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Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 03-29-2013
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00090900:00344


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Friday, March 29, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 13 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Turtle Nesting Season is March through October Seniors hall of fameOlder citizens who volunteer will be honored at Hall of Fame breakfast By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFNortheast Broward Five citizens, in uential in Northeast Broward, have been tapped for the Senior Hall of Fame along with six other residents of Broward County. They will be inducted at a May 10 breakfast at Diamantes in Tamarac. Chosen this week by a committee headed by County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, the new honorees are State Rep. Gwyn Clarke-Reed, 72, Deer eld Beach; Broward North Auxiliary President Josephine DEspies, 89, Lighthouse Point; CEO of Broward Health North Pauline Grant, 62, Parkland; NE Focal Point volunteer Bill Giroux, 76, Pompano Beach; and former Wilton Manors City Manager Dr. Bob Levy, 70, Plantation. Also named were June and John McCarthy, 60-plus, of Coral Springs; Judge Art Birken, 64, Plantation; Sandra Harris, 71, Fort Lauderdale; Margaret Reilly, 78, Tamarac; John Primeau, 60, Cooper City. Clarke-Reed serves a state house district that encompasses much of North Broward and before that was a Deer eld Beach City Commissioner for 12 years. She was the rst black woman to be elected president of the Broward League of Cities. In Deer eld, she initiated a summer employment and mentoring program for youth. As a state legislator, she works in areas of health care, affordable housing, youth See HALL OF FAME on page 24By Marty LenkowskyPELICAN WRITERLighthouse Point Looking to buy some moonshine? Well you can, right here in Lighthouse Point. Its all part of this citys 8th Annual Dinner Under the Stars to be held Saturday, April 6 from 5 to 9:30 p.m. at Frank McDonough Park, 3500 NE 27 Ave. Tables are still available to purchase for this years event, said Parks and Recreation Director John Trudel. Each table seats 10 and costs $100. The city furnishes the tables, chairs and entertainment, he said. Individual seats cannot be purchased. For newcomers to this fun event, Frank McDonough Park might easily be mistaken for a preview of Halloween. People decorate their tables with a theme and dress to t that theme. In years past, themes have included pirates, college sports teams, the Roaring 20s, tailgate parties and even a clam bake. Lighthouse Point resident Kim Hill has purchased three tables for this years event. Her theme will be moonshiners. She said her guests will dress like moonshiners and rednecks. Their decorations will include a still, a deer target and horseshoes. Its all about hanging out and being silly, Hill said. The folks at her tables will be eating the part as well enjoying Southern favorites such as barbecued ribs and collard greens. Trudel said during a past Dinner Under the Stars, people at the clam bake table enjoyed lobster, crabs, clams and other seafood delicacies. During last years event, Hill said Dining event inspires costumes, foods to matchSee UNDER THE STARS on page 2 Pompano Beach -The news that Florida legislators are seeking to shut down internet cafes and gaming arcades is not sitting well with the elderly residents who frequent them. Last week the State House voted 108-7 to approve a bill that would ban electronic games used in internet cafes and gambling arcades. State Rep. Gwyn Clarke-Reed, a Democrat from Deer eld Beach, was one of the seven House members to vote no on the bill. They lumped everybody in the same pot. The senior arcades are legal. They got thrown into the same category as the internet cafes, ClarkeReed said. She said she is for shutting down the internet cafes if the monies are not going to charities as they said. It could be theres a need to regulate them. More needs to be looked at in (the way of) regulation. A bill just like the House bill has See BAN on page 16Playing the numbers at Internet cafes may be numbered Noah learns a little bit about the trombone at the Petting Zoo which took place last weekend at St. Andrews School. The event was sponsored by the Boca Symphonia and the Allegro Society. Young children get to pet and play instruments of their choice with a little instruction from members of the Symphonia orchestra. See related story on page 11. [Staff photo] Ely Tigers on Ely Tigers on ESPN U April 4 ESPN U April 4 at noon. Game at noon. Game one of semione of seminals of National nals of National High School High School Invitational Invitational. Page 2 Page 2 Pelican Pelican

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2 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 her table theme was The Rocky Horror Picture Show complete with singing and dance routines. For those who want to dance and listen to good music, the Low Tides, a local classic rock band, will entertain. The city provides the band. Participants bring their own food and beverages. Prizes will be awarded to the table with the best decorations. Trudel said theres plenty of room as the park can accommodate up to 25 tables. Its always a fun atmosphere, he said. As many as 150 to 160 people have attended in the past, he said. The last day to reserve a table will be Wednesday, April 3. Trudel would like to sell more tables for the dinner event. He can be reached at 954-784-3439. Under the StarsContinued from page 1By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach As their classmates enjoyed a vacation, players on the Blanche Ely High School mens varsity basketball team spent spring break getting ready to play on a national stage. Fresh off its second 7A State Championship in a row on March 2 against Evans in Orlando, 58-50, the Ely Tigers have accepted the invitation to play at the ESPN National Blanche Ely Tigers off to ESPN Invitational in Maryland April 4High School Invitational, in North Bethesda, MD, April 4 through April 6. Playing on this level its huge. Its a national stage. Youre playing against the top teams in the nation, said Melvin Randall, Elys head coach. Ranked the #6 team in the country by ESPN, Ely lost in the rst round of last years invitational to New Jerseys St. Benedicts Prep, 67-61. We let it get away from us. We couldnt throw a rock in the ocean, said Randall. Elys overall record this season was 27-1. The teams only loss came against St. John Bosco, from California, 72-62, on Dec. 22 during the Chickl-A Classic Championship in Columbia, SC. At this years invitational, theyll face Prime Prep Academy, ranked #3, in the rst round. The game will be televised on ESPN U at 12 p.m. on April 4. If they win, theyll advance to the semi nals on April 5, 2:30 p.m. The nal is April 6, 1:30 p.m. Randall says last years team was one of the best hes ever coached but he expects this years to do even better. Theyve made a lot of improvements. Theyve worked extremely hard and created their own identity.See ELY TIGERS on page 7

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 29, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Twenty ve residents in Century Village East have had the $100 permit fee for installing satellite TV remitted after a protest was led last month with the Federal Communications Commission. In response to a petition for a ruling on the fees led by Serge DeRose, a homeowner in Berkshire B, the FCC has ordered the Challenge to dish TV requirements wins a review by FCCcity to suspend attempts to enforce its restrictions on the installation of satellite TV equipment. The letter was dated March 8 but not received here until the 14th. Fees collected after the 8th have been returned. Said DeRose, People were saying Im crazy, but now I am very proud of what we achieved. DeRose and his neighbors, the 22 unit owners in Berkshire B, did not receive the refund. Their satellite dish antennas were installed in March 2011. In December of 2012, a city building of cial inspected the installation and cited the dish owners for violating the Florida Building Code by failing to obtain a building permit. Additionally, this year the city told the dish owners that a new electrical code requires upgraded wiring. DeRose estimated the cost to each unit at $420, an amount he claimed unreasonable under FCC rules. The FCC is continuing its investigation of the situation and during this time the city must suspend all attempts to enforce its rules. After building of cial John Donohue cited the Berkshire unit owners, DeRose and two others met with city of cials to get a clear understanding of their problem. At that time, they were told the alreadyinstalled dishes were subject to new standards pursuant to the electrical code and ordered corrective actions or the possibility of $200 per day penalties. According to the citys public information of cer Rebecca Medina, no further action will be taken by the city until a nal ruling by the FCC is received. If the ruling favors the citys permitting process, the refunded amounts will be due again. Dish customers win moratorium; nal ruling could cost

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4 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 By Marty LenkowskyPELICAN WRITERLighthouse Point If you think computers and todays advanced electronic gadgetry are strictly for the youngsters, guess again because you are 100 percent wrong. The Lighthouse Point Librarys iPad workshop is living proof of that. The workshop meets Tuesdays at 10 a.m., and all attendees are of retirement age. In fact, instructor Bill Borough himself is 88 years old and a WWII U.S. Navy veteran. He served in the Paci c and is a retired graphic artist living in Deer eld Beach. Todays class was comprised of only women; however, once in a while a man does show up. Theyre out playing golf, jokes 20year Lighthouse Point resident Elizabeth Westbrook who describes herself as a winter bird South Florida resident. Westbrook simply loves her iPad. Everything I do on this I do on my laptop, she said. I love the face time. Thats the best thing about it. Everyone in the class agrees the small size of their iPad makes it easy to use and transport. They nd it more convenient than their laptops and said its a must if someone does a lot of traveling. As an instructional tool, Borough hooks his iPad up to a wide screen TV mounted on the wall. His personal iPad screen appears on the TV displaying a beautiful waterfront picture of Porto no, Italy as his wallpaper. With the Italian port city as a backdrop, he shows the class his various apps and how to open them. He showed the class how to open a free Broward County Library app they can use to download books onto their iPads. Borough said he and another man usually do the course together. Unfortunately, his teaching partner was out due to personal illness. Through the music app on Boroughs iPad, Frank Sinatras crooning voice played from the TVs speaker system. Eighty-two-year-old Virginia Hayden is no stranger to computer technology. She also has a laptop. I pay all my bills online, she said. My daughter taught me how. Yet, she particularly enjoys using her iPad. I love this one the most, she added. I learn better on this. Hayden said her daughter, whom she describes as being very good with computers, bought her the iPad for Christmas. Borough said he nds himself using his own iPad more and more each day. Its so convenient to check my email, he said as he walked around the classroom patiently answering questions posed by his students. The setting for the iPad workshop could not be more appropriate. The class is conducted in a room with technology-based art on the walls. One is a painting depicting a tiny baby pounding a computer keyboard. Another picture displays a laptop next to a cup of coffee. Another picture features a keyboard with the word help highlighted. Ruth Sepanski uses her iPad to watch Indiana University basketball games. Because Im from Indiana, she proudly adds. And should everyone buy an iPad? Depends on what you want to do with it, Sepanski says. If you have an iPhone, you already have most of the apps. Seniors take on latest technology at LHP LibraryiPad workshop instructor Bill Borough explains an app to student Virginia Hayden.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 29, 2013 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach This citys historic SampleMcDougald House was home to one of Floridas historic artistic groups last Friday and Saturday The Florida Highwaymen. On Friday, a few of the surviving members of the original Highwaymen group were on hand at SampleMcDougald at a special reception before the art show and sale on Saturday. The show highlighted two of the biggest changes from the 1950s and 60s, when The Highwaymen sold their work Highwaymen artists showcase their work at Sample-McDougaldPeter Williams, president of the Pompano Beach Historical Society, left, and Dan Hobby, executive director of the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society. Al Black stands with one of his paintings, a piece of work that would have fetched $25 to $35 back in the 1950s and 60s but today sells for hundreds more. Now, we dont have to sell out of the back of our cars, he said.out of car trunks and street corners to the present with the main difference being prices then and now. A member of The Highwaymen, Doretha Hair was married to Alfred Hair until his death in 1970. She said her husband was the driving force behind the group and his death ultimately led to its members going their own separate ways. Hair stopped painting when her husband died but recently picked up a brush once again. It was nothing I planned. It just happened, she said.Sold originally for $25 to $35, today a Highwayman painting goes for a minimum of $500 to $600 with some selling as high as $4,500. In the pre-civil rights days, white-owned art galleries rejected The Highwaymens unique style of painting Floridas natural beauty. Without a traditional outlet to sell their work, The Highwaymen marketed their art on the highways of Florida. Now, we dont have to sell out of the back of our cars. Now, we cant sell enough, said Al Black, one of the original Highwaymen who also served as salesman for the group. [Photos by Michael dOliveira] Visit www. oridahighwaymen.com for more information.

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6 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Circulation Joe McGeeAccount Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XXI, Issue 13 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & LettersHeavenly Pizza owner opens door for Easter To the editor, This year, we are making Easter Celebration pizzas featuring our popular breakfast pizza. Free pizzas will be offered to anyone who would like to stop by at 2647 E. Atlantic Blvd. The doors open at noon on Sunday, Mar. 31. There will be a Bible study at 4 p.m. All are welcome to attend. Anyone who would like to assist or donate, call Phil at 954-943-9271. If we dont see you, have a blessed Resurrection Day. God Bless! Phil KasseesSpot on, dear reader, turtles do not suckle their youngTo the editor, I enjoy reading The Pelican whenever I can. Part of my job as a college professor is correcting students papers; therefore, I am very picky about what I read. I have found so many errors lately in printed publications that I have learned to just sigh and thank God that there ARE printed publications. However, the error of your reporter in the March 18 Pelican was enough to make me laugh and grimace at the same time, as in his rst paragraph he describes baby sea turtles as tiny mammals. Good heavens! Hello, editors! Look up the de nition of mammal! Can you imagine a sea turtle nursing its [many] young? Yikes! Other than that, I enjoyed the article and the important information given about helping the baby turtles. Sincerely, Karen Nagy [See related story on page 1 Playing the numbers at Internet cafes may be numbered] To Our State Representatives, Ive been reading and hearing about the threat to the quality of life caused by penny arcades. I am eighty-seven years old and love to spend a few hours of my humdrum life at one. I sit with other elderly folks and talk and laugh and have this time away from my little (lonely) Century Village apartment. If you close these establishments I guess I will have to get a more comfortable rocking chair to sit on in front of my television set. Unfortunately, folks of my age group nd it dif cult to enjoy most of the programs on television these days. The programming is aimed at the younger generations. The language and the situations that they embrace is not of our preference. Ive tried spending an afternoon at a movie theatre. Unfortunately, most of their lms are not suitable for me. I am not really an old crank but am distraught over the possibility of being housebound because of your actions. We who use these facilities know how much of our nances we can afford to use. We spend a few hours of our uneventful lives with our contemporaries and the pleasant folks that run the place. I read the local newspaper and was pleased to see that Rep. Jim Waldman can appreciate that these arcades are a safe, pleasant way for seniors to spend their time. I thank him for being so thoughtful. Please take all of the above into consideration before you take away our escape from a life of boredom. Helene Wayne Deer eld BeachClosing arcades will put seniors in their rocking chairsLetters League of Women opposes House Bill 7033 that would allow politics to in uence the judicial systemTallahassee This month, the League of Women Voters of Florida alerted Floridians to a legislative proposal that would further weaken the rewall intended to shield the judicial branch from political in uence. According to the League, during every session since 2011, some form of legislation has surfaced that seeks to undermine or politicize the effectiveness of the judicial merit selection process. This year, House Bill 7033 would expand political control over the majority of members on each judicial nominating panel by subjecting them to removal at any time without cause. See HOUSE BILL on page 9This year, House Bill 7033 would expand political control over the majority of members on each judicial nominating panel by subjecting them to removal at any time without cause.In stark contrast to this type of legislation, voters overwhelmingly rejected a proposed constitutional amendment on the November ballot that would have added another layer of political in uence over court appointments. According to an expert from the Brennan Center for Justice who participated on the Wednesday conference call, similar scenarios are playing out across the nation. When voters have a chance to weigh in on the issue in recent elections, they have uniformly rejected attempts to politicize courts, said J. Adam Skaggs, senior counsel in the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law. Deirdre Macnab, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida, said the organization is disturbed that the clear message from Florida voters is being ignored. If lawmakers were listening to voters, they would be looking for ideas for strengthening Floridas merit selection system. They would be working to strengthen protections against political in uence over the courts--not promoting further encroachment of the political branches in the judicial merit selection and retention process, Macnab explained. This, in fact, is a slap in the face of Florida voters after their decision on Amendment 5 in 2012. House Bill 7033, which emerged as a committee bill out of the Civil Justice Committee, seeks to further increase political control and in uence over what is supposed to be a nonpartisan merit system for selecting judges. Originally, the nine-member commissions responsible for providing the Governor with a slate of the three most-quali ed applicants for each opening were comprised of three members appointed by the Governor, three members appointed by The Florida Bar, and three non-lawyer members elected by

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 29, 2013 And while 2012s trip to Maryland was more like a eld trip Randall said this years team is taking it a lot more seriously. It was a great experience and a disappointing loss, but we learned from that. Senior Dallas Cameron, who was on last years championship team, also has his sights set higher. It was an honor to get invited but we want to go out there and make some noise.Ely TigersContinued from page 2 MadHatters Tea LuncheonDeer eld Beach The Democratic Womens Club of Northeast Broward will hold its 10th Annual MadHatters Tea Luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at DoubleTree by Hilton, 100 Fairway Drive. The guest speaker will be former state senator Nan Rich, Democratic candidate for the 2014 Florida gubernatorial election. Attendees are encouraged to wear their favorite hat and compete for prizes in the hat contest. Items from local businesses will also be raf ed. Ads, in the events journal, will also be for sale. RSVP via email at maggie_davidson@ comcast.net or call 954-942-8711.By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Business and property owners looking to give their storefronts a new coat of paint, new signage, new lighting or new awnings may soon be able to get this city to help pay for it. City staff members have proposed the Business Enhancement Grant Program, which would reimburse property owners or their tenants for expenses related to improving the outside of their building. Were trying to spur people to look at their properties, said Randy Welker, economic development coordinator.City may foot part of bill for facade improvements hoping to ll storefrontsThe goal of the program is to provide an incentive for private owners to make changes that will have a positive effect on the streetscape and ultimately attract new tenants to ll empty storefronts. Applicants who owe money to the city, through nes, taxes, fees or liens, are prohibited from receiving funds and tenants who apply must get their property owner to sign-off on the project. New construction projects will not be allowed to receive money. Only one grant will be given per tenant or property owner. If approved by city commissioners, the program would cover 50 percent of the cost of improvements up to $1,000. So, if a business owner spent $2,000 the city would pay up to $1,000. Welker said $7,500 is earmarked for the program and it would be brought to city commissioners at their April 9 meeting. And they seem likely to vote in favor. Lets spend it, said Commissioner Tom Green. Commissioner Scott Newton said its important that the city require applicants to have some skin in the game and contribute their own money. If they dont buy into the product theyre just taking something from the city, he said, adding that it has to be a give and take situation. I See STOREFRONTS on page 14Top town of cials will be named TuesdayHillsboro Beach The town commission will meet Tuesday, April 2, 8:45 a.m. to select a mayor and vice mayor. The procedure preceeds the regular meeting at 9 a.m. Elected without opposition in March were current mayor, Dan Dodge, Vice Mayor Claire Schubert and Commissioner Javier Garcia. First elected in 2003, Dodge has served as mayor for two years. Both mayor and vice mayor are chosen by nomination from the commission and approved by a 3-2 vote.

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8 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Model train swap meet Deer eld Beach The South Florida Railway Museum of Deer eld Beach will host a model train swap meet at the historic Amtrak/Trirail station, 1300 W. Hillsboro Blvd., on Saturday, April 6 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be three operating model train layouts, museum displays of railroad memorabilia and vendor tables for model trains, accessories and railroad memorabilia. Admission and parking are free. Call 954-4488935. Circus Bar charity tournamentPompano Beach The 16th Annual Circus Bar Charity Golf Tournament will take place Saturday, April 20 at the Palm Aire Oaks Golf Course, 3701 Oaks Clubhouse Drive. Registration is at 11:30 a.m. and the tournament starts at 1 p.m. Cost is $125 per player. The cost includes golf shirt, goodie bag, alcoholic refreshments, buffet and raf e prize opportunities. Funds raised from the tournament will bene t the Childrens Health Foundation. Call 954-9731483.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFCustomer service is my mantra, admits Katrina Humbles owner of this state-of-the-art laundry which welcomes patrons with many new features seldom found in other self service laundromats. Please call me Katrina, she says in a pleasant Irish brogue. We opened of cially at 3560 N. Andrews Ave., Oakland Park, on January 14, 2012, and we were so lucky to get Tracy Wilson back. She had actually worked here before the entire plaza went bankrupt. She and her two grown children came back to work for me. I couldnt be happier. Theyre hardworking, pleasant and they know the business and many of our customers. Thats important because this a real family neighborhood business. We do everything in our power to keep our customers happy. Were open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. so we have three shifts. Tracys son Reggie takes the night shift to keep customers feeling safe. He walks our ladies to their cars, helps them stash their laundry and waits until they are locked in before he walks away. Eager to list the many amenities in her business, Katrina says, We have 64 washing machines and 64 driers. Our 80-pound machine, which washes up to 8 loads at one time, is seldom found in laundry mats. We have six, 60-pound machines which wash six loads at one time. These heavy duty machines are our busiest because they are discounted frequently and those with large families take advantage of our sale promotions. Kerry Laundry Mart offers wash and fold service, dry cleaning for very competitive prices, alterations plus an internet caf with computer stations and free WiFi. Very soon the owner hopes to have a small caf with coffee, doughnuts and muf ns. Kerry Laundry Mart is all about customer service with play room, free WiFi, and 140 machines In the meantime, there are a variety of vendor machines for those who are hungry and thirsty. This petite, Irish lass is very promotional. She says, We do free raf es at every holiday. Our next will be May Day. I have a mailing list of over 1,000 patrons and I text them often to alert them to weekly specials on the machines. Were trying to shift some of our busy weekend business to quieter weekdays and these promotions seem to be doing the trick. Customers take advantage of the sale prices and the ve dollar wash coupons offered frequently. No quarters needed here. Every customer gets a free card which starts up the machines. When they check out, they pay with either cash, debit or credit card. Katrina hopes to become an American citizen. She migrated from Ireland just three years ago to join her family in South Florida and says Im a certi ed dental hygienist in Ireland and Im waiting to be accredited here. I hope to eventually work in my profession. When that time comes, Ill turn over even more responsibility to Tracy, but Ill always be around. Tracy beams at her boss. I love her, she says. She is so considerate and polite to me and all of our customers. Shes unbelievable to me. Ive never worked for anyone like her and I thank God for bringing her into my life. The next promotion on the agenda is a yard sale during which Katrina Katrina Humbles manages to straighten up the childrens playroom every time she passes. [Below] Guy Laieta is a boxing trainer who washes his own gym clothes twice a week while working on his laptop. He says, The service is awesome here.See KERRY on page 9Code questions answeredPompano Beach Mario Sotolongo, code compliance supervisor for Pompano Beach, will be at the Tuesday, April 2 meeting of the Pompano Beach Highlands Civic Improvement Association. At the meeting, held at 7 p.m. at Highlands Park, 1650 NE 50 Ct., Sotolongo will provide an update on code compliance programs in Pompano Beach and answer questions from the public. Visit www.pbhighlands.org for more information.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 29, 2013 will sell off all of the left over clothing. All money made at this sale will go to a local charity. We are all part of a neighborhood and we want to be a good, giving neighbor. she explains. The new owner of this plaza is great. He has revived it, made it a very attractive and important part of this area where he is creating jobs, good will and hopefully attracting new tenants. During this interview, Katrina, who moves swiftly, managed to check on customers and straighten the childrens playroom. She paused to chat with Debby Burns who was busy at the iron press, ironing shirts and pants. Burns said, Im here every week. I like it here because its so clean, light and airy and you never have to wait for a machine. The help and the owner are great. Guy Laieta was doing business on his laptop while his laundry was spinning around. He said, The service here is awesome. Im here twice a week. Im a boxing trainer and my wife cant keep up with my gym clothes so I wash and dry them myself. I dont mind because Im working while they are washing. These happy customers make it clear, it might be worth leaving ones own area to use Kerry Laundry Mart because of the service and the amenities. Call 754-200-4043. KerryContinued from page 8those six appointees. The independence of the commissions was seriously undermined in 2001 when the Legislature voted to give the Governor all nine appointments, requiring only that four members of each panel be selected from names submitted for consideration by The Florida Bar. The Governor already has full discretion over selection of a ve-member majority on each panel. It should be apparent what the purpose of allowing removals without cause is, explained Peter Webster, a former judge vehicles late in the process and thus bypass the process for scrutiny and public input in committee, Macnab said. Let me be very clear. Today we have a system that needs strengthening, not weakening. We cannot afford to be silent as lawmakers make a sham out of what was once a national model for appointment of judges based solely on merit. The League of Women Voters of Florida, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and in uences public policy through education and advocacy. For more information, please visit the Leagues website at: www. TheFloridaVoter.org. on Floridas First District Court of Appeal. It clearly is intended to diminish the independence of the nominating commissioners, and to increase the likelihood that they will nominate people who are philosophically aligned with the Governor-even if they are not the most quali ed for the position. According to Webster, HB 7033 would increase the likelihood that judges will decide high-pro le or politically charged cases based on considerations other than the law and the applicable facts. HB 7033 does not yet have a companion bill in the Senate, but Macnab warned that is no guarantee it wont advance. We know from experience how easy it is for bad ideas like this to catch a ride on other legislative House billContinued from page 9 Boating safety courseFort Lauderdale The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Pompano Beach will hold an About Boating Safety course on Saturday, April 13 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Imperial Point Medical Center, 6401 N. Federal Hwy. The cost is $50 per person and includes materials. Special discount pricing is available if more than one family member from the same household attends. Email otilla34pompanobeach@gmail.com or call 954-941-5781.

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10 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFHow does a newly retired, successful business woman spend her free time in a city she barely knows? Judy Knoebel seems to have found a perfect answer to making new friends while utilizing her talents. Having spent much of her successful 31-year career with AT&T in New Zealand; Brussels, Belgium; Geneva, Switzerland, and Atlanta, GA., choosing to settle down in Pompano Beach meant starting over in a new world. Volunteering was a way to make new friends and get the feeling of really living in the area. It works well for me, and like most volunteers, I receive more than I give. The Pelican interviewed Knoebel when she had just returned from the barely opened, Hillsboro Lighthouse Museum where she is the manager. The museum is located at 2700 North Ocean Blvd. in Pompano, in a 400square-foot space that will display more than 100 years worth of artifacts. There will also be an education room where public programs will be organized. This is an incredibly exciting time for the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society as we nally found a place that will allow for our continued growth, said society president Art Makenian. Knoebel says, We hope to be open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. three days each week if and when I succeed in getting enough volunteers to keep it open. Just today I had visitors from here and from Minnesota. We will also open by appointment for group visits and for passport stamping. She explains that members of the U.S. Lighthouse Association visit lighthouses around the country and like to have their passports stamped as they do so. We will be showcasing historical artifacts, letters, maps, documents and history of the lighthouse, its keepers and its famous lens. I became involved with this preservation group just two years ago when I helped with data entry. Now Im a dedicated member of the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society. As she began her new life, Knoebels rst volunteer choice was The Bonnett House in Fort Lauderdale, where she has now volunteered for 12 years as a greeter and tour guide. As I drive six visitors around in a golf cart type vehicle, they and I enjoy the 37 acres of nature and watching the people and the monkeys, she says. Judy Knoebel volunteers her executive skills almost every day of the week and loves the challengesSee KNOEBEL on page 20The Green Market brings smiles to many faces, including volunteer Judy Knoebels mascot who roams the market on Saturday mornings. [Photo courtesy of Judy Knoebel.]Canoe Race registrationWilton Manors The 22nd Annual Island City Canoe Race will take place Saturday, May 18 at 10 a.m. at the Colohatchee Boat Ramp, 1975 NE 15 Ave. The race consists of a seven-mile relay around the city. The race is split into three divisions: mens, womens and co-ed. Each team that enters must have 10 members and the co-ed teams must have at least three men and three women. Participants must be at least 16 years old. The cost to enter is $150 per team. Deadline to register is May 3 at 5 p.m. To register, visit www.wiltonmanors. com/parks or call 954-390-2130. LBTS resident to be honoredFort Lauderdale Robert M. DeCamillo, a Lauderdale-By-The-Sea resident will be given the Robert S. Graham, M.D. Lifetime Achievement Award by Sunshine Cathedral, 1480 SW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale, on Saturday, April 6 at 6 p.m. In 1992, DeCamillo became a member of the Church of the Holy Spirit MCC, which eventually became the Sunshine Cathedral. He has served as a board member and eucharistic minister. In 2003, he was the design architect for the chancel renovation that houses the organ pipes. Currently DeCamillo is a governor of the Sunshine Community Foundation where he plans to contribute his time and talent for the bene t of the Sunshine Cathedral. Visit www.sunshinecathedral.org for more information.Painting partyWilton Manors The Island City Painters will meet Saturday, April 6 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Ct. The group offers local artists the opportunity to have their work critiqued and reviewed by other artists. A $5 donation to the Central Area Neighborhood Association, the group hosting the workshop, is requested to participate. The Island City Painters will also meet April 13 and 20 at Art Gallery 21. To join, call 954-292-3475.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 29, 2013 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFBoca Raton Last Saturday afternoon at St. Andrews School auditorium in Boca Raton, the Symphonia presented two magni cent pieces, Ottorino Respighis The Birds and a phenomenal performance of Mozarts Concerto in G for ute. The performance was a dress rehearsal for the following Sunday. But on this morning, children and media were allowed to sit in on the conversation between worldrenown conductor, Philippe Entremont, and members of his orchestra. As is expected, prior to the performance, Entremont spared a few moments of gaiety with his musicians to Boca Symphonia brings classical music to its highest level lighten them up a bit. While we could hear the laughter engendered by his humor, Entremonts jokes could not be discerned. What could be discerned was the caliber of the musicians, whose names will be found in programs of the Florida Grand Opera, the Palm Beach Opera and small chamber groups in the area where these ne musicians are nding additional work. The Birds is a nature walk in musical ornithology with excellent performances by the woodwinds and string musicians regaling the dove, hen nightingale and cuckoo. Jennifer Grim completed this woodland atmosphere on her gold ute. Her performance of Mozarts Concerto in G Major belied the rumor that Mozart called the ute, . the instrument he could not bear. But as rumor continues, when he heard utist Johann Baptist Wendling perform the concerto in 1778, he gained a new appreciation for it. Rumor aside, it was Mozart whose opera The Magic Flute remains one of todays most performed operas. Grim revealed her complete control and love of her instrument throughout the three movements offering the purest tones regardless of the level of the register. What is particularly delightful with this concerto are the continuous taunts and responses between the ute and the orchestra. It is impossible to not re-engage with the joy of life while hearing this performance. The Boca Symphonia 2014 season will offer its Magni cent Maestros series that is worth the trip. Look for Alexander Platt conducting Rossini, Shostakovich and Schubert. Entremont returns in February to conduct Chopins Piano Concerto No. 2 and Beethovens Symphony No. 4. A Broward icon, James Judd will take his baton to the podium to conduct Barber, Haydn and the glorious Beethoven Violin Concerto in D major. In April Gerard Schwartz conducts an evening of Mozart. For tickets, call 1-866678-4201.Petting zoo for instrumentsAnother aspect of open dress rehearsals is the effort of the Boca Symphonia to introduce young children not only to the sounds of an orchestra but also to the speci c instruments that are played to produce those sounds. During the intermission, families went to the lobby of the auditorium where children could pet instruments, try them out and get a little advice from the performers. Susan Courey, a member of the Allegro Society, which is one of the support groups of the Symphonia, explained that the event was one way to encourage young children to study music. The next event where children can meet the orchestra and visit instruments will be April 20 from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Call 561-376-3848 for reservations. Perfect! Jennifer Grim and Phillipe Entremont relax after a run-through of Mozart. [Staff photo]

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12 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Send news to mdpelican@yahoo. com By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park A group of area activists has formed a new Oakland Park Democratic Club and will apply to the Broward Democratic Party for a charter. The group was energized by President Barack Obamas re-election victory in the state of Florida, according to Robert Muniz, the clubs acting president. Muniz is a project manager for a national wireless rm. Before starting the Oakland Park Democratic Club, he worked with OFA (Organizing For America) for presidential and local campaigns since 2008. He was recently elected as area manager for the Broward Democratic Party, covering Oakland Park, Wilton Manors and Lazy Lake. The club is open to all registered Democrats and is seeking new members. Meetings are held at 7 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. The clubs main objectives are to start building the party infrastructure in the city, staf ng all city precincts with leaders and to providing a venue for local Democrats to share ideas among themselves and with local leaders at the Obama win prompts new Democratic club herefront of progressive causes. At the April 15 meeting, representatives from the Broward Metropolitan Planning Organization will discuss the countys forecasting and planning for the Oakland Park Boulevard corridor for the coming decade. State Rep. Gwyndolen Clarke-Reed will speak at the May 20 meeting. Other of cers are Barbara Ruge, acting vice president; Lisa Heary, acting secretary; and Gary McClellan, acting treasurer. Theyre all members of the Broward County Democratic Executive Committee. Ruge brings years of local activism with the Sierra Club and with womens causes. Heary also worked with OFA. McClellan has been active for years in Democratic circles. Board members of the new club are Harrison Grandwilliams, Kathy Hunter, Joyce Magee and Mitchell Stollberg. Grandwilliams and Hunter are members of the Broward DEC. Grandwilliams was deputy director for Broward Sheriff Scott Israels successful election campaign in November. Hunter and Mcgee were active in the Obama re-election campaign. Magee uses her background in writing and editing to review club publications. Stollberg, membership director, served on the board of North Andrews Neighborhood Association and directed volunteers for Tim Lonergans successful campaign for election to the Oakland Park City Commission. Club events are regularly posted at www.facebook. com/OPDemFL. Membership forms can be downloaded. Memberships are $15/ year per person. Email robertmmuniz@outlook.com.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 29, 2013 Hazardous waste and electronics disposalLighthouse Point On April 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., residents here can take hazardous waste, electronics, unused or expired medication and sensitive documents to Frank McDonough Park, 3500 NE 27 Ave. for safe disposal. Items accepted are household chemicals, paints, oils, solvents, pesticides, herbicides, pool chemicals, mercury thermometers, propane tanks, re extinguishers, uorescent bulbs, televisions, computers, printers, fax machines, cell phones, DVD players, rechargeable batteries and tires. Items not accepted are kitchen appliances, microwave ovens, explosives, ares, ammunition and bio-hazardous or medical waste. There will also be a shredding truck to securely dispose of personal paper documents. No business or commercial documents will be accepted. Call 954-946-7386.By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFNon-pro ts that provide services for kids aging out of the foster care system are eligible for $1.5 million in grant funding being awarded by the Childrens Services Council [CSC], an agency supported by the two cents on the dollar taken from every property owners real Little known agency supports programs for Browards at-risk children and familiesestate taxes. Also being awarded currently is $634,000 to organizations that give support to family-members raising children they have not legally adopted. For the individual, it is a small amount of their total tax bill, but in Broward County it raises almost $60 million annually. The money goes to government agencies and nonpro ts that provide services to children and their families. The latest award, $2.1 million in total, has been enhanced with a donation from the Jim Moran Foundation. According to Andrew Leone, a spokesperson for the Council, most people are unaware of the agency even after receiving their tax bill. And although $60 million sounds like a lot of money, according to Leone it does not cover the gaps in services that exist here. This is a big county. There is huge need, he said. Because public dollars are at stake, any entity receiving funds from the CSC gets a thorough review and must demonstrate its sustainability, that is, it cannot be soley funded with CSC money. Members of the Council are highly placed of cials a member from the school board, county commission, judicial system, Department of Children and Families, the health department, the school superintendent and ve others appointed by the governor. It is these people who decide how the money is spent. The CSC aims to fund programs that offer preventive measures which may be hard See CHILDREN on page 19

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14 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! Surfers fest bene ts autism researchDeer eld Beach Surfers for Autism, a state-wide nonpro t group, will host its 6th Annual Surfers for Autism Beach Festival April 5, 6 and 7 at the Deer eld Beach International Fishing Pier, 200 NE 21 Ave. Fridays kick-off begins at 5 p.m. with a party and live concert. On Saturday, sur ng events and demonstrations take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. followed by a party and live music. On Sunday, pro-surf races take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. followed by an awards ceremony from 2 to 4 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. A portion of sales from food and merchandise throughout the three days will bene t autism research. Surfers for Autism members assist people with autism in the water and teach them how to surf. The physical motions involved with sur ng helps participants improve their mental and physical faculties. For sponsorship opportunities, call Randy Skinner at 954-545-7873. money would be released to successful applicants after the improvements are completed. Nick Berry, chairman of the Economic Development Task Force, said he would like to see the money spent on Andrews Avenue. Currently, the city is working on creating two Business Improvement Districts [BID], one for Andrews Avenue and one for Wilton Drive. If approved by the property owners on each street, each BID would act as a special taxing district. The additional tax revenue raised on Andrews Avenue would be spent on that street and the revenue raised from Wilton Drive would only be used for that street. For more information, call Randy Welker at 954-390-StorefrontsContinued fro mpagebelieve that in anything. The grants would be available to tenants and property owners on Andrews Avenue, Dixie Highway and Northeast 26 Street from the railroad tracks east to Northeast 15 Street. Grant

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 29, 2013

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16 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 passed out of committee in the Senate, which is not good, said State Sen. Maria Sachs, a Democrat from Delray Beach. She is vice chair of the Gaming Committee. Sachs has led an amendment to the bill so that senior and childrens arcades, such as Chuck E. Cheese, are not affected. The intent was to get rid of internet cafes, but theyve thrown a big net and now they want to get rid of anything to do with gaming, even games of skill, Sachs said Thursday. Sachs said it was lobbyists for the large pari-mutuals and other gaming interests as well as Baptist church folk who spoke in favor of the legislation at the committee. They say they are gambling and thats illegal, she said. Its a ne line. In my opinion these are games that seniors, children and families enjoy. No money is exchanged. They have an evening out thats safe, local and easily accessible. To follow the law, she says the arcades would fall within the exception if no money is exchanged, patrons get coupons and the arcades are regulated and taxes. Until the Department of Justice releases the results of its investigation into internet cafes, she said she cant say what they were doing that is allegedly illegal. The mission of our committee is to study the problem and the issues and study which are legal and which are not. Can I say that our senior arcades are not gambling? No, of course not. We will study these issues and in the end we will have an answer. Its really, really sad. For the senior citizens, its like their life, said Michelle Towben, manager of Johnnys Rec Room on Copans Road, reacting to the proposed legislation. Were like family to them, she said. Now shes getting letters from customers unhappy at the thought of the pending legislation. One lamented that she would just get a more comfortable rocking chair to sit on in front of her television set. Customers come to Johnnys with their oxygen tanks, on walkers and in wheelchairs. This is their social life. It gives them something to do, Towben said. The bills are apparently a reaction to recent charges of racketeering against Allied Veterans, the largest Internet caf company in Florida. BanContinued from page 1 A beaming Adeline Aforismo, 90, of Pompano Beach wins a jackpot of $24.23 at Johnnys Rec Center. She and her husband, a stroke victim who cant speak, are regulars at the arcade. My husband would be lost if we couldnt come here, she said. [Staff photo by Judy Vik]Jennifer Carroll, Floridas lieutenant governor, resigned last week because of previous ties to that company. Towben says arcades like Johnnys arent the same. The internet cafes are sweepstakes and pay off in cash. At the senior arcades, players receive gift cards as prizes for playing games of skill. The gift cards awarded at Johnnys are for Publix, WalMart and Visa credit. Players who dont earn enough points for a gift card can accumulate points for future use. The skill involves knowing when to hit the hold or stop button. The minimum wager is eight cents per play. Where else would people like me go? Stella Kerrigan, a 93-year-old resident of Leisureville, asks. She comes to Johnnys three to four times a week for a few hours. I just enjoy it. We all know each other. Were like a family. And she says the free meals are delicious. Brunch is served at 11:30 a.m. on Sunday and breakfast, lunch and dinner every day. On Fridays and Saturdays, theres live music from 7 to 10 p.m. Without the arcade, Wed all drop dead or hibernate in our houses and lose our minds, Kerrigan said. Rita Coleman, 86, of Palm-Aire is another regular at Johnnys, meeting her friends there and making new friends and winning occasionally. If I had to stay home, Id go out of my mind, she says. On Monday, she won a $41 bonus. I push the buttons and hope for the best. I lost a few bucks here and there, but I dont spend my Social Security. If I couldnt go there, Id go insane, Coleman said. With family scattered all through the U.S., she says, Its important to have human contact. Coleman said she has contacted legislators urging them not to close the arcades. We have fun here, and we dont spend a lot, said Gail May of Margate, another regular at Johnnys. We need our game rooms. Its a great place to meet people.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 29, 2013 Chickl-A 2250 N. Federal Hwy. Pompano Beach 954-943-5855 6:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Closed Sundays www.chickl-a.comBy Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFWherever chicken meets charity and deep-frying meets devotion, you will nd a gleaming Chickl-A outlet beckoning the physically and spiritually hungry to enter its salvational gates. As stated on the corporate website, the Chickl-A purpose is: To glorify God by being a faithful steward of Pompano Beachs Chickl-A serves up tasty poultry delights along with strong commitment to social responsibilityall that is entrusted to us and to have a positive in uence on all who come into contact with Chickl-A. With annual sales pegged at $4.6 Billion, the family members of the privately owned Chickl-A Corporation are understandably quite grateful for the Lords magnanimity. And the companys strict observance of dominical respite is a testament to the virtues of a strong Southern Baptist tradition. I am very fortunate to have been allowed to open this location, says franchise owner Seth Poor. The company receives 25,000 applications a year but only builds about 75 new restaurants. In fact, I am the only Chickl-A The Southwest chargrilled chicken salad is always a healthy lunch option. in Broward that is east of the Turnpike! For history buffs, it all started in 1946, when Truett Cathy opened his rst restaurant, The Dwarf Grill, in Hapeville, Georgia. Credited with inventing Chickl-As boneless breast of chicken sandwich, Mr. Cathy founded Chickl-A, Inc. in the early 1960s and pioneered the establishment of restaurants in shopping malls with the opening of the rst Chickl-A Restaurant at a mall in suburban Atlanta in 1967. Since then, Chickl-A has steadily grown to become the second largest quick-service chicken restaurant chain in the United States, with over 1,700 locations in 39 states and Washington, D.C. Be it breakfast, lunch or dinner, this purveyor of poultry has been steadfast in its belief that providing highquality fare is as important as promoting social responsibility. Over the past three years, Chickl-A, Inc. and its franchised restaurant operators have given more than $68 million in contributions to over 700 educational and charitable organizations and have provided millions of dollars in food donations all across America. We partner with civic organizations, schools and many other groups, says Seth. And, of course, we provide them the best that Chickl-A has to offer! This includes popular breakfast offerings such as chicken biscuits, bagels and burritos. Another customer favorite is the Chick-n-Minis. They are hand breaded nuggets in fresh rolls that are brushed with honey butter, explains Seth. And for lunch See CHICK-FIL-A on page 18

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 or dinner, we have great salads and, of course, our famous chicken sandwiches. Indeed, the melt-in-yourmouth marinated, boneless, skinless, 100 percent whitemeat chicken is lovingly prepared by a well-trained and friendly staff that puts out about 1,500 orders a day. We are very conscious about quality and food temperature. We follow very strict rules, says the affable restaurateur who touts the virtues of his microwave-free kitchen. Fresh produce is received every morning and all the food prep is done daily. Our team does a truly phenomenal job. Patrons who opt for chicken nuggets or strips can enjoy a host of avorful dipping sauces such as barbecue, honey mustard, buttermilk ranch and the highly regarded Polynesian style. The waf e fries are also a signature menu item. We have few products but do them very well, insists Seth with well-deserved pride. And we even provide service in the dining room! Fresh squeezed lemonade, hand-spun milkshakes and frosty ice cream treats are great additions to any Chickl-A visit. Specialty soups such as Tortilla chicken make periodic appearances at various times throughout the year. Parents of young children will appreciate the enclosed play room designed to keep the little ones safely entertained. All sandwiches are between $2 and $5 with complete meals under $8. There is ample free parking and the drive-through does brisk business. Catering for of ce functions and private parties is also offered. For tender chicken served with a side order of humanitarianism, Chickl-A is the destination of choice. Enjoy! Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. Chickl-AContinued from page 17

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 29, 2013 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@ yahoo. com or 954-783-8700! But the whole community bene ts when we keep kids out of the juvenile justice system. Among the dozens of initiatives where CSC funding goes is food stamp outreach, Forever Family, a collaboration with NBC-6 that features kids seeking a foster home; after school and reading readiness programs, summer employment for teens, agencies that address special needs kids, drowning prevention programs and Swim Central, the South Florida Hunger Coalition, Family Central and Childrens Harbor. The Kinship Initiatives eligible for the $634,000 will help people taking care of family members get the social services they need. Some bene ts are not available to relatives who have not legally adopted children and Kinship provides assistance in helping them get the paperwork led that gets them assistance. Money for the kids aging out of the system comes through the It Takes a Village initiative and assists them with housing, job training and opportunity, transportation. Agencies applying for these funds have until noon April 29. The CSC was established by referendum in 2000 and, because of recent legislative action, by 2016 the voters will again decide whether to maintain this independent taxing authority.ChildrenContinued from page 13

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Call The Pelican Monday Thursday to place an ad in our Classi ed Section. Get 20 words or less for $15. 954-783-8700 Ask for Fran KnoebelContinued from page 10Monkeys? she was asked. With a laugh, Judy responds. The story goes that there was a monkey bar on the beach in the 50s. When the bar caught re, the monkeys settled in Birch State Park and the Bonnett House. The monkey population at the Bonnett House is diminishing because of inbreeding and poaching. Being a history buff, Knoebel was drawn to the Pompano Beach Historical Society where she now has been a member for over 10 years, serving as treasurer for the past seven years. She can be found at the Green Market from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., every Saturday. The Historical Society began the Green Market, featuring produce from local farms and home made products, about 10 years ago. Now, the society has a co-sponsor, the CRA and a new location at Cypress and Atlantic where 40 vendors sell their wares every week. Visitors enjoy music, special events and shopping. Judy sits at the Societys table which sells a few historical products from the Society and farm bureau nuts, jellies and jams-all from Florida farms. She says, We are currently revitalizing our oral history program to capture the memories of our pioneers before we lose them all. Im helping by taping interviews. These people are a wonderful resource for early city history. Dan Hobby, executive director of Pompano Beach Historical Society and Sample-McDougald House, says, Judy is the personi cation of the saying that if you want to get a job done, give it to a busy person. She is always on the go, from one good cause to another, and when she takes on a task you can be sure that it will be completed. Were extremely fortunate to have her involved with the Pompano Beach Historical Society and the Sample-McDougald House. Knoebel also sits on the Pompano Beach Historic Preservation Board. She says, Our main focus is to identify, document, and register historic buildings and places to make sure they dont disappear. We just did the Ali building and the re museum. The group is also focusing on developing an historic map so that visitors to Pompano Beach can drive around and see each historic sight on the map. Members meet monthly each bringing input on assigned aspects of the preservation goals. Still another recipient of this volunteering lady is Insight for the Blind where Knoebel has given over 1,500 hours in the past eight or nine years. Every Friday morning Im at the of ce at 1401 NE 4th Ave. in Fort Lauderdale from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. I am a reader and recorder of magazines and books. I also monitor. Whenever I hear people with radio voices, I try to recruit them, and its satisfying to later hear about their successes at Insight. Matt Corey, president and CEO of Insight writes, In the true spirit of volunteerism, Judy is always eager and willing to do what will help us the most and does so with a smile. I know that she is involved with many charities, so we feel lucky that Insight is where she shows up every Friday morning at 9:30. Two years ago, Knoebel was honored for her service and given an engraved medal during Insights 35 years of producing Talking Books for the Blind. Insight is the largest all volunteer studio in the United States recording materials for children and adults. Insight has grown from a single booth, recording studio to a facility with six sound recording studios and 13 reviewing booths, recording speci ed books and magazines in both digital and analog formats requested by the National Library for the Blind, located at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. To donate or volunteer, call 954-522-5057. In addition to all of this, Knoebel has written the newsletter for Friends of the Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art for years. She still loves to read to pre-schoolers at Education Station in Beacon Light Shopping Center. This is done in conjunction with the Broward Library Systems Prime Time Reading Program. In her limited spare time, this consummate volunteer reads, communicates on the computer and meets with friends for lunch, dinner or book club. Thank you for raising the bar on volunteerism, Judy Knoebel. The things you do for the community make a big difference.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, March 29, 2013 Call The Pelican! 954-783-8700! By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Its a real coup for a high school to premier a movie before it hits the big screen. But thats what happened at Ely High School this week. The Magic City may be fictional, but its story hit home to its student audience. Many of its themes: bullying, economic recession, crime, drug abuse and suicide are problems common in many communities. R. Malcolm Jones, the films writer and director, chose to screen the film March 20 in the Blanche Ely High School auditorium. This school is one of the pillars of the community, said Jones about choosing Film premier at Blanche Ely High School touches on familiar problemsEly. I graduated from Plantation. We were football rivals, so I know how much spirit this school has. Set in the abundant sunshine and urban decay of Miamis Liberty City, the film centers on two sisters, Tiana and Nia, played by Latrice and Lashalle Jackson, who are living with Aunt Georgia, their foster mother, played by Rita Wells. When Aunt Georgia dies the girls, afraid to be sent back into the foster system, hide the body in a bathtub they keep replenishing with ice. Along the way, they enlist the help of Amiya, a girl dealing with her own issues of loss and an attempted suicide. To keep their secrets safe, Tiana and Nia turn to crime. The film also touches upon Post Traumatic Stress Disorder [PTSD] as experienced by Tru, played by Jamie Hector, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who served in Afghanistan. PTSD is very real in the hood [and] as black people we tend to not go seek help, said Jones. After the screening, Jones and cast members Latrice and Lashalle Jackson and Taj Collins were part of a panel that discussed the film. Also on the panel were Pastor Nicky Lewin, substance abuse counselor Cynthia Oliver and Kirk Brown, senior vice president of programs at HANDY [Helping Abused Neglected Disadvantaged Youth]. Said Oliver. I grew up on the streets of Miami. So I know about the secrets in this film, she said. Brown advised students who find themselves in some kind of trouble to seek out an adult they can trust. Choose the adult wisely, he said. He also told these students they had the power to make bad situations better, even a fellow student who is hungry. One in six students in Broward is homeless, said Brown, an Ely graduate. If you hear their stomachs making noises in the class room, dont laugh. Stop them in the lunch room and do something good for them. Everybody has the ability to be a hero. But in the end, The Magic City is about choices more than anything else. The films climax shows Tru and Nia each faced with a decision: resort to violence or find a peaceful way of resolving their anger and hatred. You can achieve anything as long as you keep love in your heart, said Jones. The Magic City is expected to be in local movie theaters this fall.

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-783-8700 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 3-29 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO. Looking For Good People! Good Opportunity For Right Individual. Qualifications: Good Driving Record Physically Fit Professional. No Drugs! Average Tech Earns $600 $1,200 A Week. Wayne 954-868-5560. 4-5 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTMALE CNA/HHA/ COMPANION Broward Former EMT/Certified/ Lt. Massage. Compassionate References. PT/FT. Ron 954-232-2832. 3-29 HHA CERTIFIED To Care For The Elderly. Good References & Background Check. (Nurse For 27 Yrs. ) Available Mon Fri. More Information. 561784-5034. 3-29 CERTIFIED AIDE/ CAREGIVER Care For Sick Or Elderly. Very Honest Reliable & Caring. Light Housekeeping Shopping & Cooking. 786-444-7043. 3-29 FORMER MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR Of Large Rental Complex 30 Years Experience In A/C Plumbing Electrical & Landscaping Looking For Work At Local Condo Assoc. 954-3041539. 3-29 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-5 CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 4-5 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs Carpentry Plumbing Roo ng Masonry Windows Painting Decking Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 Emergency Calls. 4-5 BLADE RUNNERS Yard Maintenance. FREE ESTIMATE!! Grass Cutting Trimming Hedges & Shrubs. Mulching. Lic/Ins. Starting At $25 Per Cut. Eddie 954-4941303. 3-29 DISCOUNT PRINTING ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES Booklets Brochures Business Cards Carbonless Forms Color Copies Door Hangers Envelopes Flyers Invoices Labels Postcards Signs Banners Rudy Levy 954825-8108. 4-12 SNOWBIRDS/INVESTORS Licensed R.E. Broker Offers Property Checks & Services For Out Of Town Owners!! Short Or Long Term Customized Schedule To Suit Your Needs. Reasonable Rates!! Traci Scharf Epic R.E. Services. 954-242-2392. 3-29 GIGIS CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable Honest. More Info. 954-2957033 Or 954-210-2248. 4-5 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 3-29 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CSTAMP COLLECTIONSWANTED ACCUMULATIONS & COLLECTIONS Of Stamps. House Calls Made. Call John 954-467-7128 Or 954-6142562. 3-29 HOMEOWNERS INSURANCEBETTER RATES! BETTER SERVICE! Call KATIE For A FREE Quote! 954-784-9029. www.myersinsures.com. 3-29COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 4-19 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 4-5 THRIFT STORECLF THRIFT STORE 801 SE 10 St. Deer eld. Monday & Wednesday 10am-3pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-4pm. 20% Off Friday & Saturday ONLY. 954-428-8980. 3-29 DOCKS FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT Up To 40. $10 Per Foot. New Dock Electric & Water Available! Wide Canal! Close To INLET. No Live-Aboards!! No Fixed Bridges. Cell 412-491-3937. 3-29 POMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL Off NE 14 St. Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water, Electric. Up To 33 $325 Month. 954-7814994. 3-29 LIGHTOUSE POINT UP TO 40. No Fixed Bridges. 1 Mile To Hillsboro Inlet!! Electric & Water. Locked Secured Area. 954-818-0050. 4-12 CYPRESS CREEK CANAL Very Close To Marina Facing The Island Club Condo. 777 S. Federal Hwy. Pompano. Capacity 20 Ft. Electric. $300 Per Month Negotiable If For 1 Year. Call Yvon 954-5976668. 3-29 CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954812-5192. ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO LOOKING TO SHARE My Home With Senior Who Needs Minimum Assistance. Private Room 14th St. Causeway & Federal Hwy. 954-479-0247. 3-29 Homes For RentPOMPANO KEY WEST STYLE 2/2 HOME C/A Ceiling Fans. Large Fenced In Back Yard. $1,100 Month Yearly. Please Call Darci For Details 954-783-3723. 541 NE 34 Street. 4-19 POMPANO 1/1 COZY COTTAGE HOUSE 541 NE 34 ST 16B. Privacy Fence A/C. All Tile Floors. $675 Month Yearly. Call Darci For Details 954-783-3723. 4-19 CO-OP FOR SALELIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 55+ Building. Excellent Location. Needs Work.. $32,995. For More Information Call 954-444-7258. 4-19

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 29, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-783-8700 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! HOMES FOR SALE POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 2/1 HOME! Just REDUCED! $79,000. 55+ Community! 2 Clubhouses! FREE GOLF. Low Maintenance. Robert Elkins Charles Rutenberg R.E. 954-782-8968. 4-5 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-29 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month. 954-6291324. 3-29 APTS FOR RENTBEACH AREA APT As Low As $475 A Week In Season! (3225 NE 6th St.) 95 Yards To Beach; Bright Airy Apt With Cable, Wireless, Parking, Patio, Charming Furnishings And More. Pet Friendly. 561-541-0308; Debbie@paxpr operties.com. 4-12 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 4-19 LUXURY OCEAN-VIEW APT: $1475 A MONTH IN SEASON! (Ocean Blvd & NE 6th St.) European Style Kitchen, Ultra-Quiet, EcoFriendly, Central Air, Tropical Pool, Ocean Views, Dedicated Parking, Coin Laundry, Premium Cable TV, WI-FI And More. Pets OK. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com. 4-12 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO 1 Bedroom & Ef ciency With Kitchen. Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Yearly Seasonal. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 4-5 PRIMO OCEAN BOULEVARD APT For As Low As $68 A Night In Season! (601 N. Ocean Blvd) Great Area, Great Apt. Great Rates. 95 Yards To Beach. Special Weekly & Monthly Rates Too. Cats & Small Dogs Welcome With Pet Fee. Contact Debbie 561-541-0308. Debbie@paxpr operties.com. 4-12 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 3/1 New $1250. SW 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 4-5 POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 3-29 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 4-19 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 4-19 LIGHTHOUSE POINT UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent In A Psychologists Of ce For A SOLO PROFESSIONAL. $950/Month. Located In The GATEWAY CENTRE 2040 East Sample Rd. Windowed Unfurnished Of ce! 14 x 12.5. Call 954-942-3344. 4-5 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. 4-5 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 4-19 Head Instructor Youth (ages 9-13) Recreational Sailing Program for City of Lighthouse Point, FL seeks a certi ed Level 1 instructor for its summer program. Employment from June 19 through July 26. Weekdays from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. daily. Program provides area youth an introduction to sailing basics leading up to a fun Mayors Cup regatta at seasons end. Requirements include current CPR and First Responder certi cation background check, drug test and minimum of 18 years of age. Contact John Trudel at jtrudel@lighthousepoint.com, or 954-868-4918. Can You Teach Sailing? REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad development and senior services. DEspies began her volunteer work at the Coral Door Thrift Shop in 1990. When the shop closed, she continued to dedicate her time to Broward Health North and works ve to six days a week, 12 hours a day as president of the hospital auxiliary and buyer for the hospital gift shop. Through her efforts, over $600,000 has been raised to buy emergency and operating room equipment. Besides her demanding job as CEO of Broward Health North, Grant volunteers with multiple non-pro ts, especially the Areawide Council on Aging, United Way Committees and the John Knox Village Board, and the American Lung Association. Her leadership skills set a positive example for others to follow. She is always available to advise friends and associates regarding health and welfare issues. Giroux has given 12 years to the NE. Focal Point serving on the CASA, Inc. Board of Directors. He has headed up special committees, most notably the Cuisine of the Region fundraiser and the annual Focal Point Auxiliary fashion show. He rst became involved when his mother attended the Focal Points Adult Day Care Center and now continues to donate items for the Centers wish list. Levy, is now town manager of Pembroke Park and has been dedicated to helping Browards senior residents for over 20 years. He is presently 3rd vice president of the Areawide Council on Aging Board of Directors. In Plantation, he serves as a councilman. Dr. Levy organizes local blood drives and raises funds to save the lives of retired greyhounds. He also serves on the BSO Regional Domestic Security Task Force. The McCarthys are volunteers who have for the past 20 years meshed their healthcare business with the local social service arena. She is active in the Elder Service Resource Network, Impact Broward and the Aging and Disability Resource Center, provides educational sessions for seniors and volunteer organizations. He devotes his talents to Hospice Care, delivers medical equipment and is involved in charity events bene tting the elderly. Judge Art Birken has been a member of the Areawide Council on Aging Board since 1982 and has volunteered his knowledge of the law to serve Browards elderly population. He is an ardent advocate for animal adoptions and works closely with the Humane Society and Greyhound Protection League. His interpretation of legal guidelines has become a valued resource for the staff and board of the Council. Harris has served as executive director of the Broward Legislative Delegation for last decade and shares his knowledge with professionals and grass roots activists who have needs relating to government. She volunteers for Broward Days, the groups that brings county concerns to the legislature and served on the board of ChildNet where she has spearheaded a graduation ceremony for teens making educational progress. She participates with NBC-6 Forever Families and is a graduate of Leadership Broward where she co-chairs committees for subsequent classes. Reilly volunteers at the NW Focal Point Senior Center three days a week and knows every client by name. Since 2000, she has averaged 15 hours a week serving snacks, playing games and chatting with clients. The staff there say her patience and compassion knows no bounds. Primeau serves on a dozen boards in Broward including Women in Distress, United Way, Barry University Advisory Council, Memorial Healthcare Systems and the Broward Partnership for the Homeless. An of cer for Florida Community Bank, Primeau also served as mayor of Davie in the late 70s. Tickets to the breakfast are $35 and can be obtained from Cheryl Morrow, Aging and Disability Resource Center, 954-745-9567. Hall of fameContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 29, 2013 Send your events for publication to mdpelican@yahoo.com Lacrosse clinic promotes this actionlled sport Deerfield Beach The Florida Youth Lacrosse Association will hold a free lacrosse clinic Saturday, April 6, noon to 1:30 p.m. at Westside Park on the soccer field. This event is open to boys and girls ages 6 to 14 and is an excellent opportunity to learn about the fast-growing, actionpacked sport of lacrosse. Participants will be shown basic skills and participate in drills taught by local high school coaches coordinated through the Indoor Sports Complex. All of the equipment will be provided courtesy of Florida Youth Lacrosse Association. Please contact the City of Deerfield Beach athletics division at 954-480-4426 for additional details.Relay For LifeDeerfield Beach The Deerfield Beach, Lighthouse Point & Hillsboro Beach Relay For Life starts on Saturday, April 13 at 4 p.m. at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, and goes until Sunday, April 14 at 9 a.m. The goal of the Relay is to raise money for the American Cancer Society. Teams take turns walking through the night from the start of the event until its over. There will also be food, refreshments and other activities. Visit www. relayforlife.org/dblpfl to donate or start a team.

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Tell The Pelican your sh stories! 954-783-8700! Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFThe water this weekend might be a little bit choppy but RJ Boyle says thats a small price to pay for some good fishing. The fishing should be very good because the ocean is stirred-up, said Boyle. Dolphin, sailfish, cobia and even some sharks are ripe for the catching.Ocean stirs up good shing this weekendThere have been numerous reports. Gaffer dolphin is between 600 and 800 ft., said Boyle. The cobia bite on the wrecks is going to be good as we approach this full moon, he added. And the sailfish bite, he said, is good at about 150 ft. And for shark enthusiasts, a trip a few miles north to Lake Worth or farther is in order. If you get a chance to venture to the north, theres been a lot of shark fishing on the beach. For those who do go, Boyle suggests chartering Permitted run by Capt. Greg Bogdan out of Sailfish Marina. People I sent up there come back raving, said Boyle. And not only is the fishing good, but anglers who go might get treated to a show. Black tip spinner sharks jump and spin in the air when you hook em, said Boyle.Anglers Club meetingPompano Beach The Pompano Beach Offshore Anglers Club meets Monday, April 15 at 7:30 p.m. at Sands Harbor, 125 N. Riverside Drive. World-renowned angler George Poveromo will be the guest speaker and will answer questions. The club meets every third Monday of the month. Visit www. shing. meetup.com/97 or call 954868-0681 for more information.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 29, 2013 Lila Harber and Diana Hunt from Ruskin; Adriana Mejia from Miramar, and Ellen Bolen from Washington, D.C., display their catch from Lady Pamela II at the South Florida Ladies! Lets Go Fishing! University, April 20-22. Ladies! Lets Go Fishing hosts shing classes for women anglersSPECIAL TO THE PELICANLady anglers are invited to tackle fishing skills at the South Florida Ladies! Lets Go Fishing! University offered specifically for women. The weekend conservationminded university, held in conjunction with support from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, [FWC], emphasizes hands-on skills with techniques such as releasing, knot tying, dehooking, bait rigging, spin casting, gaffing grapefruits, cast netting, trailer backing, boat handling and more. The Womens Fishing University is scheduled for April 12-14 at the I.T. Parker Community Center in Dania Beach. Women will learn, practice and participate in this sport, while enjoying the waters surrounding South Florida. Activities launch Friday night with a networking meet and greet at 6 p.m., including a master chef appetizer contest. On Saturday, classroom presentations begin at 8 a.m., with beginner and advanced sessions on topics including fishing basics and conservation including a presentation by the FWC and lunch provided by Pollo Tropical. Other fishing classes include techniques for offshore, inshore, bottom and fly fishing conducted by local experts. A Dress for Fishing Success fashion show is planned followed by handson skill practice where ladies learn the art of fishing directly from the pros. Sunday, the ladies board charter boats at approximately 7 a.m. for an optional half day fishing trip followed by a filet demonstration. The women typically catch and/or release sailfish, mackerel, tuna, wahoo, snapper and more. Registration starts at $99 for the first 20 who sign up, then $135 after. Registration includes instruction, use of equipment, hands-on training, networking reception and fundraisers, meals, goody bags and more. The Sunday Fishing Adventure, with tackle and bait provided, is additional. No equipment or experience is necessary. Membership is not required however there is a South Florida chapter available to continue the fishing fun. Call 954-475-9068 or email fish@ladiesletsgofishing.com.

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Friday, March 29, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 13 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The Turtle Nesting Season is March through October Seniors hall of fameOlder citizens who volunteer will be honored at Hall of Fame breakfast By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFNortheast Broward – Five citizens, in uential in Northeast Broward, have been tapped for the Senior Hall of Fame along with six other residents of Broward County. They will be inducted at a May 10 breakfast at Diamante’s in Tamarac. Chosen this week by a committee headed by County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, the new honorees are State Rep. Gwyn Clarke-Reed, 72, Deer eld Beach; Broward North Auxiliary President Josephine D’Espies, 89, Lighthouse Point; CEO of Broward Health North Pauline Grant, 62, Parkland; NE Focal Point volunteer Bill Giroux, 76, Pompano Beach; and former Wilton Manors City Manager Dr. Bob Levy, 70, Plantation. Also named were June and John McCarthy, 60-plus, of Coral Springs; Judge Art Birken, 64, Plantation; Sandra Harris, 71, Fort Lauderdale; Margaret Reilly, 78, Tamarac; John Primeau, 60, Cooper City. Clarke-Reed serves a state house district that encompasses much of North Broward and before that was a Deer eld Beach City Commissioner for 12 years. She was the rst black woman to be elected president of the Broward League of Cities. In Deer eld, she initiated a summer employment and mentoring program for youth. As a state legislator, she works in areas of health care, affordable housing, youth See HALL OF FAME on page 24By Marty LenkowskyPELICAN WRITERLighthouse Point – Looking to buy some moonshine? Well you can, right here in Lighthouse Point. It’s all part of this city’s 8th Annual “Dinner Under the Stars” to be held Saturday, April 6 from 5 to 9:30 p.m. at Frank McDonough Park, 3500 NE 27 Ave. Tables are still available to purchase for this year’s event, said Parks and Recreation Director John Trudel. Each table seats 10 and costs $100. “The city furnishes the tables, chairs and entertainment,” he said. Individual seats cannot be purchased. For newcomers to this fun event, Frank McDonough Park might easily be mistaken for a preview of Halloween. People decorate their tables with a theme and dress to t that theme. In years past, themes have included pirates, college sports teams, the Roaring 20s, tailgate parties and even a clam bake. Lighthouse Point resident Kim Hill has purchased three tables for this year’s event. Her theme will be “moonshiners.” She said her guests will dress like “moonshiners and rednecks.” Their decorations will include a still, a deer target and horseshoes. “It’s all about hanging out and being silly,” Hill said. The folks at her tables will be eating the part as well enjoying Southern favorites such as barbecued ribs and collard greens. Trudel said during a past Dinner Under the Stars, people at the clam bake table enjoyed lobster, crabs, clams and other seafood delicacies. During last year’s event, Hill said Dining event inspires costumes, foods to matchSee UNDER THE STARS on page 2 Pompano Beach -The news that Florida legislators are seeking to shut down internet cafes and gaming arcades is not sitting well with the elderly residents who frequent them. Last week the State House voted 108-7 to approve a bill that would ban electronic games used in internet cafes and gambling arcades. State Rep. Gwyn Clarke-Reed, a Democrat from Deer eld Beach, was one of the seven House members to vote no on the bill. “They lumped everybody in the same pot. The senior arcades are legal. They got thrown into the same category as the internet cafes,” ClarkeReed said. She said she is for shutting down the internet cafes if the monies are not going to charities as they said. “It could be there’s a need to regulate them. More needs to be looked at in (the way of) regulation.” A bill just like the House bill has See BAN on page 16Playing the numbers at Internet cafes may be numbered Noah learns a little bit about the trombone at the “Petting Zoo” which took place last weekend at St. Andrews School. The event was sponsored by the Boca Symphonia and the Allegro Society. Young children get to “pet” and play instruments of their choice with a little instruction from members of the Symphonia orchestra. See related story on page 11. [Staff photo] E l y T i g e r s o n Ely Tigers on E S P N U A p r i l 4 ESPN U April 4 a t n o o n G a m e at noon. Game o n e o f s e m i one of semi n a l s o f N a t i o n a l nals of National H i g h S c h o o l High School I n v i t a t i o n a l Invitational P a g e 2 Page 2 P e l i c a n Pelican

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2 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 her table theme was The Rocky Horror Picture Show complete with singing and dance routines. For those who want to dance and listen to good music, the Low Tides, a local classic rock band, will entertain. The city provides the band. Participants bring their own food and beverages. Prizes will be awarded to the table with the best decorations. Trudel said there’s plenty of room as the park can accommodate up to 25 tables. “It’s always a fun atmosphere,” he said. As many as 150 to 160 people have attended in the past, he said. The last day to reserve a table will be Wednesday, April 3. Trudel would like to sell more tables for the dinner event. He can be reached at 954-784-3439. Under the StarsContinued from page 1By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – As their classmates enjoyed a vacation, players on the Blanche Ely High School men’s varsity basketball team spent spring break getting ready to play on a national stage. Fresh off its second 7A State Championship in a row on March 2 against Evans in Orlando, 58-50, the Ely Tigers have accepted the invitation to play at the ESPN National Blanche Ely Tigers off to ESPN Invitational in Maryland April 4High School Invitational, in North Bethesda, MD, April 4 through April 6. “Playing on this level – it’s huge. It’s a national stage. You’re playing against the top teams in the nation,” said Melvin Randall, Ely’s head coach. Ranked the #6 team in the country by ESPN, Ely lost in the rst round of last year’s invitational to New Jersey’s St. Benedict’s Prep, 67-61. “We let it get away from us. We couldn’t throw a rock in the ocean,” said Randall. Ely’s overall record this season was 27-1. The team’s only loss came against St. John Bosco, from California, 72-62, on Dec. 22 during the Chick l-A Classic Championship in Columbia, SC. At this year’s invitational, they’ll face Prime Prep Academy, ranked #3, in the rst round. The game will be televised on ESPN U at 12 p.m. on April 4. If they win, they’ll advance to the semi nals on April 5, 2:30 p.m. The nal is April 6, 1:30 p.m. Randall says last year’s team was one of the best he’s ever coached but he expects this year’s to do even better. “They’ve made a lot of improvements. They’ve worked extremely hard and created their own identity.”See ELY TIGERS on page 7

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 29, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Twenty ve residents in Century Village East have had the $100 permit fee for installing satellite TV remitted after a protest was led last month with the Federal Communications Commission. In response to a petition for a ruling on the fees led by Serge DeRose, a homeowner in Berkshire B, the FCC has ordered the Challenge to dish TV requirements wins a review by FCCcity to suspend attempts to enforce its restrictions on the installation of satellite TV equipment. The letter was dated March 8 but not received here until the 14th. Fees collected after the 8th have been returned. Said DeRose, “People were saying I’m crazy, but now I am very proud of what we achieved.” DeRose and his neighbors, the 22 unit owners in Berkshire B, did not receive the refund. Their satellite dish antennas were installed in March 2011. In December of 2012, a city building of cial inspected the installation and cited the dish owners for violating the Florida Building Code by failing to obtain a building permit. Additionally, this year the city told the dish owners that a new electrical code requires upgraded wiring. DeRose estimated the cost to each unit at $420, an amount he claimed “unreasonable” under FCC rules. The FCC is continuing its investigation of the situation and during this time the city must suspend all attempts to enforce its rules. After building of cial John Donohue cited the Berkshire unit owners, DeRose and two others met with city of cials to get a clear understanding of their problem. At that time, they were told the alreadyinstalled dishes were subject to new standards pursuant to the electrical code and ordered corrective actions or the possibility of $200 per day penalties. According to the city’s public information of cer Rebecca Medina, no further action will be taken by the city until a nal ruling by the FCC is received. If the ruling favors the city’s permitting process, the refunded amounts will be due again. Dish customers win moratorium; nal ruling could cost

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4 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 By Marty LenkowskyPELICAN WRITERLighthouse Point If you think computers and today’s advanced electronic gadgetry are strictly for the youngsters, guess again because you are 100 percent wrong. The Lighthouse Point Library’s iPad workshop is living proof of that. The workshop meets Tuesdays at 10 a.m., and all attendees are of retirement age. In fact, instructor Bill Borough himself is 88 years old and a WWII U.S. Navy veteran. He served in the Paci c and is a retired graphic artist living in Deer eld Beach. Today’s class was comprised of only women; however, once in a while a man does show up. “They’re out playing golf,” jokes 20year Lighthouse Point resident Elizabeth Westbrook who describes herself as a “winter bird” South Florida resident. Westbrook simply loves her iPad. “Everything I do on this I do on my laptop,” she said. “I love the face time. That’s the best thing about it.” Everyone in the class agrees the small size of their iPad makes it easy to use and transport. They nd it more convenient than their laptops and said it’s a “must” if someone does a lot of traveling. As an instructional tool, Borough hooks his iPad up to a wide screen TV mounted on the wall. His personal iPad screen appears on the TV displaying a beautiful waterfront picture of Porto no, Italy as his wallpaper. With the Italian port city as a backdrop, he shows the class his various apps and how to open them. He showed the class how to open a free Broward County Library app they can use to download books onto their iPads. Borough said he and another man usually do the course together. Unfortunately, his teaching partner was out due to personal illness. Through the music app on Borough’s iPad, Frank Sinatra’s crooning voice played from the TV’s speaker system. Eighty-two-year-old Virginia Hayden is no stranger to computer technology. She also has a laptop. “I pay all my bills online,” she said. “My daughter taught me how.” Yet, she particularly enjoys using her iPad. “I love this one the most,” she added. “I learn better on this.” Hayden said her daughter, whom she describes as being very good with computers, bought her the iPad for Christmas. Borough said he nds himself using his own iPad more and more each day. “It’s so convenient to check my email,” he said as he walked around the classroom patiently answering questions posed by his students. The setting for the iPad workshop could not be more appropriate. The class is conducted in a room with technology-based art on the walls. One is a painting depicting a tiny baby pounding a computer keyboard. Another picture displays a laptop next to a cup of coffee. Another picture features a keyboard with the word “help” highlighted. Ruth Sepanski uses her iPad to watch Indiana University basketball games. “Because I’m from Indiana,” she proudly adds. And should everyone buy an iPad? “Depends on what you want to do with it,” Sepanski says. “If you have an iPhone, you already have most of the apps.” Seniors take on latest technology at LHP LibraryiPad workshop instructor Bill Borough explains an app to student Virginia Hayden.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 29, 2013 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – This city’s historic SampleMcDougald House was home to one of Florida’s historic artistic groups last Friday and Saturday – The Florida Highwaymen. On Friday, a few of the surviving members of the original Highwaymen group were on hand at SampleMcDougald at a special reception before the art show and sale on Saturday. The show highlighted two of the biggest changes from the 1950s and 60s, when The Highwaymen sold their work Highwaymen artists showcase their work at Sample-McDougaldPeter Williams, president of the Pompano Beach Historical Society, left, and Dan Hobby, executive director of the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society. Al Black stands with one of his paintings, a piece of work that would have fetched $25 to $35 back in the 1950s and 60s but today sells for hundreds more. “Now, we don’t have to sell out of the back of our cars,” he said.out of car trunks and street corners to the present with the main difference being prices then and now. A member of The Highwaymen, Doretha Hair was married to Alfred Hair until his death in 1970. She said her husband was the driving force behind the group and his death ultimately led to its members going their own separate ways. Hair stopped painting when her husband died but recently picked up a brush once again. “It was nothing I planned. It just happened,” she said.Sold originally for $25 to $35, today a Highwayman painting goes for a minimum of $500 to $600 with some selling as high as $4,500. In the pre-civil rights days, white-owned art galleries rejected The Highwaymen’s unique style of painting Florida’s natural beauty. Without a traditional outlet to sell their work, The Highwaymen marketed their art on the highways of Florida. “Now, we don’t have to sell out of the back of our cars. Now, we can’t sell enough,” said Al Black, one of the original Highwaymen who also served as salesman for the group. [Photos by Michael d’Oliveira] Visit www. oridahighwaymen.com for more information.

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6 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Circulation Joe McGeeAccount Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XXI, Issue 13 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & LettersHeavenly Pizza owner opens door for Easter To the editor, This year, we are making Easter Celebration pizzas featuring our popular breakfast pizza. Free pizzas will be offered to anyone who would like to stop by at 2647 E. Atlantic Blvd. The doors open at noon on Sunday, Mar. 31. There will be a Bible study at 4 p.m. All are welcome to attend. Anyone who would like to assist or donate, call Phil at 954-943-9271. If we don’t see you, have a blessed Resurrection Day. God Bless! Phil KasseesSpot on, dear reader, turtles do not suckle their youngTo the editor, I enjoy reading The Pelican whenever I can. Part of my job as a college professor is correcting students’ papers; therefore, I am very picky about what I read. I have found so many errors lately in printed publications that I have learned to just sigh and thank God that there ARE printed publications. However, the error of your reporter in the March 18 Pelican was enough to make me laugh and grimace at the same time, as in his rst paragraph he describes baby sea turtles as “tiny mammals.” Good heavens! Hello, editors! Look up the de nition of mammal! Can you imagine a sea turtle nursing its [many] young? Yikes! Other than that, I enjoyed the article and the important information given about helping the baby turtles. Sincerely, Karen Nagy [See related story on page 1 “Playing the numbers at Internet cafes may be numbered”] To Our State Representatives, I’ve been reading and hearing about the threat to the quality of life caused by penny arcades. I am eighty-seven years old and love to spend a few hours of my humdrum life at one. I sit with other elderly folks and talk and laugh and have this time away from my little (lonely) Century Village apartment. If you close these establishments I guess I will have to get a more comfortable rocking chair to sit on in front of my television set. Unfortunately, folks of my age group nd it dif cult to enjoy most of the programs on television these days. The programming is aimed at the younger generations. The language and the situations that they embrace is not of our preference. I’ve tried spending an afternoon at a movie theatre. Unfortunately, most of their lms are not suitable for me. I am not really an “old crank” but am distraught over the possibility of being housebound because of your actions. We who use these facilities know how much of our nances we can afford to use. We spend a few hours of our uneventful lives with our contemporaries and the pleasant folks that run the place. I read the local newspaper and was pleased to see that Rep. Jim Waldman can appreciate that these arcades are a safe, pleasant way for seniors to spend their time. I thank him for being so thoughtful. Please take all of the above into consideration before you take away our escape from a life of boredom. Helene Wayne Deer eld BeachClosing arcades will put seniors in their rocking chairsLetters League of Women opposes House Bill 7033 that would allow politics to in uence the judicial systemTallahassee This month, the League of Women Voters of Florida alerted Floridians to a legislative proposal that would further weaken the rewall intended to shield the judicial branch from political in uence. According to the League, during every session since 2011, some form of legislation has surfaced that seeks to undermine or politicize the effectiveness of the judicial merit selection process. This year, House Bill 7033 would expand political control over the majority of members on each judicial nominating panel by subjecting them to removal at any time without cause. See HOUSE BILL on page 9This year, House Bill 7033 would expand political control over the majority of members on each judicial nominating panel by subjecting them to removal at any time without cause.In stark contrast to this type of legislation, voters overwhelmingly rejected a proposed constitutional amendment on the November ballot that would have added another layer of political in uence over court appointments. According to an expert from the Brennan Center for Justice who participated on the Wednesday conference call, similar scenarios are playing out across the nation. “When voters have a chance to weigh in on the issue in recent elections, they have uniformly rejected attempts to politicize courts,” said J. Adam Skaggs, senior counsel in the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law. Deirdre Macnab, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida, said the organization is disturbed that the clear message from Florida voters is being ignored. “If lawmakers were listening to voters, they would be looking for ideas for strengthening Florida’s merit selection system. They would be working to strengthen protections against political in uence over the courts--not promoting further encroachment of the political branches in the judicial merit selection and retention process,” Macnab explained. “This, in fact, is a slap in the face of Florida voters after their decision on Amendment 5 in 2012.” House Bill 7033, which emerged as a committee bill out of the Civil Justice Committee, seeks to further increase political control and in uence over what is supposed to be a nonpartisan merit system for selecting judges. Originally, the nine-member commissions responsible for providing the Governor with a slate of the three most-quali ed applicants for each opening were comprised of three members appointed by the Governor, three members appointed by The Florida Bar, and three non-lawyer members elected by

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 29, 2013 And while 2012’s trip to Maryland was more like “a eld trip” Randall said this year’s team is taking it a lot more seriously. “It was a great experience and a disappointing loss, but we learned from that.” Senior Dallas Cameron, who was on last year’s championship team, also has his sights set higher. “It was an honor to get invited but we want to go out there and make some noise.”Ely TigersContinued from page 2 MadHatter’s Tea LuncheonDeer eld Beach – The Democratic Women’s Club of Northeast Broward will hold its 10th Annual MadHatter’s Tea Luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at DoubleTree by Hilton, 100 Fairway Drive. The guest speaker will be former state senator Nan Rich, Democratic candidate for the 2014 Florida gubernatorial election. Attendees are encouraged to wear their favorite hat and compete for prizes in the hat contest. Items from local businesses will also be raf ed. Ads, in the event’s journal, will also be for sale. RSVP via email at maggie_davidson@ comcast.net or call 954-942-8711.By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Business and property owners looking to give their storefronts a new coat of paint, new signage, new lighting or new awnings may soon be able to get this city to help pay for it. City staff members have proposed the Business Enhancement Grant Program, which would reimburse property owners or their tenants for expenses related to improving the outside of their building. “We’re trying to spur people to look at their properties,” said Randy Welker, economic development coordinator.City may foot part of bill for facade improvements hoping to ll storefrontsThe goal of the program is to provide an incentive for private owners to make changes that will have a positive effect on the streetscape and ultimately attract new tenants to ll empty storefronts. Applicants who owe money to the city, through nes, taxes, fees or liens, are prohibited from receiving funds and tenants who apply must get their property owner to sign-off on the project. New construction projects will not be allowed to receive money. Only one grant will be given per tenant or property owner. If approved by city commissioners, the program would cover 50 percent of the cost of improvements up to $1,000. So, if a business owner spent $2,000 the city would pay up to $1,000. Welker said $7,500 is earmarked for the program and it would be brought to city commissioners at their April 9 meeting. And they seem likely to vote in favor. “Let’s spend it,” said Commissioner Tom Green. Commissioner Scott Newton said it’s important that the city require applicants to have some skin in the game and contribute their own money. “If they don’t buy into the product they’re just taking something from the city,” he said, adding that it has to be a give and take situation. “I See STOREFRONTS on page 14Top town of cials will be named TuesdayHillsboro Beach – The town commission will meet Tuesday, April 2, 8:45 a.m. to select a mayor and vice mayor. The procedure preceeds the regular meeting at 9 a.m. Elected without opposition in March were current mayor, Dan Dodge, Vice Mayor Claire Schubert and Commissioner Javier Garcia. First elected in 2003, Dodge has served as mayor for two years. Both mayor and vice mayor are chosen by nomination from the commission and approved by a 3-2 vote.

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8 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Model train swap meet Deer eld Beach – The South Florida Railway Museum of Deer eld Beach will host a model train swap meet at the historic Amtrak/Trirail station, 1300 W. Hillsboro Blvd., on Saturday, April 6 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be three operating model train layouts, museum displays of railroad memorabilia and vendor tables for model trains, accessories and railroad memorabilia. Admission and parking are free. Call 954-4488935. Circus Bar charity tournamentPompano Beach – The 16th Annual Circus Bar Charity Golf Tournament will take place Saturday, April 20 at the Palm Aire Oaks Golf Course, 3701 Oaks Clubhouse Drive. Registration is at 11:30 a.m. and the tournament starts at 1 p.m. Cost is $125 per player. The cost includes golf shirt, goodie bag, alcoholic refreshments, buffet and raf e prize opportunities. Funds raised from the tournament will bene t the Children’s Health Foundation. Call 954-9731483.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF“Customer service is my mantra,” admits Katrina Humbles owner of this state-of-the-art laundry which welcomes patrons with many new features seldom found in other self service laundromats. “Please call me Katrina,” she says in a pleasant Irish brogue. “We opened of cially at 3560 N. Andrews Ave., Oakland Park, on January 14, 2012, and we were so lucky to get Tracy Wilson back. She had actually worked here before the entire plaza went bankrupt. “She and her two grown children came back to work for me. I couldn’t be happier. They’re hardworking, pleasant and they know the business and many of our customers. That’s important because this a real family neighborhood business. We do everything in our power to keep our customers happy.” “We’re open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. so we have three shifts. Tracy’s son Reggie takes the night shift to keep customers feeling safe. He walks our ladies to their cars, helps them stash their laundry and waits until they are locked in before he walks away.” Eager to list the many amenities in her business, Katrina says, “We have 64 washing machines and 64 driers. Our 80-pound machine, which washes up to 8 loads at one time, is seldom found in laundry mats. We have six, 60-pound machines which wash six loads at one time. These heavy duty machines are our busiest because they are discounted frequently and those with large families take advantage of our sale promotions.” Kerry Laundry Mart offers wash and fold service, dry cleaning for very competitive prices, alterations plus an internet caf with computer stations and free WiFi. Very soon the owner hopes to have a small caf with coffee, doughnuts and muf ns. Kerry Laundry Mart is all about customer service with play room, free WiFi, and 140 machines In the meantime, there are a variety of vendor machines for those who are hungry and thirsty. This petite, Irish lass is very promotional. She says, “We do free raf es at every holiday. Our next will be May Day. I have a mailing list of over 1,000 patrons and I text them often to alert them to weekly specials on the machines. We’re trying to shift some of our busy weekend business to quieter weekdays and these promotions seem to be doing the trick. Customers take advantage of the sale prices and the ve dollar wash coupons offered frequently.” No quarters needed here. Every customer gets a free card which starts up the machines. When they check out, they pay with either cash, debit or credit card. Katrina hopes to become an American citizen. She migrated from Ireland just three years ago to join her family in South Florida and says “I’m a certi ed dental hygienist in Ireland and I’m waiting to be accredited here. I hope to eventually work in my profession. When that time comes, I’ll turn over even more responsibility to Tracy, but I’ll always be around.” Tracy beams at her boss. “I love her,” she says. “She is so considerate and polite to me and all of our customers. She’s unbelievable to me. I’ve never worked for anyone like her and I thank God for bringing her into my life.” The next promotion on the agenda is a yard sale during which Katrina Katrina Humbles manages to straighten up the childrens’ playroom every time she passes. [Below] Guy Laieta is a boxing trainer who washes his own gym clothes twice a week while working on his laptop. He says, “The service is awesome here.”See KERRY on page 9Code questions answeredPompano Beach – Mario Sotolongo, code compliance supervisor for Pompano Beach, will be at the Tuesday, April 2 meeting of the Pompano Beach Highlands Civic Improvement Association. At the meeting, held at 7 p.m. at Highlands Park, 1650 NE 50 Ct., Sotolongo will provide an update on code compliance programs in Pompano Beach and answer questions from the public. Visit www.pbhighlands.org for more information.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 29, 2013 will sell off all of the left over clothing. “All money made at this sale will go to a local charity. We are all part of a neighborhood and we want to be a good, giving neighbor.” she explains. “The new owner of this plaza is great. He has revived it, made it a very attractive and important part of this area where he is creating jobs, good will and hopefully attracting new tenants.” During this interview, Katrina, who moves swiftly, managed to check on customers and straighten the children’s playroom. She paused to chat with Debby Burns who was busy at the iron press, ironing shirts and pants. Burns said, “I’m here every week. I like it here because it’s so clean, light and airy and you never have to wait for a machine. The help and the owner are great.” Guy Laieta was doing business on his laptop while his laundry was spinning around. He said, “The service here is awesome. I’m here twice a week. I’m a boxing trainer and my wife can’t keep up with my gym clothes so I wash and dry them myself. I don’t mind because I’m working while they are washing.” These happy customers make it clear, it might be worth leaving one’s own area to use Kerry Laundry Mart because of the service and the amenities. Call 754-200-4043. KerryContinued from page 8those six appointees. The independence of the commissions was seriously undermined in 2001 when the Legislature voted to give the Governor all nine appointments, requiring only that four members of each panel be selected from names submitted for consideration by The Florida Bar. The Governor already has full discretion over selection of a ve-member majority on each panel. “It should be apparent what the purpose of allowing removals without cause is,” explained Peter Webster, a former judge vehicles late in the process and thus bypass the process for scrutiny and public input in committee,” Macnab said. “Let me be very clear. Today we have a system that needs strengthening, not weakening. We cannot afford to be silent as lawmakers make a sham out of what was once a national model for appointment of judges based solely on merit.” The League of Women Voters of Florida, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and in uences public policy through education and advocacy. For more information, please visit the League’s website at: www. TheFloridaVoter.org. on Florida’s First District Court of Appeal. “It clearly is intended to diminish the independence of the nominating commissioners, and to increase the likelihood that they will nominate people who are philosophically aligned with the Governor-even if they are not the most quali ed for the position.” According to Webster, HB 7033 would increase the likelihood that judges will decide high-pro le or politically charged cases based on considerations other than the law and the applicable facts. HB 7033 does not yet have a companion bill in the Senate, but Macnab warned that is no guarantee it won’t advance. “We know from experience how easy it is for bad ideas like this to catch a ride on other legislative House billContinued from page 9 Boating safety courseFort Lauderdale – The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Pompano Beach will hold an About Boating Safety course on Saturday, April 13 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Imperial Point Medical Center, 6401 N. Federal Hwy. The cost is $50 per person and includes materials. Special discount pricing is available if more than one family member from the same household attends. Email otilla34pompanobeach@gmail.com or call 954-941-5781.

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10 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFHow does a newly retired, successful business woman spend her free time in a city she barely knows? Judy Knoebel seems to have found a perfect answer to making new friends while utilizing her talents. Having spent much of her successful 31-year career with AT&T in New Zealand; Brussels, Belgium; Geneva, Switzerland, and Atlanta, GA., choosing to settle down in Pompano Beach meant starting over in a new world. “Volunteering was a way to make new friends and get the feeling of really living in the area. It works well for me, and like most volunteers, I receive more than I give.” The Pelican interviewed Knoebel when she had just returned from the barely opened, Hillsboro Lighthouse Museum where she is the manager. The museum is located at 2700 North Ocean Blvd. in Pompano, in a 400square-foot space that will display more than 100 years worth of artifacts. There will also be an education room where public programs will be organized. “This is an incredibly exciting time for the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society as we nally found a place that will allow for our continued growth,’’ said society president Art Makenian. Knoebel says, “We hope to be open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. three days each week if and when I succeed in getting enough volunteers to keep it open. Just today I had visitors from here and from Minnesota. We will also open by appointment for group visits and for passport stamping.” She explains that members of the U.S. Lighthouse Association visit lighthouses around the country and like to have their passports stamped as they do so. We will be showcasing historical artifacts, letters, maps, documents and history of the lighthouse, its keepers and its famous lens. I became involved with this preservation group just two years ago when I helped with data entry. Now I’m a dedicated member of the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society.” As she began her new life, Knoebel’s rst volunteer choice was The Bonnett House in Fort Lauderdale, where she has now volunteered for 12 years as a greeter and tour guide. “As I drive six visitors around in a golf cart type vehicle, they and I enjoy the 37 acres of nature and watching the people and the monkeys,” she says. Judy Knoebel volunteers her executive skills almost every day of the week and loves the challengesSee KNOEBEL on page 20The Green Market brings smiles to many faces, including volunteer Judy Knoebel’s mascot who roams the market on Saturday mornings. [Photo courtesy of Judy Knoebel.]Canoe Race registrationWilton Manors – The 22nd Annual Island City Canoe Race will take place Saturday, May 18 at 10 a.m. at the Colohatchee Boat Ramp, 1975 NE 15 Ave. The race consists of a seven-mile relay around the city. The race is split into three divisions: men’s, women’s and co-ed. Each team that enters must have 10 members and the co-ed teams must have at least three men and three women. Participants must be at least 16 years old. The cost to enter is $150 per team. Deadline to register is May 3 at 5 p.m. To register, visit www.wiltonmanors. com/parks or call 954-390-2130. LBTS resident to be honoredFort Lauderdale – Robert M. DeCamillo, a Lauderdale-By-The-Sea resident will be given the Robert S. Graham, M.D. Lifetime Achievement Award by Sunshine Cathedral, 1480 SW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale, on Saturday, April 6 at 6 p.m. In 1992, DeCamillo became a member of the Church of the Holy Spirit MCC, which eventually became the Sunshine Cathedral. He has served as a board member and eucharistic minister. In 2003, he was the design architect for the chancel renovation that houses the organ pipes. Currently DeCamillo is a governor of the Sunshine Community Foundation where he plans to contribute his time and talent for the bene t of the Sunshine Cathedral. Visit www.sunshinecathedral.org for more information.Painting partyWilton Manors – The Island City Painters will meet Saturday, April 6 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Ct. The group offers local artists the opportunity to have their work critiqued and reviewed by other artists. A $5 donation to the Central Area Neighborhood Association, the group hosting the workshop, is requested to participate. The Island City Painters will also meet April 13 and 20 at Art Gallery 21. To join, call 954-292-3475.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 29, 2013 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFBoca Raton Last Saturday afternoon at St. Andrews School auditorium in Boca Raton, the Symphonia presented two magni cent pieces, Ottorino Respighi’s “The Birds” and a phenomenal performance of Mozart’s Concerto in G for ute. The performance was a dress rehearsal for the following Sunday. But on this morning, children and media were allowed to sit in on the conversation between worldrenown conductor, Philippe Entremont, and members of his orchestra. As is expected, prior to the performance, Entremont spared a few moments of gaiety with his musicians to Boca Symphonia brings classical music to its highest level lighten them up a bit. While we could hear the laughter engendered by his humor, Entremont’s jokes could not be discerned. What could be discerned was the caliber of the musicians, whose names will be found in programs of the Florida Grand Opera, the Palm Beach Opera and small chamber groups in the area where these ne musicians are nding additional work. “The Birds” is a nature walk in musical ornithology with excellent performances by the woodwinds and string musicians regaling the dove, hen nightingale and cuckoo. Jennifer Grim completed this woodland atmosphere on her gold ute. Her performance of Mozart’s “Concerto in G Major” belied the rumor that Mozart called the ute, “ . the instrument he could not bear.” But as rumor continues, when he heard utist Johann Baptist Wendling perform the concerto in 1778, he gained a new appreciation for it. Rumor aside, it was Mozart whose opera “The Magic Flute” remains one of today’s most performed operas. Grim revealed her complete control and love of her instrument throughout the three movements offering the purest tones regardless of the level of the register. What is particularly delightful with this concerto are the continuous taunts and responses between the ute and the orchestra. It is impossible to not re-engage with the joy of life while hearing this performance. The Boca Symphonia 2014 season will offer its Magni cent Maestros series that is worth the trip. Look for Alexander Platt conducting Rossini, Shostakovich and Schubert. Entremont returns in February to conduct Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 2 and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 4. A Broward icon, James Judd will take his baton to the podium to conduct Barber, Haydn and the glorious Beethoven Violin Concerto in D major. In April Gerard Schwartz conducts an evening of Mozart. For tickets, call 1-866678-4201.Petting zoo for instrumentsAnother aspect of open dress rehearsals is the effort of the Boca Symphonia to introduce young children not only to the sounds of an orchestra but also to the speci c instruments that are played to produce those sounds. During the intermission, families went to the lobby of the auditorium where children could “pet” instruments, try them out and get a little advice from the performers. Susan Courey, a member of the Allegro Society, which is one of the support groups of the Symphonia, explained that the event was one way to encourage young children to study music. The next event where children can meet the orchestra and visit instruments will be April 20 from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Call 561-376-3848 for reservations. Perfect! Jennifer Grim and Phillipe Entremont relax after a run-through of Mozart. [Staff photo]

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12 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Send news to mdpelican@yahoo. com By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – A group of area activists has formed a new Oakland Park Democratic Club and will apply to the Broward Democratic Party for a charter. The group was energized by President Barack Obama’s re-election victory in the state of Florida, according to Robert Muniz, the club’s acting president. Muniz is a project manager for a national wireless rm. Before starting the Oakland Park Democratic Club, he worked with OFA (Organizing For America) for presidential and local campaigns since 2008. He was recently elected as area manager for the Broward Democratic Party, covering Oakland Park, Wilton Manors and Lazy Lake. The club is open to all registered Democrats and is seeking new members. Meetings are held at 7 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. The club’s main objectives are to start building the party infrastructure in the city, staf ng all city precincts with leaders and to providing a venue for local Democrats to share ideas among themselves and with local leaders at the Obama win prompts new Democratic club herefront of progressive causes. At the April 15 meeting, representatives from the Broward Metropolitan Planning Organization will discuss the county’s forecasting and planning for the Oakland Park Boulevard corridor for the coming decade. State Rep. Gwyndolen Clarke-Reed will speak at the May 20 meeting. Other of cers are Barbara Ruge, acting vice president; Lisa Heary, acting secretary; and Gary McClellan, acting treasurer. They’re all members of the Broward County Democratic Executive Committee. Ruge brings years of local activism with the Sierra Club and with women’s causes. Heary also worked with OFA. McClellan has been active for years in Democratic circles. Board members of the new club are Harrison Grandwilliams, Kathy Hunter, Joyce Magee and Mitchell Stollberg. Grandwilliams and Hunter are members of the Broward DEC. Grandwilliams was deputy director for Broward Sheriff Scott Israel’s successful election campaign in November. Hunter and Mcgee were active in the Obama re-election campaign. Magee uses her background in writing and editing to review club publications. Stollberg, membership director, served on the board of North Andrews Neighborhood Association and directed volunteers for Tim Lonergan’s successful campaign for election to the Oakland Park City Commission. Club events are regularly posted at www.facebook. com/OPDemFL. Membership forms can be downloaded. Memberships are $15/ year per person. Email robertmmuniz@outlook.com.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 29, 2013 Hazardous waste and electronics disposalLighthouse Point – On April 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., residents here can take hazardous waste, electronics, unused or expired medication and sensitive documents to Frank McDonough Park, 3500 NE 27 Ave. for safe disposal. Items accepted are household chemicals, paints, oils, solvents, pesticides, herbicides, pool chemicals, mercury thermometers, propane tanks, re extinguishers, uorescent bulbs, televisions, computers, printers, fax machines, cell phones, DVD players, rechargeable batteries and tires. Items not accepted are kitchen appliances, microwave ovens, explosives, ares, ammunition and bio-hazardous or medical waste. There will also be a shredding truck to securely dispose of personal paper documents. No business or commercial documents will be accepted. Call 954-946-7386.By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFNon-pro ts that provide services for kids aging out of the foster care system are eligible for $1.5 million in grant funding being awarded by the Children’s Services Council [CSC], an agency supported by the two cents on the dollar taken from every property owners’ real Little known agency supports programs for Broward’s at-risk children and familiesestate taxes. Also being awarded currently is $634,000 to organizations that give support to family-members raising children they have not legally adopted. For the individual, it is a small amount of their total tax bill, but in Broward County it raises almost $60 million annually. The money goes to government agencies and nonpro ts that provide services to children and their families. The latest award, $2.1 million in total, has been enhanced with a donation from the Jim Moran Foundation. According to Andrew Leone, a spokesperson for the Council, most people are unaware of the agency even after receiving their tax bill. And although $60 million sounds like a lot of money, according to Leone it does not cover the gaps in services that exist here. “This is a big county. There is huge need,” he said. Because public dollars are at stake, any entity receiving funds from the CSC gets a thorough review and must demonstrate its sustainability, that is, it cannot be soley funded with CSC money. Members of the Council are highly placed of cials – a member from the school board, county commission, judicial system, Department of Children and Families, the health department, the school superintendent and ve others appointed by the governor. It is these people who decide how the money is spent. The CSC aims to fund programs that offer preventive measures which may be hard See CHILDREN on page 19

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14 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! Surfers fest bene ts autism researchDeer eld Beach – Surfers for Autism, a state-wide nonpro t group, will host its 6th Annual Surfers for Autism Beach Festival April 5, 6 and 7 at the Deer eld Beach International Fishing Pier, 200 NE 21 Ave. Friday’s kick-off begins at 5 p.m. with a party and live concert. On Saturday, sur ng events and demonstrations take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. followed by a party and live music. On Sunday, pro-surf races take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. followed by an awards ceremony from 2 to 4 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. A portion of sales from food and merchandise throughout the three days will bene t autism research. Surfers for Autism members assist people with autism in the water and teach them how to surf. The physical motions involved with sur ng helps participants improve their mental and physical faculties. For sponsorship opportunities, call Randy Skinner at 954-545-7873. money would be released to successful applicants after the improvements are completed. Nick Berry, chairman of the Economic Development Task Force, said he would like to see the money spent on Andrews Avenue. Currently, the city is working on creating two Business Improvement Districts [BID], one for Andrews Avenue and one for Wilton Drive. If approved by the property owners on each street, each BID would act as a special taxing district. The additional tax revenue raised on Andrews Avenue would be spent on that street and the revenue raised from Wilton Drive would only be used for that street. For more information, call Randy Welker at 954-390-StorefrontsContinued fro mpagebelieve that in anything.” The grants would be available to tenants and property owners on Andrews Avenue, Dixie Highway and Northeast 26 Street from the railroad tracks east to Northeast 15 Street. Grant

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 29, 2013

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16 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 passed out of committee in the Senate, “which is not good,” said State Sen. Maria Sachs, a Democrat from Delray Beach. She is vice chair of the Gaming Committee. Sachs has led an amendment to the bill so that senior and children’s arcades, such as Chuck E. Cheese, are not affected. “The intent was to get rid of internet cafes, but they’ve thrown a big net and now they want to get rid of anything to do with gaming, even games of skill,” Sachs said Thursday. Sachs said it was lobbyists for the large pari-mutuals and other gaming interests as well as Baptist church folk who spoke in favor of the legislation at the committee. “They say they are gambling and that’s illegal,” she said. “It’s a ne line. In my opinion these are games that seniors, children and families enjoy. No money is exchanged. They have an evening out that’s safe, local and easily accessible.” To follow the law, she says the arcades would fall within the exception if no money is exchanged, patrons get coupons and the arcades are regulated and taxes. Until the Department of Justice releases the results of its investigation into internet cafes, she said she can’t say what they were doing that is allegedly illegal. “The mission of our committee is to study the problem and the issues and study which are legal and which are not. Can I say that our senior arcades are not gambling? No, of course not. We will study these issues and in the end we will have an answer.” “It’s really, really sad. For the senior citizens, it’s like their life,” said Michelle Towben, manager of Johnny’s Rec Room on Copans Road, reacting to the proposed legislation. “We’re like family to them,” she said. Now she’s getting letters from customers unhappy at the thought of the pending legislation. One lamented that she would just get a more comfortable rocking chair to sit on in front of her television set. Customers come to Johnny’s with their oxygen tanks, on walkers and in wheelchairs. “This is their social life. It gives them something to do,” Towben said. The bills are apparently a reaction to recent charges of racketeering against Allied Veterans, the largest Internet caf company in Florida. BanContinued from page 1 A beaming Adeline Aforismo, 90, of Pompano Beach wins a jackpot of $24.23 at Johnny’s Rec Center. She and her husband, a stroke victim who can’t speak, are regulars at the arcade. ‘My husband would be lost if we couldn’t come here,’ she said. [Staff photo by Judy Vik]Jennifer Carroll, Florida’s lieutenant governor, resigned last week because of previous ties to that company. Towben says arcades like Johnny’s aren’t the same. The internet cafes are sweepstakes and pay off in cash. At the senior arcades, players receive gift cards as prizes for playing games of skill. The gift cards awarded at Johnny’s are for Publix, WalMart and Visa credit. Players who don’t earn enough points for a gift card can accumulate points for future use. The skill involves knowing when to hit the hold or stop button. The minimum wager is eight cents per play. “Where else would people like me go?” Stella Kerrigan, a 93-year-old resident of Leisureville, asks. She comes to Johnny’s three to four times a week for a few hours. “I just enjoy it. We all know each other. We’re like a family.” And she says the free meals are delicious. Brunch is served at 11:30 a.m. on Sunday and breakfast, lunch and dinner every day. On Fridays and Saturdays, there’s live music from 7 to 10 p.m. Without the arcade, “We’d all drop dead or hibernate in our houses and lose our minds,” Kerrigan said. Rita Coleman, 86, of Palm-Aire is another regular at Johnny’s, meeting her friends there and making new friends and winning occasionally. “If I had to stay home, I’d go out of my mind,” she says. On Monday, she won a $41 bonus. “I push the buttons and hope for the best. I lost a few bucks here and there, but I don’t spend my Social Security. If I couldn’t go there, I’d go insane,” Coleman said. With family scattered all through the U.S., she says, “It’s important to have human contact.” Coleman said she has contacted legislators urging them not to close the arcades. “We have fun here, and we don’t spend a lot,” said Gail May of Margate, another regular at Johnny’s. “We need our game rooms. It’s a great place to meet people.”

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 29, 2013 Chick l-A 2250 N. Federal Hwy. Pompano Beach 954-943-5855 6:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Closed Sundays www.chick l-a.comBy Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFWherever chicken meets charity and deep-frying meets devotion, you will nd a gleaming Chick l-A outlet beckoning the physically and spiritually hungry to enter its salvational gates. As stated on the corporate website, the Chick l-A purpose is: “To glorify God by being a faithful steward of Pompano Beach’s Chick l-A serves up tasty poultry delights along with strong commitment to social responsibilityall that is entrusted to us and to have a positive in uence on all who come into contact with Chick l-A.” With annual sales pegged at $4.6 Billion, the family members of the privately owned Chick l-A Corporation are understandably quite grateful for the Lord’s magnanimity. And the company’s strict observance of dominical respite is a testament to the virtues of a strong Southern Baptist tradition. “I am very fortunate to have been allowed to open this location,” says franchise owner Seth Poor. “The company receives 25,000 applications a year but only builds about 75 new restaurants. In fact, I am the only Chick l-A The Southwest chargrilled chicken salad is always a healthy lunch option. in Broward that is east of the Turnpike!” For history buffs, “it all started in 1946, when Truett Cathy opened his rst restaurant, The Dwarf Grill, in Hapeville, Georgia. Credited with inventing Chick l-A’s boneless breast of chicken sandwich, Mr. Cathy founded Chick l-A, Inc. in the early 1960s and pioneered the establishment of restaurants in shopping malls with the opening of the rst Chick l-A Restaurant at a mall in suburban Atlanta in 1967. Since then, Chick l-A has steadily grown to become the second largest quick-service chicken restaurant chain in the United States, with over 1,700 locations in 39 states and Washington, D.C.” Be it breakfast, lunch or dinner, this purveyor of poultry has been steadfast in its belief that providing highquality fare is as important as promoting social responsibility. “Over the past three years, Chick l-A, Inc. and its franchised restaurant operators have given more than $68 million in contributions to over 700 educational and charitable organizations and have provided millions of dollars in food donations all across America.” “We partner with civic organizations, schools and many other groups,” says Seth. “And, of course, we provide them the best that Chick l-A has to offer!” This includes popular breakfast offerings such as chicken biscuits, bagels and burritos. “Another customer favorite is the Chick-n-Minis. They are hand breaded nuggets in fresh rolls that are brushed with honey butter,” explains Seth. “And for lunch See CHICK-FIL-A on page 18

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 or dinner, we have great salads and, of course, our famous chicken sandwiches.” Indeed, the melt-in-yourmouth marinated, boneless, skinless, 100 percent whitemeat chicken is lovingly prepared by a well-trained and friendly staff that puts out about 1,500 orders a day. “We are very conscious about quality and food temperature. We follow very strict rules,” says the affable restaurateur who touts the virtues of his microwave-free kitchen. “Fresh produce is received every morning and all the food prep is done daily. Our team does a truly phenomenal job.” Patrons who opt for chicken nuggets or strips can enjoy a host of avorful dipping sauces such as barbecue, honey mustard, buttermilk ranch and the highly regarded Polynesian style. The waf e fries are also a signature menu item. “We have few products but do them very well,” insists Seth with well-deserved pride. “And we even provide service in the dining room!” Fresh squeezed lemonade, hand-spun milkshakes and frosty ice cream treats are great additions to any Chick l-A visit. Specialty soups such as Tortilla chicken make periodic appearances at various times throughout the year. Parents of young children will appreciate the enclosed play room designed to keep the little ones safely entertained. All sandwiches are between $2 and $5 with complete meals under $8. There is ample free parking and the drive-through does brisk business. Catering for of ce functions and private parties is also offered. For tender chicken served with a side order of humanitarianism, Chick l-A is the destination of choice. Enjoy! Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. Chick l-AContinued from page 17

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 29, 2013 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@ yahoo. com or 954-783-8700! “But the whole community bene ts when we keep kids out of the juvenile justice system.” Among the dozens of initiatives where CSC funding goes is food stamp outreach, Forever Family, a collaboration with NBC-6 that features kids seeking a foster home; after school and reading readiness programs, summer employment for teens, agencies that address special needs kids, drowning prevention programs and Swim Central, the South Florida Hunger Coalition, Family Central and Children’s Harbor. The Kinship Initiatives eligible for the $634,000 will help people taking care of family members get the social services they need. Some bene ts are not available to relatives who have not legally adopted children and Kinship provides assistance in helping them get the paperwork led that gets them assistance. Money for the kids aging out of the system comes through the It Takes a Village initiative and assists them with housing, job training and opportunity, transportation. Agencies applying for these funds have until noon April 29. The CSC was established by referendum in 2000 and, because of recent legislative action, by 2016 the voters will again decide whether to maintain this independent taxing authority.ChildrenContinued from page 13

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Call The Pelican Monday Thursday to place an ad in our Classi ed Section. Get 20 words or less for $15. 954-783-8700 Ask for Fran KnoebelContinued from page 10“Monkeys?” she was asked. With a laugh, Judy responds. “The story goes that there was a monkey bar on the beach in the 50s. When the bar caught re, the monkeys settled in Birch State Park and the Bonnett House. The monkey population at the Bonnett House is diminishing because of inbreeding and poaching.” Being a history buff, Knoebel was drawn to the Pompano Beach Historical Society where she now has been a member for over 10 years, serving as treasurer for the past seven years. She can be found at the Green Market from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., every Saturday. The Historical Society began the Green Market, featuring produce from local farms and home made products, about 10 years ago. Now, the society has a co-sponsor, the CRA and a new location at Cypress and Atlantic where 40 vendors sell their wares every week. Visitors enjoy music, special events and shopping. Judy sits at the Society’s table which sells a few historical products from the Society and farm bureau nuts, jellies and jams-all from Florida farms. She says, “We are currently revitalizing our oral history program to capture the memories of our pioneers before we lose them all. I’m helping by taping interviews. These people are a wonderful resource for early city history.” Dan Hobby, executive director of Pompano Beach Historical Society and Sample-McDougald House, says, “Judy is the personi cation of the saying that if you want to get a job done, give it to a busy person. She is always on the go, from one good cause to another, and when she takes on a task you can be sure that it will be completed. We’re extremely fortunate to have her involved with the Pompano Beach Historical Society and the Sample-McDougald House.” Knoebel also sits on the Pompano Beach Historic Preservation Board. She says, “Our main focus is to identify, document, and register historic buildings and places to make sure they don’t disappear. We just did the Ali building and the re museum. The group is also focusing on developing an historic map so that visitors to Pompano Beach can drive around and see each historic sight on the map. Members meet monthly each bringing input on assigned aspects of the preservation goals.” Still another recipient of this volunteering lady is Insight for the Blind where Knoebel has given over 1,500 hours in the past eight or nine years. “Every Friday morning I’m at the of ce at 1401 NE 4th Ave. in Fort Lauderdale from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. I am a reader and recorder of magazines and books. I also monitor. Whenever I hear people with radio voices, I try to recruit them, and it’s satisfying to later hear about their successes at Insight.” Matt Corey, president and CEO of Insight writes, “In the true spirit of volunteerism, Judy is always eager and willing to do what will help us the most and does so with a smile. I know that she is involved with many charities, so we feel lucky that Insight is where she shows up every Friday morning at 9:30.” Two years ago, Knoebel was honored for her service and given an engraved medal during Insight’s 35 years of producing Talking Books for the Blind. Insight is the largest all volunteer studio in the United States recording materials for children and adults. Insight has grown from a single booth, recording studio to a facility with six sound recording studios and 13 reviewing booths, recording speci ed books and magazines in both digital and analog formats requested by the National Library for the Blind, located at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. To donate or volunteer, call 954-522-5057. In addition to all of this, Knoebel has written the newsletter for Friends of the Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art for years. She still loves to read to pre-schoolers at Education Station in Beacon Light Shopping Center. This is done in conjunction with the Broward Library System’s Prime Time Reading Program. In her limited spare time, this consummate volunteer reads, communicates on the computer and meets with friends for lunch, dinner or book club. Thank you for raising the bar on volunteerism, Judy Knoebel. The things you do for the community make a big difference.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, March 29, 2013 Call The Pelican! 954-783-8700! By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – It’s a real coup for a high school to premier a movie before it hits the big screen. But that’s what happened at Ely High School this week. “The Magic City” may be fictional, but its story hit home to its student audience. Many of its themes: bullying, economic recession, crime, drug abuse and suicide are problems common in many communities. R. Malcolm Jones, the film’s writer and director, chose to screen the film March 20 in the Blanche Ely High School auditorium. “This school is one of the pillars of the community,” said Jones about choosing Film premier at Blanche Ely High School touches on familiar problemsEly. “I graduated from Plantation. We were football rivals, so I know how much spirit this school has.” Set in the abundant sunshine and urban decay of Miami’s Liberty City, the film centers on two sisters, Tiana and Nia, played by Latrice and Lashalle Jackson, who are living with Aunt Georgia, their foster mother, played by Rita Wells. When Aunt Georgia dies the girls, afraid to be sent back into the foster system, hide the body in a bathtub they keep replenishing with ice. Along the way, they enlist the help of Amiya, a girl dealing with her own issues of loss and an attempted suicide. To keep their secrets safe, Tiana and Nia turn to crime. The film also touches upon Post Traumatic Stress Disorder [PTSD] as experienced by Tru, played by Jamie Hector, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who served in Afghanistan. “PTSD is very real in the hood [and] as black people we tend to not go seek help,” said Jones. After the screening, Jones and cast members Latrice and Lashalle Jackson and Taj Collins were part of a panel that discussed the film. Also on the panel were Pastor Nicky Lewin, substance abuse counselor Cynthia Oliver and Kirk Brown, senior vice president of programs at HANDY [Helping Abused Neglected Disadvantaged Youth]. Said Oliver. “I grew up on the streets of Miami. So I know about the secrets in this film,” she said. Brown advised students who find themselves in some kind of trouble to seek out an adult they can trust. “Choose the adult wisely,” he said. He also told these students they had the power to make bad situations better, even a fellow student who is hungry. “One in six students in Broward is homeless,” said Brown, an Ely graduate. “If you hear their stomachs making noises in the class room, don’t laugh. Stop them in the lunch room and do something good for them. Everybody has the ability to be a hero.” But in the end, “The Magic City” is about choices more than anything else. The film’s climax shows Tru and Nia each faced with a decision: resort to violence or find a peaceful way of resolving their anger and hatred. “You can achieve anything as long as you keep love in your heart,” said Jones. The Magic City is expected to be in local movie theaters this fall.

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-783-8700 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 3-29 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO. Looking For Good People! Good Opportunity For Right Individual. Qualifications: Good Driving Record – Physically Fit – Professional. No Drugs! Average Tech Earns $600 $1,200 A Week. Wayne 954-868-5560. 4-5 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTMALE CNA/HHA/ COMPANION – Broward – Former EMT/Certified/ Lt. Massage. Compassionate – References. PT/FT. Ron 954-232-2832. 3-29 HHA CERTIFIED To Care For The Elderly. Good References & Background Check. (Nurse For 27 Yrs. ) Available Mon – Fri. More Information. 561784-5034. 3-29 CERTIFIED AIDE/ CAREGIVER – Care For Sick Or Elderly. Very Honest – Reliable & Caring. Light Housekeeping – Shopping & Cooking. 786-444-7043. 3-29 FORMER MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR Of Large Rental Complex – 30 Years Experience In A/C – Plumbing – Electrical & Landscaping Looking For Work At Local Condo Assoc. 954-3041539. 3-29 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-5 CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 4-5 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs – Carpentry – Plumbing – Roo ng – Masonry – Windows – Painting – Decking – Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 – Emergency Calls. 4-5 BLADE RUNNERS – Yard Maintenance. FREE ESTIMATE!! Grass Cutting –Trimming Hedges & Shrubs. Mulching. Lic/Ins. Starting At $25 Per Cut. Eddie 954-4941303. 3-29 DISCOUNT PRINTING – ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES – Booklets – Brochures – Business Cards – Carbonless Forms – Color Copies – Door Hangers – Envelopes – Flyers – Invoices – Labels – Postcards – Signs – Banners – Rudy Levy 954825-8108. 4-12 SNOWBIRDS/INVESTORS – Licensed R.E. Broker Offers Property Checks & Services For Out Of Town Owners!! Short Or Long Term – Customized Schedule To Suit Your Needs. Reasonable Rates!! Traci Scharf – Epic R.E. Services. 954-242-2392. 3-29 GIGI’S CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable – Honest. More Info. 954-2957033 Or 954-210-2248. 4-5 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 3-29 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CSTAMP COLLECTIONSWANTED – ACCUMULATIONS & COLLECTIONS Of Stamps. House Calls Made. Call John 954-467-7128 Or 954-6142562. 3-29 HOMEOWNERS INSURANCEBETTER RATES! BETTER SERVICE! Call KATIE For A FREE Quote! 954-784-9029. www.myersinsures.com 3-29COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 4-19 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 4-5 THRIFT STORECLF THRIFT STORE – 801 SE 10 St. Deer eld. Monday & Wednesday 10am-3pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-4pm. 20% Off Friday & Saturday ONLY. 954-428-8980. 3-29 DOCKS FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT – Up To 40’. $10 Per Foot. New Dock – Electric & Water Available! Wide Canal! Close To INLET. No Live-Aboards!! No Fixed Bridges. Cell 412-491-3937. 3-29 POMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL – Off NE 14 St. Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water, Electric. Up To 33’ $325 Month. 954-7814994. 3-29 LIGHTOUSE POINT – UP TO 40’. No Fixed Bridges. 1 Mile To Hillsboro Inlet!! Electric & Water. Locked Secured Area. 954-818-0050. 4-12 CYPRESS CREEK CANAL – Very Close To Marina – Facing The Island Club Condo. 777 S. Federal Hwy. Pompano. Capacity 20 Ft. Electric. $300 Per Month – Negotiable If For 1 Year. Call Yvon 954-5976668. 3-29 CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 – Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954812-5192. ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO – LOOKING TO SHARE My Home With Senior Who Needs Minimum Assistance. Private Room – 14th St. Causeway & Federal Hwy. 954-479-0247. 3-29 Homes For RentPOMPANO KEY WEST STYLE 2/2 HOME – C/A – Ceiling Fans. Large Fenced In Back Yard. $1,100 Month Yearly. Please Call Darci For Details 954-783-3723. 541 NE 34 Street. 4-19 POMPANO 1/1 COZY COTTAGE HOUSE – 541 NE 34 ST – 16B. Privacy Fence – A/C. All Tile Floors. $675 Month Yearly. Call Darci For Details 954-783-3723. 4-19 CO-OP FOR SALELIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 – 55+ Building. Excellent Location. Needs Work.. $32,995. For More Information Call 954-444-7258. 4-19

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 29, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-783-8700 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! HOMES FOR SALE POMPANO LEISUREVILLE – 2/1 HOME! Just REDUCED! $79,000. 55+ Community! 2 Clubhouses! FREE GOLF. Low Maintenance. Robert Elkins – Charles Rutenberg R.E. 954-782-8968. 4-5 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-29 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony – Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month. 954-6291324. 3-29 APTS FOR RENTBEACH AREA APT As Low As $475 A Week In Season! (3225 NE 6th St.) 95 Yards To Beach; Bright Airy Apt With Cable, Wireless, Parking, Patio, Charming Furnishings And More. Pet Friendly. 561-541-0308; Debbie@paxproperties.com 4-12 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 4-19 LUXURY OCEAN-VIEW APT: $1475 A MONTH IN SEASON! (Ocean Blvd & NE 6th St.) European Style Kitchen, Ultra-Quiet, EcoFriendly, Central Air, Tropical Pool, Ocean Views, Dedicated Parking, Coin Laundry, Premium Cable TV, WI-FI And More. Pets OK. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com 4-12 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO – 1 Bedroom & Ef ciency With Kitchen. Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly –Seasonal. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 4-5 PRIMO OCEAN BOULEVARD APT For As Low As $68 A Night In Season! (601 N. Ocean Blvd) Great Area, Great Apt. Great Rates. 95 Yards To Beach. Special Weekly & Monthly Rates Too. Cats & Small Dogs Welcome With Pet Fee. Contact Debbie 561-541-0308. Debbie@paxproperties.com 4-12 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 – 3/1 New $1250. SW – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 4-5 POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 3-29 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 4-19 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 4-19 LIGHTHOUSE POINT – UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent In A Psychologists Of ce For A SOLO PROFESSIONAL. $950/Month. Located In The GATEWAY CENTRE – 2040 East Sample Rd. Windowed – Unfurnished Of ce! 14’ x 12.5’. Call 954-942-3344. 4-5 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. 4-5 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 4-19 Head Instructor Youth (ages 9-13) Recreational Sailing Program for City of Lighthouse Point, FL seeks a certi ed Level 1 instructor for its summer program. Employment from June 19 through July 26. Weekdays from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. daily. Program provides area youth an introduction to sailing basics leading up to a “fun” Mayor’s Cup regatta at season’s end. Requirements include current CPR and First Responder certi cation background check, drug test and minimum of 18 years of age. Contact John Trudel at jtrudel@lighthousepoint.com, or 954-868-4918. Can You Teach Sailing? REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad development and senior services. D’Espies began her volunteer work at the Coral Door Thrift Shop in 1990. When the shop closed, she continued to dedicate her time to Broward Health North and works ve to six days a week, 12 hours a day as president of the hospital auxiliary and buyer for the hospital gift shop. Through her efforts, over $600,000 has been raised to buy emergency and operating room equipment. Besides her demanding job as CEO of Broward Health North, Grant volunteers with multiple non-pro ts, especially the Areawide Council on Aging, United Way Committees and the John Knox Village Board, and the American Lung Association. Her leadership skills set a positive example for others to follow. She is always available to advise friends and associates regarding health and welfare issues. Giroux has given 12 years to the NE. Focal Point serving on the CASA, Inc. Board of Directors. He has headed up special committees, most notably the Cuisine of the Region fundraiser and the annual Focal Point Auxiliary fashion show. He rst became involved when his mother attended the Focal Point’s Adult Day Care Center and now continues to donate items for the Center’s “wish list.” Levy is now town manager of Pembroke Park and has been dedicated to helping Broward’s senior residents for over 20 years. He is presently 3rd vice president of the Areawide Council on Aging Board of Directors. In Plantation, he serves as a councilman. Dr. Levy organizes local blood drives and raises funds to save the lives of retired greyhounds. He also serves on the BSO Regional Domestic Security Task Force. The McCarthys are volunteers who have for the past 20 years meshed their healthcare business with the local social service arena. She is active in the Elder Service Resource Network, Impact Broward and the Aging and Disability Resource Center, provides educational sessions for seniors and volunteer organizations. He devotes his talents to Hospice Care, delivers medical equipment and is involved in charity events bene tting the elderly. Judge Art Birken has been a member of the Areawide Council on Aging Board since 1982 and has volunteered his knowledge of the law to serve Broward’s elderly population. He is an ardent advocate for animal adoptions and works closely with the Humane Society and Greyhound Protection League. His interpretation of legal guidelines has become a valued resource for the staff and board of the Council. Harris has served as executive director of the Broward Legislative Delegation for last decade and shares his knowledge with professionals and grass roots activists who have needs relating to government. She volunteers for Broward Days, the groups that brings county concerns to the legislature and served on the board of ChildNet where she has spearheaded a graduation ceremony for teens making educational progress. She participates with NBC-6 Forever Families and is a graduate of Leadership Broward where she co-chairs committees for subsequent classes. Reilly volunteers at the NW Focal Point Senior Center three days a week and knows every client by name. Since 2000, she has averaged 15 hours a week serving snacks, playing games and chatting with clients. The staff there say her patience and compassion knows no bounds. Primeau serves on a dozen boards in Broward including Women in Distress, United Way, Barry University Advisory Council, Memorial Healthcare Systems and the Broward Partnership for the Homeless. An of cer for Florida Community Bank, Primeau also served as mayor of Davie in the late 70s. Tickets to the breakfast are $35 and can be obtained from Cheryl Morrow, Aging and Disability Resource Center, 954-745-9567. Hall of fameContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 29, 2013 Send your events for publication to mdpelican@yahoo.com Lacrosse clinic promotes this action lled sport Deerfield Beach – The Florida Youth Lacrosse Association will hold a free lacrosse clinic Saturday, April 6, noon to 1:30 p.m. at Westside Park on the soccer field. This event is open to boys and girls ages 6 to 14 and is an excellent opportunity to learn about the fast-growing, actionpacked sport of lacrosse. Participants will be shown basic skills and participate in drills taught by local high school coaches coordinated through the Indoor Sports Complex. All of the equipment will be provided courtesy of Florida Youth Lacrosse Association. Please contact the City of Deerfield Beach athletics division at 954-480-4426 for additional details.Relay For LifeDeerfield Beach – The Deerfield Beach, Lighthouse Point & Hillsboro Beach Relay For Life starts on Saturday, April 13 at 4 p.m. at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, and goes until Sunday, April 14 at 9 a.m. The goal of the Relay is to raise money for the American Cancer Society. Teams take turns walking through the night from the start of the event until it’s over. There will also be food, refreshments and other activities. Visit www. relayforlife.org/dblpfl to donate or start a team.

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 29, 2013 Tell The Pelican your sh stories! 954-783-8700! Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFThe water this weekend might be a little bit choppy but RJ Boyle says that’s a small price to pay for some good fishing. “The fishing should be very good because the ocean is stirred-up,” said Boyle. Dolphin, sailfish, cobia and even some sharks are ripe for the catching.Ocean stirs up good shing this weekend“There have been numerous reports. Gaffer dolphin is between 600 and 800 ft.,” said Boyle. “The cobia bite on the wrecks is going to be good as we approach this full moon,” he added. And the sailfish bite, he said, is good at about 150 ft. And for shark enthusiasts, a trip a few miles north to Lake Worth or farther is in order. “If you get a chance to venture to the north, there’s been a lot of shark fishing on the beach.” For those who do go, Boyle suggests chartering Permitted run by Capt. Greg Bogdan out of Sailfish Marina. “People I sent up there come back raving,” said Boyle. And not only is the fishing good, but anglers who go might get treated to a show. “Black tip spinner sharks jump and spin in the air when you hook ‘em,” said Boyle.Anglers Club meetingPompano Beach – The Pompano Beach Offshore Anglers Club meets Monday, April 15 at 7:30 p.m. at Sands Harbor, 125 N. Riverside Drive. World-renowned angler George Poveromo will be the guest speaker and will answer questions. The club meets every third Monday of the month. Visit www. shing. meetup.com/97 or call 954868-0681 for more information.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 29, 2013 Lila Harber and Diana Hunt from Ruskin; Adriana Mejia from Miramar, and Ellen Bolen from Washington, D.C., display their catch from Lady Pamela II at the South Florida “Ladies! Let’s Go Fishing!” University, April 20-22. Ladies! Let’s Go Fishing hosts shing classes for women anglersSPECIAL TO THE PELICANLady anglers are invited to tackle fishing skills at the South Florida “Ladies! Let’s Go Fishing!” University offered specifically for women. The weekend conservationminded university, held in conjunction with support from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, [FWC], emphasizes hands-on skills with techniques such as releasing, knot tying, dehooking, bait rigging, spin casting, gaffing grapefruits, cast netting, trailer backing, boat handling and more. The Women’s Fishing University is scheduled for April 12-14 at the I.T. Parker Community Center in Dania Beach. Women will learn, practice and participate in this sport, while enjoying the waters surrounding South Florida. Activities launch Friday night with a networking meet and greet at 6 p.m., including a master chef appetizer contest. On Saturday, classroom presentations begin at 8 a.m., with beginner and advanced sessions on topics including fishing basics and conservation including a presentation by the FWC and lunch provided by Pollo Tropical. Other fishing classes include techniques for offshore, inshore, bottom and fly fishing conducted by local experts. A “Dress for Fishing Success” fashion show is planned followed by handson skill practice where ladies learn the art of fishing directly from the pros. Sunday, the ladies board charter boats at approximately 7 a.m. for an optional half day fishing trip followed by a filet demonstration. The women typically catch and/or release sailfish, mackerel, tuna, wahoo, snapper and more. Registration starts at $99 for the first 20 who sign up, then $135 after. Registration includes instruction, use of equipment, hands-on training, networking reception and fundraisers, meals, goody bags and more. The Sunday Fishing Adventure, with tackle and bait provided, is additional. No equipment or experience is necessary. Membership is not required however there is a South Florida chapter available to continue the fishing fun. Call 954-475-9068 or email fish@ladiesletsgofishing.com.

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