assistance, and Support Services.)

Resources include cash and bank accounts, cars, and real estate.

But your home doesn't count. Things that belong to somebody who gets
SSI don't count.






And you can subtract $8,500 from the blue book value of one car before
you count the rest of it as part of your resources. If the work rules apply to
you, and your family uses more than one car to get to work or school, you
add up the value of all the cars. Then you subtract $8,500, and what's left
counts as part of your resources.

This means if you have $100 in the bank, and a car that is worth $10,000,
you will be counted as having $1,600 in resources. ($10,000 car minus
$8,500 = $1,500. Plus $100 cash, equals $1,600.) Your total resources are
less than $2,000, so you will be able to get money each month if you fit the
rest of the rules.


Notes:













What do you count as income?
Do count:

Money you and most people who live with you earn

Child support (But if one of the children gets no cash assistance
because of the "family cap," child support for her is not included.
See the box about the family cap, p. 916)

Alimony

Social Security (except when you get it in combination with SSI)







Don't count:


* Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

* Social Security you get with your SSI

* Money your children under 19 earn if they are in school

* Money paid for foster children17

* Money you get for being a foster grandparent or in the RSVP program18

* Incentive payments you get from the welfare transition program19

* Non-cash items. If someone brings you groceries or diapers or clothes,
these don't count.


Notes.











s________________________________


Even though these people aren't included in the grant, some of
their income has to be counted:

Parents of a teen parent under 18 if the teen lives with them.20

Sponsor of an eligible non-citizen.21

Immigrant parents of a child who is a citizen or eligible
immigrant child, even if the parents aren't eligible themselves.22






Turning weekly income into monthly income:


You figure out if you can get help by using your monthly income.

If you get paid every week, multiply that amount by 4.3 to get your
monthly income.

If you get paid every two weeks, multiply that amount by 2.15 to get
your monthly income.

Am I too rich for welfare?
Compare your monthly income to the poverty level table (see p. 20). If it is
more than 185% of the poverty level for your size family, you are too rich to
get monthly money!23 But you might be able to get other kinds of help. If your
monthly income is the same as or less than 185% of the poverty level, keep
reading to see if you can get monthly money.

What do I deduct from income? And how much
money will I get?



SWe explain the Payment Standard on p. 14.



If you're not earning money

Add up all the income that counts. This is your
"gross income."

Compare this to the Payment Standard for a family your size.

If your gross income is more than the Payment Standard, you're not
eligible for monthly cash assistance.

If it's smaller, subtract it from the Payment Standard. That is how much
money you should get.









(


If the money you should get is less than $10, you won't get any
money! But you can still get services.


If you're earning money
There are two ways you can get some of your earnings not counted. This
is called an "earned income disregard," and we explain how it works below.
1. If you have gotten welfare for at least 1 of the last 4 months, you get the
earned income disregard.24
2. If you haven't been getting welfare in the last 4 months, add up all the
income that counts. Subtract $90.25
Compare this to the Payment Standard for a family your size. If it's bigger
than the Payment Standard, you're not eligible for monthly cash assistance.
If it's smaller, you get the "Earned Income Disregard"


Earned Income Disregard (This means they don't count
some of the money you make when they figure out if you
can get help.)


* Add up all the income you earn.
* Subtract $200.
* Subtract 1/2 of what is left.
* Add any unearned income you have.
* This is your "gross income."






If it's bigger than the Payment Standard for a family your size, you can't
get monthly money.
If it's smaller, subtract it from the Payment Standard. That is how much
money you should get each month.



If you have a child born more than 10 months after you apply
for monthly help, you get less additional money for that child. See
Family Cap, on p. 9.




Notes.








The Payment Standard26

The Payment Standards are based on your family size and the amount of
rent or mortgage you are supposed to pay. (They call this the "shelter
obligation.") For child-only cases, the caretaker relative decides how much
"rent" the child is supposed to pay.

To use the Payment Standard, you have to figure out which shelter
obligation you use.

If you don't have any rent or mortgage to pay, or if you are a teen parent
living with your parents, you are in Level 1.

If you have to pay up to $50 rent or mortgage, you are in Level 2.

If you have to pay more than $50, or if you are homeless, you are in
Level 3.










Three-tier Shelter Payment Standard

Level One Level Two Level Three
Family Zero Shelter Zero to $50 More than $50
Size Obligation Shelter Obligation Shelter Obligation


$95

$158

$198

$254

$289

$346

$392

$438

$485

$534

$582

$630

$678


$153

$205

$258

$309

$362

$414

$467

$519

$570

$623

$676

$728

$781


$180

$241

$303

$364

$426

$487

$549

$610

$671

$733

$795
$857

$919












Other Cash Assistance

There are other programs in the welfare law that can help people with
money or services. Some of these are to help people so they won't need to
get money every month. They are called diversion programs. You don't have
to be eligible to get monthly money to get this help. Your income has to be
200% of the poverty level or less.27


Relocation Help28

Maybe you can't get a job where you live. You might live in a place where
there are hardly any jobs, or where you can't get transportation. Maybe you
have found a job somewhere else at higher pay or with better benefits than
the job you have now. Maybe you could get training in a different place that
would help you get ahead in your work. Maybe you need to get away from
domestic violence to hold a job. Or maybe you could hold a job if you lived
near your family. Your welfare program can pay for the cost of moving.
You can also get transitional benefits or diversion benefits after you move.

If welfare paid your moving costs to get you and your children away from
domestic violence, you can still get monthly cash assistance. But if they paid
moving costs for some other reason, you will have to agree not to apply for
monthly cash assistance for 6 months, except in an emergency.


Up-Front Diversion29

Maybe you don't need to get money every month. Maybe you just need
some help to get you out of a jam, so you can find a job, or keep your job.






At the One Stop they can help you with services or money. You will have to
agree not to apply for monthly cash assistance for three months, unless an
emergency comes up. And you can only get this kind of help one time in five
years.30

The worker has to look at all your circumstances and barriers to getting
and keeping a job to see if you can get this help.31 He may need estimates
of what it would take to fix your problem. He is supposed to see if other
community agencies can help out. But he is supposed to get you help within
7 days of the time you apply.

If you have a job, or you lost your job in the last 60 days, your DCF worker
should automatically see if you are eligible for this. But even if you haven't
had a job in a while, if you are interested in this one time help, tell the worker.

Here are some examples of emergencies they can help you with:

Your car broke down and needs repairs

You need to catch up your rent

You can't pay your light bill

You need medical help

They can also help with other emergencies that aren't listed here.

First, they will try to help you get a job if you don't have one. Then they
see if there are services, like child care or transportation, that you need. If
your emergency can best be fixed with money, they can give you up to
$1,000 to solve your problem.


Diversion to Strengthen Families32

This help is for people with children whose income is no more than 200%
of the poverty level. (See poverty level table on p. 20). It lets you get the
same kind of services people who get monthly money can get: job






placement, training and education, child care, transportation, counseling.
You can also get a RITA account.

To get this help, you have to agree not to apply for monthly money for six
months, unless an emergency comes up.


Diversion to Prevent Child Abuse or Neglect33

Sometimes the Department removes children from their families because
they are homeless, or their home is dangerous. This part of the law lets the
Department help the family fix the problem so the children can stay with
them. You can get services or a one-time payment of money under this
program. You will still be able to apply for other help, like monthly money
or support services for working.


Diversion for Domestic Violence Victims34

If you are a pregnant woman, or you have children, and you need help
because of domestic violence, you can get services or a one-time payment
of up to $1,000 to help you. You will still be able to apply for other help if you
need it later, like monthly money or support services for working.


Teen Parent Diversion35

If you are a teen parent you can get services to help you finish your
education and avoid getting pregnant. Even if you don't have a child, you
can get these services if the Department thinks you are "at risk" of getting
pregnant. You will still be able to apply for other help if you need it later,
like monthly money or support services for working.






Cash Assistance Severance Benefit36

If you have been getting monthly money for 6 months or more, you can
stop getting that and get one big check instead. You have to have a job that
will probably last at least 6 months. You have to give the program information
about your employment and earnings. You have to agree not to apply for
monthly money in the next six months unless there is an emergency. Then
you can get $1,000 at one time. This will only count as one month toward
your time limit. You can still get food stamps, Medicaid and child care if your
income makes you eligible.


The severance benefit is one reason it's important to let your
S worker know if you decide to go off cash assistance because you
found a job!
^ I I


Notes:






The Poverty Level37

Some services are only for people whose income is below the poverty
level, or a certain percent of the poverty level. Here is a table to show you
how much that is.


Number of 100% 185% 200%
people poverty poverty poverty


$687

$922

$1,157

$1,392

$1,627

$1,862

$2,097

$2,332

$2,567

$2,802

$3,037

$3,272


$1,271

$1,706

$2,140

$2,575

$3,010

$3,445

$3,879

$4,314

$4,749

$5,184

$5,618

$6,053


$1,374

$1,844

$2,314

$2,784

$3,254

$3,724

$4,194

$4,664

$5,134

$5,604

$6,074

$6,544


These dollar amounts are monthly income. Multiply weekly income by 4.3 to get monthly
income. Multiply biweekly income by 2.15 to get monthly income.












Support Services38

A special note: Education and training aren't called "support
services." But they are one of the most important benefits you can get
from the welfare program. They can count as a work activity, and we tell
about them in the Work Requirements section. See p. 35.

Support services are things that help you get or stay in a job or attend
school. Child care, transportation, books, counseling, uniforms and tools for
a job, are all support services. Your Regional Workforce Board decides
which support services they will pay for.

To get support services, the activity you're in has to be approved by the
welfare program as a work activity. But if you are doing your work activity
and also going to school, you can get support services to help you do that,
too.39

Your Regional Workforce Board doesn't have to give you these services if
they have run out of money. The Florida Legislature decides how much
money to give them for these services.


Transportation

You can get transportation help to get to and from work and school, and to
get your children to child care. This could be cash or bus tokens. It could be
a van service. They can also pay you back for transportation costs you
already paid, if you have receipts.

If you have your own car, you can get a voucher or a gas card to buy gas.
If your car needs fixing, they can pay for it if you have an estimate from a car






repair shop. Some Regional Workforce Boards have a program to give
donated, second-hand cars to people on welfare.

If you need your car to go to work or school, you may be able to get help
to pay for your car insurance, your drivers license, and your car registration.

If you are getting temporary cash assistance, the program should pay
almost all of your child care costs for children under 13 when you are working
or looking for work. They may also pay child care while you are in school.
You will probably have to pay a small fee for child care, depending on what
your income is.



If your children are between 13 and 17 but have "special needs,"
you can get child care for them too.40



You can choose any kind of child care you want, as long as it is legal.
If you don't want your children in a day care center, you can use a registered
family child care home or some other informal arrangement. A family mem-
ber can be paid to provide child care at half the professional rate, after taking
a three-hour course. If you don't already have child care you will be sent to
the local community child care coordinating agency. They can help you find
child care.


RITAs41

If you get a job, your Regional Workforce Board can use their money to
set up an account for you, called a Retention Incentive Training Account, or
RITA. The accounts are to help people stay in jobs and get better jobs. You
can use the money to pay for education or training from approved programs
in your area, or support services to help you get education or training.







Other Services

Welfare will help pay for a lot of other support services so you can work or
be in a work activity. For instance, they may be able to help you and your
family get counseling. It can be counseling for personal or family problems. It
can be counseling for drug or alcohol problems.

They will also help you pay for things like books, tools, clothing, fees and
other things you need to work.



Your case worker is supposed to tell you about support services
you can have. But that doesn't always happen. Be sure to ask for
the services you need. If the worker says they don't have those
services in your area, it's important to let your Regional Workforce
Board know people need those services to work.


Examples of Useful Services

Your worker at the One Stop has assigned you to computer class. The
teacher tells you to buy a special book about computers, but it costs $40.
Welfare can buy it for you. The book is a support service because it will help
you with class.


Notes:








L y






The One Stop worker assigned you to look for a job (called "job search").
Your car breaks down while you are out looking. Welfare can help you get
your car fixed. Getting your car fixed is a support service because you need
it to look for a job.

You find a job as a security guard. You need a uniform and a license.
Welfare can pay for those. The uniform and license are support services
because you need them to take the job.




















Transitional Benefits42



You might decide you don't want to get money every month
anymore. Maybe you got a job, or maybe it's just too much hassle for
too little money. There are three reasons why it's important to let
your worker know that you are leaving welfare.

1. You can still get child care and Medicaid and other help.

2. If you have a job, you can get $1,000 as your last payment
(see "Cash Assistance Severance Benefit" on p. 19).

3. If you just stop doing the things you're supposed to do, with out
telling your worker, you may end up with a sanction on your
record. This will stay there, and could cause you a lot of
headaches if you need help in the future.


When you stop getting monthly money, you can still get help from the
welfare program, and from other programs. Help you get after your monthly
money stops is called "transitional benefits," because it's supposed to help
you make a transition from getting welfare to supporting your family with what
you earn. Your Regional Workforce Board decides which transitional services
they will pay for.

Your welfare program doesn't have to give you these services (except
Medicaid) if they have run out of money. The Florida Legislature decides how






much money to give them for these services. Medicaid is a separate
program, and if you meet the rules, you get it even if they run out of welfare
money.


Transportation43

You can get help with transportation that you need for work or school for
two years after your welfare stops, no matter why it stops. They can help
you pay for a driver's license, for fixing your car, and for your tags and insur-
ance. You can even get help paying for a car. You can also get bus passes
or help paying for gas.


Child Care44

If you go off cash assistance because you got a job, you can get help with
child care for two years after your check stops, as long as your income is
200% of the poverty level or less. This is also true if you don't go on monthly
cash assistance but get "up front diversion" (see p. 16).

After that, you can get help with child care if your income is 150% of the
poverty level or less.45


Education and Training46

If you are working or looking for work, you can get money for training or
education for two years after you stop getting monthly money. You can use
this to upgrade your job, or train for a new kind of job. If the program you
want offers financial aid, you will need to apply for that before you can get
help from the One Stop.

Your Regional Workforce Board can also decide to provide support
services, like child care or transportation help, for people who are getting
education or training after they stop getting the monthly money. If they aren't






doing this, remember you need to let them know how important it is to you.
(See "Making Welfare Better" p. 52).


Medicaid47

If you've been on monthly cash assistance for 3 of the last 6 months, and
you have children, and your cash assistance stops because you are earning
too much money, you can get Medicaid for 6 more months. You don't have to
apply again to get this, and it doesn't matter how much money you are
earning.

After that, you can get another 6 months of Medicaid if your income is less
than 185% of the poverty level, and you go to DCF and apply for it. You do
need to report your income and child care costs to DCF.48

If you've been on monthly cash assistance for 3 of the last 6 months, and
your cash assistance stops because you are getting too much alimony or
child support, you can get 4 more months of Medicaid. This is called
"extended Medicaid" instead of transitional Medicaid.49

If you stop getting cash assistance because you have reached your time
limit, and your income hasn't gone up, you and your children still can get
Medicaid. If your income has gone up, be sure to ask your worker if you and
your children can still get Medicaid.

If you are sanctioned for not doing your work requirement, you and your
children still get Medicaid.5s

If you are sanctioned for not cooperating with child support enforcement,
your children still get Medicaid.51







Food Stamps

If your cash assistance stops because you get a job, or reach your time
limit, you can probably still get food stamps if you're not earning too much. If
you are sanctioned for not doing your work activity, you could lose your food
stamps too. If you're sanctioned for some other reason you can probably still
get food stamps.


On the next few pages we tell you the rules about hardship
exemptions, time limits, work requirements and sanctions. They can
be confusing. On p. 43 we have a chart to help you figure them out.


Your worker is supposed to tell you about transitional support
services you can have. But she can't do that if you don't come in to talk
to her when you decide to leave welfare!

So be sure to talk to her and tell her the services you need. If the
worker says they don't have those services in your area, it's important
to let your local Regional Workforce Board know people need those
services to work.

















Time Limits52

There are two kinds of time limits.

Lifetime time limit: You can only get cash welfare for 48 months in your
adult life. This includes money you got in another state, before you moved to
Florida. It also includes money you got for yourself and your baby when you
were still a teenager.

At-a-time time limit: Most families can only get monthly money for 24
months in 5 years. Some families can get the monthly money for 36 months
in 6 years.


Does Everybody Have a Time Limit?53

Almost everyone who gets welfare has time limits, but these people don't:

People who get a disability check: SSI or SSDI.

People who have to take care of a disabled family member.

Children who live with their relatives, if only the children get money.







Who Gets The Longer (36 Month) Time Limit?54

* Parents under age 24 who haven't finished high school

* Parents under age 24 who have worked less than three months in the
last year

* People who have gotten temporary cash assistance (this includes AFDC
or WAGES) for 36 months in the last five years.



No matter how little your monthly money is, every month you get it
counts toward the time limit. So if you are working and getting very
little money from welfare, think about going off welfare. That way if
you need it in the future, you will still have time left from the 48
months. You can still get Medicaid, and help with child care and
transportation, even though you stop getting cash assistance.
See "Transitional Benefits" on p. 25. Also see "Cash Assistance
Severance Benefits" on p. 19.




What If My At-A-Time Time Limit is Close
and I Don't Have a Job?

You might be able to get up to 12 more months of welfare. This is called
an extension.

Another way to get more time is a hardship exemption. We tell about
these in the next section, on p. 32.


Reasons for an extension

* Work credit extension. You can get another month of cash assistance for
every month that you had a job.55







* Treatment extension. You can get another month of cash assistance for
every month that you followed the rules of a mental health or drug or
alcohol treatment program. You can get this extension when you
successfully finish the program. You can only get it once.56

* Disability applicants. If you are waiting for SSI or SSDI to decide if you will
get disability checks, you automatically get a extension until they make
their decision.57


Should I ask for more time?

Just because you can get an extension doesn't mean you should use it.
This is because every month you get cash assistance counts against your
four-year lifetime limit. If you are working, and getting a very little money
from welfare, ask yourself if you can live on just your earnings. If you need
help again in the future, you will still have some months left to get money.
Remember, when you stop getting monthly money you can still get
transitional services, like child care, transportation, and education and
training. This is explained in "Transitional Benefits," on p. 25.

If you do need the extension, be sure to contact your worker when you get
a notice that you are running out of time. Be sure that you got credit for the
months you were earning money, or the months you were in a treatment
program.


Notes:











\J












Hardship Exemptions58

You can get up to 24 months more of cash assistance if you get a hard-
ship exemption. A hardship exemption can get you cash assistance even
past the 48 month lifetime limit. But the state can only give these exemptions
to 1/5 of the people in the caseload.59 There are different reasons why you can
get a hardship exemption.


Reason #1 Diligent Participation60

You did every activity you were supposed to. Or you couldn't do your
activity because of something you couldn't help. You've only had one work
sanction in 18 months. Still, you can't find a job. Or maybe it was very hard
for you to have a job while you were getting cash assistance because

your child was under six and you can't get child care, or

you were incapacitated, or

you had a baby less than 3 months old, or

you had to take care of a disabled family member, or

you were a teen parent and just got your high school diploma or GED


Reason #2 Significant Barriers61

Even if you have had lots of sanctions, you may be able to get extra
months of cash assistance if there are things that make it hard for you to find
work or go to work. These things include






* You don't have child care or transportation


You live in a place with high unemployment

You are homeless

You have a felony conviction

You work, but not enough to support your family

You are illiterate

English is not your main language


Reason #3 Child Protection

If stopping your cash assistance would mean your children had to go into
emergency shelter or foster care, your children can go on getting money. But
the money will only be for the children, and it will be paid to somebody else to
be used for the children. This person is called a protective payee. (That's
the same as an alternative payee. We explain that on p. 6).


Reason #4 Domestic Violence

If violence in your home prevents you from doing what you're supposed to
do in the welfare program, you can get extra time on welfare.


Reason #5 -Teen Parent62

A teen parent can get up to 24 months of cash assistance after getting her
high school diploma or GED, even if this takes her past her 36-month limit.






Reason #6 Applying for Disability63

If you have applied for disability from SSI or Social Security, you can have
an extension from time limits until you get the final decision on whether you
will get disability. But if you lose your disability case, the months you kept
getting monthly money will count against your 48-month lifetime limit.


How Do I Ask For More Time?64

You ask your worker. Your worker should meet with you before you reach
your time limit, and ask if you want an exemption. The worker decides
whether you should have more time. Then a group of people reviews that
decision. If the worker and the reviewers say no, you should ask for a "fair
hearing." Legal aid can help you with this.



Be sure to look on p. 50 to learn about fair hearings.


Notes:


r












Work Requirements65

Usually if you get cash assistance you have to be in a "work activity." This
is usually paid work or volunteer work, but it can be looking for a job or going
to school or training.


Who Has to Work?

People 16 and over who get cash assistance have to work unless they are
exempt from working. Single parents have to work 30 hours a week. In
two-parent families, the parents' work hours have to total 35 hours a week.66
(If you are getting mental health or drug or alcohol treatment your total hours
of work can be reduced by 5 hours a week.)67


Who is Exempt?68

You are exempt if you:

Are under 16

Get SSI or Social Security disability checks

Don't get money for yourself, but only for the children who stay with
you69

Have a child under 3 months old (But if you haven't finished high school
you may have to go to school)

You are also exempt from work requirements if you have no time limit.
See p. 29 to learn who has no time limit.







(Also look at p. 41, which tells you what the law says about "good
cause" for not doing your work activity.)


What Counts as Work?70

Job search and job preparation. These can go on for up to six weeks
when you start getting monthly money.

A job you get paid for. This could include a work-study job when you are
a student, or on-the-job training with a private employer. Your employer may
be able to get some of your salary paid by the government. The One Stop
staff should have information about this that you can give to an employer.



You or your employer should ask the One Stop staff about Work
Supplementation, and other ways to get some of your salary paid by
the government.



Community service work experience, or CWEP. They
used to call this workfare. It means you work enough hours
to earn your monthly money and food stamps at an hourly minimum
wage rate.71

Taking care of children. If you take care of somebody's children while
she does her community service work, you can count that as a work activity.


You should not be assigned to CWEP for a long time. Be sure
your plan includes what you need to get a paid job. This could be
training, or counseling, or English lessons. It's your case manager's
job to help you figure out what services you need, and arrange for
you to get them.







Work experience. If you don't have work experience already, you can be
in an on-the-job training program. If you are assigned to this, you will still be
getting monthly money instead of a paycheck. The training should be aimed
at employment.

Job skills training which you need to meet the needs of a specific job or
industry. This could include English or Spanish language classes with the
training.

Vocational education and training for up to 12 months. After 12 months,
you can still get vocational education and training. But you'll have to do other
work activities too.



The law says lots of people who get cash assistance could be
getting vocational education for a year. But not very many people
are. If that's what you want, ask your case manager about it. First
you'll have to show you're willing to work, either in a job or in CWEP.
And you may have to take a remedial course first. But don't let them
leave you in a dead-end job if there's training you want. Be sure your
plan moves you toward training!



High school or GED classes, if you haven't finished high school or your
GED. This can include literacy training. If you are under 19 you may be re-
quired to go to high school or GED classes. If you are 19 or older, you can
only count 10 hours a week in education; the rest of your 30 required hours
have to be in a different work activity.

Education related to employment. If you are under 19 and haven't fin-
ished high school or your GED, you can get education services to prepare
you for a job in a specific field.






Special programs for teen parents


Extended education and training. Your regional workforce board can
set up a plan for people to get more education and have it count toward their
work hours. If they haven't done this, and you think they should, let them
know! (See Making Welfare Better on p. 55).



When you meet with your case manager for the first time, you'll


AW


Notes:


















Sanctions

If you don't do your work activity, and you don't have a good reason, you
can be sanctioned. You can also be sanctioned if you don't help enforce child
support. A sanction means they cut off your money and usually your food
stamps. But they don't cut off your Medicaid. (See the end of this section for
information about child support sanctions)



Will they cut off my food stamps? The food stamp law says
certain people don't have to work to get food stamps they have an
"exemption." If you are one of those people, you will still get food
stamps when your monthly money is cut off. See the end of this
section for information about food stamps work exemptions.




Work Requirements Sanctions72

The first time you get sanctioned DCF will stop your cash for at least ten
days. When the ten days is over, they'll start your cash again when you start
doing your work activity. Your food stamps will be cut off for at least ten days
too. If you are the head of household, your family's food stamps will stop too.






The second time you get sanctioned they stop your cash for at least a
month. After the month is up they will start it again on the first day of the next
month, or when you start doing your work activity, whichever is later. Your
food stamps will be cut off for at least three months. If you are the head of
household, your family's food stamps will stop too.

The third time you get sanctioned they stop your cash for at least three
months and your food stamps for at least six months. After the 3 months is
up, they will start it again on the first day of the next month or when you start
doing your work activity, whichever is later. If you're head of household, your
family's food stamps will stop too.

On the second and third times, DCF can keep your money and food
stamps coming for the children by paying it to someone else who will use it
for the children. That could be a close friend or relative. This person is
called an alternative payee or a protective payee. If DCF can't find someone
to do this, they may get "protective services" to come to your home and see if
your children are okay.73

You can see why it's really important to let your case manager know if you
can't do your work activity. He may be able to help you so your cash
assistance won't be stopped.

If you don't do your work requirement, your worker has to write you before
he asks DCF to cut off your money. Then you can tell him why you didn't do
your work activity. He should help you find the services you need to go to
work, like child care or transportation.

If DCF sends you a letter saying they are going to sanction you, don't give
up! If you had a good reason for not doing your work activity, ask for a
hearing. You can call and ask for a hearing. But it's better to do it in writing.
You can write a letter using the model letter on p. 49. Make a copy to keep,
and send the letter right away. It's even better if you can deliver it in person.
When you do, ask them to stamp the date you gave it to them on your copy.
Then call Legal Aid and ask them to help you with the hearing.








If you ask for a hearing within ten days of the date on DCF's letter,
your money will keep coming. If you wait, you have 90 days to ask
for the hearing, but your money will stop until the decision is made.



The law says these are good reasons for not doing your activity:74

* no child care for child under 6

* doctor says you can't work75

* you've applied for disability

* care for disabled family member76

* you can't do it because of domestic violence then you and your case
manager need to make a different plan that will keep you safe

* you are in a residential program for drug, alcohol, or mental health
treatment77

* circumstances beyond your control


Food Stamp Work Exemptions78

You don't have to work to get food stamps if you:

* are younger than 16 or older than 59

* are 16 or 17 and are in school and not head of your family

* are physically or mentally unfit to work

* you have to take care of your child under 6

* you have to take care of a disabled person






* you are getting unemployment compensation


you are participating in a drug or alcohol treatment program

you are a seasonal farm worker who will be starting work in 30 days

you are a school employee off for the summer

you are in school or a training program half-time

you are in college or graduate school half-time, in certain situations79


Child Support Sanctions

If you don't cooperate with child support enforcement they will cut off all
your cash assistance. They will start it again when you cooperate, unless
you named the wrong father. Then they won't start it until they find the real
father. If you get a letter saying you are being sanctioned, and you have
good cause not to cooperate, answer the letter right away. Ask for a hearing,
and then contact Legal Aid for help. See Cooperating with Child Support
Enforcement on p. 6, and Making Welfare Work for You on p. 44.


Notes.









Summary: Exceptions to time limits, work requirements, and sanctions

Can Get Hardship
Exemption Can Get Hardship Have To Work But
(makes time limit longer) Exemption Don't Have To "Good Cause" Not To
No time Limit If Only 1 Sanction With More Sanctions Work (No Sanction)

Disability check Doctor says can't work No child care for child Disability check You've applied for
under 6 disability

Cares for disabled Cares for disabled family Domestic violence Cares for disabled Care for disabled family
family member member family member member

Check only for kids Baby under 3 months No transportation Check only for kids Doctor says you can't
work

Teen parent Homeless Baby under 3 months No child care for child
under 6

(And all the reasons in the Felony conviction Under 16 Domestic violence
next column)

Employed but very low In residential treatment
income program

Illiterate Circumstances beyond
your control

English not your main
language

High unemployment in
area

Kids would need foster
care (money continues
only for kids)



















Making Welfare Work For You

(Parts of this chapter are adapted with permission from a Consumer's Guide to Missouri
Welfare Policies, from the Reform Organization of Welfare (ROWEL) in St Louis, Missouri.)


What's the best way to get what you need from the welfare system?

Keep your worker informed of changes in your income, of what
you need, of problems you have.
Give your worker information in writing, and keep a copy.

Ask questions about services you need, about rules you don't
understand.


You can see from this manual that the rules of welfare are complicated.
They might confuse you sometimes. They confuse the DCF workers and One
Stop workers, too! That means the workers don't always follow the rules.
This part of the manual tells you how you can make welfare work for you.


To Prevent Mistakes

1. Read what they send you.

When you get a letter from DCF or your worker at the One Stop, read it
right away. Be sure you understand what it says. Some of these letters
are not written very clearly. If you have trouble understanding it, ask your






friends or family for help. If they can't help you, call your worker and ask
her to explain it.

2. Save the paperwork.

Keep all the papers or letters that come from the DCF or the One Stop or
the Regional Workforce Board. If you put them all in one box or folder, you
will be able to find them when you need to. Some people like to get a 3-
ring notebook and put each paper in it when it comes. That way the pa-
pers will stay in order and be easier to find.

3. Put things in writing.

Whenever you talk to a worker, in person or on the phone, write down the
person's name. Also write down the date and time, and what they told
you. Put this in your folder too. If you keep your papers in a notebook, you
can put some blank pages in the notebook for writing this information.
When the worker calls, tell her to "hold on" while you go get your
notebook!


Notes:






4. Keep copies.


DCF and the One Stop need lots of information from you. When you take
a paper to the agency, ask the receptionist or your worker to make a copy
and stamp the date on it. In case the paper gets lost, you can prove you
gave it to them! Keep all your copies in your folder or notebook.


What If There is a Mistake?
What If You Disagree with What They Say?

Sometimes you want services your worker says you can't have. Some-
times you get a letter saying they are stopping your benefits. If you think they
are not following the rules, you can try to get the decision changed.

Here are some steps you can take to fix problems:

You can meet with your caseworker
1. Be sure you say clearly what your problem is, or what it is you need. You
can write down your own "problem statement" to explain what you need.
Examples:

"My son's daycare center won't let him come back because he gets in
fights. I need help to find daycare for the evening shift. Child care
resources says they don't have any evening slots."

"I should have food stamps today but my card is still showing no money."

"My doctor wrote a letter saying I can't work but my worker says it's not
good enough."

2. If your worker says you have to do something you don't think you have to
do, or says you can't have services you think you should have, ask her to
explain why. Write down what she says, or ask her to write it down.







3. Sometimes your DCF or One Stop worker may tell you something is a rule
that isn't in this book. Ask her to give you a copy of that rule.

If she doesn't have it written down, maybe she has made a mistake and it
is not a rule.

4. If the worker can't help you, ask to talk to her supervisor. If the supervisor
is not available, get her name and phone number and call her.

3. When you talk with the supervisor tell her your problem. Use your
problem statement if you wrote it down. Tell her what the worker says.

4. Write down what the supervisor tells you, or ask her to write it down.
If there's something you don't understand, ask her to explain.

5. If you can't get the problem fixed just talking with the worker and her
supervisor, you will need to figure out your next step.

If your problem is at the One Stop, tell them you want to file a grievance.
If they say there is no grievance procedure, you should call your local
Legal Aid. If they can't help you, you can get some good advice from
Florida Legal Services, at their toll free number.

If your problem is with DCF, you should ask for a fair hearing. We tell you
more about fair hearings on p. 50.


The rules change a lot, and they aren't simple! Sometimes differ-
ent offices make mistakes, or even make up rules when they
shouldn't. If they can't show you a copy of a rule, you should call your
local Legal Aid, or Florida Legal Services. If they do show you a copy
of a rule, I'd love it if you'd send it to me! (The address is in front of
the book.)







You can write a letter to your caseworker
The best way to let the agency know what you want is to write a letter.
You should keep a copy. If you take it to the agency, be sure they stamp the
date on your copy. If you mail it, you might want to pay extra and send it
"return receipt requested." Then you will get a card back in the mail showing
the agency got your letter.

Your letter should have these 7 parts:

The date you write the letter

Your caseworker's name and address

Your name, address, Social Security number, and phone number

Tell what your problem is, and why you disagree with what the agency
is doing

Tell what you want the agency to do

Ask the worker to answer your letter

Your signature

Here is a sample letter (see next page):








(Date)
January 1, 2000

(Caseworkers name and address)
To: Wanda Worker
Department of Children and Families
1234 Wages Way
Your town, Florida Zip code

(Your name, address, and phone)
From: Lily Lively
5678 Belleview Road
Your town, Florida, Zip code

(Your Social Security number)
SS #987-654-3210

I don't agree with the actions in my case:

(Here you say what your problem is)
I brought my caseworker a doctor's letter that says I can't work.
She says it's not good enough and I have to work. Now she says
she will sanction me. I can't work because I am pregnant and have
to stay in bed or I could lose my baby.

I ask that you take the following steps:

(Here you say what you want them to do)
Don't sanction me.

Tell me what you need to know from my doctor.

Please let me know that you got this letter. If you can't do what I
asked, please consider this letter a request for a hearing.

(Sign your name)






What If They Send Me a Letter Saying I Can't
Get Benefits, or I'm Being Sanctioned?

Asking for a hearing
If you get a letter that tells you this, it will say that you have ten days to ask
for a hearing. If you do that within ten days of the date on the letter, they
can't stop your benefits until there's been a hearing, and the hearing officer
has decided you can't get benefits. But even if you don't ask in time to keep
your benefits coming, you can still ask for a hearing. Then if the hearing
officer agrees that you are right and the agency made a mistake, you will get
your benefits.

Getting ready for a hearing
If you want help getting ready for the hearing, call Legal Aid and see if
they can help you. Maybe they can tell you what to do, or maybe they will
represent you at the hearing. If they can't help you:

1. Ask your worker for a copy of your case file. Go through the file and see if
they have all the information you gave them. See if they wrote down when
you asked for help or told them you were having a problem. See if there is
information in the file that isn't true.

2. Ask your caseworker to give you a copy of the rule that says why your
case was changed or closed.

3. If there is information missing that you already gave them, take copies of
what you have given them to the hearing. If you have information that you
didn't give them yet, bring it to the hearing if you can. Tell the hearing
officer why you didn't give them the information before. If you can't get the
information you need, tell the hearing officer why.

4. If you can, get proof of what you are telling them. If you didn't keep an
appointment because your child was sick, you can get a note from the






child's doctor. If he didn't go to the doctor, but your neighbor knew he was
home sick, your neighbor can come tell the hearing officer.

5. Look in this manual to see if the rules are being followed.

If your case worker or supervisor fixes your problem after you
ask for a hearing:
Be sure they tell you in writing what they are going to do. Then write a
note to the hearing officer and your case worker saying you don't need a
hearing because the problem is fixed. Keep a copy.

When you go to the hearing
1. Bring a friend with you, even if they don't have evidence to give. It will
make you feel more comfortable.

2. Take all the information you need: copies of what you gave them, copies of
rules, receipts, letters. Take whatever you have that helps prove your
case.

3. Tell your story clearly. Answer questions politely. If you don't understand
what someone is saying, or you don't understand a question, say so.

4. Try to stick to the facts that make a difference in your case. If the
caseworker was rude to you, that probably doesn't make a difference.
But if you got to your appointment on time, and waited for the caseworker,
and she didn't show up, that makes a difference if they're saying you
missed an appointment.

(If you can't go to the hearing, call your caseworker and the hearing
officer and tell them why. Ask them to reschedule the hearing.)






Making Welfare Better

Who's in charge here?
To get welfare to work for you, it helps to know who makes the rules.
This part will tell you who makes some of the rules in the welfare program.
If you think the rules should be different, or if you think the rules aren't being
followed, you can get in touch with these people.

Regional Workforce Board, or "RWB"
The volunteers on this Board run the welfare services program where you
live. Some people call it the WAGES board. A lot of the people on this Board
own businesses. Most RWBs don't have poor people on them.

The RWB decides:

Who will give services (like training or support services) to people who
get cash assistance.

How much money to spend on different kinds of services

What kind of programs you will have where you live

The RWB has contracts with different agencies and companies to give
services to people who get cash assistance. Those agencies and companies
have to do what they say they will do in their contract.

The RWB needs to follow the law. They need to know how their program
is working. They hire staff, or they hire a company to organize their meet-
ings, and give them the information they need.

If you want to let the RWB know what's happening, you can call the staff or
company that works for them and ask them to send you a letter whenever the
Board is going to have a meeting. You should ask them what you need to do
to get a chance to talk at that meeting. Some RWBs listen to the public at the
beginning of the meeting, and some at the end of the meeting.








The name and phone number of the staff or company that works
for your RWB is in the section called Regional Workforce Boards.




Department of Children and Families DCF.
(Used to be called HRS)

This is where you apply to get cash assistance, food stamps, and
Medicaid. You might also be able to apply at your One Stop Center. Your
DCF worker is in charge of getting you your money. He is also in charge of
sanctions. DCF has to follow the laws the Florida Legislature makes.


Case management contractor

The local RWB has a contract with a company (or sometimes more than
one company) to manage your case. They have to do what they said they
would do in their contract with the local RWB.

Your case worker at the One Stop works for that company. She is called a
career manager. Her job is to help you figure out what you are good at and
what you want to do, to help you find a job, and help you get the services you
need to go to work. She also should help you get training or education if that
is what you want.


Your DCF worker and your One Stop worker have to follow the
law. If you have a problem with one of them that you can't work out,
remember you can talk to their supervisor. If that doesn't help, you
should let the people who make the rules know what's going on. And
you can contact Legal Aid for help.






Workforce Florida, Inc.


Volunteers run this Board, too. They are mostly business owners. There
are also some people from government agencies, and from labor unions.
There are few, if any, poor people on this Board. But these volunteers decide
what your Regional Workforce Board should be doing.

Agency for Workforce Innovation
This is a new agency in the Florida Department of Management Services.
It will make rules for how your local Regional Workforce Board, and the
companies who have contracts with them, do their job.

Florida Legislature and the Governor
If you want changes in welfare, you can let them know. They decide:

Who can get welfare
How much money a family should get each month
What counts as a work activity
How sanctions are supposed to work
Who has time limits
How long time limits are
What kind of people should be on the state Workforce Florida, Inc., and
your Regional Workforce Board
The Florida Legislature and the Governor also decide how much money to
spend in the state for things like child care, transportation, and other support
services. Workforce Florida, Inc. and your Regional Workforce Board decide
when and how to spend the money.






Congress and the President


This is the federal government. They give money to Florida for the welfare
program. The federal law says Florida has to:

use some of their own money to help low-income people too.

have lifetime time limits of five years or less. (Florida has a four-year
time limit.)

have most grown-ups who get monthly welfare money do some kind of
work.

The federal government also makes most of the rules about Medicaid and
Food Stamps.


Making Welfare Work Better

Now that you know who makes the decisions, maybe you will want to
change the decisions they make! Here are some examples:

M I don't like the way my DCF worker talks to me. What can I do?

A Talk to the worker's supervisor. Write a letter to the District
Administrator of DCF.

B I have two children and I'm working without pay in the food stamp
office. I only get $303 a month. Nobody can live on that. Who should
I complain to?

A First, you should talk to your One Stop worker. His job is to get you into
paid work. If he isn't doing that, ask why. If you think his answer isn't
good, you can talk to his supervisor. Or you can ask Legal Aid to help
you get the One Stop worker working for you.







Second, your Regional Workforce Board should know what is
happening in the program. Write them a letter, or go to their monthly
meeting. Let them know what's happened to you in the welfare
program.

Finally, the Florida Legislature decides how much money you and other
welfare recipients get. You can let them know how it is to live on that
much money.

B I want to get job training. But my worker says the only training
programs they have are for nail technicians and nursing home aides.
I don't want to do that kind of work. What can I do?

A Find out what other kind of training programs are in your community.
If there is a program you want, tell your worker. If she says no, and you
don't agree or don't understand why not, you can ask Legal Aid to help
you get that training. Go to a Regional Workforce Board meeting and
let them know you want more kinds of training for welfare recipients.


When you want to make government work better, it helps to have
other people to work with. People all over Florida are trying to make
welfare better. To find out if there's someone near you working on this,
call C.H.A.I.N. (Communication Health Action Information Network).
You can reach them at the Human Services Coalition in Miami. Call
305 576 5001. Or send them an email: hsc@hscdade.org.








What Could Your Welfare Program Do?

Because the number of people getting welfare has fallen so fast, there is a
lot of money available to do good things to help people get and keep jobs.
But in the 1999 fiscal year, the local RWBs spent less than a fifth of the
money they had. They had to send it back to the state because they couldn't
figure out how to use it.

Find out how much money your RWBs sent back to the State. Ask them
what they're planning to do next year. And give them some good ideas for
what you'd like them to do in your community.

Here are just a few of the things RWBs can do. You probably have other
good ideas. And if you know about something useful that they are doing in
your community, would you please let us know?

1. Establish RITA accounts. (See p. 22).

2. Require the people who do their case management to hire plenty of case
managers, so the workers have a small caseload and can really help
people.

3. Organize a program to give used cars to welfare participants, and pay for
insurance and registration.

4. Buy vans or buses. Train and hire welfare participants to drive them, to
get children to day care and people to work.

6. Pay for people to go to college or vocational training longer than 12
months.

7. Send children to summer camp while their parents are working or going
to school.80

8. Create a summer jobs program for teenagers.






9. Provide intensive case management (workers with very low caseloads
and special training) for participants with special needs.

10. Pay for special services for substance abusers or domestic violence
victims. Pay for people to learn to read. Pay for people to learn English.
Pay for people to get special training if they have learning disabilities.
Where there are waiting lists for these services, your RWB can put
money into expanding these programs.

11. Hire some people to be "ombudsmen" that anyone can call if they're
having a problem with the welfare program.

Here are some things the state Legislature could do:
1. Require Regional Workforce Boards to have people on them who are
eligible for cash assistance.

2. Create a public jobs program: hire people to do what they now have to
do for "community work experience." Let people earn a paycheck instead
of "volunteer" for monthly money from welfare.81 Programs like this are
going on all over the country, including Miami, Florida.

3. Use welfare dollars to buy computers and Internet access for poor
families.82


Notes.



















Legal Aid and Legal Services

Programs

(This directory shows the programs that provide free legal services to low income people in
each county. We've included the programs that don't handle welfare issues, because you may
have questions about other issues. If a certain person handles mostly welfare issues, or there is a
special number to call, we have put that after the program information.)


Statewide Legal Services
Florida Legal Services
Director: Kent Spuhler
2121 Delta Blvd.
Tallahassee, FL 92303
850-385-7900

This program works with the legal services
programs in the counties to help low-income
Floridians. They represent people who are
referred through the county programs. But if
you have a problem or question about welfare,
and you can't get help from the program in
your county, you can call them for information.
You can call them toll-free at 888-352-3570
and ask for Cindy Huddlestone.
Florida Institutional Legal Services, Inc.
1110-C NW 8th Ave.
Gainesville, FL 32601
352-955-2260

This program provides legal services to
people in the Florida prison system. You can
write them if you are a prisoner and have a
legal problem.


Alachua


Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
Director: Allison Thompson
111 SW First Street
Gainesville, FL 32601
352-372-0519
Ali Vasquez


Baker
Jacksonville Area Legal Aid, Inc.
(see Duval)

Bay
Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
Managing Attorney: Robert Daigle
204 E. 4th St.
Panama City, FL 32401
850-769-3581


Bradford

Three Rivers Legal Services
(see Alachua)








Brevard


Central Florida Legal Services
Managing Attorney: B.J. Owens
803 N. Fiske Blvd.
Cocoa, FL 32922-7323
407-636-3515
Brevard County Legal Aid
Director: Susan Christmas
1017 S. Florida Ave.
Rockledge, FL 32955
407-631-2500
(Doesn't handle welfare issues)

Broward

Legal Aid Services of Broward
County, Inc.
Director: Anthony J. Karrat
609 SW First Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301
954-765-8950

Sharon Bourassa; Dyan Davis (call Dyan
Davis 954-765-8957 ext 280)
2201 West Sample Rd., Bldg. 7, Ste. 5A
Pompano Beach, FL 33073
954-970-0155
Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center, Inc
(see Dade)

Calhoun

Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
(see Gadsden)

Charlotte

Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc.
(see Lee)

Citrus

Withlacoochee Area Legal
Services, Inc.
Director: Glenn Shuman
611 US Hwy. 41 S.
Inverness, FL 34450
352-726-8512


Jacksonville Area Legal Aid, Inc.
Director: Michael Figgins
1107 Middleburg Ave.
Green Cove Springs, FL 32043
904-284-8410


Collier

Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc.
106 S. Second St.
P.O. Box 1109
Immokalee, FL 33934
941-657-3681
Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center
1402 W. New Market Rd., Ste. B
Immokalee, FL 34142
941-657-7442
Collier County Voluntary Lawyers' Project
Director: Judy Baker
Collier County Government Ctr., Bldg. L
3301 E. Tamiami Trail
Naples, FL 34112
941-775-8566
(Doesn't handle welfare issues)

Columbia

Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
Managing Attorney: Donna McCray
2111 Sisters Welcome Rd.
P.O. Drawer 3067
Lake City, FL 32056-3067
904-752-5960
Shirley Rentz

Dade

Legal Services of Greater Miami, Inc.
Director: Marcia Cypen
3000 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 500
Miami, FL 33137
305-576-0080
Dawn Miller


Clay







South Dade Office
Directing Attorney: Mary Webster
16201 SW 95th Ave., Ste. 301
Miami, FL 33157
305-232-9680
Miami Beach Office
1424 Drexel Ave., Rm. 19
Miami Beach, FL 33139
305-672-2004
ACCION Outreach Office
858 W. Flagler St.
Little Havana, FL 33135
305-545-9747
Joseph Caleb Center
5400 NW 22nd Ave., Ste 303
Miami, FL 33142
305-635-3130
Opa Locka Neighborhood Office
16405 NW 25th Ave.
Miami, FL 33054
305-620-6609
Blanche Morton City of Hialeah Office
300 E. 1st Ave., Rm. 109
Hialeah, FL 33010
305-884-1376
Overtown Neighborhood Office
1600 NW 3rd Ave.
Miami, FL 33136
305-576-0080 (for appointment)
Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center, Inc.
Executive Director: Cheryl Little
3000 Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 400
Miami, FL 33137
305-573-1106
Brett Lassen
125 NE 8th Ave., Ste. 6
Homestead, FL 33030
305-245-0509
Cuban-American Bar Assoc. Pro
Bono Project
3000 Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 400
Miami, FL 33137
305-573-1106
(Doesn't handle welfare issues)


Legal Aid Society of Dade County Bar Ass.
Director: Sharon L. Langer
123 NW First Ave.
Miami, FL 33128
305-579-5733
(Doesn't handle welfare issues)

Duval

Jacksonville Area Legal Aid, Inc.
Director: Michael Figgins
126 WAdams St.
Jacksonville, FL 32202-4092
904-356-8371
Jane Hawkins, Michael Figgins

Escambia

Northwest Florida Legal Services
Director: C. V. Ford, Jr.
24 W. Government St.
P.O. Box 1551
Pensacola, FL 32597-1551
850-432-2336
Irene Macy

Flagler

Central Florida Legal Services, Inc.
(see Putnam)

Gadsden

Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
Managing Attorney: Grant Dearborn
8 W. Jefferson St., Ste. 200
Quincy, FL 32351
850-875-9881

Gilchrist

Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
(see Alachua)


Glades

Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc.
(see Collier)







Jackson


Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
(see Bay)


Hernando


Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
(see Gadsden)


Jefferson


Withlacoochee Area Legal Services, Inc.
Director: Glenn Shuman
51 W. Ft. Dade Ave.
Brooksville, FL 34601
352-796-7238

Highlands

Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc.
(see Polk)

Hillsborough

Bay Area Legal Services, Inc.
Director: Richard C. Woltmann
829 W. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. 2nd Fl.
Tampa, FL 33603-3331
813-232-1343
Linda Breen. For intake call Mr. Garcia at
813-232-1343 ext 107
1001 E. Baker St., Ste. 200
Plant City, FL 33566-3746
18240 U.S. Highway 301 S.
813-752-1335
18240 US Hwy 301 S.
P.O. Box 249
Wimauma, FL 33598
813-634-4044

Holmes

Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
(see Okaloosa)

Indian River

Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc.
(see St. Lucie)


Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
(see Leon)

Lafayette

Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
(see Alachua)

Lake

Greater Orlando Area Legal Services
Director: Ralph Armstead
226 W. Main St.
Tavares, FL 32778
352-343-0815

Lee

Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc.
Associate Director: Don Isaac
2254 McGregor Blvd. Plaza
P.O. Box 219
Ft. Myers, FL 33902-9205
941-334-4554
Lee County Legal Aid Society, Inc.
Director: J. Philip Short
P.O. Box 9205
Ft. Myers, FL 33902-9205
941-334-6118
(Doesn't handle welfare issues)

Leon

Legal Aid Foundation of the Tallahassee
Bar Association, Inc.
Director: Allen Tedder
301 S. Monroe St. Rm. 421
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-222-3004


Gulf







Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
Director: Kristine Knab
2119 Delta Blvd.
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-385-9007
Scott Manion

Levy

Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
(see Alachua)


Liberty


Martin

Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc. (See St.
Lucie)

Monroe

Legal Services of Greater Miami, Inc.
Executive Director: Marcia K. Cypen
600 White St.
Key West, FL 33040
305-292-3566


Nassau


Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
(See Gadsden)


Madison


Jacksonville Area Legal Aid, Inc.
(see Duval)


Okaloosa


Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
(see Columbia)

Manatee

Gulfcoast Legal Services, Inc.
Managing Attorney: Michael Stuckey
430 12th St., W.
P.O. Box 1373
Bradenton, FL 34205
941-746-6151
Legal Aid of Manasota, Inc.
Director: Nina Perry
1900 Main St., Ste. 302
Sarasota, FL 34236
941-366-0038

Marion

Withlacoochee Area Legal Services, Inc.
Director: Glenn Shuman
222 SW Broadway
Ocala, FL 34474
352-629-0105
Susan Creel, Suzanne Edmunds


Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
Senior Attorney: Jeffery Toney
326-A Green Acres Rd.
Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32549
850-862-3279
Okaloosa County Legal Aid
Director: Deborah Suhre Angerman
Okaloosa County Courthouse Annex
Shalimar, FL 32579
850-651-7254
(Doesn't handle welfare issues)

Okeechobee

Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc.
(see St. Lucie)

Orange

Greater Orlando Area Legal Services, Inc.
Director: Ralph Armstead
1036 W. Amelia St.
Orlando, FL 32805
407-841-7777
Michelle Ku







Legal Aid Society of the Orange County
Bar Association
Director: Mary Anne DePetrillo
100 E. Robinson St.
Orlando, FL 32801-1602
407-841-8310
Karrie Beebe

Osceola

Greater Orlando Area Legal Services, Inc.
Director: Ralph Armstead
800 N. Main St.
Kissimmee, FL 34744
407-847-0053

Palm Beach

Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc.
Managing Attorney: Sally Schmidt
423 Fern St. Ste. 220
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
561-820-8902
Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach County
Director: Robert A. Bertisch
423 Fern St., Ste. 200
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
561-655-8944
(Don't handle welfare issues)

Pasco

Bay Area Legal Services, Inc.
Director: Richard C. Woltmann
37718 Meridian
Dade City, FL 33525
352-567-9044


8406 Massachusetts.Ave., Ste. B-2
New Port Richey, FL 34653-3100
727-847-5494


Pinellas

Gulfcoast Legal Services, Inc.
Director: John P. Cunningham
641 First St., S.
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
727-821-0726
Pam Weiner, Mishell Brown
314 S. Missouri Ave., Ste. 109
Clearwater, FL 33756
727-443-0657
Clearwater Bar Foundation
Pro Bono Coordinator: Jefferson H. Taylor
314 S. Missouri Ave., Ste. 107
Clearwater, FL 34616-5858
727-461-5450
Community Law Program, Inc.
Executive Director: Kelly Rauch
3420 8th Ave., S., Rm. 109
St. Petersburg, FL 33711
727-323-7712

Polk

Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc.
Director: Peter Helwig
963 E. Memorial Blvd.
Lakeland, FL 33802-4688
941-688-7376
Heart of Florida Legal Aid Society, Inc.
Director: Linda Moore
501 South Broadway Ave Suite 2
Bartow, FL 33830
863-519-5663
Gina Robinson, 863-519-5663 ext 106

Putnam

Central Florida Legal Services
Managing Attorney: Catherine A. Altman
216 South 6th Street
Palatka, FL 32177-4608
904 328 8361
Megan Wall







St. Johns
Central Florida Legal Services, Inc.
(see Putnam)

St. Lucie
Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc.
Managing Attorney: Raul Pardo
200 S. Indian River Dr. Ste. 101
P.O. Box 4333
Ft. Pierce, FL 31948-4333
561-466-4766
Dervette Green
Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center
131B N. Second St.
Ft. Pierce, FL 34950
561-489-4660

Santa Rosa

Northwest Florida Legal Services, Inc.
Director: C.V. Ford, Jr.
6856 Caroline St., Ste. 105 & 107
Milton, FL 32507
850-626-2188

Sarasota

Gulfcoast Legal Services, Inc.
1750 17th St., Unit 1
Sarasota, FL 34234
941-366-1746
Legal Aid of Manasota, Inc.
Director: Nina Perry
1900 Main St., Ste. 302
Sarasota, FL 34236
941-336-0038

Seminole

Central Florida Legal Services, Inc.
Managing Attorney: Treena Kaye
315 Magnolia Ave.
Sanford, FL 32771-1915
407-322-8983
Bruce Scott


Seminole County Bar Association Legal
Aid Society
Director: Silvia McLain
115 Boston Ave., Ste. 100
Altamonte Springs, FL 32701
407-834-1660

Sumter

Withlacoochee Area Legal Services, Inc.
(see Citrus)

Suwannee

Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
(see Columbia)

Taylor

Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
(see Columbia)

Union

Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
(see Alachua)

Volusia
Central Florida Legal Services, Inc.
Director: Bill Abbuehl
128-A Orange Ave.
Daytona Beach, FL 32114-4310
904-255-6573
Martha Guillan

Wakulla
Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
(see Leon)

Walton

Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
(see Okaloosa)

Washington

Legal Services of North Florida, Inc.
(See Bay)








Florida Legislators


Alachua
Senate:
Betty Holzendorf
816 N. Ocean St.
Jacksonville 32202-3083
(904) 359-6880
Assistants: Ken Johnson, Milessa Nesbitt,
Geraldine C. Orr
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
Rod Smith
2727 NW 43rd St., Suite 2A
Gainesville 32606
(352) 375-3555
Assistants: Tonya Shays, Pat Shays, Mike
Murtha, Nancy Williams
House:
Will S. Kendrick
212 Capitol
Tallahassee 32399-1300
(850) 488-7870
Assistant: Laura Jersey
Perry McGriff
1120 NW 13th St.
Gainesville 32601-4136
(352) 372-8406
Assistant: Tammy Salmon
Ed Jennings, Jr.
4707 NW 53rd Ave., Suite A
Gainesville 32606-3400
(352) 377-0022


Baker


Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean
Papapetrou, Anjanette Radney, Pam
Clemmons
House:
Aaron Bean
305 Bonnieview Rd
Fernandina Beach 32034-8614
(904) 277-3493

Bay

Senate:
Durell Peaden
598 North Ferdon Blvd.
Crestview 32536-2753
(850) 689-0556
Assistants: Roger Robinson, Susan Levine,
Ann McGraw, James Snyder
Alfred Lawson
400 North Adams St.
Tallahassee 32301
(850) 222-1286
Assistants: Melissa Durham, Berta Kemp,
Deborah Fairhurst
Charlie Clary
1241 Airport Rd., Suite A
Destin 32541
(850) 833-9159
Assistants: Peggy Hicks, Buckley Vernon,
Allison Pursley, Stacey Allen
House:
Allan Bense
PO Box 2345
Panama City 32401-2345
(850) 488-9696
Assistants: David Coley, Sharron Brown







Bev Kilmer
PO Box 1586
Marianna 32447-5586
(850) 718-0047
Assistants: Debbie Dennis, Joyce Watters,
Chris Akins

Bradford

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
Rod Smith
2727 NW 43rd St., Suite 2A
Gainesville 32606
(352) 375-3555
Assistants: Tonya Shays, Pat Shays, Mike
Murtha, Nancy Williams
House:
Aaron Bean
305 Bonnieview Rd
Fernandina Beach 32034-8614
(904) 277-3493

Brevard

Senate:
Bill Posey
1802 S. Fiske Blvd., Suite 108
Rockledge 32955-3007
(321) 690-3484
Assistants: Patrick Gavin, William DuPree,
Russell Cyphers
Charlie Bronson
1813 South Patrick Dr.
Indian Harbour Beach 32937
(321) 726-2880
Assistants: David Mclnnes, Kathy Lane,
Melissa Hunt


House:
Randy Ball
400 South St. Suite 1-C
Titusville 32780-7683
(321) 383-5151
Assistants: Theda Roberts, Bonnie Rhodes
Mitch Needelman
PO Box 1656
Melbourne 32902-1656
(321) 768-7752
Assistants: Vicki Wooldridge, Jeanette
Williams
Bob Allen
PO Box 561177
Rockledge 32956-1177
(321) 452-2220
Assistant: Mary Bolin

Broward

Senate:
Ron Klein
3333 S. Congress Ave., Suite 305A
Delray Beach 33445
(561) 274-4777
Assistants: Kelly Skidmore, Brandon
Biederman, Lesley Shriberg
Steven Geller
400 S. Federal Hwy., Suite 204
Hallandale Beach 33009
(954) 893-5089
Assistants: Gail Schwartz, John Reid, Jennifer
James
Mandy Dawson
33 NE 2d St., Suite 209
Ft. Lauderdale 33301-1033
(954) 467-4317
Assistant: Rona Silberman
Debby Sanderson
4800 NE 20th Terr., Suite 401
Ft. Lauderdale 33308-4572
(954) 958-5500
Assistants: John Kuczwanski, Vicki Pearson







Debbie Wasserman Schultz
2500 Weston Rd., Suite 101
Weston 33331-3616
(954) 424-6956
Assistants: Stephanie Grutman, Michelle Glatt,
MacAdam Glinn
Walter "Skip" Campbell
10094 McNab Rd.
Tamarac 33321
(954) 346-2813
Assistants: Michael Kaplan, Fatima Perez,
Michael Dolce
House:
Mark Weissman
Deerfield Beach City Hall
150 NE 2nd Ave.
Deerfield Beach 33441-3598
Assistants: Rainslee Millward, Deborah
Christian
Connie Mack
2400 East Las Olas Blvd., Suite 421
Ft. Lauderdale 33301-1529
(954) 563-3232
John Seiler
City Park Mall
128 SE 1st St.
Ft. Lauderdale 33301-1924
(954) 467-4510
Assistant: Kathryn Snyder
Christopher Smith
1818 NW 19th St.
Ft. Lauderdale 33311-3535
(954) 762-3746
Assistants: Sheila Robinson, Mama Clark
Matthew Meadows
4380 NW 11th St.
Lauderhill 33313-6610
(954) 587-6863
Assistants: Carolyn McTier, June Suepaul
Ron Greenstein
4800 West Copans Road
Coconut Creek 33063-3879
(954) 956-5600
Assistants: Gwynne Gonzalez, Antonia
Fontanazza


Stacy Ritter
7880 N. University Dr., Suite 301
Tamarac 33321-2124
(954) 718-0077
Assistants: Peter Grady, Barbara Glenos
Nan Rich
777 Sawgrass Corporate Parkway
Sunrise 33325-6256
(954) 747-7933
Roger Wishner
Plantation City Hall
400 NW 73rd Ave.
Plantation 33317-1609
(954) 321-9855
Assistants: Jordan Leonard, Mary Anne Harris
Timothy "Tim" Ryan
26-B NE First Ave.
Dania Beach 33004-0036
(954) 924-3856
Assistants: Noel Flasterstein, Kevin
Lounsberry
Eleanor Sobel
3365 Sheridan St.
Hollywood 33021-3606
(954) 965-3795
Assistants: Lisa Jacques, Bill Sherwood
Kenneth "Ken" Gottlieb
6700 Miramar Pky.
Miramar 33023-4897
(954) 893-5081
Assistants: Adam Sanders, Hilda Harley

Calhoun

Senate:
Alfred Lawson
400 North Adams St.
Tallahassee 32301
(850) 222-1286
Assistants: Melissa Durham, Berta Kemp,
Deborah Fairhurst







House:
Bev Kilmer
PO Box 1586
Marianna 32447-5586
(850) 718-0047
Assistants: Debbie Dennis, Joyce Watters,
Chris Akins

Charlotte

Senate:
Lisa Carlton
2127 S. Tamiami Trail
Osprey 34229-9695
(941) 486-2032
Assistants: Linda Mineer, Barbara Harle, Rita
Faulkner
Tom Rossin
503 Royal Palm Beach Blvd.
Royal Palm Beach 33441
(561) 753-2537
Assistants: Cathy Branch, Mike Welch, Tracy
Peters, Becki Siegendorf
House:
Jerry Paul
Aztec Plaza
4456 Tamiami Trail, Suite B-14
Port Charlotte 33890-2136
(941) 764-1100
Assistants: Judy Skinner, Jackie Hadley
Lindsay Harrington
115 Tamiami Trail, Unit 2110
Punta Gorda 33950-3600
(941) 575-5820
Assistant: Cynthia Beckett
Bruce Kyle
2120 Main St., Suite 208
Fort Myers 33901-3010
(941) 335-2411
Assistants: Jessica Belvitch, Ashley Biagi
Jeff Kottkamp
PO Box 152085
Cape Coral 33915-2085
(941) 242-7267


Citrus

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
Anna Cowin
716 W. Magnolia St.
Leesburg 34748
(352) 315-9335
Assistants: Barbara Macdonell, Doris Meisner,
Elaine Merritt
House:
Nancy Argenziano
6216 W. Corporate Oaks Dr.
Crystal River 34429-2694
(352) 563-1204
Assistants: Janet Oehmig, Elizabeth Peterson

Clay

Senate:
Betty Holzendorf
816 N. Ocean St.
Jacksonville 32202
(904) 359-6880
Assistants: Ken Johnson, Milessa Nesbitt,
Gerri Orr
Rod Smith
2727 NW 43rd St., Suite 2A
Gainesville 32606
(352) 375-3555
Assistants: Tonya Shays, Pat Shays, Mike
Murtha, Nancy Williams
Jim Home
2301 Park Ave., Suite 403
Orange Park 32073
(904) 573-4900
Assistants: Georgia Flynn McKeown, Kelly
Williams







House:
Mike Hogan
3520-2 Blanding Blvd.
Jacksonville 32210-5253
(904) 573-4994
Assistant: Sandy Griffin Matthews
Dick Kravitz
2131 Park Ave.
Orange Park 32073-5585
(904) 278-5660
Assistant: Debra Harris
Doug Wiles
1510 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Suite Al
St. Augustine 32084-2602
(904) 823-4660
Assistants: Steven Schale, Martha Jennison
Joe Pickens
3841 Reid St., Suite 5
Palatka 32177-2509
(904) 325-8384
Assistant: Debra LeRoy

Collier

Senate:
Burt Saunders
3301 E. Tamiami Trail
Administration Bldg., Suite 304
Naples 34112
(941) 417-6220
Assistant: Rebecca Kokkinos, Randi Rosete,
Terry Tallent, Jr.
Steven Geller
400 S. Federal Hwy., Suite 204
Hallandale Beach 33009
(954) 893-5089
Assistants: Gail Schwartz, Jennifer James,
John Reid
House:
Carole Green
15248 S. Tamiami Trail, Suite 200
Ft. Meyers 33908
(941) 433-6775
Assistants: Jerri Veenstra, Julie Richardson


Dudley Goodlette
3301 E. Tamiami Trail, Suite 203
Naples 34112-4961
(941) 417-6205
Assistants: J. Robert Moates, Jennifer Minick
Joseph Spratt
205 S. Commerce Ave., Suite B
Sebring 33870
(863) 385-5251
Assistants: Marty Mielke, Geri Yoraschek,
Janet Short
Rafael Arza
1800 West 49th St., Suite 300
Hialeah 33012-2947
(305) 827-2720
Assistants: Sandi Brunker, Luis Menendez,
Osvaldo Guerra

Columbia

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
Rod Smith
2727 NW 43rd St., Suite 2A
Gainesville 32606
(352) 375-3555
Assistants: Tonya Shays, Pat Shays, Mike
Murtha, Nancy Williams
House:
Dwight Stansel
208 N. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak 32060-2455
(904) 758-0480
Assistants: Diana Robinson, Julie Myers








Dade

Senate:
Debbie Wasserman Schultz
2500 Weston Rd., Suite 101
Weston 33331-3616
(954) 424-6956
Assistants: Stephanie Grutman, Michelle Glatt,
MacAdam Glinn
Alex Diaz de la Portilla
8300 SW 8th St., Suite 306
Miami 33144-4132
(305) 569-2691
Assistants: Jeanette Nunez, Anabel Castillo,
Julio Guillen
J. Alex Villalobos
2350 Coral Way, Suite 202-A
Miami 33145-3500
(305) 222-4160
Assistants: Miguel Otero, Vicky
Romaguera-Garcia, Norma Ledesma
Rodolfo Garcia
7475 West 4th Ave.
Hialeah 33014-4327
(305) 364-3191
Assistants: Daniel Ruiz, Francis Aleman,
Danielle Blake
Kendrick Meek
18441 NW 2nd Ave., Suite 515
Miami 33169
(305) 655-3671
Assistants: Charesse Chester, Shirlee Moreau,
Joyce Postell
Ronald Silver
12000 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 411
North Miami 33181
(305) 893-0488
Assistants: Sharon West James, Barbara
Ruderman, Kelly Mallette
Daryl Jones
9200 S. Dadeland Blvd., Suite 208
Miami 33156
(305) 671-7240
Assistants: Heather Price, Taffi Miller, Donald
West, Mercedes Pasley


House:
Kenneth "Ken" Gottlieb
6700 Miramar Pky.
Miramar 33023-4897
(954) 893-5081
Assistants: Adam Sanders, Hilda Harley
Rafael Arza
1800 West 49th St., Suite 300
Hialeah 33012-2947
(305) 827-2720
Assistants: Sandi Brunker, Luis Menendez,
Osvaldo Guerra
Wilbert Holloway
Cross Pointe at Golden Glades
1405 NW 167th St., Suite 260
Miami 33169-5732
(305) 347-5454
Assistant: Ruby Morton
Sally Heyman
1100 NE 163 St., Suite 303
North Miami Beach 33162-4515
(305) 919-1888
Assistants: Bonnie Michaels, Norma Jay
Dan Gelber
5445 LaGorce Dr.
Miami Beach 33140-2135
(305) 865-5900
Gustavo Barreiro
1454 SW 1st St., Suite 100
Miami 33135-2203
(305) 643-7324
Assistants: Ana Maria Garcia, Teresa
Llerena-Perez
Phillip Brutus
645 NE 127th St.
North Miami 33161-4824
(305) 899-0411
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall
3310 NW 80th Terr.
Miami 33147-4623
(305) 691-7129
Assistants: Oliver Gilbert, Isabell Williams







Rene Garcia
3766 West 12th Ave.
Hialeah 33012-4126
(305) 827-2767
Assistant: William Rodriguez
Marco Rubio
4790 NW 7th St., Suite 212
Miami 33126-2200
(305) 442-6939
Assistants: Nelson Diaz, Maribel Villarreal
Manuel Prieguez
316-A SW 12th Ave.
Miami 33130-2012
(305) 643-7336
Assistants: Viviana Pineiro, YuditArteaga
Gaston Cantens
300 SW 107th Ave., Suite 213
Miami 33174-3602
(305) 227-7626
Assistants: Miguel Rodriguez, Veronica Denis
Renier Diaz de la Portilla
8300 SW 8th St., Suite 305
Miami 33144-4132
(305) 569-2606
Assistants: Claudia Miro, Erik Fresen
Annie Betancourt
10691 N. Kendall Dr., Suite 103
Miami 33176-1591
(305) 279-7337
Assistants: Teresa Gavalda, Lillian Barahona
Carlos Lacasa
1890 SW 57th Ave., Suite 108
Miami 33155-2164
(305) 569-2600
Assistants: Lubby Navarro, Cristina Acosta
Edward Bullard
16201 SW 95th Ave., Suite 214
Miami 33157-3459
(305) 251-8299
Assistant: Frank Morra
Cindy Lerner
5901 Moss Ranch Rd.
Miami 33156-5636
(305) 665-3864
Assistant: Marta Gomez-Chen


Ken Sorensen
91760 Overseas Hwy.
PO Box 699
Tavenier 33070-0697
(305) 853-1947
Assistants: Laura Todd, Glenda Hall, Kathleen
Mravic

DeSoto

Senate:
John McKay
3653 Cortez Rd. West, Suite 90
Bradenton 34210
(941) 727-6349
Assistants: Peg Faulkner, Bill Griffin, Ms.
Lester Rice
House:
Lindsay Harrington
115 Tamiami Trail, Unit 2110
Punta Gorda 33950
(941) 575-5820
Assistant: Cynthia Beckett

Dixie

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
House:
Will S. Kendrick
212 Capitol
Tallhassee 32399-1300
(850) 488-7870
Assistant: Laura Jersey
Dwight Stansel
208 North Ohio Ave.
Live Oak 32060-2455
(904) 758-0480
Assistants: Diana Robinson, Julie Myers








Duval

Senate:
Betty Holzendorf
816 N. Ocean St.
Jacksonville 32202
(904) 359-6880
Assistants: Ken Johnson, Milessa Nesbitt,
Gerri C. Orr
Jim Horne
2301 Park Ave., Suite 403
Orange Park 32073
(904) 573-4900
Assistants: Georgia Flynn McKeown, Kelly
Williams
James King
9485 Regency Square Blvd., Suite 108
Jacksonville 32225-8145
(904) 727-3600
Assistants: Kay Rousseau, Paul Hull, Rebecca
Stagg, Clara Schrader
House:
Aaron Bean
305 Bonnieview Rd
Fernandina Beach 32034-8614
(904) 277-3493
Mike Hogan
3520-2 Blanding Blvd.
Jacksonville 32210-5253
(904) 573-4994
Assistant: Sandy Griffin Matthews
Terry Fields
2731-1 Edgewood Ave., W
Jacksonville 32209-2314
(904) 924-9742
Assistants: Cynthia Appling, Sherrae Gravely
E. Denise Lee
1722 North Davis St.
Jacksonville 32209-6519
(904) 798-4880
Assistants: Valarie Chrispin, Mary Annette
Cole


Mark Mahon
233 East Bay St., Suite 1120
Jacksonville 32202-5414
(904) 354-3526
Assistants: Richard Pra, Jennifer Booth
Stan Jordan
9210 Arlington Expressway
Jacksonville 32211-8512
(904) 727-6560
Assistants: Cheryl Phillips Almond, Dee
Alexander
Don Davis
2320 South 3rd St., Suite 3
Jacksonville Beach 32250-4057
(904) 249-1990
Assistant: Marcie Regan
Dick Kravitz
2131 Park Ave.
Orange Park 32073-5585
(904) 278-5660
Assistant: Debra Harris

Escambia

Senate:
Durell Peaden
598 North Ferdon Blvd.
Crestview 32536-2753
(850) 689-0556
Assistants: Roger Robinson, Susan Levine,
Ann McGraw, James Snyder
Charlie Clary
1241 Airport Rd., Suite A
Destin 32541
(850) 833-9159
Assistants: Peggy Hicks, Buckley Vernon,
Stacey Allen, Allison Pursley
House:
Jefferson "Jeff" Miller
5233 Willing St.
Milton 32570-4973
(850) 983-5550
Assistants: David Murzin, Sherry Joann
Mullins







Jerry Maygarden
7201 N. 9th Ave., Suite A6
Pensacola 32504
(850) 494-7330
Assistants: Janice Perkins Gilley, Suzie West,
Patricia Young
Holliday Benson
1915 E. Mallory St.
Pensacola 32503-6158
(850) 429-0607
Jerry Melvin
38 Miracle Strip Pkwy., Suite 1A
Ft. Walton Beach 32548
(850) 833-9319
Assistants: Don Pardue, Joann Hofstad

Flagler

Senate:
James King
9485 Regency Square Blvd., Suite 108
Jacksonville 32225-8145
(904) 727-3600
Assistants: Kay Rousseau, Paul Hull, Rebecca
Stagg, Clara Schrader
House:
Doug Wiles
1510 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Suite Al
St. Augustine 32084
(904) 823-4660
Assistants: Steven Schale, Martha Jennison
Joyce Cusack
224 N. Woodland Blvd.
DeLand 32720-4219
(904) 943-7900

Franklin

Senate:
Alfred Lawson
400 North Adams St.
Tallahassee 32301
(850) 222-1286
Assistants: Melissa Durham, Berta Kemp,
Deborah Fairhurst


House:
Will S. Kendrick
212 Capitol
Tallhassee 32399-1300
(850) 488-7870
Assistant: Laura Jersey

Gadsden

Senate:
Alfred Lawson
400 North Adams St.
Tallahassee 32301
(850) 222-1286
Assistants: Melissa Durham, Berta Kemp,
Deborah Fairhurst
House:
Bev Kilmer
PO Box 1586
Marianna 32447-5586
(850) 718-0047
Assistants: Debbie Dennis, Joyce Watters,
Chris Akins
Curtis Richardson
533 Tuskegee St.
Tallahassee 32310-6861
(850) 414-8341
Assistant: Gwendolyn Simmonds

Gilchrist

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
House:
Will S. Kendrick
212 Capitol
Tallhassee 32399-1300
(850) 488-7870
Assistant: Laura Jersey







Dwight Stansel
208 N. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak 32060-2455
(904) 758-0480
Assistants: Diana Robinson, Julie Myers

Glades

Senate:
Tom Rossin
503 Royal Palm Beach Blvd.
Royal Palm Beach 33441
(561) 753-2537
Assistants: Cathy Branch, Mike Welch, Tracy
Peters, Becki Siegendorf
House:
Joseph Spratt
205 S. Commerce Ave., Suite B
Sebring 33870
(863) 385-5251
Assistants: Marty Mielke, Geri Yoraschek,
Janet Short

Gulf

Senate:
Alfred Lawson
400 North Adams St.
Tallahassee 32301
(850) 222-1286
Assistants: Melissa Durham, Berta Kemp,
Deborah Fairhurst
House:
Bev Kilmer
PO Box 1586
Marianna 32447-5586
(850) 718-0047
Assistants: Debbie Dennis, Joyce Watters,
Chris Akins

Hamilton

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons


House:
Dwight Stansel
208 N. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak 32060-2455
(904) 758-0480
Assistants: Diana Robinson, Julie Myers

Hardee

Senate:
John McKay
3653 Cortez Rd. West, Suite 90
Bradenton 34210
(941) 727-6349
Assistants: Peg Faulkner, Bill Griffin,
Ms. Lester Rice
House:
Lindsay Harrington
115 Tamiami Trail, Unit 2110
Punta Gorda 33950-3600
(941) 575-5820
Assistant: Cynthia Beckett

Hendry

Senate:
Steven Geller
400 S. Federal Hwy., Suite 204
Hallandale Beach 33009
(954) 893-5089
Assistants: Gail Schwartz, John Reid, Jennifer
James
House:
Joseph Spratt
205 S. Commerce Ave., Suite B
Sebring 33870
(863) 385-5251
Assistants: Marty Mielke, Geri Yoraschek,
Janet Short

Hernando

Senate:
Virginia "Ginny" Brown-Waite
20 N. Main St., Room 200
Brooksville 34601
(352) 544-2344
Assistant: Judy Wells, Lynn Stewart, Tamara
Potts







House:
Nancy Argenziano
6216 W. Corporate Oaks Dr.
Crystal River 34429-2694
(352) 563-1204
Assistants: Janet Oehmig, Elizabeth Peterson
David Russell
5331 Commercial Way, Suite 204
Spring Hill 34606
(352) 544-2300
Assistants: Ann Marie Comeau, Anne Lossing
Mike Fasano
8217 Massachusetts Ave.
New Port Richey 34653
(727) 848-5885
Assistants: Gregory Giordano, Christine
Hunter

Highlands

Senate:
John Laurent
250 N. Clark Ave.
Bartow 33830
(941) 519-7595
Assistants: Ken Grimes, Ed Smith, Larry Ford
John McKay
3653 Cortez Rd. West, Suite 90
Bradenton 34210
(941) 727-6349
Assistants: Peg Faulkner, Bill Griffin,
Ms. Lester Rice
House:
Joseph Spratt
205 S. Commerce Ave., Suite B
Sebring 33870
(863) 385-5251
Assistants: Marty Mielke, Geri Yoraschek,
Janet Short
Richard Machek
2300 Virginia Ave.
Fort Pierce 34982-5632
(561) 595-1380
Assistant: Candace Jones Wright


Hillsborough

Senate:
Victor Crist
PO Box 47058
Tampa 33647
(813) 988-8206
Assistants: Brandon Wagner, Damian Wilson,
Carol Antrim
Jim Sebesta
9887 4th St. N., Suite 319
St. Petersburg 33702
(727) 563-0377
Assistants: Sue Berfield, Cheri Engala, David
Winialski
Lesley Miller
2109 Palm Ave., Suite 302
PO Box 5993
Tampa 33675-5993
(813) 272-2831
Assistants: Randolph Kinsey, Wanda
Beckham, Lyn Harris
Tom Lee
PO Box 2743
Brandon 33509
(813) 744-8683
Assistants: Chris Floyd, Ronald Price, Becky
Simmons
House:
Rob Wallace
10031 N. Dale Mabry Hwy.
Tampa 33618
(813) 632-6830
Assistants: Melonie Hoyt, Gloria Perez
Gus Bilirakis
31608 US Highway 19 N
Palm Harbour 34684
(727) 669-1911
Assistants: Rick Mahler, Chandria Kime
Sandra Murman
1107 E. Jackson St., Suite 101
Tampa 33602
(813) 272-2884
Assistants: Ralph Lair, Paula Tonelli







Chris Hart IV
4302 Henderson Blvd., Suite 113
Tampa 33629
(813) 272-2920
Assistants: James Mosteller, Sherry Knox
Bob Henriquez
4449 W Hillsborough
Tampa 33614
(813) 673-4673
Assistants: Ana Cruz, Ann Shelton
Arthenia Joyner
PO Box 172297
Tampa 33672-0297
(813) 229-9300
Sara Romeo
4815 E. Busch Blvd., Suite 204
Tampa 33617-6091
(813) 909-7182
Ken Littlefield
37818 State Rd. 54 West
Zephyrhills 33541-5428
(813) 779-8915
Assistants: Linda Harris, Robin Ringeisen
Johnnie Byrd, Jr.
121 N. Collins St., Suite 202
Plant City 33566
(813) 752-5863
Assistants: Edward Howlette, Jessica
Corcoran
J.D. Alexander
391 Ave. A., SW
Winter Haven 33880
(941) 298-7677
Assistants: Shannon Ross, Lisa Loomis
Michael Bennett
7011 301st Blvd., Suite B-1
Sarasota 34243-6205
(941) 755-8548
Assistants: Crystal Hatter, Leslie Hallows


Holmes

Senate:
Durell Peaden
598 North Ferdon Blvd.
Crestview 32536-2753
(850) 689-0556
Assistants: Roger Robinson, Susan Levine,
Ann McGraw, James Snyder
House:
Donald Brown
PO Box 1287
DeFuniak Springs 32435-1287
(850) 892-5188
Assistants: David Drake, Claude Joscelyn

Indian River

Senate:
Bill Posey
1802 S. Fiske Blvd., Suite 108
Rockledge 32955-3007
(321) 690-3484
Assistants: Patrick Gavin, William DuPree

Ken Pruitt

2400 SE Midport Rd., Suite 110
Port St. Lucie 34952-4806
(561) 335-8000
Assistants: Sheila Fennelly, Elaine Keller,
Carrie Lira
House:
Bob Allen
PO Box 561177
Rockledge 32956-1177
(321) 452-2220
Assistant: Mary Bolin
Stan Mayfield
PO Box 2380
Vero Beach 32961-2380
(561) 778-5077
Assistants: Travis Chapman, Lynne Glass








Jackson

Senate:
Alfred Lawson
400 North Adams St.
Tallahassee 32301
(850) 222-1286
Assistants: Melissa Durham, Berta Kemp,
Deborah Fairhurst
House:
Bev Kilmer
PO Box 1586
Marianna 32447-5586
(850) 718-0047
Assistants: Debbie Dennis, Joyce Watters,
Chris Akins

Jefferson

Senate:
Alfred Lawson
400 North Adams St.
Tallahassee 32301
(850) 222-1286
Assistants: Melissa Durham, Berta Kemp,
Deborah Fairhurst
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
House:
Will S. Kendrick
212 Capitol
Tallhassee 32399-1300
(850) 488-7870
Assistant: Laura Jersey

Lafayette

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons


House:
Dwight Stansel
208 N. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak 32060-2455
(904) 758-0480
Assistants: Diana Robinson, Julie Myers

Lake

Senate:
Anna Cowin
716 W. Magnolia St.
Leesburg 34748
(352) 315-9335
Assistants: Barbara Macdonell, Doris Meisner,
Elaine Merritt
House:
Carey Baker
301 West Ward Ave.
Eustis 32726-4024
(352) 742-6490
Assistant: Gale Bass
Joyce Cusack
224 N. Woodland Blvd.
DeLand 32720-4219
(904) 943-7900
Frederick "Fred" Brummer
409 S. Park Ave.
Apopka 32703
(407) 880-4414
Assistants: John Byrd, Alice Berkley
Randy Johnson
99 West Plant St.
Winter Garden 34787
(407) 877-0122
Assistant: Nathan Cook
Hugh Gibson
916 Avenida Central
The Villages 32159-5704
(352) 750-0267
David Russell
5331 Commercial Way, Suite 204
Spring Hill 34606
(352) 544-2300
Assistants: Ann Marie Comeau, Anne Lossing








Lee


Senate:
Lisa Carlton
2127 S. Tamiami Trail
Osprey 34229-9695
(941) 486-2032
Assistants: Linda Mineer, Barbara Harle, Rita
Faulkner
Burt Saunders
3301 E. Tamiami Trail
Administration Bldg., Suite 304
Naples 34112
(941) 417-6220
Assistant: Rebecca Kokkinos
Tom Rossin
503 Royal Palm Beach Blvd.
Royal Palm Beach 33441
(561) 753-2537
Assistants: Cathy Branch, Mike Welch, Tracy
Peters, Becki Siegendorf
House:
Lindsay Harrington
115 Tamiami Trail, Unit 2110
Punta Gorda 33950-3600
(941) 575-5820
Assistant: Cynthia Beckett
Bruce Kyle
2120 Main St., Suite 208
Fort Myers 33901-3010
(941) 335-2411
Assistants: Jessica Belvitch, Ashley Biagi
Jeff Kottkamp
PO Box 152085
Cape Coral 33915-2085
(941) 242-7267
Carole Green
15248 S. Tamiami Trail, Suite 200
Ft. Meyers 33908
(941) 433-6775
Assistants: Jerri Veenstra, Julie Richardson


Leon


Senate:
Alfred Lawson
400 North Adams St.
Tallahassee 32301
(850) 222-1286
Assistants: Melissa Durham, Berta Kemp,
Deborah Fairhurst
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
House:
Bev Kilmer
PO Box 1586
Marianna 32447-5586
(850) 718-0047
Assistants: Debbie Dennis, Joyce Watters,
Chris Akins
Curtis Richardson
533 Tuskegee St.
Tallahassee 32310-6861
(850) 414-8341
Assistant: Gwendolyn Simmonds
Loranne Ausely
PO Box 786
Tallahassee 32302-0786
(850) 412-0070
Will S. Kendrick
212 Capitol
Tallhassee 32399-1300
(850) 488-7870
Assistant: Laura Jersey

Levy

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons







Rod Smith
2727 NW 43rd St., Suite 2A
Gainesville 32606
(352) 375-3555
Assistants: Tonya Shays, Pat Shays, Mike
Murtha, Nancy Williams
House:
Will S. Kendrick
212 Capitol
Tallhassee 32399-1300
(850) 488-7870
Assistant: Laura Jersey
Liberty
Senate:
Alfred Lawson
400 North Adams St.
Tallahassee 32301
(850) 222-1286
Assistants: Melissa Durham, Berta Kemp,
Deborah Fairhurst
House:
Bev Kilmer
PO Box 1586
Marianna 32447-5586
(850) 718-0047
Assistants: Debbie Dennis, Joyce Watters,
Chris Akins

Madison

Senate:
Alfred Lawson
400 North Adams St.
Tallahassee 32301
(850) 222-1286
Assistants: Melissa Durham, Berta Kemp,
Deborah Fairhurst
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons


House:
Dwight Stansel
208 N. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak 32060-2455
(904) 758-0480
Assistants: Diana Robinson, Julie Myers

Manatee

Senate:
Lesley Miller
2109 Palm Ave., Suite 302
PO Box 5993
Tampa 33675-5993
(813) 272-2831
Assistants: Randolph Kinsey, Wanda
Beckham, Lyn Harris
John McKay
3653 Cortez Rd. West, Suite 90
Bradenton 34210
(941) 727-6349
Assistants: Peg Faulkner, Bill Griffin,
Ms. Lester Rice
House:
Frank Peterman
1198 62nd Ave., South
St. Petersburg 33705-5620
(727) 327-2443
Assistant: Gershom Faulkner
Michael Bennett
7011 301st Blvd., Suite B-1
Sarasota 34243-6205
(941) 755-8548
Assistants: Crystal Hatter, Leslie Hallows
Mark Flanagan
4301 32nd St. W., Suite C2
Bradenton 34205
(941) 755-2283
Assistants: Cheryl Ennis, Kathleen Laffey








Marion

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
Rod Smith
2727 NW 43rd St., Suite 2A
Gainesville 32606
(352) 375-3555
Assistants: Tonya Shays, Pat Shays, Mike
Murtha, Nancy Williams
James King
9485 Regency Square Blvd., Suite 108
Jacksonville 32225-8145
(904) 727-3600
Assistants: Kay Rousseau, Paul Hull, Rebecca
Stagg, Clara Schrader
Anna Cowin
716 W. Magnolia St.
Leesburg 34748
(352) 315-9335
Assistants: Barbara Macdonell, Doris Meisner,
Elaine Merritt
House:
Will S. Kendrick
212 Capitol
Tallhassee 32399-1300
(850) 488-7870
Assistant: Laura Jersey


Joe Pickens
3841 Reid St., Suite 5
Palatka 32177-2509
(904) 325-8384
Assistant: Debra LeRoy
Perry McGriff
1120 NW 13th St.
Gainesville 32601-4136
(352) 372-8406
Assistant: Tammy Salmon


Ed Jennings, Jr.
4707 NW 53rd Ave., Suite A
Gainesville 32606-3400
(352) 377-0022
Dennis Baxley
111 SE 25th Ave.
Ocala 34471-9179
(352) 723-1313
Assistants: Sharon Nehring, Brenda Wright
Carey Baker
301 West Ward Ave.
Eustis 32726-4024
(352) 742-6490
Assistant: Gale Bass
Hugh Gibson
916 Avenida Central
The Villages 32159-5704
(352) 750-0267
Nancy Argenziano
6216 W. Corporate Oaks Dr.
Crystal River 34429-2694
(352) 563-1204
Assistants: Janet Oehmig, Elizabeth Peterson

Martin

Senate:
Ken Pruitt
2400 SE Midport Rd., Suite 110
Port St. Lucie 34952-4806
(561) 335-8000
Assistants: Sheila Fennelly, Elaine Keller,
Carrie Lira
Tom Rossin
503 Royal Palm Beach Blvd.
Royal Palm Beach 33441
(561) 753-2537
Assistants: Cathy Branch, Mike Welch, Tracy
Peters, Becki Siegendorf
House:
Richard Machek
2300 Virginia Ave.
Fort Pierce 34982-5632
(561) 595-1380
Assistant: Candace Jones Wright







Gayle Harrell
121 SW Port St. Lucie Blvd.
Port St. Lucie 34984-5099
(561) 283-1179
Assistant: Janet Skolnick
Joe Negron
Box 2589
Stuart 34995-2589
(561) 287-2600
Assistant: Cheryl Vancura

Monroe

Senate:
Daryl Jones
9200 S. Dadeland Blvd., Suite 208
Miami 33156
(305) 671-7240
Assistants: Heather Price, Taffi Miller, Donald
West, Mercedes Pasley
House:
Ken Sorensen
91760 Overseas Hwy.
PO Box 699
Tavenier 33070-0697
(305) 853-1947
Assistants: Laura Todd, Glenda Hall, Kathleen
Mravic

Nassau

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
House:
Aaron Bean
305 Bonnieview Rd
Fernandina Beach 32034-8614
(904) 277-3493


Okaloosa

Senate:
Durell Peaden
598 North Ferdon Blvd.
Crestview 32536-2753
(850) 689-0556
Assistants: Roger Robinson, Susan Levine,
Ann McGraw, James Snyder
Charlie Clary
1241 Airport Rd., Suite A
Destin 32541
(850) 833-9159
Assistants: Peggy Hicks, Buckley Vernon,
Allison Pursley, Stacey Allen
House:
Jefferson "Jeff" Miller
5233 Willing St.
Milton 32570
(850) 983-5550
Assistants: David Murzin, Sherry Mullins
Jerry Melvin
38 Miracle Strip Pkwy., Suite 1A
Ft. Walton Beach 32548
(850) 833-9319
Assistants: Don Pardue, Joann Hofstad
Donald Brown
PO Box 1287
DeFuniak Springs 32435-1287
(850) 892-5188
Assistants: David Drake, Claude Joscelyn

Okeechobee

Senate:
John Laurent
250 N. Clark Ave.
Bartow 33830
(941) 519-7595
Assistants: Ken Grimes, Ed Smith, Larry Ford
Tom Rossin
503 Royal Palm Beach Blvd.
Royal Palm Beach 33441
(561) 753-2537
Assistants: Cathy Branch, Mike Welch, Tracy
Peters, Becki Siegendorf







House:
Richard Machek
2300 Virginia Ave.
Fort Pierce 34982-5632
(561) 595-1380
Assistant: Candace Jones Wright
Frank Attkisson
323 Pleasant St.
Kissimmee 34741-5763

Orange

Senate:
Lee Constantine
378 Centerpointe Circle, Suite 1268
Altamonte Springs 32701-3442
(407) 331-9675
Assistants: Chris Stewart, Paul Finelli
Daniel Webster
315 S. Dillard St.
Winter Garden 34787
(407) 656-0066
Assistants: Ann Drawdy, Kathy Mears,
Cindy Brown
Buddy Dyer
PO Box 1031
Orlando 32802
(407) 245-0882
Assistants: Gloria Warden, Suzanne Denson,
Jennifer Duncanson
House:
Bob Allen
PO Box 561177
Rockledge 32956-1177
(321) 452-2220
Assistant: Mary Bolin
Thomas Feeney
PO Box 622109
Oviedo 32762
(407) 977-6500
Assistants: Shannon Conklin, Cheryl Moore
Thomas Feeney
PO Box 622109
Oviedo 32762
(407) 977-6500
Assistants: Shannon Conklin, Cheryl Moore


David Mealor
224 Waymont Ct., Suite 101
Lake Mary 32746-3119
(407) 322-4496
Assistants: Julie Fees, Hilda Quintero
Jim Kallinger
7523 Aloma Ave., Suite 106
Winter Park 32792-9158
(407) 654-5756
Assistant: Daniel Peterson
Allen Trovillion
1360 Palmetto Ave.
Winter Park 32789
(407) 623-1355
Assistants: Vilma Dowd, Kathleen Gilland
David Simmons
332 N. Magnolia Ave.
Orlando 32801-1609
(407) 422-2454
Frederick "Fred" Brummer
409 S. Park Ave.
Apopka 32703
(407) 880-4414
Assistants: John Byrd, Alice Berkley
Gary Siplin
725 S. Goldwyn Ave.
Orlando 32805-2903
(407) 481-0078
Assistant: Naomi Cooper
Andy Gardiner
1817 Antilles PI.
Orlando 32806-1436
(407) 895-3831
Randy Johnson
99 West Plant St.
Winter Garden 34787
(407) 877-0122
Assistant: Nathan Cook








Osceola

Senate:
Daniel Webster
315 S. Dillard St.
Winter Garden 34787
(407) 656-0066
Assistants: Ann Drawdy, Kathy Mears, Cindy
Brown
Charlie Bronson
1813 South Patrick Dr.
Indian Harbour Beach 32937
(321) 726-2880
Assistants: David Mclnnes, Kathy Lane
House:
Randy Johnson
99 West Plant St.
Winter Garden 34787
(407) 877-0122
Assistant: Nathan Cook
Frank Attkisson
323 Pleasant St.
Kissimmee 34741-5763
(407) 846-3448

Palm Beach

Senate:
Ken Pruitt
2400 SE Midport Rd., Suite 110
Port St. Lucie 34952-4806
(561) 335-8000
Assistants: Sheila Fennelly, Elaine Keller,
Carrie Lira
Ron Klein
3333 S. Congress Ave., Suite 305A
Delray Beach 33445
(561) 274-4777
Assistants: Kelly Skidmore, Brandon
Biederman, Lesley Shriberg
Steven Geller
400 S. Federal Hwy., Suite 204
Hallandale Beach 33009
(954) 893-5089
Assistants: Gail Schwartz, John Reid, Jennifer
James


Mandy Dawson
33 NE 2d St., Suite 209
Ft. Lauderdale 33301-1033
(954) 467-4317
Assistant: Rona Silberman
Debby Sanderson
4800 NE 20th Terr., Suite 401
Ft. Lauderdale 33308-4572
(954) 958-5500
Assistants: John Kuczwanski, Vicki Pearson
Tom Rossin
503 Royal Palm Beach Blvd.
Royal Palm Beach 33441
(561) 753-2537
Assistants: Cathy Branch, Mike Welch, Tracy
Peters, Becki Siegendorf
House:
Richard Machek
2300 Virginia Ave.
Fort Pierce 34982-5632
(561) 595-1380
Assistant: Candace Jones Wright
Joe Negron
Box 2589
Stuart 34995-2589
(561) 287-2600
Assistant: Cheryl Vancura
Jeff Atwater
824 US Highway 1, Suite 260
North Palm Beach 33408-3876
Assistant: Barbara Strominger
James Harper
2620 Australian Ave.
West Palm Beach 33404-4159
(561) 833-7783
Assistant: Lee Langston
Lois Frankel
1645 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.,
Suite 290
West Palm Beach 33401
(561) 681-2597
Assistants: Aimee Diaz, Dawn Goodman







Susan Bucher
1660 Southern Blvd., Suite Q
West Palm Beach 33406-3219
(561) 682-0156
Assistants: Rachel Glickman, Audrey Spudeck
William "Bill" Andrews
31 NE 4th Ave.
Delray Beach 33483
(561) 279-1616
Assistants: Pam Hackett, Wendy Mortimer
Ann Gannon
302 SE 2nd St.
Delray Beach 33483-4506
Assistant: Lauran Hausdorff
Irving Slosberg
20952 Certosa Terr.
Boca Raton 33433-1638
(561) 309-0056
Connie Mack
2400 East Las Olas Blvd., Suite 421
Ft. Lauderdale 33301-1529
(954) 563-3232

Pasco

Senate:
Virginia "Ginny" Brown-Waite
20 N. Main St., Room 200
Brooksville 34601
(352) 544-2344
Assistant: Judy Wells, Lynn Stewart, Tamara
Potts
Victor Crist
PO Box 47058
Tampa 33647
(813) 988-8206
Assistants: Brandon Wagner, Damian Wilson,
Carol Antrim
Jack Latvala
35111 US Hwy. 19 N, Suite 105
Palm Harbor 34684
(727) 787-8991
Assistants: Missy Timmons, Katherine
Johnson, Tracy Caddell


House:
David Russell
5331 Commercial Way, Suite 204
Spring Hill 34606
(352) 544-2300
Assistants: Ann Marie Comeau, Anne Lossing
Mike Fasano
8217 Massachusetts Ave.
New Port Richey 34653
(727) 848-5885
Assistants: Gregory Giordan, Christine Hunter
Heather Fiorentino
6231 Grand Blvd.
New Port Richey 34652
(727) 816-1307
Assistants: John Legg, Evelyn Hass
Ken Littlefield
37818 State Rd. 54 West
Zephyrhills 33541-5428
(813) 779-8915
Assistants: Linda Harris, Robin Ringeisen

Pinellas

Senate:
Jack Latvala
35111 US Hwy. 19 N, Suite 105
Palm Harbor 34684
(727) 787-8991
Assistants: Missy Timmons, Katherine
Johnson, Tracy Caddell
Jim Sebesta
9887 4th St. N., Suite 319
St. Petersburg 33702
(727) 563-0377
Assistants: Sue Berfield, Cheri Engala, David
Winialski
Lesley Miller
2109 Palm Ave., Suite 302
PO Box 5993
Tampa 33675-5993
(813) 272-2831
Assistants: Randolph Kinsey, Wanda
Beckham, Lyn Harris







Donald Sullivan
4020 Park St., N., Suite 204
St. Petersburg 33709
(727) 893-9657
Assistants: Charline "Charlie" Anderson, Doris
Burns, Betsy Collins
House:
Rob Wallace
10031 N. Dale Mabry Hwy.
Tampa 33618
(813) 632-6830
Assistants: Melonie Hoyt, Gloria Perez
Gus Bilirakis
31608 US Highway 19 N
Palm Harbour 34684
(727) 669-1911
Assistants: Rick Mahler, Chandria Kime
Larry Crow
2432 Bayshore Blvd.
Dunedin 34698
(727) 298-1674
Assistants: Liada LaBonte, Jan Zimmerman
Kim Berfield
1466 Flora Rd.
Clearwater 33755-1514
(727) 465-4646
Leslie Waters
11350 66th St. N., Suite 107
Largo 33773
(727) 545-6421
Assistants: Bruce Cotton, Tanya Moore
Frank Farkas
1510 4th St. N.
St. Petersburg 33704
(727) 893-9855
Assistants: Christopher K. Davis, Julie Kelsey


Charlie Justice
PO Box 47741
St. Petersburg 33743-7741
(727) 343-5757
Assistant: Brian Hohman


John Carassas
2401 W. Bay Dr., Suite 124
Largo 33770-4902
(727) 562-4010
Assistants: Jim Johnson, Janet Fleeker
Frank Peterman
1198 62nd Ave., South
St. Petersburg 33705-5620
(727) 327-2443
Assistant: Gershom Faulkner

Polk

Senate:
Virginia "Ginny" Brown-Waite
20 N. Main St., Room 200
Brooksville 34601
(352) 544-2344
Assistants: Judy Wells, Lynn Stewart, Tamara
Potts
John Laurent
250 N. Clark Ave.
Bartow 33830
(941) 519-7595
Assistants: Ken Grimes, Ed Smith, Larry Ford
Tom Lee
PO Box 2743
Brandon 33509
(813) 744-8683
Assistants: Chris Floyd, Ronald Price, Becky
Simmons
House:
David Russell
5331 Commercial Way, Suite 204
Spring Hill 34606
(352) 544-2300
Assistants: Ann Marie Comeau, Anne Lossing
Dennis Ross
4416 Florida National Dr.
Lakeland 33813-1515
(863) 834-6799
Paula Bono Dockery
PO Drawer 2395
Lakeland 33806
(941) 284-4525
Assistants: Cheryl Fulford, Kathy Riggs







Marty Bowen
PO Box 7229
Winter Haven 33883-7229
(863) 298-8270
J.D. Alexander
391 Ave. A., SW
Winter Haven 33880-2931
(941) 298-7677
Assistants: Shannon Ross, Lisa Loomis

Putnam

Senate:
Betty Holzendorf
816 N. Ocean St.
Jacksonville 32202-3083
(904) 359-6880
Assistants: Ken Johnson, Milessa Nesbitt,
Geraldine C. Orr
Rod Smith
2727 NW 43rd St., Suite 2A
Gainesville 32606
(352) 375-3555
Assistants: Tonya Shays, Pat Shays, Mike
Murtha, Nancy Williams
House:
Joe Pickens
3841 Reid St., Suite 5
Palatka 32177-2509
(904) 325-8384
Assistant: Debra LeRoy

St. Johns

Senate:
Betty Holzendorf
816 N. Ocean St.
Jacksonville 32202-3083
(904) 359-6880
Assistants: Ken Johnson, Milessa Nesbitt,
Geraldine C. Orr
Jim Horne
2301 Park Ave., Suite 403
Orange Park 32073
(904) 573-4900
Assistants: Georgia Flynn McKeown, Kelly
Williams


James King
9485 Regency Square Blvd., Suite 108
Jacksonville 32225-8145
(904) 727-3600
Assistants: Kay Rousseau, Paul Hull, Rebecca
Stagg, Clara Schrader
House:
Don Davis
2320 South 3rd St., Suite 3
Jacksonville Beach 32250-4057
(904) 249-1990
Assistant: Marcie Regan
Dick Kravitz
2131 Park Ave.
Orange Park 32073-5585
(904) 278-5660
Assistant: Debra Harris
Doug Wiles
1510 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Suite Al
St. Augustine 32084-2602
(904) 823-4660
Assistants: Steven Schale, Martha Jennison

St. Lucie

Senate:
Bill Posey
1802 S. Fiske Blvd., Suite 108
Rockledge 32955-3007
(321) 690-3484
Assistants: Patrick Gavin, William DuPree
Ken Pruitt
2400 SE Midport Rd., Suite 110
Port St. Lucie 34952-4806
(561) 335-8000
Assistants: Sheila Fennelly, Elaine Keller,
Carrie Lira
House:
Richard Machek
2300 Virginia Ave.
Fort Pierce 34982-5632
(561) 595-1380
Assistant: Candace Jones Wright







Stan Mayfield
PO Box 2380
Vero Beach 32961-2380
(561) 778-5077
Assistants: Travis Chapman, Lynne Glass
Gayle Harrell
121 SW Port St. Lucie Blvd.
Port St. Lucie 34984-5099
(561) 283-1179
Assistant: Janet Skolnick

Santa Rosa

Senate:
Durell Peaden
598 North Ferdon Blvd.
Crestview 32536-2753
(850) 689-0556
Assistants: Roger Robinson, Susan Levine,
Ann McGraw, James Snyder
Charlie Clary
1241 Airport Rd., Suite A
Destin 32541
(850) 833-9159
Assistants: Peggy Hicks, Buckley Vernon,
Allison Pursley, Stacey Allen
House:
Jefferson "Jeff" Miller
5233 Willing St.
Milton 32570-4973
(850) 983-5550
Assistants: David Murzin, Sherry Joann
Mullins
Jerry Melvin
38 Miracle Strip Pkwy., Suite 1A
Ft. Walton Beach 32548
(850) 833-9319
Assistants: Don Pardue, Joann Hofstad

Sarasota

Senate:
Lisa Carlton
2127 S. Tamiami Trail
Osprey 34229-9695
(941) 486-2032
Assistants: Linda Mineer, Barbara Harle, Rita
Faulkner


John McKay
3653 Cortez Rd. West, Suite 90
Bradenton 34210
(941) 727-6349
Assistants: Peg Faulkner, Bill Griffin,
Ms. Lester Rice
House:
Michael Bennett
7011 301st Blvd., Suite B-1
Sarasota 34243-6205
(941) 755-8548
Assistants: Crystal Hatter, Leslie Hallows
Donna Clarke
PO Box 25071
Sarasota 34277-2071
(941) 955-8683
Nancy Detert
4000 S. Tamiami Tr., Suite 124
Venice 34293-5029
(941) 480-3057
Assistants: Pam Nickell, Marcus Quimby,
Richard Breeden
Jerry Paul
Aztec Plaza
4456 Tamiami Trail, Suite B-14
Port Charlotte 33890-2136
(941) 764-1100
Assistants: Judy Skinner Jackie Hadley
Jeff Kottkamp
PO Box 152085
Cape Coral 33915-2085
(941) 242-7267

Seminole

Senate:
D. Lee Constantine
378 Centerpointe Circle, Suite 1268
Altamonte Springs 32701-3442
(407) 331-9675
Assistants: Chris Stewart, Paul Finelli







Anna Cowin
716 W. Magnolia St.
Leesburg 34748
(352) 315-9335
Assistants: Barbara Macdonell, Doris Meisner,
Elaine Merritt
Daniel Webster
315 S. Dillard St.
Winter Garden 34787
(407) 656-0066
Assistants: Ann Drawdy, Kathy Mears,
Cindy Brown
Buddy Dyer
PO Box 1031
Orlando 32802
(407) 245-0882
Assistants: Gloria Warden, Suzanne Denson,
Jennifer Duncanson
House:
(OMIT)Stan Bainter
301 W. Ward Ave.
Eustis 32726
(352) 589-1998
Assistant: Jake Bebber
Carey Baker
301 West Ward Ave.
Eustis 32726-4024
(352) 742-6490
Assistant: Gale Bass
Thomas Feeney
PO Box 622109
Oviedo 32762
(407) 977-6500
Assistants: Shannon Conklin, Cheryl Moore
David Mealor
224 Waymont Ct., Suite 101
Lake Mary 32746-3119
(407) 322-4496
Assistants: Julie Fees, Hilda Quintero
Jim Kallinger
7523 Aloma Ave., Suite 106
Winter Park 32792-9158
(407) 654-5756
Assistant: Daniel Peterson


Lee Constantine
378 Centerpointe Circle, Suite 1268
Altamonte Springs 32701-3442
(407) 331-9675
Assistants: Chris Stewart, Paul Finelli

Sumter

Senate:
Virginia "Ginny" Brown-Waite
20 N. Main St., Room 200
Brooksville 34601
(352) 544-2344
Assistants: Judy Wells, Lynn Stewart, Tamara
Potts
Anna Cowin
716 W. Magnolia St.
Leesburg 34748
(352) 315-9335
Assistants: Barbara Macdonell, Doris Meisner,
Elaine Merritt
House:
Hugh Gibson
916 Avenida Central
The Villages 32159-5704
(352) 750-0267
David Russell
5331 Commercial Way, Suite 204
Spring Hill 34606
(352) 544-2300
Assistants: Ann Marie Comeau, Anne Lossing

Suwannee

Senate:
Richard Mitchell
406 10th Ave. NW
Jasper 32052
(904) 719-2733
Assistants: Kym Galliah, Dean Papapetrou,
Anjanette Radney, Pam Clemmons
Rod Smith
2727 NW 43rd St., Suite 2A
Gainesville 32606
(352) 375-3555
Assistants: Tonya Shays, Pat Shays, Mike
Murtha, Nancy Williams




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