Pompano Pelican ( 04-05-2013 )

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Pompano Pelican
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Pompano Pelican
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Pompano Pelican
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Pompano Beach
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United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
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26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Friday, April 5, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 14 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Turtle Nesting Season is March through October Pelican Pelican By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Nine veterans from the Goldcoast Chapter of the Disabled Americans Veterans [DAV] have dedicated themselves to decoding the language of the Veterans Administration. It is a monumental task. Not only because as Navy vet Elliott Roth said, It is the most confusing, disjointed manual Ive ever seen, but thats because the rules are constantly changing. As an example, Form 527 was two-pages long for many years. A recently published version, 527-EZ, is eight pages. Few veterans of earlier wars Volunteer vets lead others through the VAs tortuous claims process; average wait is 600 days Mayor wants charter revised but withholds speci csBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Mayor Jean Robb presented several of her initiatives this week, saying she would ask for formal action at future commission meetings. Top of her list is establishment of a charter review committee. Robb said some changes now allowed by ordinance should be given to the electorate and other things need to be eliminated or changed. WWII, Korea and Vietnam are capable of ling the VAs bene t forms without help. So these nine volunteers spend most Tuesdays as service of cers at the American Legion Post in Deer eld Beach, offering their free expertise to help their comrades navigate the governments paperwork. As broadcast recently on MSNBCs Morning Joe the wait for the average VA disability claim is 600 days. And while the VA aims to update its processing systems by 2015, for most of the aging WWII veterans that help will come too late. They need these assets now, said counselor Mike Butler. So DAV service of cers attempt to expedite the process. Said one, lling out the forms correctly is more than half the battle because if information is missing, and the forms returned, many vets abandoned their efforts to get the compensation due them. Ninetyve percent need some additional information, ex-Marine Bob Citrolo said. Were here to do it once and do it right. Florida has the largest population of veterans in this country and because the Goldcoast Chapter has the most service of cers in the state, it handles $93,000 entry sculpture approved for LBTSBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Town commissioners on Tuesday authorized artist Laurie Huck to create a Coral Arch metal sculpture to highlight the western gateway to town. Cost of the artwork is $93,025. The 14-foot sculpture on a 3.75-foot base, featuring ying sh and a turtle, will be installed in the rst town parking lot east of the Intracoastal Waterway bridge on the south side of Commercial Boulevard. It will be in the general vicinity of where the agpole is today. The vote to approve the agreement was 4-1, Commissioner Chris Vincent dissenting. He objected to the cost and the placement of the artwork. Funds for the sculpture come from See VETS on page 16 See SCULPTURE on page 12 See DEERFIELD on page 5 Parties with reworks mark citys new lookBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach This citys beach area is having a coming-out party tonight that will rival any other event that has taken place on the east side of town for years. And the party moves from west to east. Redevelopment at the beach has been a project of the citys Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA. The big deal is that most of the work on the beach, Atlantic Boulevard and Harbor Village has been completed. The celebration See FEAST on page 18

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2 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Members of the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Town Commission honored Broward Sheriffs Of ce Capt. Angelo Cedeno with a proclamation Tuesday in recognition of his service to the town. He was executive of cer from February 2009 to January when he was promoted to Internal Affairs. He was recognized for displaying a tremendous passion for law enforcement, exceptional leadership and a high level of professionalism. Shown with Cedeno, fourth from left, are Commissioners Mark Brown, Chris Vincent, Mayor Roseann Minnet, Vice Mayor Scot Sasser and Commissioner Stuart Dodd. [Staff photo by Judy Vik] Town honors work of BSO Capt. Angelo Cedeno SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.comArt 4-5 Photographs of Peter J. Nolan will be on display at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Ct., Wilton Manors, until May 3. Gallery 21 is open Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. 954-661-4740. 4-12 Social Media & The Artists workshop from 7 to 9 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Court. Cost is $5 donation to the Central Area Neighborhood Association of Wilton Manors. Email PoetC7@aol.com or 954-6614740. 4-17 Free Artistic Candy Making class from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvilla Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Organized by Our Art By The Sea. 954-594-0444.Auctions & Sales4-13 Yard Sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, Wilton Manors. Vendor space available. 954-390-2115 or 954-390-2130. 4-27 & 28 Garden Isles community garage sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Houses throughout community gardens, along Cypress Road and Northeast 3 Street, will be having garage sales. 954-6461948.Auditions & Theatre4-6 Beau Jest at 8 p.m. at Broward Stage Door Theatre, 8036 W. Sample Road, Coral Springs through April 28. Tickets are $38. 954-344-7765. 4-12 The Turn of the Screw opera at 7:30 p.m. at Keith C. & Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center, Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets range from $45 to $65. 561-237-9000. 4-27 With Love, from Broadway & More at 8 p.m. at Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets range from $10 to $25. 954-784 0768.See SIGHTINGS on page 11

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The Pelican 3 Friday, April 5, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach Mayor Dan Dodge has asked commissioners here to submit their ideas for the towns long range planning. Saying he had trouble nding a plan that would mirror the needs of this small beachfront community, the mayor laid out what he thought should be considered. Most important is keeping good nancial controls and the towns traditional low mileage rate, Dodge said, Looking to the future, mayor addresses long range planningand then assessing future capital needs which will likely include improvements to the water distribution system. Maintaining the smalltown quality of life is also important, the mayor said. Future transportation needs should also be considered: the towns bus service, pedestrian crossings, speed limits, and the introduction of sidewalks. The town owns just two pieces of property, the water plan site on Sample Road and the town hall complex on A1A. Acquiring more land could be a possibility and the feasibility and affordability of that needs to be studied, Dodge said. Along with the water distribution system which at some time will have to be either replaced or upgraded, other power sources such as natural gas or solar energy could be proposed, he said. It [the plan] doesnt have to be overly complicated, Dodge said. But it is up to us to determine what is practical and correct for us. Then we will re ne it at a public workshop.Sun Bergeron wins disposal contractHillsboro Beach The commission chose Sun Bergeron as its waste disposal contractor this week commenting that they felt more material would be recycled and reintroduced as new products with Sun rather than with the other competitor present on Tuesday, Wheelabrator. Suns price is $45.25 a ton against Wheelabrators $42. Mayor Dan Dodge said the rm, new to the industry here, has shown success in winning accounts and that he liked the idea of the small guy challenging the big guy. Everyone seemed to admire their success in introducing their product to market, he added. The small difference in tonnage fees makes little difference over the length of the ve-year contract, he said. Sun Bergeron won its rst See HILLSBORO on page 16

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4 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Marine interests here have drawn a proposal that, if accepted by the city commission, will improve access to local waterways, establish a nautical art program and create signature events with a nautical theme. In addition, the business group headed by former re rescue administrator Jim Mathie, is asking the city to establish a marine advisory committee, install mooring buoys along Angels Reef for divers, work to build an arti cial reef, establish a system of oating docks for kayak and paddle-board users and ask the water management district to deepen the Hillsboro River east of Military Trail. Additionally, the group wants to help the city design the maritime village being proposed for Sullivan Park. Purpose of the plan presented Tuesday at the commission meeting is to Plan aims to make Deer eld Beach a nautical destinationpromote the city as a nautical destination for visitors and as a place to live with opportunities for recreation and business near the water. It is a 44-page analysis of the areas existing marine amenities and what is needed in the way of improvements. On Mathies team are major business owners such as Marina One, 2 Georges at the Cove, the Wyndham Beach Resort, Island Water Sports, Riva Motorsports, Dixie Divers, Oceans 234, Embassy Suites, Skirixen as well as the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce. Already accomplished is one of their goals: a local map that highlights the citys nautical destinations and which is now being distributed by the chamber. Deer eld Beach is currently ranked fth among Browards 32 municipalities in the amount of tourist tax collected. Promoting the city as a nautical destination should increase this amount and improve our overall ranking, Mathie said. In 2011, this city sent $1.7 million in bed tax revenues to the county. Tourism is Browards number one economic engine, Mathie added. To be a player, destinations need to nd their niche and brag about it. Come aboard and help promote us. Integral to the image of Deer eld Beach as a nautical destination is the establishment of a funded public art program that emphasizes nautical themes such as the mural by artist Rick Novak at the 2 Georges. Public art is encouraged and funded with development and redevelopment fees. In Boynton Beach, one percent of the cost of all commercial development is set aside for public art. Last year Pompano Beach approved an ordinance establishing a two percent share of each public project for art. Also presented for consideration was a logo design consisting of the pier, a wave and a rising sun. Commissioners accepted the destination plan without comment except for Joe Miller who said he favored the idea of branding our city and asked if staff would look into the proposal. DBES sets Round-Up for kindergarten parentsDeer eld BeachAnother Kindergarten Round-Up will be held at Deer eld Beach Elementary School, 60 NE 1 St. April 10, 6 to 7 p.m. in the media center. Parents will meet staff and learn about curriculum and school activities. To enroll in kindergarten, children must be age ve by Sept. 1, 2013 and provide original birth certi cate, two proofs of residency, current Florida Immunization Record and physical exam form. Call 754-322-6100.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, April 5, 2013 Robb has chaired several charter review committees in the past and said there were things we should have looked at but didnt. She said she would elaborate further at another time. Commissioner Bill Ganz said he would not favor establishing the committee without further discussion and Vice Mayor Ben Preston asked what the directive would be for the reviewers. Robb said she would table the issue for now but asked the city clerk to determine what elections are being scheduled by the county prior to the next city ballot in 2015. Noting the dif culty in lling advisory board seats, the mayor also suggested disbanding the Memorial Committee and giving the Deer eld Beach Historical Society street-naming responsibilities and increasing the size of the Community Appearance Board to include two members from the now defunct Beauti cation Committee.Pier lease being challenged by the mayorDeer eld Beach The lease-holders of the Deer eld Caf, the new restaurant on the shing pier, may have to rethink their 24/7 business plan. Mayor Jean Robb said this week she wants to reconsider commission action taken before her election that permits the restaurant to be open 24 hours a day. She said she wanted the commission to hear her concerns about the extended hours in that location. In February, the commission granted a request from Toula Amanna to extend the 6 a.m. to midnight hours stated in the lease but retained the ability to revert to the original agreement if late-night problems occur. Amanna had contended that the extended hours could produce much higher revenues for the restaurant and as much as $40,000 a year for the city.Two commercial buildings approvedDeer eld Beach A commercial addition to the Target Super Store on Hillsboro Boulevard was approved by commissioners Tuesday night. The 48,425 square feet of retail space will be attached at the east side of the Target building on what is now a grassy pad making the entire structure 241,364 square feet. The plat for the 23 acre property owned by United Growth Capital also sets aside two outparcels for future development. One was a Kentucky Fried Chicken outlet, the other a Subway store. Construction of another large commercial building was also okd by the commission. A 97,615 squarefoot decorative tile showroom and distribution center will be built at 1901 W. Sample Road bordering Crystal Lake. Owner is Bedrosians Inc. Commissioner Richard Rosensweig asked if landscaping would block views of the building for people living across the lake. A fence and required landscaping will be installed, he was told. Funding set for summer programsDeer eld Beach A summer camp program at Westside Park will be funded by a $50,000 grant from the Law Enforcement Trust Fund and a private benefactor chipping in another $125,000. The new funding sources replace a former grant provided by the Childrens Services Council. Children ages 5 to 12 are eligible to attend the camp which will be held June 10 to Aug. 16. And students in grades three to 12 needing tutoring in math can attend summer classes at the Cathedral Community Church, 365 S. Dixie Highway. Funded with $5,000 from the Cathedral Community Development Corporation, certi ed teachers are hired to help students improve their skills in pre-algebra, algebra, geometry and pre-calculus.Deer eldContinued from page 1

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6 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Circulation Joe McGeeAccount Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XXI, Issue 14 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & Letters Unity in the Commnity of Pompano Beach is pleased to announce that two scholarships in the amount of $1,000 each will be presented this year to local highschool students. The quali cations are: the applicant must be a resident of Pompano Beach, have a GPA of 2.0 or greater, family income must not exceed Broward County median income, be drug and crime free and of good moral character, have completed 40 hours of community service, complete a 500-word essay and have been accepted to attend a college or vocational institute for the 2013-2014 school year. Applications are available at the CRA Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1st St., Pompano Beach, 33060, or they may be requested by sending an email to Carolyn Mann at carpelican@gmail.com. Completed applications must be received by April 30. Please mail or deliver the application and requirements to: Unity in the Community, 50 NE 1st St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060.College scholarships open to Pompano Beach residents Tonight, weather permitting, this citys residents will join of cials to celebrate much more than the new look of Pompano Beach, they celebrate teamwork. A year into the great economic crash, Pompano Beach commissioners stayed the course with their plans to redevelop the beachfront, what little the developers left for us.Celebrate Pompanos new look tonightPompano Beachs CRA shines brightly with its latest projects at the beach on the BoulevardWhile all of us were thrilled with renderings of what could happen, mistrust and fear of change often took a front seat. Then we went through months of dust in the air, disappearing parking spots, torn up sidewalks and lost customers. Tonight all those memories begin to fade. Pompano Beach has never looked so good with the renovations, redevelopment and restorations that have taken place since Kim Briesemeister and Chris Brown took leadership of the citys Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA. They came in as pros, and they withstood the doubts and complaints that always arise when change raises its ugly head. Tonight, the champagne glasses should point in the direction of Briesemeister and Brown as we all get used to a new pride in Pompano Beach. Brown said it best. April 5 is the turning point for Pompano Beach. Tonight is our chance for residents to see that a city can really change.Bicycle RodeoPompano Beach The City of Pompano Beach, in conjunction with Florida Bicycle Month, will hold its Bicycle Rodeo on Saturday, April 6 from 8 to 1 p.m. at McNair Park, 951 NW 27 Ave. There will be bicycle safety information, food and more for families and children of all ages. The event is free. Call 954786-7882. Sheriffs charity golf tournamentBroward The Sheriffs Foundation of Broward County and the Broward Sheriffs Of ce are hosting the 2nd Annual Sheriffs Cup Golf Tournament on Monday, May 6 at the Weston Hills Country Club, 2600 Country Club Way, Weston. Registration is at 8 a.m. and. The tournament starts at 9:30 a.m. Cost is $125 per golfer or $500 for a foursome. The money raised will bene t nonpro t charities in Broward County. Visit www.birdeasepro.com/sheriffscup for more information.Classic Car ShowPompano Beach The Cruisin South Florida Classic Car Show takes place Saturday, April 20 at Pompano Citi Centre at the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cars from many different eras will be on display. The juried show is free to the public. There will be special giveaways for attendees. Car owners can pre-register by calling Russ Gagliano at 954-560-5412 or by email at russgevents@gmail.com.Youth basketball registrationOakland Park Registration has begun for the Summer Youth Basketball League. Parents can register children ages 7 to 16 [as of June 3] at city hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave., or online [www.oaklandpark .org] until the league is full. Registration fee is $55 for residents and $100 for non-residents. There will be separate age divisions for girls and boys. Call 954-630-4506.Recycling cartsWilton Manors On Monday, April 22, residents in single-family homes will start to receive the new roll-out recycling carts. The 65-gallon carts will be dropped off at each single-family home. Residents can keep their old recycling bins or put them on the curb to be picked-up. Residents can start using their new carts on Monday, April 29. For more information, call 954-390-2100.Seafood Festival returnsPompano Beach The 29th Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival takes place over three days from Friday, April 26 to Sunday, April 28 at the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. Cost is $15 per person per day. Children 12 and under are free. In addition to the food and merchandise sold throughout the weekend, there will also be live entertainment every day and night. On Friday, 5 to 10 p.m., Fourth Dimension and Never Stop Believing will perform. Saturdays lineup, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., includes Brass Evolution, Ploomie, Low Tides and Special. On Sunday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Two Can Blue, Across the Universe and Jimmy Stowe and the Stowaways will be performing. Part of the proceeds from the event bene t local charities, including local school activities. Visit www.pompanobeachseafoodfestival.com for more information.Low cost rabies clinicFort Lauderdale Broward County Animal Care and Adoption will host a rabies clinic on Saturday, April 6 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Roosevelt Gardens Park, 2841 NW 11 St. Pet owners can purchase low cost vaccinations for dogs or cats to protect them against rabies. Cost for a one-year rabies vaccination and registration tag is $15 per pet. Cash only payments will be accepted. To qualify, pet owners must provide proof of Broward County residency, such as a valid Florida drivers license or a current utility bill. No appointment is necessary. Customers are taken on a rst come, rst served basis. All dogs must be on leashes and all cats must be in carriers. Call 954-359-1313.Classic movies for $1Lauderdale-By-The-Sea In the mood for a nostalgic movie? Every second Friday of the month at 6:30 p.m., a classic lm is played at Jarvis Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Dr. The selection for April 12 is Singin in the Rain. Tickets are $1. Funds raised during the event bene t the American Diabetes Association. On May 11 Dr. Zhivago will be played. Grease will be shown on June 8. Attendees are encouraged to come dressed as their favorite character from the movie being shown. Call 954-449-4368.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, April 5, 2013 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach This citys Northeast Transit Center may soon be named after Rosa Parks, the woman who helped end segregation in public transportation. Of cials with Broward County Transit [BCT] came up with the idea and are now looking for support from the community. Phyllis Berry, manager with BCTs Customer Relations and Communications Department, brought the issue before members of the Northwest CRA Advisory Committee Transit center may bear Rosa Parks name, CRA plans move forwardWest CRA Updateon Monday to enlist their support. How appropriate that the two who started their movements together may wind up together in your community, she said, referring to Parks and Martin Luther King. Opened in September of last year, the Northeast Transit Center is located at the corner of Dixie Highway and Martin Luther King Boulevard. Advisory members will discuss the issue at their next meeting on Monday, May 6 at 5 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 MLK Boulevard. To rename the center, Berry said there have to be at least three letters of support from the community and facilities cant be named after anyone still alive. Parks died in 2005. Since the transit center is a county-owned building, nal approval will be determined by county commissioners. Berry said she doesnt want to assume how commissioners will vote but shes con dent they will approve the new name. Dist. 4 Commissioner Woodrow Poitier, in whose district the center is located, said he would be ne with naming the facility after Parks or someone from Pompano. I hadnt given it much thought, but I dont have any objections. Either way, Im ne.NW Advisory Committee votes to acquire propertyPompano Beach Members of the Northwest CRA Advisory Committee voted Monday to acquire two properties 690 Hammondville Road and 236 NW 7 Ave. CRA staff members said the purchase price of both properties would be for their combined assessed value $56,600. The nal decision on the purchase will be made by city commissioners at their CRA board meeting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 16 in the commission chambers, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Nguyen Tran, CRA senior project manager, said the properties are located adjacent to land already owned by the NW CRA. Once purchased, he said the CRA would clean up the sites and maintain them. Carlton Moore, liaison to the NW CRA Advisory Committee, said CRA staff members recommended the purchase because they want to make sure the properties arent sold at a later date to a developer who might propose building something that isnt good for nearby properties. The CRA plans to leave the properties undeveloped for now.MLK retail building 60 percent completedPompano Beach Carlton Moore, liaison to the NW CRA Advisory Committee, said the 731 Building on Martin Luther King Boulevard, a 4,100 sq. ft. commercial development nanced for $1.5 million by the NW CRA, is 60 percent completed. In addition to the physical aspects of the project, Moore added that the NW CRA is also very close to securing leases from four tenants two restaurants, See WEST CRA on page 11

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8 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Fireworks at the beachPompano Beach The grand re-opening of East Village and the Beach takes place on Friday, April 5 from 5 to 10 p.m. at Harbor Village Shoppes, located at Atlantic Boulevard and Northeast 27 Avenue. To celebrate, the city will have a ribbon cutting at Harbor Village Shoppes at 6:30 p.m. and re works at 8:30 p.m. on the beach. There will also be live music from 6 to 10 p.m., an interactive art project and childrens activities. City of cials will also turn on the water fountain built on the beach at the east end of Atlantic Boulevard at 7:30 p.m. Call 954-786-7824. Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach City commissioners this week authorized the CRA staff to negotiate with Landmark Development Corp. to construct a mixeduse development at MLK Boulevard and Northwest Sixth Ave. The vote was 5-1, Vice Mayor George Brummer dissenting. Landmark, a Miamibased rm, was one of two rms to submit a request for proposal to develop the site. The second, Pinnacle Housing Group, which proposed senior housing, withdrew from consideration last week. Landmark proposes to build up to a seven-story building with the rst oor retail/ commercial and residential oors above. Retail space, fronting on MLK Boulevard, would be about 4,000 square feet. The proposal also calls for a three-story parking structure with 160 spaces. The developer proposes to build about 127 living units ranging from one to three bedrooms. Cost is $22.5 million and will be paid for in CRA [Community Redevelopment Agency] tax credits.Plans for mixed-use on MLK Boulevard move forwardA family of four would be eligible to rent a unit with a maximum income of $40,800. It looks like were on our way nally, said Commissioner Woody Poitier. I think its a good project. Im all for this project. Brummer questioned whether one respondent was suf cient. He wondered if the city should seek more proposals. I dont think this does anything positive for the community except to build something where there is nothing, Brummer said. Were putting more subsidized building into the community. We could do something with higher rentals. He noted that the new bus depot is within easy walking distance, and eventually the area will have a rail station. And he said hes not that sold on mixed-use development. It really doesnt work. You can only have so many barbers, beauty shops and cleaners. Brummer suggested rejecting this proposal and looking for something better. Kim Briesemeister, coexecutive director of the CRA, noted the area has been designated for transit-oriented development and a mixed-use district. She said the district will have mixed incomes and a combination of uses. Commissioner Rex Hardin, while noting he would support going forward with negotiations, said he was concerned were limiting our future and limiting our potential. Were almost saying thats all that area will support. Brummer said theyre also looking for mixed use next to the bus station, questioning how much the neighborhood can absorb. We should try for something better. My aspirations are higher and my ambitions are greater, he said. Commissioner Barry Dockswell said, It is a mistake to paint all subsidized housing with the same brush. This is a great match and a great start. It will help kick start the area. Mayor Lamar Fisher said he would like to see more retail in the development. I think its a great t for what were trying to do and the right t for the property. This begins the availability to provide retail and residential.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, April 5, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park Commissioners in this city have had a change of heart and are revisiting a recent decision to destroy a 40-foot live oak tree to make way for a parking lot. A group intent on saving the tree gathered last Saturday and hung a yellow ribbon about the old oak tree, prompting commissioners to discuss the matter again this week. The previous commission had approved a site plan for a parking lot at 1201-1235 E. Oakland Park Blvd. just west of the property that will house the proposed culinary arts school. That plan called for 21 trees to be removed and 13 trees relocated. Among the trees slated for removal was the old live oak which could not withstand relocation. Because of residents concerns, staff developed another plan which does not impact the oak trees and meets downtown parking lot requirements. Mayor John Adornato said he will support the alternative plan that leaves the oak tree intact. He was among commissioners who approved the previous site plan. He assured residents that the parking lot wont be built until theres a contract between the property owner Yellow ribbon saves old oak tree, commissioners back off axing plansand the school. We were told that was imminent, he said. Were still waiting for an agreement. Any nal proposals will come back before the commission, Adornato said. We wont be building this project until we have a deal, and you are satis ed with the design of the parking lot, City Manager John Stunson said. We acted with haste, Vice Mayor Shari McCartney said of the previous decision, which she also supported. Commissioner Jed Shank, who voted against the previous plan, said Its important that we preserve the tree that is such an important part of Oakland Park. He said hes happy an alternative is being presented and asked if the 100-year-old pine trees could be preserved as well. In the early sketches, it looks like all three oaks and one slash pine would be saved, said Ray Lubomski, community and economic development director. Shank said he is concerned about spending $750,000 for a temporary parking lot. He asked if there were other things the city could do as an incentive for the school. Commissioner Sara Guevrekian said she was optimistic about the culinary school. Whenever possible, dont remove trees. I hear a consensus to maintain and preserve as many trees as possible, Adornato said. Commissioner Tim Lonergan said he wants to encourage business and is See OAKS on page 19Residents gather at the site of a live oak tree in Oakland Park. In a plan approved by the City Commission last month, the tree was to be removed. That plan is now being reconsidered. [Photo by Judy Vik]

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10 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFIn an almost seamless transition, Doreen Gauthier has handed off a smooth as silk functioning library to the accommodating and very capable Christy Keyes. Gauthier has guided this citys independent library from a small store in a strip center to a technically savvy, computerized state of the art library. Keyes is moving it into the future with outreach events like live story time televised simultaneously to over 12 schools, followed by student interaction in each school from children selected by classroom teachers. The two librarians, who stay closely linked, never forget that this wonderful library couldnt happen without the 110 volunteers who share their time, talent and dedication with just three and one half salaried employees. And on March 20, the traditional volunteer appreciation luncheon took place at Saint Paul the Apostle Catholic Church in Lighthouse Point. Once again Monsignor Brice gave the invocation. Mayor Fred Schorr gave brief but eloquent thanks to the staff and volunteers. The ladies from Saint Paul Auxiliary were the gracious table servers. Doreen could be seen as she moved from place to place, helping to serve and pour tea and coffee. After lunch, she once again thanked and handed out a certi cate of appreciation to each volunteer. City commissioners, library advisory board members, Friends of the Library board members and the staff members Cathy Anthony, Rosemary Wilson and Barbara Stiles were all on hand to thank the volunteers and receive thanks for their efforts. Blue and silver invitations, with a curious dimensional puzzle on the front, were created by Keyes. The center of the puzzle was missing. The mystery of the puzzle with a blank center was solved when the volunteers were seated at their tables. They found small silver boxes at each place setting. Inside was a pale blue card inscribed with the message, Thank you for being an Essential Piece of the library. Lapel pins repeated the puzzle theme, each inscribed with the phrase, Essential Piece. In keeping with the theme, miniature puzzle shapes were scattered around the center piece of each table. In her welcoming speech, Keyes highlighted each signi cant area manned by volunteers and echoed the theme of the importance of each piece Tradition continues! Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point celebrates its 34th annual volunteers luncheonSee LIBRARY on page 17 Oakland Park The Oakland Park Historical Society presents the Florida Highwaymen artists from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 6, at Jaco Pastorius Community Center, 4000 N. Dixie Highway. R.L. Lewis, one of the Highwaymen, will be painting at the event. Admission is free. Donations are accepted. The Oakland Park Time Capsule, in recognition of Floridas 500th birthday, will also be on display, and members of the Oakland Park Historical Society will accept any proposed articles for inclusion in the time capsule. The time capsule will be lled with Oakland Park items submitted and chosen by residents at the city birthday event on July 1. For more information, email ophs. @gmail.com or call 954-253-0850.Highwaymen and history at Pastorius Park Chamber shing for networking groupPompano Beach If its who you know that makes a difference, the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce is putting together a new group of business owners to widen the net of names. Says Ric Green, chamber CEO, the new group will start April 23, and he hopes interested members will offer input. Those interested should contact Marianne Miccoli mmiccoli@ pompanobeachchamber.com or by phone at 954-941-2940.Lighthouse Point Commissioner Earl Maucker, Larainne Schorr, Commissioner Sandy Johnson, Betsy Maucker, Commissioner Glenn Troast, Doreen Gauthier, Mayor Fred Schoor and Mary Ann

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The Pelican 11 Friday, April 5, 2013 an engineering rm and a printing rm. Built on 2.18 acres, the development will have enough space for up to seven businesses and NW CRA of cials hope to ll the rest of the space with retail and professional of ces. The building is expected to be completed this spring.Downtown Streetscape improvements Pompano Beach Horatio Danovich, CRA engineer, said the $11 million Downtown Streetscape Improvements project is one day ahead of schedule. Plans include 60 new parking spaces, landscape, lighting and sidewalk improvements and entryway signs for MLK Boulevard and Historic Downtown Pompano. About $7 million of that money is supposed to be spent on MLK, with the rest going to Downtown area east of Dixie Highway. The rst phase involves upgrading the sewer and water lines under MLK Boulevard. The upgrades are being made so that the infrastructure can accommodate future residential and commercial developments. Were making provisions for all the future development coming to town, said Danovich.Management entity wanted for community garden Pompano Beach CRA of cials have started their search for a company or organization to develop, cultivate and manage the proposed 26,000 sq. ft. community garden that will be located on the corner of Northwest 6 Avenue and Northwest 10 Street, east of Blanche Ely High School. Once completed, the $50,000 project would feature hydroponic towers and garden plots tended by residents. Horatio Danovich, CRA engineer, said anyone can apply but in order to qualify they must be insured to protect the city from liability, in case something happens on the garden property, and they must be able to manage the garden and provide assistance to residents who utilize the facility. We want [the process] as open as possible, said Carlton Moore, liaison to the NW CRA. Jeanette Copeland, NW CRA Advisory Committee member, said she wants CRA of cials to make sure everyone has a fair chance of getting the contract. We make the puzzle so hard some people cant get in. Danovich responded that the application process would be made as simple as possible. To apply, call 954-786-7834.West CRAContinued from page 7 Books & Libraries4-6 Anime Club 2 to 3:30 at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Boulevard, Pompano Beach. 954-786-2181. 4-6 Chess Club 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Boulevard, Pompano Beach. 954-786-2181. 4-9 Writers Workshop Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954-9466398. 4-11 Bingo Thursdays at 1 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954946-6398. 4-12 Spanish I help at 2 p.m. Fridays at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Spanish II help at 3 p.m. every Friday. 954-946-6398. 4-15 Senior Scams & Identity Theft class from 12 to 1 p.m. at Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954357-7697.Business4-8 Wilton Manors Business Association meeting at 6 p.m. at RMS Accounting, 2319 N. Andrews Ave., Wilton Manors. 4-10 Wednesday Winners from 11:30 to 1 SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 13

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12 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 this years capital budget as part of the $1.2 million West Commercial Boulevard streetscape project. Design plans for the area also include four way nding plaza sculptures by Huck, estimated to cost about $100,000. At earlier meetings, Commissioner Mark Brown preferred starting with those four sculptures rather than the entryway feature. This week he asked for consensus on that idea. Only Vincent agreed with Brown and added that he wasnt sure the town should spend so much on the entryway sculpture. He suggested a better location for the piece would be El Prado Park. Im not happy with the cost, and I dont know if this monument at that location says this is Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea, Vincent said. He said more discussion was needed. Mayor Roseann Minnet said she didnt concur with Vincent at all. We have talked about the entry and how when you cross the bridge you dont know you are in LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. This will bring the coral reef to you, she said. It will look magni cent, and at night when its all lit up you will see it before you cross the bridge. Minnet said she feels the entryway sculpture is very important. The piece will make the town visible from so many places. We need that signature as you come into town. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea hasnt created its own picture frame, and this will start that. The mayor then read portions of a letter from the artist, Laura Huck. Art is a great uni er and de ner of a community. I can only think how natural it is for everyone to take note of the pelican sculpture at the end of Commercial Boulevard. The series we have planned will be even brighter and more eyecatching. Not only that, it will draw attention to the treasure trove of accessible reef off your beaches. Very few improvements to a townscape, such as you are planning, will have as much impact as the art. Huck said the main piece, the Coral Arch, is the rst thing people will see as they enter the town. It will say, This is not an ordinary community, but a community with much to offer. The Coral Arch is designed to wow, in the day with its bright colors and details, and at night, when lit, with its glowing rays. Minnet urged commissioners to approve executing the agreement and to start with the Coral Arch. Commissioner Stuart Dodd said he agreed, that the Coral Arch sculpture makes a huge statement. I think we should go ahead. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said he was in full agreement with the mayor and with Dodd. Were talking about the entry and a true piece of art. Sasser, however, still seemed baf ed by an earlier decision. I think Im in a dream world when everyone voted for a 33-foot Las Vegas parking lot sign to put in the center of the downtown. [That sign was later modi ed to 30 feet.] This [the entryway sculpture] is much more important than the other, he said. Vincent said he never SculptureContinued from page 1suggested the entryway sculpture wasnt a beautiful piece of artwork. It wont be seen or recognized at that location. It wont be appreciated by pedestrians or by vehicular traf c going east.State approves $100,000 grant for landscaping on Commercial In related news, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann announced Tuesday that state of cials have approved the towns grant application for $100,000 to assist with landscaping costs for the West Commercial Boulevard streetscape project. This is a matching grant from the Florida Highway Beauti cation Council, and the town is committed to match it with $202,000 in additional landscaping monies. Hoffmann credited staff member Pat Himelberger and Hugh Johnson of Architectural Alliance for their work on the grant. Himelberger wrote the grant application, and Johnson modi ed the tree selection to improve the towns chances getting the funding. Lighthouse tours April 20Hillsboro Beach A tour of the Hillsboro Lighthouse will be offered Saturday, April 20. To participate, meet Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society members at the Sands Harbor Marina, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach, beginning at 8:45 a.m. The rst boat launches at 9 a.m. and the last boat leaves at 2:30 p.m. The tour is free for Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society members and $15 for non-members. The annual cost to join the Preservation Society is $25 for individuals, $35 for a family, $50 for a business and $500 for a lifetime membership. For more, visit www.hillsborolighthouse. org or call 954-942-2102.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, April 5, 2013 p.m. at Bobby Rubinos, 2501 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Cost is $15. 954-9711077. 4-12 The Originals business networking meeting at 8 a.m. at Jukebox Diner, 2773 E Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach. Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerces networking event. 954-803-4174.Children & Family4-5 Story Time at 10:30 a.m. every Friday at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Ages 18 months to three years. 954946-6398. 4-6 Bike Rodeo from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at McNair Park, 951 NW 27 Ave., Pompano Beach. Bicycle safety education and food. All ages welcome. 954-786-7882. Clubs & Charity4-5 Dance from 7 to 10 p.m. at Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $15 per person. Funds go to Relay For Life. 954-781-2300. 4-5 Chess Club Fridays from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach Branch Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-786-2181. 4-9 Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club Tuesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. 4-9 Deer eld Beach Rotary Club Tuesdays at 1:15 p.m. at Deer Creek Country Club, 2801 Country Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 866976-8279 4-9 Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale/Cypress Creek Tuesdays at 12 p.m. at Westin Cypress Creek Hotel, 400 Corporate Drive. 954-4928254. 4-10 Kiwanis Club of Oakland Park Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954566-9957. 4-10 Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach Wednesdays at 12 p.m. at Sea Side Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954783-4999. 4-10 Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954-560-7813. 4-11 Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954491-6158. 4-12 Pompano Beach Rotary Club Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. 4-13 Kiwanis Club of Deer eld Beach West second and fourth Saturdays at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St. Meets every second and fourth Saturday. 954-54-732-9883.Education & Self Development4-8 Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 9 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954-3575579. SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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14 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach In the 25 years hes been skateboarding, Rafal Dradrach has been kicked out of parks, malls, parking lots and countless number of other places. Now, Dradrach and his fellow skateboarders want city of cials here to build a concrete skate park where they wont have to worry about cops or security guards chasing them away. You usually have a max of about ve minutes [to skate] before someone comes and asks you to leave the premises. We get kicked out of everywhere. On Wednesday, Dradrach and over 100 people, some with boards in hand, packed the meeting of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center. The skateboarders, some in their teens and some in their 40s and 50s, came to persuade the committee to recommend the city build the park. It will keep kids off the street and give them a safe environment. It will also minimize damage to public property [by reducing the number of kids who damage Fate of Pompano Beach skate park proposal delayedhand rails and other surfaces in their quest for a cool trick], said Dradrach. But committee members delayed a vote until city staff could provide them with more information. Speci cally, they want to know about attendance, safety, how much it will cost to build and maintain the facility and if a fee will be charged to use it. Im not opposed to a skate park per say. Im opposed to spending money the city doesnt have, said Rafael Katz, committee member. According to Mark Beaudreau, recreation programs administrator, the cost to build the skate park is $208,000. But Katz wasnt buying it. I challenge you to show me the numbers, he said to Beaudreau. Dradrach said a $10,000 grant from the Tony Hawk Foundation will be available to help build the facility if its approved. Katz also doubted the honesty of many audience members when the overwhelming majority of them put their hands up after being asked if they were from Pompano. Magically, 90 percent of them raised their hand, he said. If I sound annoyed, its because I am. Weve discussed this. Weve beat this into the ground, said Katz, who added that the issue of building a skate park has come up multiple times and has always been rejected See SKATE PARK on page 20

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The Pelican 15 Friday, April 5, 2013 4-10 Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W Atlantic Blvd. 954-3575579. 4-11 Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 10 a.m. at Century Village Deer eld Beach, 2400 Century Village Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954357-5579. 4-12 Identity theft protection class at 10 a.m. at St. Stephens Evangelical Lutheran Church, 2500 NE 14 Street Causeway, Pompano Beach. Refreshments served. 954 943-3644. 4-15 Identity theft and fraud protection class from 12 to 1 p.m. at Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-357-7680.Events & Activities4-6 Model train swap meet from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. Model train layouts, museum displays of railroad memorabilia and vendor tables for model trains, SightingsContinued from page 13 See SIGHTINGS on page 19

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16 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013Send your events for publication to mdpelican@ yahoo.com municipal contract in 2012 in Miramar breaking into a market controlled for 20 years by Wheelabrator, a subsidiary of Waste Management. Its website cites its commitment to zero waste for the cities it serves and its contracts guarantee 75 percent of the solid waste collected will be recycled.HillsboroContinued from page 3 more claims than any other chapter, more than 500 a year. A large number of the vets applying for assistance here qualify because the government has taken responsibility for the illnesses caused by Agent Orange which has a long list of diseases from cancer to arthritis associated with the chemical. And it has now been determined that the chemical still affects future generations, the grandchildren of the Vietnam servicemen. To establish exposure to Agent Orange counselors have to match the veterans service record with military records that show the exact place time and amount of Agent Orange that was used to defoliate the jungles. Having access to all this history is important to the outcome of the claim. The local DAV volunteers VetsContinued from page 1are available 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Tuesday at the Legion, 820 SE 8 Ave. No appointment necessary. Additionally, these volunteers spend four days a year being recerti ed at a seminar held at Lake Mary, FL. The system is intimidating and these guys know the language of the VA, says Acting Cmdr. Don Carney. Im not dumb, but it confuses me. Since the damaging effects of service-related injuries may not occur for years, returning vets from Iraq and Afghanistan need to start keeping track of their records now for future needs, Roth said. The VA compensates for physical and mental disabilities and, for veterans or their spouses on very low incomes, provides a pension. Bene ts, if awarded, are retroactive to the date the claim was started. Healthcare is available at VA hospitals with a minimum of paperwork. Often these disabilities dont surface until the vet ages requiring years of documentation. While these local service of cers are skeptical that the VA will go electronic anytime soon, they are looking for sponsors who will contribute money for computers, printers and wiso they will be ready when it does happen. Indicating the work going on behind him, Carney said, These guys are doing the right thing. Id like to see it get known that they are available. While the DAV does not give direct nancial assistance to vets in need, members of the chapter provide transportation, visit nursing homes to help residents with their claims, make some home repairs. They stress that all their time and their talents are given for free and caution that anyone being charged a fee to get help with their claim application is being ripped off. One widow who met with them this week reported being charged $750 by a VA rep. The service of cers also advise their clients of other legal rights such as the additional Homestead Exemption. Said Citrolo, The reward is in helping people, and Butler added, We are handful of people who dont mind ghting for other people. The local DAV chapter raises money by holding car shows and golf tournaments and manning their information booth at public events. Other service of cers from the Goldcoast Chapter are Bob Kontz, Jim Zane, Dave Nystrom, Gerg Chaipponi, Tom Perry and Chuck McLaughlin.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, April 5, 2013 that keeps this home town library the beating heart of the city. She called the circulation desk the front line where 42,681 materials were checked out this year and shelved over and over again by volunteers, who take their shift seriously and either show up or arrange for a substitute. She praised the volunteers who worked the hot week of kids library summer camp in 2012, and those that lead 150 pre-kindergarten activities, school outreach, and teen programs. Volunteers who managed, organized and ran three book sales raised over $10,000 to support the library. Cristy paid tribute to the volunteer leaders of the senior classes in nance, yoga, exercise, quilting, knitting, bingo, card games, digital photography, writers group, foreign languages, book clubs, iPad, computer and eReader tutoring.LibraryContinued from page 10The new library website was co-designed, hosted and tracked by volunteers who ranged in age from 11 to wont tell. In October, November and December of 2012, the website had over 200,000 hits. And lastly, she thanked the volunteers from Friends of the Library and Teen advisory Boards who co-hosted and set up the traditional luncheon. When they learned there was an issue with dessert vendors, they offered and made over 300 mini deserts for all to enjoy. The Teen Board appeared at the church community center the day before the event to cover the chairs with white slipcovers, tied with big silver bows. Floral centerpieces at each table re ected the silver and blue color scheme combining white roses with delicate light blue hydrangeas and purple pansy accents. The mayor, Gauthier, Keyes and the small library staff stopped at every table to greet and show their appreciation to the men and women volunteers on hand. To become a library volunteer, call 954-946-6398. Dave Probonic, Kadena Tedlock, Karen Julius and Simms Pam Sargent and Susie Gordon Janice Clermont Sandy Whipple Jean Taylor and Barbara Stiles Sue Blough, Bonnie Bonadelli and Tina Furey

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18 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 will include music, art, food and re works. Says Mayor Lamar Fisher, Without a doubt, this will be fantastic. Its been a long time coming. Fisher refers to the new promenade at the beach which replaced a 40-plus-year-old parking lot at the terminus of Atlantic and Ocean Boulevard. Leading up to the promenade are wide sidewalks, landscaping and lots of people enjoying the ocean breezes as they dine outside under the canopies of long-standing restaurants that have taken on new life. Just west of the Atlantic Boulevard Bridge, shop-owners who have tasted dust for months have polished off their new facades at Harbor Village. Here celebrants can enjoy the cuisine of the area from local restaurants and food trucks, the music of Weedline Band, art exhibitions by local artists and more. The big moment of the evening will take place on the beach when reworks are shot from the pier. Commissioner Barry Dockswell [District 1] who has pushed for beach improvements for years will be among the party-goers. Prior to his election in 2008, Dockswell had served four years on the East CRA advisory board. I am thrilled, says Dockswell. This is why I ran for of ce. As former chair of the advisory committee 2007, I made the presentation that resulted in hiring an executive director. For years, the executive director of the CRA for both the beach area and the western side of the city, was the late city manager, Bill Hargett. [Director of CRA] was just one of the hats that he wore, said Dockswell. [This celebration] has born out the fact that a director with skills was a necessary ingredient to success. The CRA program in this city has been under the leadership of Kim Briesemeister and Chris Brown, who serve jointly as CRA directors. Funding for the CRA comes from a portion of the taxes that are paid by property owners within the CRA area. The east CRA, a $10 million project so far, includes a portion of the beach, the north and south sides of Atlantic Boulevard and other contiguous properties. The entire area is about 150 acres of land. A study made in the late 90s indicated the area had become blighted over the years. It would be the CRA that focused on that blight and redevelopment. Briesemeister said she and Brown have worked together for years. We go in to identify needed improvements, see what has to be changed, both public and private properties, and create a ve-year plan to implement and fund the project. She adds, I am ecstatic. This is the most amazing transformation we have worked on in all our years together. It means so much when people come to us and say they never thought Pompano could change. Its a great reward to hear that. Tonights parties take place within three time periods: East Village celebrations at Harbor Village Shoppes [East Atlantic Boulevard and NE 27 Avenue] begin at 6:30 p.m. At 7:30 p.m., the mayor and other of cials will launch the large fountain at the terminus of East Atlantic Boulevard, and reworks begin at the pier at 8:30 p.m. Call 954-7867824. FeastContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 19 Friday, April 5, 2013 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@ yahoo. com or excited about the culinary school. Theres a good compromise that can be found, he said. Guevrekian and Lonergan were elected to the commission after the earlier decision. Several residents addressed the commission, some noting that no more parking spaces are needed. When you think of downtown Oakland Park, concrete comes to mind, said Christina Harper. You have dozens of parking spaces. Main Street reminds me of a ghost town. Having another parking lot seems redundant. Now that area feels wild, pristine and special. Bill Sears said there are already 50 parking spaces in a lot underneath the building proposed for a culinary school. Theres another parking lot on the east side of the building that could hold 40 cars and a city-owned lot with room for 200 cars to the north. He urged commissioners to stop the parking lot project. If you keep building parking lots, we will have to change the name of the city to Parking Lot City, he said. Katie Freeman suggested commissioners go take a look at the parking lot on the south side of Imperial Point Medical Center. Its a beautiful parking lot full of gorgeous trees. She then read Joyce Kilmers poem, Trees. On Saturday, about 15 residents, led by Joyce Rau, gathered at the site of the oak tree, and wrapped the tree in yellow ribbon. Were calling attention to how (the city) is cutting down our ancestral trees when we have so few left in the city, Rau said. Its irresponsible to spend our money on a parking lot that will be temporary. They plan to spend close to $1 million on a parking lot that will be tossed up and thrown to the wind. Rau said the site plan called for removing the 40foot oak tree so a sign on the adjacent building wall could be read. Only God can make a tree. Anybody can make a parking lot, Freeman said.OaksContinued from page memorabilia. Admission and parking are free. 954-4488935. 4-6 Wilton Manors Wine & Food Festival from 6 to 10 p.m. at Eucalyptus Gardens, 2430 NE 13 Ave. Tickets: $50.00 or $75 at the door. VIP admission is $75.00 or $100.00 at the door. 954394-4322. 4-6 Disc Glow Golf Tournament 7 to 9 p.m. at Easterlin Park, 100 NW 38 St., Oakland Park. Ages 13 and up. Preregistration: $5 plus tax per person; Registration on night of tournament: $8 plus tax per person. $1.50 per person gate fee. Participants must provide their own equipment. 954-357-5190. 4-6 Lichen Love Affair from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Easterlin Park, 100 NW 38 St., Oakland Park. Ages six and up. Cost is $5 plus tax per person. $1.50 per person gate fee. Preregistration required. 954-357-5100. 4-6 Help remove exotic and invasive plants from 9 a.m. to noon. At Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 S. Lyons Road, Coconut Creek. 954357-5198. 4-9 St. Ambrose Mens Club hosts a trip to Seminole Casino in Coconut Creek. Cost is $21 and includes transportation, $10 in chips and $5 food voucher. Bus leaves parking lot at church, 380 S. Federal Hwy., Deereld Beach, at 10 a.m. 954856 6062. 4-9 Womans Club of Deer eld Beach installation luncheon at 12 p.m. at Wyndham Hotel Resort, 4011 N. Ocean Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $30. Public welcome. 954-421-4700. 4-12 50s concert at 7 p.m. at Cokesbury United Methodist Church, 1801 NW 65 Ave., Margate. Tickets: $5 presale, $7 at the door. Refreshments will be available. 954-972-3424 or www. cokesburymargate.org. 4-12 Singin in the Rain at 6:30 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Dr., Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Tickets are $1. Funds raised during the event bene t the American Diabetes Association. 954-449-4368. 4-13 13th Annual Cuisine of the Region Food and Wine Tasting from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at Hillsboro Club, 901 Hillsboro Mile, Hillsboro Beach. Tickets: $50 in advance, $60 at the door. Proceeds bene t the N.E. Focal Point. Auction items SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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20 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 unanimously by the committee. One audience member called Katz a liar. But whether or not they live here or other parts of South Florida, proponents of the skate park say that bringing in people from outside the city is one of the bene ts of building it. Bradentons [skate park] is insane, to the point that its a focal point of the town, said Howard Montaque, an Air Force veteran who served in Afghanistan for ve years as a civilian contractor. Dradrach said a concrete park would make the skateboarding world take notice of this city. Concrete, multiple proponents said, is the best material to build a park with because it can best handle the stress of skateboards and can last for decades without little maintenance. And the facility, he added, will draw people from across the state, including teens and their parents, bringing more tourist dollars into the city. You cant underestimate a teenagers sway on their parents travel plans, he said. Kurt Massinello, a Pompano resident who has been a skateboarder for 42 years, said his money goes elsewhere when he takes his son to other parts of the state including Tampa, Orlando, Sarasota, Naples and Bradenton that have poured concrete skate parks. Im a parent. We do a wonderful job [of providing facilities for every other sport and] we have a dog park. Give the kids a skate park, he said. Ken Arnold, Parks and Recreation Advisory member, agreed. You name [a facility for a sport], we have it. [Except skateboarding]. Beaudreau wants to give the kids a park to keep them from using the rest of Pompano. If you dont build a skate park then your city becomes a skate park, he said. I can tell you that we chase kids out of the amphitheater routinely. Mayor Lamar Fisher also supports building the park and getting kids off our sidewalks. A skateboarder in my younger years, Fisher dealt with the same problems todays youth do: trying to get as much time in a good skating spot as he could before being kicked out. Skateboarding has always been a very popular sport. And if were able to provide a facility for our youth, as well as our adults, it will provide more recreation and a more well-rounded community. Despite the popularity of skateboarding and the large turnout Wednesday, not everyone is convinced yet that a skate park would be a wise investment. My biggest concern is that if we build this thing it will just not be used as much as some people expect. Weve done that before and it just breaks my heart to see money spent in that regard, said Commissioner Rex Hardin, who added that hes not against the park but just wants to know more before making a decision. Right now, the most likely spot for the skate park would be the unused roller hockey Skate parkContinued from page 14rink in Pompano Community Park a sport that didnt fare too well in this city. It was a passing fad that lasted three years and it tanked, said Beaudreau. Skateboarders and their supporters packed one of the meeting rooms at the Emma Lou Olson Center on Wednesday. [Staff photo]

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The Pelican 21 Friday, April 5, 2013 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Were a team, said artist Pat Anderson about her partnership with fellow artist John Wetzstein. Anderson creates tropical-style paintings and Wetzstein fashions the frames that surround them out of driftwood he finds on the beaches of Florida. Their combined work has gotten a combined showing as ArtHalls monthly featured artists at the CRA Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. The opening reception was March 20. Named Art and Arbor, Andersons paintings focus on the historic East Coast Railroad built by Henry Flagler. The railroad stretched She paints, he makes frames; Anderson, Wetzstein team up for ArtHallalong Floridas east coast in areas that include Pompano Beach, Deerfield Beach, Oakland Park, Wilton Manors and the Keys. Im really trying to get the Keys and Pompano together [in my work], said Anderson. Her work, showcased during the exhibit, also features scenes from her travels outside the United States, including the Panama Canal and Cabo San Lucas in Mexico. Pat Anderson with some of her paintings at ArtHall on March 20. Anderson paints scenes unique to Florida as well as other tropical destinations outside the United States. Her work, complimented by the frames created by fellow artist John Wetzstein, will be on display at the CRA Business Resource center until April 16. [Right] John Wetzstein with one of his favorite creations, a hallowed-out piece of wood he transformed into a boat-shaped blueprints holder. Wetzsteins art comes from pieces of drift wood he nds on the beaches of South Florida.See ARTHALL on page 27

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22 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-783-8700 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 3-29 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO. Looking For Good People! Good Opportunity For Right Individual. Qualifications: Good Driving Record Physically Fit Professional. No Drugs! Average Tech Earns $600 $1,200 A Week. Wayne 954-868-5560. 4-5 TELEPHONE SALES PART TIME. Immediate Openings Pompano Beach. Monday Tuesday Thursday Evenings 6 10:30PM. Saturday 9AM 4PM. Perfect English Only!! GUARANTEED HOURLY + BONUS + COMMISSION. Average $11 $15 Per Hour. GREAT PART TIME JOB! 754-235-9556. 4-12 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTMALE CNA/HHA/ COMPANION Broward Former EMT/Certified/ Lt. Massage. Compassionate References. PT/FT. Ron 954-232-2832. 4-5 EXP. COMPANION/ CAREGIVER (Non-Medical) Light Cleaning Gardening Organizing Laundry Cooking Shopping Movies. Friendly Compassionate Engaging. Bonded Insured. References. Call Robert 954707-0264. 4-12 CNA/PERSONAL ASSISTANT Competent, Compassionate With Over 10 Years Of Private Home Health Care & Administrative Experience. Available For Day Or Evening Shifts. Please Call Lisa 561-750-7617. 4-12 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. RED BOX MOVING OWNER IS PRESENT AT ALL MOVES! Affordable Reliable Careful. MV#567/ Insured. 954-305-9176 Or 561506-5540. 4-26 CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 4-5 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs Carpentry Plumbing Roo ng Masonry Windows Painting Decking Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 Emergency Calls. 4-5 HOUSE CLEANING 13 Years Experience!! Good References!! Residential Or Commercial. FREE Estimates!! Call 954-778-9643. 4-19 BLADE RUNNERS Yard Maintenance. FREE ESTIMATE!! Grass Cutting Trimming Hedges & Shrubs. Mulching. Lic/Ins. Starting At $25 Per Cut. Eddie 954-4941303. 3-29 DISCOUNT PRINTING ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES Booklets Brochures Business Cards Carbonless Forms Color Copies Door Hangers Envelopes Flyers Invoices Labels Postcards Signs Banners Rudy Levy 954825-8108. 4-12 GIGIS CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable Honest. More Info. 954-2957033 Or 954-210-2248. 4-5 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 4-5 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CHOMEOWNERS INSURANCEBETTER RATES! BETTER SERVICE! Call KATIE For A FREE Quote! 954-784-9029. www.myersinsures.com. 4-26 COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 4-19 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 4-5 THRIFT STORECLF THRIFT STORE 801 SE 10 St. Deer eld. Monday & Wednesday 10am-3pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-4pm. 20% Off Friday & Saturday ONLY. 954-428-8980. 4-5 DOCKS FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT UP TO 40. No Fixed Bridges. 1 Mile To Hillsboro Inlet!! Electric & Water. Locked Secured Area. 954-818-0050. 4-12 LIGHTHOUSE POINT DOCK Boat Up To 28. Electric/ Water/Whips. 1st Canal To Hillsboro Inlet. Super Location & Price!! Call 954-942-7433. 4-5 CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954812-5192. CO-OP FOR SALELIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 55+ Building. Excellent Location. Needs Work.. $32,995. For More Information Call 954-444-7258. HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 2/1 HOME! Just REDUCED! $79,000. 55+ Community! 2 Clubhouses! FREE GOLF. Low Maintenance. Robert Elkins Charles Rutenberg R.E. 954-782-8968. 4-5 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO KEY WEST STYLE 2/2 HOME C/A Ceiling Fans. Large Fenced In Back Yard. $1,100 Month Yearly. Please Call Darci For Details 954-783-3723. 541 NE 34 Street. 4-19

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The Pelican 23 Friday, April 5, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-783-8700 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! POMPANO 1/1 COZY COTTAGE HOUSE 541 NE 34 ST. 16B. Privacy Fence-A/C. All Tile Floors. $675 Month Yearly. Call Darci For Details 954-783-3723. 4-19 TOWNHOME FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT REMODELED 3/3 Deep Water Townhome! Pool 1 Car Garage. $3,000 Per Month Annual. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty 954-8034174. 4-5 TOWNHOMES FOR SALEORCHID GROVE BRAND NEW Spacious 3 Bedroom TOWNHOMES 1 CG $189K In Pompano Beach 3% Down/ FHA Approved. Call Bob Alon 954-605-2265 AllStar Realty OrchidGroveFl.com. 4-5 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month Yrly. 954-629-1324. 4-26 APTS FOR RENTBEACH AREA APT As Low As $475 A Week In Season! (3225 NE 6th St.) 95 Yards To Beach; Bright Airy Apt With Cable, Wireless, Parking, Patio, Charming Furnishings And More. Pet Friendly. 561-541-0308; Debbie@paxpr operties.com 4-12 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 4-19 LIGHTHOUSE POINT MARINA AREA. Very Attractive Large 2/2. Rent Dock At Marina & Walk Home. Unfurnished. Agent 954-6148428. 4-5 LUXURY OCEAN-VIEW APT: $1475 A MONTH IN SEASON! (Ocean Blvd & NE 6th St.) European Style Kitchen, Ultra-Quiet, EcoFriendly, Central Air, Tropical Pool, Ocean Views, Dedicated Parking, Coin Laundry, Premium Cable TV, WI-FI And More. Pets OK. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com. 4-12 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO 1 Bedroom & Ef ciency With Kitchen. Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Yearly Seasonal. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 4-5 PRIMO OCEAN BOULEVARD APT For As Low As $68 A Night In Season! (601 N. Ocean Blvd) Great Area, Great Apt. Great Rates. 95 Yards To Beach. Special Weekly & Monthly Rates Too. Cats & Small Dogs Welcome With Pet Fee. Contact Debbie 561-541-0308. Debbie@paxpr operties.com. 4-12 POMP ANO BEACH NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 3/1 New $1250. SW 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 4-5 BOX BOLD POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Ef ciency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 4-19 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 4-19 LIGHTHOUSE POINT UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent In A Psychologists Of ce For A SOLO PROFESSIONAL. $950/Month. Located In The GATEWAY CENTRE 2040 East Sample Rd. Windowed Unfurnished Of ce! 14 x 12.5. Call 954-942-3344. 4-5 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. 4-5 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 4-19 DEERFIELD REDUCED $50,000 1,464 SQ FT. Free Standing Of ce/Retail Building Off Federal & 10 St. In Heart Of Business District. Great For Many Uses. Financing Considered. $179,000. Details First Realty. 954-9805780. 4-5

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24 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Rev. Hyvenson Joseph The Original Florida Follies did it again! The sixth and last show of the season ended on a high note on March 17 at the Parker Playhouse. The girls, ages 60 to 90, wowed the audience with their fast paced musical and dance trip, a tribute to Las Vegas. Whistles, cheers and constant applause from the audience made it clear that the Follies girls were a smash. Wearing breathtaking, glamorous costumes, they kicked up their gorgeous synchronized dancing legs to the beat of musical favorites. Elvis was on hand, as were a few children from the Childrens Diagnostic and Treatment Center who had bene ted from the largesse of this all volunteer, non-pro t group. The Follies ladies dance for children in need every season, giving six performances in area venues. All proceeds are donated to childrens charities. Pictured are Sheila Phillips, Elvis (Gene Allen) and Jo Schlags and some of their fans. Its a wrap! and sponsorships available. 954-480-4460. 4-14 Polynesian Cultural Festival from 12 to 8 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-630-4500.Health4-9 Education class on hip replacement procedures from 6 to 7 p.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E. Sample Road, Deer eld Beach. 954759-7400. 4-9 Support group for family and friends of people with mental illness from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954-739-1888. 4-9 Class on living with and preventing diabetes from 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954-7597400. 4-11 Five OB-GYN Issues You Should Be Talking About class from 6 to 7 p.m. at Dorothy Mangurian Comprehensive Womens Center, 1000 NE 56 St., Fort Lauderdale. 954-351-7804. 4-13 I Can Cope class for cancer patients and their friends and family from 8:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, 4725 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954-351-7804. 4-16 Breast cancer detection and treatment class from 12 to 1 p.m. at Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-357-7680. 4-23 Class on relieving joint pain from 5 to 6 p.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E. Sample Road, Deer eld Beach. 954-759-7400.SightingsContinued from page 19

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26 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Tell The Pelican your sh stories! 954-783-8700! Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Want some dolphin? Look for the birdsBy RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point Over the last two weeks I have struggled in the swordfish department. We have had our share of bites, but just havent been overly consistent with getting them in the boat. We usually put out a couple of spinning rods behind the boat while we are waiting for the swords, and occasionally a dolphin will pick up one of the ballyhoos at the end of a rod. But just occasionally. And then, the frigatebirds showed the way and made us all look like heroes. This week, we kept seeing frigatebirds, a species closely related to pelicans, soaring and diving for fish. We took that as a sign that a good grouping of dolphin might be in the area. So, every time we saw a bird diving we would push up the throttle and run right up underneath it. Once in position, we would troll about 10 knots with ballyhoo on a spinning rod way back and make sure the bait was skipping so the fish would hear it, see it or both. 5K walk for KIDSFort Lauderdale The Kids In Distress Hero 5K run/walk will take place on Thursday, May 2 at 5 p.m. on Las Olas Boulevard. Participants are encouraged to dress up as their favorite super hero. Prizes awarded for best costumes. After the run/walk, there will be free entertainment by the Black Violins starting at 7:30 p.m. The deadline to enter is April 30 at noon. The cost is $35 for adults and $10 for children 17 and under. Registration begins at 5 p.m., runners start at 6:30 p.m. and walkers at 6:35 p.m. Visit www.walkforkid.org to register. Call 954-390-7654 ext: 1290 for assistance. And jackpot. The dolphin bite would then be almost instantaneous. With a little help, we were catching dolphin weighing between 20 and 50 lbs. consistently from 10 to 14 miles offshore. So, if you get a chance to venture offshore make sure to look up every once in a while. It may be the best decision you make when it comes to catching something below. Fred Gushue shows off a Mahi Mahi [dolphin]. [Photo courtesy of RJ Boyle]

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The Pelican 27 Friday, April 5, 2013 In my artwork, I paint when I see it, she said. Wetzsteins work also comes from what he spots. Along with frames for Andersons art, he also takes ArtHallContinued from page 21driftwood and mostly turns it into tables and lamps. I came from the Keys so Ive always been in the mangroves with my dad. And hes not too picky. Wetzstein has found and used pieces of oak, Dade County pine and tiki. But his favorite is mahogany, especially the stuff that drifts here from Cuba. His greatest find was a refugee boat in the Keys last year. That had a lot of real colorful wood. Anderson and Wetzsteins work will be on display at the CRA Business Resource Center until April 16. Call 954-586-1111 for more information. Andy Cherenfant, loan manager for the International Enterprise Development, with Srah Ysrael, a volunteer at the Business Resource Center, at the wine table at ArtHall on March 20.Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@ yahoo. com or 954-783-8700!

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Friday, April 5, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 14 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The Turtle Nesting Season is March through October P e l i c a n Pelican By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Nine veterans from the Goldcoast Chapter of the Disabled Americans Veterans [DAV] have dedicated themselves to decoding the language of the Veteran’s Administration. It is a monumental task. Not only because as Navy vet Elliott Roth said, “It is the most confusing, disjointed manual I’ve ever seen, but that’s because the rules are constantly changing. As an example, Form 527 was two-pages long for many years. A recently published version, 527-EZ, is eight pages.” Few veterans of earlier wars Volunteer vets lead others through the VA’s tortuous claims process; average wait is 600 days Mayor wants charter revised but withholds speci csBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Mayor Jean Robb presented several of her initiatives this week, saying she would ask for formal action at future commission meetings. Top of her list is establishment of a charter review committee. Robb said some changes now allowed by ordinance should be given to the electorate and other things need to be eliminated or changed. – WWII, Korea and Vietnam are capable of ling the VA’s bene t forms without help. So these nine volunteers spend most Tuesdays as service of cers at the American Legion Post in Deer eld Beach, offering their free expertise to help their comrades navigate the government’s paperwork. As broadcast recently on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” the wait for the average VA disability claim is 600 days. And while the VA aims to update its processing systems by 2015, for most of the aging WWII veterans that help will come too late. “They need these assets now,” said counselor Mike Butler. So DAV service of cers attempt to expedite the process. Said one, lling out the forms correctly is more than half the battle because if information is missing, and the forms returned, many vets abandoned their efforts to get the compensation due them. “Ninety ve percent need some additional information,” ex-Marine Bob Citrolo said. “We’re here to do it once and do it right.” Florida has the largest population of veterans in this country and because the Goldcoast Chapter has the most service of cers in the state, it handles $93,000 entry sculpture approved for LBTSBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – Town commissioners on Tuesday authorized artist Laurie Huck to create a “Coral Arch” metal sculpture to highlight the western gateway to town. Cost of the artwork is $93,025. The 14-foot sculpture on a 3.75-foot base, featuring ying sh and a turtle, will be installed in the rst town parking lot east of the Intracoastal Waterway bridge on the south side of Commercial Boulevard. It will be in the general vicinity of where the agpole is today. The vote to approve the agreement was 4-1, Commissioner Chris Vincent dissenting. He objected to the cost and the placement of the artwork. Funds for the sculpture come from See VETS on page 16 See SCULPTURE on page 12 See DEERFIELD on page 5 Parties with reworks mark city’s new lookBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach This city’s beach area is having a “coming-out” party tonight that will rival any other event that has taken place on the east side of town for years. And the party moves from west to east. Redevelopment at the beach has been a project of the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA. The big deal is that most of the work on the beach, Atlantic Boulevard and Harbor Village has been completed. The celebration See FEAST on page 18

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2 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Members of the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Town Commission honored Broward Sheriff’s Of ce Capt. Angelo Cedeno with a proclamation Tuesday in recognition of his service to the town. He was executive of cer from February 2009 to January when he was promoted to Internal Affairs. He was recognized for displaying a tremendous passion for law enforcement, exceptional leadership and a high level of professionalism. Shown with Cedeno, fourth from left, are Commissioners Mark Brown, Chris Vincent, Mayor Roseann Minnet, Vice Mayor Scot Sasser and Commissioner Stuart Dodd. [Staff photo by Judy Vik] Town honors work of BSO Capt. Angelo Cedeno SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.comArt 4-5 – Photographs of Peter J. Nolan will be on display at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Ct., Wilton Manors, until May 3. Gallery 21 is open Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. 954-661-4740. 4-12 – Social Media & The Artists workshop from 7 to 9 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Court. Cost is $5 donation to the Central Area Neighborhood Association of Wilton Manors. Email PoetC7@aol.com or 954-6614740. 4-17 – Free “Artistic Candy Making” class from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvilla Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Organized by Our Art By The Sea. 954-594-0444.Auctions & Sales4-13 – Yard Sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, Wilton Manors. Vendor space available. 954-390-2115 or 954-390-2130. 4-27 & 28 – Garden Isles community garage sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Houses throughout community gardens, along Cypress Road and Northeast 3 Street, will be having garage sales. 954-6461948.Auditions & Theatre4-6 – “Beau Jest” at 8 p.m. at Broward Stage Door Theatre, 8036 W. Sample Road, Coral Springs through April 28. Tickets are $38. 954-344-7765. 4-12 – The “Turn of the Screw” opera at 7:30 p.m. at Keith C. & Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center, Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets range from $45 to $65. 561-237-9000. 4-27 – “With Love, from Broadway & More” at 8 p.m. at Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets range from $10 to $25. 954-784 0768.See SIGHTINGS on page 11

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The Pelican 3 Friday, April 5, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – Mayor Dan Dodge has asked commissioners here to submit their ideas for the town’s long range planning. Saying he had trouble nding a plan that would mirror the needs of this small beachfront community, the mayor laid out what he thought should be considered. Most important is keeping good nancial controls and the town’s traditional low mileage rate, Dodge said, Looking to the future, mayor addresses long range planningand then assessing future capital needs which will likely include improvements to the water distribution system. Maintaining the smalltown quality of life is also important, the mayor said. Future transportation needs should also be considered: the town’s bus service, pedestrian crossings, speed limits, and the introduction of sidewalks. The town owns just two pieces of property, the water plan site on Sample Road and the town hall complex on A1A. Acquiring more land could be a possibility and the feasibility and affordability of that needs to be studied, Dodge said. Along with the water distribution system which at some time will have to be either replaced or upgraded, other power sources such as natural gas or solar energy could be proposed, he said. “It [the plan] doesn’t have to be overly complicated,” Dodge said. “But it is up to us to determine what is practical and correct for us. Then we will re ne it at a public workshop.”Sun Bergeron wins disposal contractHillsboro Beach The commission chose Sun Bergeron as its waste disposal contractor this week commenting that they felt more material would be recycled and reintroduced as new products with Sun rather than with the other competitor present on Tuesday, Wheelabrator. Sun’s price is $45.25 a ton against Wheelabrator’s $42. Mayor Dan Dodge said the rm, new to the industry here, has shown success in winning accounts and that he liked the idea of the “small guy challenging the big guy. Everyone seemed to admire their success in introducing their product to market,” he added. The small difference in tonnage fees makes little difference over the length of the ve-year contract, he said. Sun Bergeron won its rst See HILLSBORO on page 16

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4 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Marine interests here have drawn a proposal that, if accepted by the city commission, will improve access to local waterways, establish a nautical art program and create signature events with a nautical theme. In addition, the business group headed by former re rescue administrator Jim Mathie, is asking the city to establish a marine advisory committee, install mooring buoys along Angel’s Reef for divers, work to build an arti cial reef, establish a system of oating docks for kayak and paddle-board users and ask the water management district to deepen the Hillsboro River east of Military Trail. Additionally, the group wants to help the city design the maritime village being proposed for Sullivan Park. Purpose of the plan presented Tuesday at the commission meeting is to Plan aims to make Deer eld Beach a nautical destinationpromote the city as a nautical destination for visitors and as a place to live with opportunities for recreation and business near the water. It is a 44-page analysis of the area’s existing marine amenities and what is needed in the way of improvements. On Mathie’s ‘team’ are major business owners such as Marina One, 2 Georges at the Cove, the Wyndham Beach Resort, Island Water Sports, Riva Motorsports, Dixie Divers, Oceans 234, Embassy Suites, Skirixen as well as the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce. Already accomplished is one of their goals: a local map that highlights the city’s nautical destinations and which is now being distributed by the chamber. “Deer eld Beach is currently ranked fth among Broward’s 32 municipalities in the amount of tourist tax collected. Promoting the city as a nautical destination should increase this amount and improve our overall ranking,” Mathie said. In 2011, this city sent $1.7 million in bed tax revenues to the county. “Tourism is Broward’s number one economic engine,” Mathie added. “To be a player, destinations need to nd their niche and brag about it. Come aboard and help promote us.” Integral to the image of Deer eld Beach as a nautical destination is the establishment of a funded public art program that emphasizes nautical themes such as the mural by artist Rick Novak at the 2 Georges. Public art is encouraged and funded with development and redevelopment fees. In Boynton Beach, one percent of the cost of all commercial development is set aside for public art. Last year Pompano Beach approved an ordinance establishing a two percent share of each public project for art. Also presented for consideration was a logo design consisting of the pier, a wave and a rising sun. Commissioners accepted the destination plan without comment except for Joe Miller who said he favored the idea of “branding our city” and asked if staff would look into the proposal. DBES sets Round-Up for kindergarten parentsDeer eld Beach Another Kindergarten Round-Up will be held at Deer eld Beach Elementary School, 60 NE 1 St. April 10, 6 to 7 p.m. in the media center. Parents will meet staff and learn about curriculum and school activities. To enroll in kindergarten, children must be age ve by Sept. 1, 2013 and provide original birth certi cate, two proofs of residency, current Florida Immunization Record and physical exam form. Call 754-322-6100.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, April 5, 2013 Robb has chaired several charter review committees in the past and said “there were things we should have looked at but didn’t.” She said she would elaborate further at another time. Commissioner Bill Ganz said he would not favor establishing the committee without further discussion and Vice Mayor Ben Preston asked what the directive would be for the reviewers. Robb said she would “table the issue for now” but asked the city clerk to determine what elections are being scheduled by the county prior to the next city ballot in 2015. Noting the dif culty in lling advisory board seats, the mayor also suggested disbanding the Memorial Committee and giving the Deer eld Beach Historical Society street-naming responsibilities and increasing the size of the Community Appearance Board to include two members from the now defunct Beauti cation Committee.Pier lease being challenged by the mayorDeer eld Beach The lease-holders of the Deer eld Caf, the new restaurant on the shing pier, may have to rethink their 24/7 business plan. Mayor Jean Robb said this week she wants to reconsider commission action taken before her election that permits the restaurant to be open 24 hours a day. She said she wanted the commission to hear her concerns about the extended hours in that location. In February, the commission granted a request from Toula Amanna to extend the 6 a.m. to midnight hours stated in the lease but retained the ability to revert to the original agreement if late-night problems occur. Amanna had contended that the extended hours could produce much higher revenues for the restaurant and as much as $40,000 a year for the city.Two commercial buildings approvedDeer eld Beach A commercial addition to the Target Super Store on Hillsboro Boulevard was approved by commissioners Tuesday night. The 48,425 square feet of retail space will be attached at the east side of the Target building on what is now a grassy pad making the entire structure 241,364 square feet. The plat for the 23 acre property owned by United Growth Capital also sets aside two outparcels for future development. One was a Kentucky Fried Chicken outlet, the other a Subway store. Construction of another large commercial building was also ok’d by the commission. A 97,615 squarefoot decorative tile showroom and distribution center will be built at 1901 W. Sample Road bordering Crystal Lake. Owner is Bedrosian’s Inc. Commissioner Richard Rosensweig asked if landscaping would block views of the building for people living across the lake. A fence and required landscaping will be installed, he was told. Funding set for summer programsDeer eld Beach – A summer camp program at Westside Park will be funded by a $50,000 grant from the Law Enforcement Trust Fund and a private benefactor chipping in another $125,000. The new funding sources replace a former grant provided by the Children’s Services Council. Children ages 5 to 12 are eligible to attend the camp which will be held June 10 to Aug. 16. And students in grades three to 12 needing tutoring in math can attend summer classes at the Cathedral Community Church, 365 S. Dixie Highway. Funded with $5,000 from the Cathedral Community Development Corporation, certi ed teachers are hired to help students improve their skills in pre-algebra, algebra, geometry and pre-calculus.Deer eldContinued from page 1

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6 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Circulation Joe McGeeAccount Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XXI, Issue 14 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & Letters Unity in the Commnity of Pompano Beach is pleased to announce that two scholarships in the amount of $1,000 each will be presented this year to local highschool students. The quali cations are: the applicant must be a resident of Pompano Beach, have a GPA of 2.0 or greater, family income must not exceed Broward County median income, be drug and crime free and of good moral character, have completed 40 hours of community service, complete a 500-word essay and have been accepted to attend a college or vocational institute for the 2013-2014 school year. Applications are available at the CRA Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1st St., Pompano Beach, 33060, or they may be requested by sending an email to Carolyn Mann at carpelican@gmail.com. Completed applications must be received by April 30. Please mail or deliver the application and requirements to: Unity in the Community, 50 NE 1st St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060.College scholarships open to Pompano Beach residents Tonight, weather permitting, this city’s residents will join of cials to celebrate much more than the new look of Pompano Beach, they celebrate teamwork. A year into the great economic crash, Pompano Beach commissioners stayed the course with their plans to redevelop the beachfront, what little the developers left for us.Celebrate Pompano’s new look tonightPompano Beach’s CRA shines brightly with its latest projects at the beach on the BoulevardWhile all of us were thrilled with renderings of what could happen, mistrust and fear of change often took a front seat. Then we went through months of dust in the air, disappearing parking spots, torn up sidewalks and lost customers. Tonight all those memories begin to fade. Pompano Beach has never looked so good with the renovations, redevelopment and restorations that have taken place since Kim Briesemeister and Chris Brown took leadership of the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA. They came in as pros, and they withstood the doubts and complaints that always arise when ‘change’ raises its ugly head. Tonight, the champagne glasses should point in the direction of Briesemeister and Brown as we all get used to a new pride in Pompano Beach. Brown said it best. “April 5 is the turning point for Pompano Beach. Tonight is our chance for residents to see that a city can really change.”Bicycle RodeoPompano Beach – The City of Pompano Beach, in conjunction with Florida Bicycle Month, will hold its Bicycle Rodeo on Saturday, April 6 from 8 to 1 p.m. at McNair Park, 951 NW 27 Ave. There will be bicycle safety information, food and more for families and children of all ages. The event is free. Call 954786-7882. Sheriff’s charity golf tournamentBroward – The Sheriff’s Foundation of Broward County and the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce are hosting the 2nd Annual Sheriff’s Cup Golf Tournament on Monday, May 6 at the Weston Hills Country Club, 2600 Country Club Way, Weston. Registration is at 8 a.m. and. The tournament starts at 9:30 a.m. Cost is $125 per golfer or $500 for a foursome. The money raised will bene t nonpro t charities in Broward County. Visit www.birdeasepro.com/sheriffscup for more information.Classic Car ShowPompano Beach – The Cruisin’ South Florida Classic Car Show takes place Saturday, April 20 at Pompano Citi Centre at the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cars from many different eras will be on display. The juried show is free to the public. There will be special giveaways for attendees. Car owners can pre-register by calling Russ Gagliano at 954-560-5412 or by email at russgevents@gmail.com.Youth basketball registrationOakland Park – Registration has begun for the Summer Youth Basketball League. Parents can register children ages 7 to 16 [as of June 3] at city hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave., or online [www.oaklandpark .org] until the league is full. Registration fee is $55 for residents and $100 for non-residents. There will be separate age divisions for girls and boys. Call 954-630-4506.Recycling cartsWilton Manors – On Monday, April 22, residents in single-family homes will start to receive the new roll-out recycling carts. The 65-gallon carts will be dropped off at each single-family home. Residents can keep their old recycling bins or put them on the curb to be picked-up. Residents can start using their new carts on Monday, April 29. For more information, call 954-390-2100.Seafood Festival returnsPompano Beach – The 29th Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival takes place over three days from Friday, April 26 to Sunday, April 28 at the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. Cost is $15 per person per day. Children 12 and under are free. In addition to the food and merchandise sold throughout the weekend, there will also be live entertainment every day and night. On Friday, 5 to 10 p.m., “Fourth Dimension” and “Never Stop Believing” will perform. Saturday’s lineup, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., includes “Brass Evolution,” “Ploomie,” “Low Tides” and “38 Special.” On Sunday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., “Two Can Blue,” “Across the Universe” and “Jimmy Stowe and the Stowaways” will be performing. Part of the proceeds from the event bene t local charities, including local school activities. Visit www.pompanobeachseafoodfestival.com for more information.Low cost rabies clinicFort Lauderdale – Broward County Animal Care and Adoption will host a rabies clinic on Saturday, April 6 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Roosevelt Gardens Park, 2841 NW 11 St. Pet owners can purchase low cost vaccinations for dogs or cats to protect them against rabies. Cost for a one-year rabies vaccination and registration tag is $15 per pet. Cash only payments will be accepted. To qualify, pet owners must provide proof of Broward County residency, such as a valid Florida driver’s license or a current utility bill. No appointment is necessary. Customers are taken on a rst come, rst served basis. All dogs must be on leashes and all cats must be in carriers. Call 954-359-1313.Classic movies for $1Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – In the mood for a nostalgic movie? Every second Friday of the month at 6:30 p.m., a classic lm is played at Jarvis Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Dr. The selection for April 12 is “Singin’ in the Rain.” Tickets are $1. Funds raised during the event bene t the American Diabetes Association. On May 11 “Dr. Zhivago” will be played. “Grease” will be shown on June 8. Attendees are encouraged to come dressed as their favorite character from the movie being shown. Call 954-449-4368.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, April 5, 2013 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – This city’s Northeast Transit Center may soon be named after Rosa Parks, the woman who helped end segregation in public transportation. Of cials with Broward County Transit [BCT] came up with the idea and are now looking for support from the community. Phyllis Berry, manager with BCT’s Customer Relations and Communications Department, brought the issue before members of the Northwest CRA Advisory Committee Transit center may bear Rosa Parks’ name, CRA plans move forwardWest CRA Updateon Monday to enlist their support. “How appropriate that the two who started their movements together may wind up together in your community,” she said, referring to Parks and Martin Luther King. Opened in September of last year, the Northeast Transit Center is located at the corner of Dixie Highway and Martin Luther King Boulevard. Advisory members will discuss the issue at their next meeting on Monday, May 6 at 5 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 MLK Boulevard. To rename the center, Berry said there have to be at least three letters of support from the community and facilities can’t be named after anyone still alive. Parks died in 2005. Since the transit center is a county-owned building, nal approval will be determined by county commissioners. Berry said she doesn’t want to assume how commissioners will vote but she’s con dent they will approve the new name. Dist. 4 Commissioner Woodrow Poitier, in whose district the center is located, said he would be ne with naming the facility after Parks or someone from Pompano. “I hadn’t given it much thought, but I don’t have any objections. Either way, I’m ne.”NW Advisory Committee votes to acquire propertyPompano Beach – Members of the Northwest CRA Advisory Committee voted Monday to acquire two properties – 690 Hammondville Road and 236 NW 7 Ave. CRA staff members said the purchase price of both properties would be for their combined assessed value – $56,600. The nal decision on the purchase will be made by city commissioners at their CRA board meeting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 16 in the commission chambers, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Nguyen Tran, CRA senior project manager, said the properties are located adjacent to land already owned by the NW CRA. Once purchased, he said the CRA would clean up the sites and maintain them. Carlton Moore, liaison to the NW CRA Advisory Committee, said CRA staff members recommended the purchase because they want to make sure the properties aren’t sold at a later date to a developer who might propose building something that isn’t good for nearby properties. The CRA plans to leave the properties undeveloped for now.MLK retail building 60 percent completedPompano Beach – Carlton Moore, liaison to the NW CRA Advisory Committee, said the 731 Building on Martin Luther King Boulevard, a 4,100 sq. ft. commercial development nanced for $1.5 million by the NW CRA, is 60 percent completed. In addition to the physical aspects of the project, Moore added that the NW CRA is also very close to securing leases from four tenants – two restaurants, See WEST CRA on page 11

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8 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Fireworks at the beachPompano Beach – The grand re-opening of East Village and the Beach takes place on Friday, April 5 from 5 to 10 p.m. at Harbor Village Shoppes, located at Atlantic Boulevard and Northeast 27 Avenue. To celebrate, the city will have a ribbon cutting at Harbor Village Shoppes at 6:30 p.m. and re works at 8:30 p.m. on the beach. There will also be live music from 6 to 10 p.m., an interactive art project and children’s activities. City of cials will also turn on the water fountain built on the beach at the east end of Atlantic Boulevard at 7:30 p.m. Call 954-786-7824. Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach – City commissioners this week authorized the CRA staff to negotiate with Landmark Development Corp. to construct a mixeduse development at MLK Boulevard and Northwest Sixth Ave. The vote was 5-1, Vice Mayor George Brummer dissenting. Landmark, a Miamibased rm, was one of two rms to submit a request for proposal to develop the site. The second, Pinnacle Housing Group, which proposed senior housing, withdrew from consideration last week. Landmark proposes to build up to a seven-story building with the rst oor retail/ commercial and residential oors above. Retail space, fronting on MLK Boulevard, would be about 4,000 square feet. The proposal also calls for a three-story parking structure with 160 spaces. The developer proposes to build about 127 living units ranging from one to three bedrooms. Cost is $22.5 million and will be paid for in CRA [Community Redevelopment Agency] tax credits.Plans for mixed-use on MLK Boulevard move forwardA family of four would be eligible to rent a unit with a maximum income of $40,800. “It looks like we’re on our way nally,” said Commissioner Woody Poitier. “I think it’s a good project. I’m all for this project.” Brummer questioned whether one respondent was suf cient. He wondered if the city should seek more proposals. “I don’t think this does anything positive for the community except to build something where there is nothing,” Brummer said. “We’re putting more subsidized building into the community. We could do something with higher rentals.” He noted that the new bus depot is within easy walking distance, and eventually the area will have a rail station. And he said he’s not that sold on mixed-use development. “It really doesn’t work. You can only have so many barbers, beauty shops and cleaners.” Brummer suggested rejecting this proposal and looking for something better. Kim Briesemeister, coexecutive director of the CRA, noted the area has been designated for transit-oriented development and a mixed-use district. She said the district will have mixed incomes and a combination of uses. Commissioner Rex Hardin, while noting he would support going forward with negotiations, said he was concerned “we’re limiting our future and limiting our potential. We’re almost saying that’s all that area will support.” Brummer said they’re also looking for mixed use next to the bus station, questioning how much the neighborhood can absorb. “We should try for something better. My aspirations are higher and my ambitions are greater,” he said. Commissioner Barry Dockswell said, “It is a mistake to paint all subsidized housing with the same brush. This is a great match and a great start. It will help kick start the area.” Mayor Lamar Fisher said he would like to see more retail in the development. “I think it’s a great t for what we’re trying to do and the right t for the property. This begins the availability to provide retail and residential.”

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The Pelican 9 Friday, April 5, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park – Commissioners in this city have had a change of heart and are revisiting a recent decision to destroy a 40-foot live oak tree to make way for a parking lot. A group intent on saving the tree gathered last Saturday and hung a yellow ribbon about the old oak tree, prompting commissioners to discuss the matter again this week. The previous commission had approved a site plan for a parking lot at 1201-1235 E. Oakland Park Blvd. just west of the property that will house the proposed culinary arts school. That plan called for 21 trees to be removed and 13 trees relocated. Among the trees slated for removal was the old live oak which could not withstand relocation. Because of residents’ concerns, staff developed another plan which does not impact the oak trees and meets downtown parking lot requirements. Mayor John Adornato said he will support the alternative plan that leaves the oak tree intact. He was among commissioners who approved the previous site plan. He assured residents that the parking lot won’t be built until there’s a contract between the property owner Yellow ribbon saves old oak tree, commissioners back off axing plansand the school. “We were told that was imminent,” he said. “We’re still waiting for an agreement.” Any nal proposals will come back before the commission, Adornato said. “We won’t be building this project until we have a deal, and you are satis ed with the design of the parking lot,” City Manager John Stunson said. “We acted with haste,” Vice Mayor Shari McCartney said of the previous decision, which she also supported. Commissioner Jed Shank, who voted against the previous plan, said “It’s important that we preserve the tree that is such an important part of Oakland Park.” He said he’s happy an alternative is being presented and asked if the 100-year-old pine trees could be preserved as well. “In the early sketches, it looks like all three oaks and one slash pine would be saved,” said Ray Lubomski, community and economic development director. Shank said he is concerned about spending $750,000 for a temporary parking lot. He asked if there were other things the city could do as an incentive for the school. Commissioner Sara Guevrekian said she was optimistic about the culinary school. “Whenever possible, don’t remove trees.” “I hear a consensus to maintain and preserve as many trees as possible,” Adornato said. Commissioner Tim Lonergan said he wants to encourage business and is See OAKS on page 19Residents gather at the site of a live oak tree in Oakland Park. In a plan approved by the City Commission last month, the tree was to be removed. That plan is now being reconsidered. [Photo by Judy Vik]

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10 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFIn an almost seamless transition, Doreen Gauthier has handed off a smooth as silk functioning library to the accommodating and very capable Christy Keyes. Gauthier has guided this city’s independent library from a small store in a strip center to a technically savvy, computerized state of the art library. Keyes is moving it into the future with outreach events like live story time televised simultaneously to over 12 schools, followed by student interaction in each school from children selected by classroom teachers. The two librarians, who stay closely linked, never forget that this wonderful library couldn’t happen without the 110 volunteers who share their time, talent and dedication with just three and one half salaried employees. And on March 20, the traditional volunteer appreciation luncheon took place at Saint Paul the Apostle Catholic Church in Lighthouse Point. Once again Monsignor Brice gave the invocation. Mayor Fred Schorr gave brief but eloquent thanks to the staff and volunteers. The ladies from Saint Paul Auxiliary were the gracious table servers. Doreen could be seen as she moved from place to place, helping to serve and pour tea and coffee. After lunch, she once again thanked and handed out a certi cate of appreciation to each volunteer. City commissioners, library advisory board members, Friends of the Library board members and the staff members –Cathy Anthony, Rosemary Wilson and Barbara Stiles were all on hand to thank the volunteers and receive thanks for their efforts. Blue and silver invitations, with a curious dimensional puzzle on the front, were created by Keyes. The center of the puzzle was missing. The mystery of the puzzle with a blank center was solved when the volunteers were seated at their tables. They found small silver boxes at each place setting. Inside was a pale blue card inscribed with the message, “Thank you for being an Essential Piece of the library.” Lapel pins repeated the puzzle theme, each inscribed with the phrase, “Essential Piece.” In keeping with the theme, miniature puzzle shapes were scattered around the center piece of each table. In her welcoming speech, Keyes highlighted each signi cant area manned by volunteers and echoed the theme of the importance of each piece Tradition continues! Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point celebrates its 34th annual volunteers’ luncheonSee LIBRARY on page 17 Oakland Park – The Oakland Park Historical Society presents the Florida Highwaymen artists from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 6, at Jaco Pastorius Community Center, 4000 N. Dixie Highway. R.L. Lewis, one of the Highwaymen, will be painting at the event. Admission is free. Donations are accepted. The Oakland Park Time Capsule, in recognition of Florida’s 500th birthday, will also be on display, and members of the Oakland Park Historical Society will accept any proposed articles for inclusion in the time capsule. The time capsule will be lled with Oakland Park items submitted and chosen by residents at the city birthday event on July 1. For more information, email ophs. @gmail.com or call 954-253-0850.Highwaymen and history at Pastorius Park Chamber shing for networking groupPompano Beach If it’s ‘who you know’ that makes a difference, the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce is putting together a new group of business owners to widen the net of names. Says Ric Green, chamber CEO, the new group will start April 23, and he hopes interested members will offer input. Those interested should contact Marianne Miccoli mmiccoli@ pompanobeachchamber.com or by phone at 954-941-2940.Lighthouse Point Commissioner Earl Maucker, Larainne Schorr, Commissioner Sandy Johnson, Betsy Maucker, Commissioner Glenn Troast, Doreen Gauthier, Mayor Fred Schoor and Mary Ann

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The Pelican 11 Friday, April 5, 2013 an engineering rm and a printing rm. Built on 2.18 acres, the development will have enough space for up to seven businesses and NW CRA of cials hope to ll the rest of the space with retail and professional of ces. The building is expected to be completed this spring.Downtown Streetscape improvements Pompano Beach – Horatio Danovich, CRA engineer, said the $11 million Downtown Streetscape Improvements project is one day ahead of schedule. Plans include 60 new parking spaces, landscape, lighting and sidewalk improvements and entryway signs for MLK Boulevard and Historic Downtown Pompano. About $7 million of that money is supposed to be spent on MLK, with the rest going to Downtown area east of Dixie Highway. The rst phase involves upgrading the sewer and water lines under MLK Boulevard. The upgrades are being made so that the infrastructure can accommodate future residential and commercial developments. “We’re making provisions for all the future development coming to town,” said Danovich.Management entity wanted for community garden Pompano Beach – CRA of cials have started their search for a company or organization to develop, cultivate and manage the proposed 26,000 sq. ft. community garden that will be located on the corner of Northwest 6 Avenue and Northwest 10 Street, east of Blanche Ely High School. Once completed, the $50,000 project would feature hydroponic towers and garden plots tended by residents. Horatio Danovich, CRA engineer, said anyone can apply but in order to qualify they must be insured to protect the city from liability, in case something happens on the garden property, and they must be able to manage the garden and provide assistance to residents who utilize the facility. “We want [the process] as open as possible,” said Carlton Moore, liaison to the NW CRA. Jeanette Copeland, NW CRA Advisory Committee member, said she wants CRA of cials to make sure everyone has a fair chance of getting the contract. “We make the puzzle so hard some people can’t get in.” Danovich responded that the application process would be made “as simple as possible.” To apply, call 954-786-7834.West CRAContinued from page 7 Books & Libraries4-6 – Anime Club 2 to 3:30 at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Boulevard, Pompano Beach. 954-786-2181. 4-6 – Chess Club 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Boulevard, Pompano Beach. 954-786-2181. 4-9 – Writers’ Workshop Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954-9466398. 4-11 – Bingo Thursdays at 1 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954946-6398. 4-12 – Spanish I help at 2 p.m. Fridays at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Spanish II help at 3 p.m. every Friday. 954-946-6398. 4-15 – Senior Scams & Identity Theft class from 12 to 1 p.m. at Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954357-7697.Business4-8 – Wilton Manors Business Association meeting at 6 p.m. at RMS Accounting, 2319 N. Andrews Ave., Wilton Manors. 4-10 – Wednesday Winners from 11:30 to 1 SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 13

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12 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 this year’s capital budget as part of the $1.2 million West Commercial Boulevard streetscape project. Design plans for the area also include four way nding plaza sculptures by Huck, estimated to cost about $100,000. At earlier meetings, Commissioner Mark Brown preferred starting with those four sculptures rather than the entryway feature. This week he asked for consensus on that idea. Only Vincent agreed with Brown and added that he wasn’t sure the town should spend so much on the entryway sculpture. He suggested a better location for the piece would be El Prado Park. “I’m not happy with the cost, and I don’t know if this monument at that location says this is Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea,” Vincent said. He said more discussion was needed. Mayor Roseann Minnet said she didn’t concur with Vincent at all. “We have talked about the entry and how when you cross the bridge you don’t know you are in LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. This will bring the coral reef to you,” she said. “It will look magni cent, and at night when it’s all lit up you will see it before you cross the bridge.” Minnet said she feels the entryway sculpture is very important. “The piece will make the town visible from so many places. We need that signature as you come into town. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea hasn’t created its own picture frame, and this will start that.” The mayor then read portions of a letter from the artist, Laura Huck. “Art is a great uni er and de ner of a community. I can only think how natural it is for everyone to take note of the pelican sculpture at the end of Commercial Boulevard. The series we have planned will be even brighter and more eyecatching. Not only that, it will draw attention to the treasure trove of accessible reef off your beaches. Very few improvements to a townscape, such as you are planning, will have as much impact as the art.” Huck said the main piece, the Coral Arch, is the rst thing people will see as they enter the town. “It will say, ‘This is not an ordinary community, but a community with much to offer.’ The Coral Arch is designed to wow, in the day with its bright colors and details, and at night, when lit, with its glowing rays.” Minnet urged commissioners to approve executing the agreement and to start with the Coral Arch. Commissioner Stuart Dodd said he agreed, that the Coral Arch sculpture “makes a huge statement. I think we should go ahead.” Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said he was in full agreement with the mayor and with Dodd. “We’re talking about the entry and a true piece of art.” Sasser, however, still seemed baf ed by an earlier decision. “I think I’m in a dream world when everyone voted for a 33-foot Las Vegas parking lot sign to put in the center of the downtown. [That sign was later modi ed to 30 feet.] This [the entryway sculpture] is much more important than the other,” he said. Vincent said he never SculptureContinued from page 1suggested the entryway sculpture wasn’t a beautiful piece of artwork. “It won’t be seen or recognized at that location. It won’t be appreciated by pedestrians or by vehicular traf c going east.”State approves $100,000 grant for landscaping on Commercial In related news, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann announced Tuesday that state of cials have approved the town’s grant application for $100,000 to assist with landscaping costs for the West Commercial Boulevard streetscape project. This is a matching grant from the Florida Highway Beauti cation Council, and the town is committed to match it with $202,000 in additional landscaping monies. Hoffmann credited staff member Pat Himelberger and Hugh Johnson of Architectural Alliance for their work on the grant. Himelberger wrote the grant application, and Johnson modi ed the tree selection to improve the town’s chances getting the funding. Lighthouse tours April 20Hillsboro Beach – A tour of the Hillsboro Lighthouse will be offered Saturday, April 20. To participate, meet Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society members at the Sands Harbor Marina, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach, beginning at 8:45 a.m. The rst boat launches at 9 a.m. and the last boat leaves at 2:30 p.m. The tour is free for Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society members and $15 for non-members. The annual cost to join the Preservation Society is $25 for individuals, $35 for a family, $50 for a business and $500 for a lifetime membership. For more, visit www.hillsborolighthouse. org or call 954-942-2102.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, April 5, 2013 p.m. at Bobby Rubino’s, 2501 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Cost is $15. 954-9711077. 4-12 – The Originals business networking meeting at 8 a.m. at J ukebox Diner, 2773 E Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach. Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce’s networking event. 954-803-4174.Children & Family4-5 – Story Time at 10:30 a.m every Friday at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Ages 18 months to three years. 954946-6398. 4-6 – Bike Rodeo from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at McNair Park, 951 NW 27 Ave., Pompano Beach. Bicycle safety education and food. All ages welcome. 954-786-7882. Clubs & Charity4-5 – Dance from 7 to 10 p.m. at Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $15 per person. Funds go to Relay For Life. 954-781-2300. 4-5 – Chess Club Fridays from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach Branch Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-786-2181. 4-9 – Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club Tuesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. 4-9 – Deer eld Beach Rotary Club Tuesdays at 1:15 p.m. at Deer Creek Country Club, 2801 Country Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 866976-8279 4-9 – Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale/Cypress Creek Tuesdays at 12 p.m. at Westin Cypress Creek Hotel, 400 Corporate Drive. 954-4928254. 4-10 – Kiwanis Club of Oakland Park Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954566-9957. 4-10 – Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach Wednesdays at 12 p.m. at Sea Side Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954783-4999. 4-10 – Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954-560-7813. 4-11 – Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954491-6158. 4-12 – Pompano Beach Rotary Club Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. 4-13 – Kiwanis Club of Deer eld Beach West second and fourth Saturdays at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St. Meets every second and fourth Saturday. 954-54-732-9883.Education & Self Development4-8 – Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 9 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954-3575579. SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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14 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – In the 25 years he’s been skateboarding, Rafal Dradrach has been kicked out of parks, malls, parking lots and countless number of other places. Now, Dradrach and his fellow skateboarders want city of cials here to build a concrete skate park where they won’t have to worry about cops or security guards chasing them away. “You usually have a max of about ve minutes [to skate] before someone comes and asks you to leave the premises. We get kicked out of everywhere.” On Wednesday, Dradrach and over 100 people, some with boards in hand, packed the meeting of the Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center. The skateboarders, some in their teens and some in their 40s and 50s, came to persuade the committee to recommend the city build the park. “It will keep kids off the street and give them a safe environment. It will also minimize damage to public property [by reducing the number of kids who damage Fate of Pompano Beach skate park proposal delayedhand rails and other surfaces in their quest for a cool trick],” said Dradrach. But committee members delayed a vote until city staff could provide them with more information. Speci cally, they want to know about attendance, safety, how much it will cost to build and maintain the facility and if a fee will be charged to use it. “I’m not opposed to a skate park per say. I’m opposed to spending money the city doesn’t have,” said Rafael Katz, committee member. According to Mark Beaudreau, recreation programs administrator, the cost to build the skate park is $208,000. But Katz wasn’t buying it. “I challenge you to show me the numbers,” he said to Beaudreau. Dradrach said a $10,000 grant from the Tony Hawk Foundation will be available to help build the facility if it’s approved. Katz also doubted the honesty of many audience members when the overwhelming majority of them put their hands up after being asked if they were from Pompano. “Magically, 90 percent of them raised their hand,” he said. “If I sound annoyed, it’s because I am. We’ve discussed this. We’ve beat this into the ground,” said Katz, who added that the issue of building a skate park has come up multiple times and has always been rejected See SKATE PARK on page 20

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The Pelican 15 Friday, April 5, 2013 4-10 – Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W Atlantic Blvd. 954-3575579. 4-11 – Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 10 a.m. at Century Village Deer eld Beach, 2400 Century Village Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954357-5579. 4-12 – Identity theft protection class at 10 a.m. at St. Stephens Evangelical Lutheran Church, 2500 NE 14 Street Causeway, Pompano Beach. Refreshments served. 954 943-3644. 4-15 – Identity theft and fraud protection class from 12 to 1 p.m. at Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-357-7680.Events & Activities4-6 – Model train swap meet from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 445 SW 2 St ., Deer eld Beach. Model train layouts, museum displays of railroad memorabilia and vendor tables for model trains, SightingsContinued from page 13 See SIGHTINGS on page 19

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16 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013Send your events for publication to mdpelican@ yahoo.com municipal contract in 2012 in Miramar breaking into a market controlled for 20 years by Wheelabrator, a subsidiary of Waste Management. Its website cites its commitment to ‘zero waste’ for the cities it serves and its contracts guarantee 75 percent of the solid waste collected will be recycled.HillsboroContinued from page 3 more claims than any other chapter, more than 500 a year. A large number of the vets applying for assistance here qualify because the government has taken responsibility for the illnesses caused by Agent Orange which has a long list of diseases from cancer to arthritis associated with the chemical. And it has now been determined that the chemical still affects future generations, the grandchildren of the Vietnam servicemen. To establish exposure to Agent Orange counselors have to match the veteran’s service record with military records that show the exact place time and amount of Agent Orange that was used to defoliate the jungles. Having access to all this history is important to the outcome of the claim. The local DAV volunteers VetsContinued from page 1are available 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Tuesday at the Legion, 820 SE 8 Ave. No appointment necessary. Additionally, these volunteers spend four days a year being recerti ed at a seminar held at Lake Mary, FL. “The system is intimidating and these guys know the language of the VA,” says Acting Cmdr. Don Carney. “I’m not dumb, but it confuses me.” Since the damaging effects of service-related injuries may not occur for years, returning vets from Iraq and Afghanistan need to start keeping track of their records now for future needs, Roth said. The VA compensates for physical and mental disabilities and, for veterans or their spouses on very low incomes, provides a pension. Bene ts, if awarded, are retroactive to the date the claim was started. Healthcare is available at VA hospitals with a minimum of paperwork. Often these disabilities don’t surface until the vet ages requiring years of documentation. While these local service of cers are skeptical that the VA will go electronic anytime soon, they are looking for sponsors who will contribute money for computers, printers and wi so they will be ready when it does happen. Indicating the work going on behind him, Carney said, “These guys are doing the right thing. I’d like to see it get known that they are available.” While the DAV does not give direct nancial assistance to vets in need, members of the chapter provide transportation, visit nursing homes to help residents with their claims, make some home repairs. They stress that all their time and their talents are given for free and caution that anyone being charged a fee to get help with their claim application is “being ripped off.” One widow who met with them this week reported being charged $750 by a “VA rep.” The service of cers also advise their clients of other legal rights such as the additional Homestead Exemption. Said Citrolo, “The reward is in helping people,” and Butler added, “We are handful of people who don’t mind ghting for other people.” The local DAV chapter raises money by holding car shows and golf tournaments and manning their information booth at public events. Other service of cers from the Goldcoast Chapter are Bob Kontz, Jim Zane, Dave Nystrom, Gerg Chaipponi, Tom Perry and Chuck McLaughlin.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, April 5, 2013 that keeps this home town library the beating heart of the city. She called the circulation desk the front line where 42,681 materials were checked out this year and shelved over and over again by volunteers, who take their shift seriously and either show up or arrange for a substitute. She praised the volunteers who worked the hot week of kids’ library summer camp in 2012, and those that lead 150 pre-kindergarten activities, school outreach, and teen programs. Volunteers who managed, organized and ran three book sales raised over $10,000 to support the library. Cristy paid tribute to the volunteer leaders of the senior classes in nance, yoga, exercise, quilting, knitting, bingo, card games, digital photography, writers’ group, foreign languages, book clubs, iPad, computer and eReader tutoring.LibraryContinued from page 10The new library website was co-designed, hosted and tracked by volunteers who ranged in age from 11 to ‘won’t tell.’ In October, November and December of 2012, the website had over 200,000 hits. And lastly, she thanked the volunteers from Friends of the Library and Teen advisory Boards who co-hosted and set up the traditional luncheon. When they learned there was an issue with dessert vendors, they offered and made over 300 mini deserts for all to enjoy. The Teen Board appeared at the church community center the day before the event to cover the chairs with white slipcovers, tied with big silver bows. Floral centerpieces at each table re ected the silver and blue color scheme combining white roses with delicate light blue hydrangeas and purple pansy accents. The mayor, Gauthier, Keyes and the small library staff stopped at every table to greet and show their appreciation to the men and women volunteers on hand. To become a library volunteer, call 954-946-6398. Dave Probonic, Kadena Tedlock, Karen Julius and Simms Pam Sargent and Susie Gordon Janice Clermont Sandy Whipple Jean Taylor and Barbara Stiles Sue Blough, Bonnie Bonadelli and Tina Furey

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18 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 will include music, art, food and re works. Says Mayor Lamar Fisher, “Without a doubt, this will be fantastic. It’s been a long time coming.” Fisher refers to the new promenade at the beach which replaced a 40-plus-year-old parking lot at the terminus of Atlantic and Ocean Boulevard. Leading up to the promenade are wide sidewalks, landscaping and lots of people enjoying the ocean breezes as they dine outside under the canopies of long-standing restaurants that have taken on new life. Just west of the Atlantic Boulevard Bridge, shop-owners who have tasted dust for months have polished off their new facades at Harbor Village. Here celebrants can enjoy the cuisine of the area from local restaurants and food trucks, the music of Weedline Band, art exhibitions by local artists and more. The big moment of the evening will take place on the beach when reworks are shot from the pier. Commissioner Barry Dockswell [District 1] who has pushed for beach improvements for years will be among the party-goers. Prior to his election in 2008, Dockswell had served four years on the East CRA advisory board. “I am thrilled,” says Dockswell. “This is why I ran for of ce. As former chair of the advisory committee 2007, I made the presentation that resulted in hiring an executive director.” For years, the executive director of the CRA for both the beach area and the western side of the city, was the late city manager, Bill Hargett. “[Director of CRA] was just one of the hats that he wore,” said Dockswell. “[This celebration] has born out the fact that a director with skills was a necessary ingredient to success.” The CRA program in this city has been under the leadership of Kim Briesemeister and Chris Brown, who serve jointly as CRA directors. Funding for the CRA comes from a portion of the taxes that are paid by property owners within the CRA area. The east CRA, a $10 million project so far, includes a portion of the beach, the north and south sides of Atlantic Boulevard and other contiguous properties. The entire area is about 150 acres of land. A study made in the late 90s indicated the area had become blighted over the years. It would be the CRA that focused on that blight and redevelopment. Briesemeister said she and Brown have worked together for years. “We go in to identify needed improvements, see what has to be changed, both public and private properties, and create a ve-year plan to implement and fund the project.” She adds, “I am ecstatic. This is the most amazing transformation we have worked on in all our years together. It means so much when people come to us and say they never thought Pompano could change. It’s a great reward to hear that.” Tonight’s parties take place within three time periods: East Village celebrations at Harbor Village Shoppes [East Atlantic Boulevard and NE 27 Avenue] begin at 6:30 p.m. At 7:30 p.m., the mayor and other of cials will launch the large fountain at the terminus of East Atlantic Boulevard, and reworks begin at the pier at 8:30 p.m. Call 954-7867824. FeastContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 19 Friday, April 5, 2013 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@ yahoo. com or excited about the culinary school. “There’s a good compromise that can be found,” he said. Guevrekian and Lonergan were elected to the commission after the earlier decision. Several residents addressed the commission, some noting that no more parking spaces are needed. “When you think of downtown Oakland Park, concrete comes to mind,” said Christina Harper. “You have dozens of parking spaces. Main Street reminds me of a ghost town. Having another parking lot seems redundant. Now that area feels wild, pristine and special.” Bill Sears said there are already 50 parking spaces in a lot underneath the building proposed for a culinary school. There’s another parking lot on the east side of the building that could hold 40 cars and a city-owned lot with room for 200 cars to the north. He urged commissioners to stop the parking lot project. “If you keep building parking lots, we will have to change the name of the city to Parking Lot City,” he said. Katie Freeman suggested commissioners go take a look at the parking lot on the south side of Imperial Point Medical Center. “It’s a beautiful parking lot full of gorgeous trees.” She then read Joyce Kilmer’s poem, “Trees.” On Saturday, about 15 residents, led by Joyce Rau, gathered at the site of the oak tree, and wrapped the tree in yellow ribbon. “We’re calling attention to how (the city) is cutting down our ancestral trees when we have so few left in the city,” Rau said. “It’s irresponsible to spend our money on a parking lot that will be temporary. They plan to spend close to $1 million on a parking lot that will be tossed up and thrown to the wind.” Rau said the site plan called for removing the 40foot oak tree so a sign on the adjacent building wall could be read. “Only God can make a tree. Anybody can make a parking lot,” Freeman said.OaksContinued from page memorabilia. Admission and parking are free. 954-4488935. 4-6 – Wilton Manors Wine & Food Festival from 6 to 10 p.m. at Eucalyptus Gardens, 2430 NE 13 Ave. Tickets: $50.00 or $75 at the door. VIP admission is $75.00 or $100.00 at the door. 954394-4322. 4-6 – Disc Glow Golf Tournament 7 to 9 p.m. at Easterlin Park, 100 NW 38 St., Oakland Park. Ages 13 and up. Preregistration: $5 plus tax per person; Registration on night of tournament: $8 plus tax per person. $1.50 per person gate fee. Participants must provide their own equipment. 954-357-5190. 4-6 – Lichen Love Affair from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Easterlin Park, 100 NW 38 St., Oakland Park. Ages six and up. Cost is $5 plus tax per person. $1.50 per person gate fee. Preregistration required. 954-357-5100. 4-6 – Help remove exotic and invasive plants from 9 a.m. to noon. At Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 S. Lyons Road, Coconut Creek. 954357-5198. 4-9 – St. Ambrose Men’s Club hosts a trip to Seminole Casino in Coconut Creek. Cost is $21 and includes transportation, $10 in chips and $5 food voucher. Bus leaves parking lot at church, 380 S. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 10 a.m. 954856 6062. 4-9 – Woman’s Club of Deer eld Beach installation luncheon at 12 p.m. at Wyndham Hotel Resort, 4011 N. Ocean Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $30. Public welcome. 954-421-4700. 4-12 – 50s concert at 7 p.m. at Cokesbury United Methodist Church, 1801 NW 65 Ave., Margate. Tickets: $5 presale, $7 at the door. Refreshments will be available. 954-972-3424 or www. cokesburymargate.org. 4-12 – “Singin’ in the Rain” at 6:30 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Dr., Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Tickets are $1. Funds raised during the event bene t the American Diabetes Association. 954-449-4368. 4-13 – 13th Annual Cuisine of the Region Food and Wine Tasting from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at Hillsboro Club, 901 Hillsboro Mile, Hillsboro Beach. Tickets: $50 in advance, $60 at the door. Proceeds bene t the N.E. Focal Point. Auction items SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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20 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 unanimously by the committee. One audience member called Katz a liar. But whether or not they live here or other parts of South Florida, proponents of the skate park say that bringing in people from outside the city is one of the bene ts of building it. “Bradenton’s [skate park] is insane, to the point that it’s a focal point of the town,” said Howard Montaque, an Air Force veteran who served in Afghanistan for ve years as a civilian contractor. Dradrach said a concrete park would make the skateboarding world take notice of this city. Concrete, multiple proponents said, is the best material to build a park with because it can best handle the stress of skateboards and can last for decades without little maintenance. And the facility, he added, will draw people from across the state, including teens and their parents, bringing more tourist dollars into the city. “You can’t underestimate a teenager’s sway on their parents’ travel plans,” he said. Kurt Massinello, a Pompano resident who has been a skateboarder for 42 years, said his money “goes elsewhere” when he takes his son to other parts of the state – including Tampa, Orlando, Sarasota, Naples and Bradenton – that have poured concrete skate parks. “I’m a parent. We do a wonderful job [of providing facilities for every other sport and] we have a dog park. Give the kids a skate park,” he said. Ken Arnold, Parks and Recreation Advisory member, agreed. “You name [a facility for a sport], we have it. [Except skateboarding].” Beaudreau wants to give the kids a park to keep them from using the rest of Pompano. “If you don’t build a skate park then your city becomes a skate park,” he said. “I can tell you that we chase kids out of the amphitheater routinely.” Mayor Lamar Fisher also supports building the park and getting kids “off our sidewalks.” A skateboarder “in my younger years,” Fisher dealt with the same problems today’s youth do: trying to get as much time in a good skating spot as he could before being kicked out. “Skateboarding has always been a very popular sport. And if we’re able to provide a facility for our youth, as well as our adults, it will provide more recreation and a more well-rounded community.” Despite the popularity of skateboarding and the large turnout Wednesday, not everyone is convinced yet that a skate park would be a wise investment. “My biggest concern is that if we build this thing it will just not be used as much as some people expect. We’ve done that before and it just breaks my heart to see money spent in that regard,” said Commissioner Rex Hardin, who added that he’s not against the park but just wants to know more before making a decision. Right now, the most likely spot for the skate park would be the unused roller hockey Skate parkContinued from page 14rink in Pompano Community Park – a sport that didn’t fare too well in this city. “It was a passing fad that lasted three years and it tanked,” said Beaudreau. Skateboarders and their supporters packed one of the meeting rooms at the Emma Lou Olson Center on Wednesday. [Staff photo]

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The Pelican 21 Friday, April 5, 2013 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – “We’re a team,” said artist Pat Anderson about her partnership with fellow artist John Wetzstein. Anderson creates tropical-style paintings and Wetzstein fashions the frames that surround them out of driftwood he finds on the beaches of Florida. Their combined work has gotten a combined showing as ArtHall’s monthly featured artists at the CRA Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. The opening reception was March 20. Named “Art and Arbor,” Anderson’s paintings focus on the historic East Coast Railroad built by Henry Flagler. The railroad stretched She paints, he makes frames; Anderson, Wetzstein team up for ArtHallalong Florida’s east coast in areas that include Pompano Beach, Deerfield Beach, Oakland Park, Wilton Manors and the Keys. “I’m really trying to get the Keys and Pompano together [in my work],” said Anderson. Her work, showcased during the exhibit, also features scenes from her travels outside the United States, including the Panama Canal and Cabo San Lucas in Mexico. Pat Anderson with some of her paintings at ArtHall on March 20. Anderson paints scenes unique to Florida as well as other tropical destinations outside the United States. Her work, complimented by the frames created by fellow artist John Wetzstein, will be on display at the CRA Business Resource center until April 16. [Right] John Wetzstein with one of his favorite creations, a hallowed-out piece of wood he transformed into a boat-shaped blueprints holder. Wetzstein’s art comes from pieces of drift wood he nds on the beaches of South Florida.See ARTHALL on page 27

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22 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-783-8700 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 3-29 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO. Looking For Good People! Good Opportunity For Right Individual. Qualifications: Good Driving Record – Physically Fit – Professional. No Drugs! Average Tech Earns $600 $1,200 A Week. Wayne 954-868-5560. 4-5 TELEPHONE SALES – PART – TIME. Immediate Openings – Pompano Beach. Monday – Tuesday – Thursday Evenings 6 – 10:30PM. Saturday 9AM – 4PM. Perfect English Only!! GUARANTEED HOURLY + BONUS + COMMISSION. Average $11 $15 Per Hour. GREAT PART – TIME JOB! 754-235-9556. 4-12 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTMALE CNA/HHA/ COMPANION – Broward – Former EMT/Certified/ Lt. Massage. Compassionate – References. PT/FT. Ron 954-232-2832. 4-5 EXP. COMPANION/ CAREGIVER (Non-Medical) Light Cleaning – Gardening – Organizing – Laundry – Cooking – Shopping – Movies. Friendly – Compassionate – Engaging. Bonded – Insured. References. Call Robert 954707-0264. 4-12 CNA/PERSONAL ASSISTANT – Competent, Compassionate With Over 10 Years Of Private Home Health Care & Administrative Experience. Available For Day Or Evening Shifts. Please Call Lisa 561-750-7617. 4-12 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. RED BOX MOVING – OWNER IS PRESENT AT ALL MOVES! Affordable – Reliable – Careful. MV#567/ Insured. 954-305-9176 Or 561506-5540. 4-26 CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 4-5 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs – Carpentry – Plumbing – Roo ng – Masonry – Windows – Painting – Decking – Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 – Emergency Calls. 4-5 HOUSE CLEANING – 13 Years Experience!! Good References!! Residential Or Commercial. FREE Estimates!! Call 954-778-9643. 4-19 BLADE RUNNERS – Yard Maintenance. FREE ESTIMATE!! Grass Cutting –Trimming Hedges & Shrubs. Mulching. Lic/Ins. Starting At $25 Per Cut. Eddie 954-4941303. 3-29 DISCOUNT PRINTING – ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES – Booklets – Brochures – Business Cards – Carbonless Forms – Color Copies – Door Hangers – Envelopes – Flyers – Invoices – Labels – Postcards – Signs – Banners – Rudy Levy 954825-8108. 4-12 GIGI’S CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable – Honest. More Info. 954-2957033 Or 954-210-2248. 4-5 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 4-5 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CHOMEOWNERS INSURANCEBETTER RATES! BETTER SERVICE! Call KATIE For A FREE Quote! 954-784-9029. www.myersinsures.com 4-26 COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 4-19 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 4-5 THRIFT STORECLF THRIFT STORE – 801 SE 10 St. Deer eld. Monday & Wednesday 10am-3pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-4pm. 20% Off Friday & Saturday ONLY. 954-428-8980. 4-5 DOCKS FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT – UP TO 40’. No Fixed Bridges. 1 Mile To Hillsboro Inlet!! Electric & Water. Locked Secured Area. 954-818-0050. 4-12 LIGHTHOUSE POINT DOCK – Boat Up To 28’. Electric/ Water/Whips. 1st Canal To Hillsboro Inlet. Super Location & Price!! Call 954-942-7433. 4-5 CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 – Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954812-5192. CO-OP FOR SALELIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 – 55+ Building. Excellent Location. Needs Work.. $32,995. For More Information Call 954-444-7258. HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE – 2/1 HOME! Just REDUCED! $79,000. 55+ Community! 2 Clubhouses! FREE GOLF. Low Maintenance. Robert Elkins – Charles Rutenberg R.E. 954-782-8968. 4-5 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO KEY WEST STYLE 2/2 HOME – C/A – Ceiling Fans. Large Fenced In Back Yard. $1,100 Month Yearly. Please Call Darci For Details 954-783-3723. 541 NE 34 Street. 4-19

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The Pelican 23 Friday, April 5, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-783-8700 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! POMPANO 1/1 COZY COTTAGE HOUSE – 541 NE 34 ST. – 16B. Privacy Fence-A/C. All Tile Floors. $675 Month Yearly. Call Darci For Details 954-783-3723. 4-19 TOWNHOME FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT REMODELED 3/3 – Deep Water Townhome! Pool – 1 Car Garage. $3,000 Per Month Annual. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty – 954-8034174. 4-5 TOWNHOMES FOR SALEORCHID GROVE – BRAND NEW Spacious 3 Bedroom TOWNHOMES – 1 CG $189K In Pompano Beach – 3% Down/ FHA Approved. Call Bob Alon 954-605-2265 – AllStar Realty OrchidGroveFl.com. 4-5 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony – Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month Yrly. 954-629-1324. 4-26 APTS FOR RENTBEACH AREA APT As Low As $475 A Week In Season! (3225 NE 6th St.) 95 Yards To Beach; Bright Airy Apt With Cable, Wireless, Parking, Patio, Charming Furnishings And More. Pet Friendly. 561-541-0308; Debbie@paxproperties.com 4-12 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 4-19 LIGHTHOUSE POINT – MARINA AREA. Very Attractive Large 2/2. Rent Dock At Marina & Walk Home. Unfurnished. Agent 954-6148428. 4-5 LUXURY OCEAN-VIEW APT: $1475 A MONTH IN SEASON! (Ocean Blvd & NE 6th St.) European Style Kitchen, Ultra-Quiet, EcoFriendly, Central Air, Tropical Pool, Ocean Views, Dedicated Parking, Coin Laundry, Premium Cable TV, WI-FI And More. Pets OK. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com 4-12 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO – 1 Bedroom & Ef ciency With Kitchen. Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly –Seasonal. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 4-5 PRIMO OCEAN BOULEVARD APT For As Low As $68 A Night In Season! (601 N. Ocean Blvd) Great Area, Great Apt. Great Rates. 95 Yards To Beach. Special Weekly & Monthly Rates Too. Cats & Small Dogs Welcome With Pet Fee. Contact Debbie 561-541-0308. Debbie@paxproperties.com 4-12 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 – 3/1 New $1250. SW – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 4-5 BOX BOLD POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Ef ciency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 4-19 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 4-19 LIGHTHOUSE POINT – UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent In A Psychologists Of ce For A SOLO PROFESSIONAL. $950/Month. Located In The GATEWAY CENTRE – 2040 East Sample Rd. Windowed – Unfurnished Of ce! 14’ x 12.5’. Call 954-942-3344. 4-5 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. 4-5 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 4-19 DEERFIELD REDUCED $50,000 – 1,464 SQ FT. Free Standing Of ce/Retail Building Off Federal & 10 St. In Heart Of Business District. Great For Many Uses. Financing Considered. $179,000. Details First Realty. 954-9805780. 4-5

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24 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Rev. Hyvenson Joseph The Original Florida Follies did it again! The sixth and last show of the season ended on a high note on March 17 at the Parker Playhouse. The girls, ages 60 to 90, wowed the audience with their fast paced musical and dance trip, a tribute to Las Vegas. Whistles, cheers and constant applause from the audience made it clear that the Follies girls were a smash. Wearing breathtaking, glamorous costumes, they kicked up their gorgeous synchronized dancing legs to the beat of musical favorites. Elvis was on hand, as were a few children from the Children’s Diagnostic and Treatment Center who had bene ted from the largesse of this all volunteer, non-pro t group. The Follies ladies dance for children in need every season, giving six performances in area venues. All proceeds are donated to children’s charities. Pictured are Sheila Phillips, Elvis (Gene Allen) and Jo Schlags and some of their fans. It’s a wrap! and sponsorships available. 954-480-4460. 4-14 – Polynesian Cultural Festival from 12 to 8 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-630-4500.Health4-9 – Education class on hip replacement procedures from 6 to 7 p.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E. Sample Road, Deer eld Beach. 954759-7400. 4-9 – Support group for family and friends of people with mental illness from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954-739-1888. 4-9 – Class on living with and preventing diabetes from 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954-7597400. 4-11 – “Five OB-GYN Issues You Should Be Talking About” class from 6 to 7 p.m. at Dorothy Mangurian Comprehensive Women’s Center, 1000 NE 56 St., Fort Lauderdale. 954-351-7804. 4-13 – “I Can Cope” class for cancer patients and their friends and family from 8:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, 4725 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954-351-7804. 4-16 – Breast cancer detection and treatment class from 12 to 1 p.m. at Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-357-7680. 4-23 – Class on relieving joint pain from 5 to 6 p.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E. Sample Road, Deer eld Beach. 954-759-7400.SightingsContinued from page 19

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26 The Pelican Friday, April 5, 2013 Tell The Pelican your sh stories! 954-783-8700! Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Want some dolphin? Look for the birdsBy RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point – Over the last two weeks I have struggled in the swordfish department. We have had our share of bites, but just haven’t been overly consistent with getting them in the boat. We usually put out a couple of spinning rods behind the boat while we are waiting for the swords, and occasionally a dolphin will pick up one of the ballyhoos at the end of a rod. But just occasionally. And then, the frigatebirds showed the way and made us all look like heroes. This week, we kept seeing frigatebirds, a species closely related to pelicans, soaring and diving for fish. We took that as a sign that a good grouping of dolphin might be in the area. So, every time we saw a bird diving we would push up the throttle and run right up underneath it. Once in position, we would troll about 10 knots with ballyhoo on a spinning rod way back and make sure the bait was skipping so the fish would hear it, see it or both. 5K walk for KIDSFort Lauderdale – The Kids In Distress Hero 5K run/walk will take place on Thursday, May 2 at 5 p.m. on Las Olas Boulevard. Participants are encouraged to dress up as their favorite super hero. Prizes awarded for best costumes. After the run/walk, there will be free entertainment by the Black Violins starting at 7:30 p.m. The deadline to enter is April 30 at noon. The cost is $35 for adults and $10 for children 17 and under. Registration begins at 5 p.m., runners start at 6:30 p.m. and walkers at 6:35 p.m. Visit www.walkforkid.org to register. Call 954-390-7654 ext: 1290 for assistance. And jackpot. The dolphin bite would then be almost instantaneous. With a little help, we were catching dolphin weighing between 20 and 50 lbs. consistently from 10 to 14 miles offshore. So, if you get a chance to venture offshore make sure to look up every once in a while. It may be the best decision you make when it comes to catching something below. Fred Gushue shows off a Mahi Mahi [dolphin]. [Photo courtesy of RJ Boyle]

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The Pelican 27 Friday, April 5, 2013 “In my artwork, I paint when I see it,” she said. Wetzstein’s work also comes from what he spots. Along with frames for Anderson’s art, he also takes ArtHallContinued from page 21driftwood and mostly turns it into tables and lamps. “I came from the Keys so I’ve always been in the mangroves with my dad.” And he’s not too picky. Wetzstein has found and used pieces of oak, Dade County pine and tiki. But his favorite is mahogany, especially the stuff that drifts here from Cuba. His greatest find was a refugee boat in the Keys last year. “That had a lot of real colorful wood.” Anderson and Wetzstein’s work will be on display at the CRA Business Resource Center until April 16. Call 954-5861111 for more information. Andy Cherenfant, loan manager for the International Enterprise Development, with Srah Ysrael, a volunteer at the Business Resource Center, at the wine table at ArtHall on March 20.Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@ yahoo. com or 954-783-8700!

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