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Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 03-22-2013
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00343


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Friday, March 22, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 12 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Getting into law school was fairly easy for Terry O’Neil, but the incentive she had for it was painful. The scene is New Orleans. O’Neil had a great job at the French Consulate as a translator. But things weren’t so hot at home although it was August in New Orleans, the month when heat is hurtful. O’Neil was 22. At breakfast, O’Neil asked her husband for a divorce. They had no children; the relationship had been spiraling downward and they were both young enough to move on. That’s when her husband started whacking away. Her screams went unnoticed. She found herself on the couch trying to protect her head. And here’s the part that is pretty hard to believe. It was time for work. They had one car, and O’Neil was the driver. They cleaned up and left. On the way to taking her husband to work, he apologized. That’s when she reiterated the divorce idea, and that’s when the apologetic husband whacked her again. This week, O’Neil, now president of the National Organization of Women [NOW], a practicing attorney and mother of a daughter, was keynote speaker for Women’s History Month, sponsored by a coalition of several groups: Democratic Women’s Club of Northeast Broward, Pro-Choice NOW president, Terry O’Neil, continues to ght for women’s issues she knows rsthand Incumbents and former mayor take their oathsForget outsourcing, Mayor Robb wants to return workers to city hallBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Mayor Jean Robb made her rst move to bring work and wages back to city employees Tuesday night. Soon after being sworn in, Robb pulled a tree-trimming contract from the agenda and said, “These are things our workers used to do . it is incumbent on our city manager to look at these people and bring them back.” Mayor Jean Robb confers with City Manager Burgess Hanson over an agenda item privatizing tree and palm trimming. Robb was sworn in as mayor Tuesday evening and immediately brought forth one of her issues. [Photo courtesy of Deer eld Beach] See ROBB on page 12 Beach library site tentatively chosen By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach – A site for the beach library has been proposed and apparently accepted by city commissioners. The new branch will be built on the corner of Riverside Drive and Northeast 2 Street on cityowned land. The library must move from its current site to make room for redevelopment of the pier parking lot. Goals have been to keep the library in operation and keep it on the barrier island, Nguyen Tran, project manager, said. Before making its site recommendation, Tran said staff looked at several possibilities, See BEACH LIBRARY on page 5 Fisher begins his third term as mayor this week as he takes his oath of of ce. Fisher, home-grown in Pompano Beach, says his win was a mandate to keep redevelopment on the move. Fisher also gained recognition for his “Mayor’s Stimulus” package which calls for fast tracking business plans through the city’s permitting of ce. The Rev. Ron Harvey, First Baptist Church, holds the Bible as Fisher takes his oath as friends and family look on. [Photo courtesy of Pompano Beach] Removal of trees an issue as parking lot plan is approvedBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park – City commissioners on Wednesday approved plans for a public parking lot at 1201-1235 E. Oakland Park Blvd, but not before two of them tried to save a live oak tree at the site. Commissioners Suzanne Boisvenue and Jed Shank tried unsuccessfully to convince the board to change the plan and save the tree. Of the 44 trees on the property, the 40-foot live oak is not recommended for relocation because of a typically low survival rate and the cost, about $19,000. The parking lot is needed to support the establishment of a culinary arts school in the adjacent building at 1299 E. Oakland Park Blvd. and to provide additional public parking See OAKS on page 16 Turtle Nesting Season is March through OctoberSee O’NEIL on page 19

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2 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – The commission will appoint members to the city’s advisory boards in May and are looking for a few good citizens to volunteer. Many board terms expire while vacancies exist on almost all of them. In particular the Deer eld Beach Housing Authority has three seats to ll after the resignation this week of Joan Maurice, Mike Weiss and Sally Potter, all appointees of former mayor Peggy Noland. The resignations reduce the seven man board to four members. Those positions will be lled by the mayor with commission approval. Also in need of new blood is the Cultural Committee which produces the Festival of the Arts in January and concerts throughout the year. Mayor Jean Robb urged commissioners to seek interested residents within their districts, adding “we need to get young people” on these boards and Commissioner Ben Preston asked his constituents to consider serving. As for the city’s representation on the Metropolitan Planning Organization and League of Cities [MPO], the mayor withdrew her name and appointed Commissioner Bill Ganz to the MPO and Commissioner Ben Preston to attend League meetings. Former mayor Peggy Noland has been active in both agencies. Citizens urged to ll board vacancies, mayor to name three for housing authority See DEERFIELD on page 24By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFF Lighthouse Point – Tony Grimaldi won’t be able to provide for his three-weekold daughter but the friends and family he left behind are trying to make sure she gets as much as help as possible. Grimaldi, 31, a Lighthouse Point resident, who worked in the yachting industry, died March 5 during a trip to the Ukraine to bring his anc and their daughter back to Florida. “We really don’t how he died,” said Brandon McCarraher, Grimaldi’s longtime friend who spoke for the family. To help the family raise enough money to bring Grimaldi’s body home, McCarraher set up an account Family, friends raise money for daughter of deceased Lighthouse Point residentSee GRIMALDI on page 13 GRIMALDI

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 22, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Seven tournaments after they won the USSSA World Series last August, the Deer eld Beach Sharks are number one – in the U.S. The 12-and-under girls softball team rose to the top through a combination of wins, runs scored and other rating systems used by the USSSA [US Specialty Sports Association] said their general manager Karla Antonio. In the World Series they went The Best The Deer eld Beach Sharks, from left, front rowAJ Chang, Mia Veliz. Back row – Chelsea Brown, Taylor Cochrane, Anna Knight, Brooke Antonio, Sami Restrepo, Brandi Antonio, Jorden ‘Taco’ Grif th, Lindsey Garcia.Sharks are number one! They are strong at the plate, give up few runs undefeated. In their last four games they scored 40 runs against the opponents’ three. Said Antonio, “We thought we shouldn’t have allowed those three.” For all their games, the team averages seven runs a game while allowing only one run. Tuesday night, the 10-girl squad was honored by the city commission before a packed house there to witness the installation of the mayor and commissioners.See SHARKS on page 9

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4 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Beach Rescue Captain Mike Brown demonstrates the Sea Legs beach buggy that gives persons with disabilities the ability to get into the ocean safely. The buggy is equipped with wheels and pontoons and in the water is in a reclining position. Deer eld Beach and Pompano Beach are the rst two cities in the country to be able to provide the oating chairs, at no cost, to beach visitors. They will be available only on green ag days [smooth seas], Brown said. Money to buy the chairs was raised by Dave and Terri Rittenhouse and made possible by donations from the Isle Casino, the Veterans United Foundation and other. [Staff photo] New beach chairs offer persons with disabilities swimming oating rightsArt 3-24 – Riverwalk Sunday Arts from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Esplanade Park, 401 SW 2 St., Fort Lauderdale. Performance artists, dancers, visual artists, photographers, sculptors, story tellers and jewelry designers. 954-462-8190. 3-26 – Art classes Tuesdays through Thursdays at Morais Art Gallery, 418 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Classes are from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., 2 to 4 p.m. and 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Registration is $30. Cost is $25 per session. 954-5321534. 4-12 – Social Media & The Artists workshop from 7 to 9 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Court. Cost is $5 donation to the Central Area Neighborhood Association of Wilton Manors. Email PoetC7@aol.com or 954-6614740.Auctions & Sales3-23 – Women’s Club of Coconut Creek hosts a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at North Recreation Complex, 4455 Sol Press Blvd., Coconut Creek. Fundraiser to support scholarships for Coconut Creek residents and charitable programs. 954-326-7480.Auditions & Theater3-23 – Pilobolus dance troupe performs at 2 and 8 p.m. at Parker Playhouse, 700 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are $36.50 and $46.50. 954764-1441. 3-30 – Magician Jason Bishop performs at 8 p.m. the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, 2855 Coral Springs Drive, Coral Springs. 954-3445999. Tickets are between $25 and $35.Books & Lectures3-23 & 24 – Book sale from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Northwest Regional Library, 3151 University Drive, Coral Springs. 954-3577990. 3-27 – Afternoon Book Club at 3 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. 954946-6398.Business3-25 – Networking Monday Mixer from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at CRA Business See SIGHTNGS on page 7

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 22, 2013 “ including the second story of the Wells Fargo building, the Sera Martell Martel site at 110 N. Ocean and the Oceanside lot. The bank site was ruled out because it is half the size of the existing library and would have required extensive renovation. There was no workable parking solution at the Martel location. They also looked at moving the existing building to the recommended site, but the cost was estimated at $920,000. The new site is just west of the Wells Fargo building. “One of our goals is to create a pedestrian connection from the beach [and pier development] through the site to the Intracoastal Waterway to the west,” said planner Natasha Alfonso. Discussions are under way with Wells Fargo of cials to recon gure some of their parking and to share an entrance off Northeast 2 Street. The greenway would be enhanced there and expanded to Riverside Drive. The library building would front on a park, enhancing security there. Conceptual drawings are of a 4,000 square foot Florida vernacular style structure with a 1,400-foot veranda wrapping around a corner. About half the building would be used for meetings and storage. Several residents urged the commission to approve the location, including Jack Rogerson, chair of the East CRA Advisory Board, who said the board voted 6-2 in favor of the site. He said the location has a lot of community support, and is “the only option we have. I think we did it right, nally,” he said. Phyllis Nackman, a resident of Jamaica House condominium and a nine-year library volunteer, said she has seen the importance of the library, with people using computers, iPads “and still those who treasure a book.” She said the proposed new location would satisfy the needs of the community. Some residents urged the commission to approve a bigger library, so more programs could be planned for children, and a larger community center area so meetings could take place there. “If we’re looking for a semi-permanent or permanent solution, we need to do something that satis es all the residents,” said Sandy Von Staden, vice chair of the East CRA Advisory Board, who voted against the site. She said patrons have been promised programming for families and older residents and were told that a lack of space prevented expanded programming. Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca told commissioners they had a commitment from the county administration to keep operating the library. Commissioner Rex Hardin asked if the library could be larger, so community meetings could be held there. Vice Mayor George Brummer was not satis ed with the proposal. “It’s haphazard.” He said it should rst be determined what is wanted in the library and then decide the size. “It’s not practical to start planning a building when you don’t know what will be in it,” he said to audience applause. Brummer questioned whether there would be a charge for parking at the library. Beach said that wasn’t envisioned. Brummer said if there was no charge, spaces would be available for beachgoers. The library must be relocated by June 2014. The city recently approved a development agreement between the city and Pompano Pier Associates for redevelopment on the land where the library is now located. Kim Briesemeister, co-executive director of the CRA, said the current discussion was aimed at the beach library relocation. “This is about a library, not a community center,” she said. “Do you approve this site for the library? We will discuss other uses later.” Still Brummer persisted, noting, “It’s wrong to say we’re just discussing a library now. I can’t see a library being built without a community center. We need to know a little more about it. I’m not satis ed with what I’m seeing here.” Commissioner Barry Dockswell said, “Our priority is to keep the library and move off the pier development area.” He said the proposed plan moves the city in the right direction. “It’s new, bigger and can enhance programming.” Mayor Lamar Fisher suggested negotiating with Wells Fargo to get their site for a community center and visitor’s center. He said they’ve shut down their drivethrough. “The cry is so loud to keep the library; this is where we need to go,” Fisher said. The proposed library will cost about $1.67 million.Beach LibraryContinued from page 1 The cry is so loud to keep the library this; is where we need to go. Fisher The proposed beach library includes a 4,000 sq. ft. design with a Florida style and is planned for a site just west of the Wells Fargo Bank between Atlantic Boulevard and 14th St. Causeway.

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6 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Circulation Joe McGeeAccount Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XXI, Issue 12 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & LettersPassover, Festival of FreedomBy Rabbi David MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOMOf all Jewish holidays, Passover’s theme is the most universal: the message of freedom. ‘Way back in 1400 BCE, during the reign of the mighty Pharaoh Ramses II [or perhaps his son, Merneptah], an invisible God reached out of the heavens and into human history. “Let My people go!” ordered Moses, His prophet, and, shocked and demoralized by ten plagues which af icted his country, his cattle, and his people, Ramses had no choice but to comply, according to the biblical Book of Exodus. Today, this message continues to resonate in oppressed nations worldwide, where uncounted millions of human beings yearn for the very freedoms which we Americans take for granted: freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of religion, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. What do Jews do during Passover, Pesach in Hebrew? For the seven-day [eight, outside of Israel] period of the holiday, observant Jews refrain from eating leavened foods, and instead eat foods consisting of matzah, the grain of which (usually wheat) has been mixed with water and baked before eighteen minutes have passed, in remembrance of the speed in which the Israelites departed Egypt during the Exodus. Passover is a home-based holiday, and it may be the single festival most responsible for “keeping Jews Jewish.” Many Jews attend temple services on the High Holy Days, but it is estimated that a full 80 percent will attend a seder [Hebrew, “order”] meal, the special feast which this year falls on Monday and Tuesday evenings, March 25 and 26. It is a dinner full of ritual, in which the participants partake of four cups of wine, to represent the four promises God made to our ancestors: “I took you out of Egypt; I saved you from Pharaoh’s wrath; I liberated you from slavery; I took you to be My special people.” It is a repast full of symbolism: while singing and chanting prayers and songs from a special book called the Hagadah, [Hebrew, “the Telling”], we eat white horseradish, the “bitter herb” which reminds us of the bitterness of slavery, and dip green parsley, the symbol of springtime, into salt water, to recall the bitter tears of slavery, while reclining at the table in the attitude of free people. Indeed, the seder represents the earliest audio-visual learning experience known to humankind, and everything we do there is meant to provoke questions and discussion. Outside of mono-seasonal Florida, Passover marks the beginning of the spring harvest season. Accordingly, the temple service during the holiday includes a prayer for dew, representing both God’s visible grace upon the earth, and the gentle rain which sustains the standing barley. May Passover 2013 bring blessings of peace and freedom for all! To the editor As the owner of one rescued feral cat, (2 others lived their remaining lives with me), I would encourage both sides to work together to nd a compromise. No one wants animals to suffer, nor does anyone want to force neighbors to deal with animals that they don’t want. I believe, the moratorium will enable Pompano Beach, the citizen advocates/activists, and Pompano Beach Animal Control to have some dialogue. For now, the rhetoric appears to be in ammatory. I applaud Mayor Lamar Fisher and the Pompano Beach City Commission for attempting to resolve the matter in a manner that is equitable to the City, its residents, and the cats. I hope that everyone with a stake in the outcome will offer their input to those trying to make things better. Name withheldReaders want Pompano Beach to take actions to stop cat suffering To the editor, I was at that commission meeting. There was only one negative person on that council that gave a NO vote. Well, now that the political season is over, maybe Commissioner Dockswell can open his mind, to what the cat situation in Pompano and every city in Broward County is facing and possibly learn something. We have a population of 1.8 million people in Broward County. We also have a feral/stray/free roaming cat population in Broward County of 300,000 as well. David Aycock claimed that only 2 percent of free roaming cats are neutered. I don’t know where he gets his information from. Stray Aid & Rescue performed over 1800 surgeries on feral cats alone in 2011. If only 2% (of 300,000) were sterilized, that would only be 6,000 in the entire county. Stray Aid and Rescue did 3.3% of the surgeries working 4 days a week. I am sure other spay/neuter clinics such as the Humane Society of Broward County, Cats Exclusive, and Discount Pet Clinic to name just a few could show even greater percentages of feral spay/neuter surgeries that would far exceed 6,000. Pompano does not have more than the norm when it comes to the number of feral cats. Here is what happens when just one pair of cats is allowed to breed uncontrolled it is called “The Cat Multiplier”: Start with one young breeding pair of cats. Assume they have two litters of kittens each year, 2.8 kittens in each litter will survive, and the cats will continue to breed for 10 years. Factor in all the cats born into the formula, and this is how overpopulation occurs: In year 1, there will be 12 cats. In year 2, there will be 66 cats. In year 3, there will be 382 cats. In year 4, there will be 2,201 cats. In year 5, there will be 12,680 cats. In year 6, there will be 73,041 cats. In year 7, there will be 420,715 cats. In year 8, there will be 2,423,316 cats. In year 9, there will be 13,968,290 cats. In year 10, there will be 80,399,780 cats YES, 80 MILLION. I personally made sure that everyone on the Commission received a copy of “The Cat Multiplier” the night of the Commission meeting. Everyone knows that cats continue to have kittens, a lot of them. But when you see it in print, it is truly eye opening. This is why TNR is so important. No, University of Florida researchers, we CAN’T get them ALL, but we make the effort to get out there to trap, neuter, and return as many cats as we possibly can. Some colonies are small, some are large and contained meaning that all the cats withing the colony have been spayed/neutered. Generally, new cats do not come in. On occasion, someone may dump a cat because they see that someone is feeding. David Aycock makes it sound like a feral colony is full of sickly, suffering cats. These might be isolated cases and I am certain he has seen his fair share. But you can’t See CATS on page 18 Rollie/Velcro is three months old and paralyzed in the back hindquarters. She was found at Quiet Waters Park. To pay for a mobility cart and surgery, The Florida Humane Society is raising money. To donate, visit www. oridahumanesociety.org or call 954-974-6152. The Florida Humane Society, a non-pro t/no-kill organization, is located at 3870 N. Powerline Rd., Pompano Beach., has dogs and cats available for adoption. [Photo courtesy of the Florida Humane Society]Take me home . In Lighthouse PointOfferdahl’s, 2400 N. Federal Hwy. Publix at Venetian Isles; Red Fox Diner, 3640 N. Federal Hwy. Publix at The Shoppes of Beacon Light Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St Bone sh Mac’s, 2002 E. Sample Rd. Packy’s 4480 N. Federal Hwy Get together for the cats

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 22, 2013 League of cities takes on hunger issues in South FloridaSPECIAL TO THE PELICANThe Broward League of Cities, a non-pro t organization representing the Lauderhill Vice Mayor Ken Thurston, Pembroke Park Mayor Ashira Mohammed, Hollywood Commissioner Patricia Asseff, Fort Lauderdale Commissioner Bobby DuBose, Hollywood Commissioner Kevin Biederman, Margate Commissioner Joanne Simone, Wilton Manors Commissioner Tom Green. [Photo courtesy of The Broward League of Cities]31 municipal governments and more than 80 associate government, non-pro t and business organizations within Broward County, recently hosted a service project at Feeding South Florida with more than 40 elected of cals, city staff and associate members sorting and packing nutritious food for lowincome children. During his tenure as president of the League, Fort Lauderdale City Commissioner Bobby DuBose is highlighting the power of volunteerism by adopting “Together We Serve” as his platform and issuing a Million-Hour Volunteer Challenge to the local communities. The Feeding South Florida service project kicks off a series of community events being planned this spring as part of DuBose’s “Together We Serve” platform. During the Resource Center, 501 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach, 954586-1111. 3-28 – Wilton Manors Business Association meets for lunch networking from 12 to 1 p.m. at Lotus Chinese Kitchen, 1434 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Visit wiltonmanors businessassociation.com.Children & Family3-23 – Easter Bunny from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Community Park, 820 NE 8 Ave. Free games, face painting egg hunts, arts and crafts and more. 954-786-4111. 3-29 – “Madagascar 3” plays at sundown at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. Event is free. 954-360-4507. 3-30 – Easter Bunny visits Pompano Citi Centre, corner of Federal Highway and Copans Road, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Photos, food, arts and crafts, egg hunt and other kids activities. 954943-4683. Clubs & Charity3-22 – Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SightingsContinued from page 4 See SIGHTINGS on page 21 See LEAGUE FEED on page 13

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8 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 BriefsBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRichard N. DeMaio, president and owner of his maintenance supply company, says he’s been working the East Coast for 24 years. He knows his customers’ needs well. “Because I have local warehouses up and down the coast, I can offer many nancial advantages to large consumers of janitorial supplies,” he explains. “Right now in Pompano Beach and the tri-county area, I sell large quantities of supplies to housing authorities, schools, sewer plants, public works and more. Working with volume from locations near my customers gives me an edge over competition. I can deliver large quantities quickly to accommodate my clients, and I can keep prices very competitive because of the volume of business I do.” Both his grandfather and his father were in the plumbing and supply business, so DeMaio was raised around the business and as in all families, he helped out from childhood and became familiar with the supply side of the business. He says, “When I graduated from college, I went to work for a company, but soon decided I wanted to be my own boss. I took the risk, and it has worked out well, partly because I began a business selling products I understood.” He expanded his business from the north east into the Tri-counties of southern Florida and Pompano Beach in 2005, and spends most of his time here. “I want to be available in-person to my newer accounts to build relationships with them,” he says. “My long time accounts in the northeast do not require in-person contact. I handle much of that business on the phone.” Most of his clients buy large quantities of product in ve-gallon pails, 30 or 55 gallon drums because it is both ef cient and cost effective. R.N. DeMaio, distributor from Florida to Maine, delivers wholesale janitorial supplies locallySee DEMAIO on page 21Richard DeMaio keeps busy in one of his many warehouses where he stores janitorial supplies for local businesses. [Photo courte sy of R.N. DeMaio]Bicycle RodeoPompano Beach – The City of Pompano Beach, in conjunction with Florida Bicycle Month, will hold its Bicycle Rodeo on Saturday, April 6 from 8 to 1 p.m. at McNair Park, 951 NW 27 Ave. There will be bicycle safety information, food and more for families and children of all ages. The event is free. Call 954-786-7882. Healthy Aging workshop Pompano Beach – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the City of Pompano Beach are hosting a workshop that focuses on using urban planning to improve neighborhoods for elderly residents. The workshop will be held on Wednesday, April 3 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Blvd. The neighborhoods discussed will be Leisureville, Kendall Green and Loch Lomond. Register for this free event by April 1 by calling Kevin Gurley, Pompano’s neighborhood planner, at 954-786-7921.Dinner Under the StarsLighthouse Point – The 8th Annual Dinner Under the Stars will be held Saturday, April 6 from 5 to 9:30 p.m. at Frank McDonough Park, 3500 NE 27 Ave. There will be live music, dancing and dining with prizes awarded to participants who have the best decorated table. The event, which sold out last year, has limited seating. Table reservations must be made by March 29. Cost is $10 per table. Each table seats 10. To RSVP, call John Trudel at 954-784-3439.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 22, 2013 Said Jose Antonio, “These are the 10 most talented softball players in Florida, maybe the country.” This weekend, the Sharks are playing in Georgia but the start of the spring season and bigger tournaments are just ahead. They will return to the World Series in July already eyeing their stiffest competition, Jacksonville, Orlando and Pembroke Pines. The Shark’s success has attracted players from Boynton Beach to Davie. One of their best is Chelsea Brown, a 6th grader who is the starting shortstop at Westminster Academy. Brown is a “very strong hitter” as are Grif th and Restrepo who was the MVP at the World Series. Sharing mound duties are Taylor Cochrane who also plays out eld and Brandi Antonio often on rst base. The two were named Co-MVPs of the Series. Contributing speed to the game are “really fast runners” Brooke Antonio, Mia Veliz and Lindsey Garcia. Defensive standouts Anna Knight and AJ Chang add versatility, playing several positions and hitting both left and right handed. Each girl on the small squad gets lots of playing time which, according to Karla Antonio, is the way they like it. Despite their young ages, four of them also play high school ball. The Sharks received public acclaim two years ago when they were fth in the nation in the 10-and-under division. Now they are eyeing the 14-and-under competition. And the Antonios will move along with them. The local couple started the team four seasons ago emphasizing stress conditioning, speed and agility. They also have given the girls the advantage of working out with softball coaches at Lynn University and Nova SE University.SharksContinued from page 33-26 – Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets Tuesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. 3-26 – Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets Tuesdays at 12:15 p.m. at Deer Creek Country Club, 2801 Country Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 866976-8279 3-26 – Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale/Cypress Creek meets Tuesdays at 12 p.m. at Westin Cypress Creek Hotel, 400 Corporate Drive. 954-492-8254. 3-27 – Kiwanis Club of Oakland Park meets Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. 3-27 – Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach meets every Wednesday at 12 p.m. at Sea Side Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954783-4999. 3-27 – Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at SightingsContinued from page 7 See SIGHTINGS on page

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10 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Pelican sat down with Yvonne Womack, a dedicated volunteer and team leader of the Blessings Food Pantry, located on the Christ Church campus at 210 NE 3 St. in Pompano Beach. Cynthia Metzger Phipps, church communications director, sat in on this interview. “I responded to an ad for volunteers in this pantry for threehours a week,” says Yvonne who now volunteers at the pantry the equal of a regular work week. “This place is a passion for me and it’s a wonderful, gratifying way to spend my week. I’m also a mentor at Bennett Elementary School which is a two-hour weekly commitment for me. I’m from Michigan where I worked for an architectural rm as of ce manager. Although we came to Florida to retire, my husband works and I volunteer full time.” She offers a brief tour of the space provided by the church which shows well organized boxes of clothing and shoes in one area, hygiene items in another. A room with refrigerated produce is lled with box after box of bagged groceries ready to go. “We treat our clients with dignity and respect,” Yvonne says referring to the homeless and hungry families in Broward County. We understand and we tell them that we are just like them—a pay check away from needing the same kind of help. We started this pantry in the church kitchen in 2007, feeding 10 people on a busy day. This space feels like a mansion by comparison, and we need it because we feed well over 200 people each week.” Cynthia chimes in with a few statistics. “This food pantry served 10,500 people in 2012. That’s an increase of 7.5 percent over 2011. We have over 40 volunteers who keep the pantry operating by conducting food drives, transporting and distributing food, meeting with clients, creating and maintaining client records. At the end of last year, we became part of the United Way of Broward’s Project Lifeline so we now receive fresh fruits and vegetables twice a month to give to the county’s hungry.” The homeless are welcomed twice a month to pick up packed nonperishable foods with pop top tabs and clean clothing. Hungry families send a family representative once a month to receive their food. The size of the family determines the number of bags handed to them. Asked how these clients hear about Blessings Pantry, Yvonne says, Pasta dinner to bene t Boy ScoutsDeer eld Beach The annual pasta dinner night for Troop 119, Lighthouse District is planned for March 23 from 4:30 to 7 p.m. at St. Ambrose Catholic Church Rectory Social Hall, 380 S. Federal Highway, Deer eld Beach. Price of the dinner is $5 and includes salad, dessert, and beverage. Children under ve are free. Tickets are available at the door. The evening also includes raf es with items donated from local businesses. This troop has been in existence for over 50 years. Monies raised from this dinner will help scouts attend campouts, jamborees, and summer camp. Call 954 675-5683. Those blessed share time and treasures volunteering at Blessings Food Pantry in Christ Church Dedicated volunteer, Yvonne Womack, team leader of Blessings Pantry on the campus of Christ Church 210 NE 3rd St. stands in front of a wall of pictures of the 40 volunteers who assist her in running the pantry. With smiles and caring hearts they have distributed food to 10,500 homeless and hungry Broward residents in 2012. Womack says, “We tell them that we are one paycheck away from being in their shoes. They may be homeless and or hungry, but they deserve our respect and their own dignity.”See BLESSINGS on page 11 Threads of LovePompano Beach – Every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. the women of the Threads of Love quilting group come together to make quilts at St. Stephen Evangelical Lutheran Church, 2500 NE 14 St. Causeway. The group, consisting of about 18 members, has made over 16,500 quilts since it was founded over 25 years ago. This past year, they made 431 quilts. Once completed, the quilts are donated to local charities and organizations such as Women In Distress, John Knox Village, the Pompano Rehab Center and Community Church at Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea. To join, call Lynn Vatral at 954-782-9967.Recycling carts readyLighthouse Point – Residents who want new 48-gallon or 64-gallon recycling carts can get one by calling 954-946-7386. The old green bins can also be recycled by placing them on the curb on recycling day. Recycling service is provided once a week. Recycling items will be collected on the rst day of scheduled garbage collection.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 22, 2013 “They hear about us from one another. Some are referred by case workers, hospitals and other pantries and then there is the Broward Hot Line, 211. Those who no longer need us, thrill us when they stop by to say, “I’ve got a job and will now provide for my own family.” Sometimes we get a postcard from families who have moved away. We’re always happy to hear good news.” Cynthia adds, “No one in America should go hungry. We want the children who come with a parent to remember this as a happy time so we always have juice, cookies and a toy on hand for all who visit.” Yvonne explains that a system has been devised in order to provide properly. “We have a greeting room so when clients comes in, volunteers pull their les. We visit with them, trying to make it a personal experience. The vast majority would prefer to be shopping at Publix like we do and they are usually embarrassed and grateful. We try to treat them with the same courtesy we would want and respond in kind. Next, we hand them their food and all of the information we have on other pantries and agencies which may be of help. We wish we could give them enough food for the month but we just don’t have it.” A number of generous businesses and local groups keep the pantry stocked. Cynthia ticks off a list of major supporters including Winn Dixie Foundation, Whole Foods, Gordon Food Service, Farm Share, a USDA distributor, Oakland Park Kiwanis, Christ Church School PTO, Christ Church, The Spice Quarter, Templeton Funds Fort Lauderdale, Bishop Gallagher High School, Zion Lutheran Christian School, Curves of Lighthouse Point, Upward Soccer and Upward Basketball. In addition to Project Lifeline, two community gardens, The Need to Feed on Christ Church campus and The Fruitful Field in Pompano Beach, donate fresh produce. When it arrives, the fresh produce is spread out attractively on tables and clients pick and choose just like they would do at Whole Foods. Blessings Pantry is totally volunteer driven. No one is paid. The 40 volunteers work in shifts. Team meetings keep the pantry functioning smoothly. Volunteer Cynthia Buehl says, “It’s a delight to work here because everyone is grateful to be helping others. I work in the storage area where we pack the food in bags and receive donations for our clients. It’s heartwarming to know how many people care and donate. Another volunteer, Christina Abrams, is a retired executive who nds this volunteer job a “wonderful way to give back to the community”. The pantry is open 52 weeks a year from 9 a.m. to 12 noon Mon. through Fri. Pastor Fawn Mikel is available once a week to provide spiritual help, and occasional nancial assistance. Yvonne wraps up the interview saying, “We have clients who have lost their homes and live in their cars if they are lucky enough to still have a car. The work we do may sound depressing but it is also gratifying because we are helping. We have to accept the idea that we are doing the best we can. The need seems to grow and we all wish there were more resources for them and ways to help them to get jobs and regain their self respect.” Thank you Yvonne Womack and your team of 40 volunteers for your generous hearts and hands that keep Blessings Pantry open for those in need. To donate, bring nonperishable foods that have not expired with pull tab tops if possible. Hygiene items are also welcome. To volunteer or donate, call 954-943-0404, ext. 207 Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – Three Easter egg hunts for children of various ages, a bonnet contest and visit by BlessingsContinued from page 8Plenty of egg hunts planned the Easter bunny are planned during Easter-By-The-Sea from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, March 30, on the grounds of Town Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Drive. Volunteers are needed to help stuff Easter eggs from 5 to 7:30 p.m. in Jarvis Hall, next to Town Hall, on Friday, March 22, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Call 954-254-1743

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12 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Send news to mdpelican@yahoo.com Two years ago the city laid off 106 employees, most of them maintenance workers, citing budget constraints. Re-assigning the work to city crews will cost $250,000, City Manager Burgess Hanson said, while the pending contract with Complete Property Services is for $93,000. Hanson reminded the commission they had made the decision to privatize some services. The contract is for tree trimming on Powerline Road which Hanson said could be dangerous work for the employees and raises workman’s comp issues. “Some of these trees have not been cut in ve years . . It is more ef cient to get it done now,” the manager said. The mayor countered saying, “It is important to take care of our own . it is a small price to pay for our residents to work here.” Commissioner Bill Ganz said the function was privatized at a “tremendous savings . we need to spend taxpayer’s dollars wisely . right now we need to be responsible.” Commissioner Ben Preston said the commission should look at “transitioning and restoring jobs as nances improve, and Vice Mayor Joe Miller pointed out the trees must be trimmed before hurricane season. “I wouldn’t want anyone other than an arborist out there,” he added. A motion to approve the contract with Complete Property Services was passed 3-2 with Preston and the mayor casting the ‘no’ votes and urging Hanson to come to the next meeting with a progress report on reinstating the workers. Earlier in the meeting, Robb, who won a very tight election race, took the gavel saying she was “humbled” to have been chosen to serve. She also brought to the podium her special guests, former vice mayor Don Thomas, former mayor Oren Woodward and former mayor and county commissioner Sylvia Poitier, all of whom provided brief glimpses of the city’s political history. Woodward retired his position 33 years ago when Robb was rst elected mayor. Thomas was vice mayor at the time and Robb ran against him. Tuesday, Thomas was still the graceful loser saying “I think the best person won . Jean belongs to the City of Deer eld Beach.” Poitier, who served on the commission before and after Robb’s terms in the 90s spoke of her as “a loving friend.” She also pointed out that with 5,000 voters, District 2 can now elect a mayor. “We have the mayor now,” Poitier said “Century Village has to give it up.” Also installed Tuesday were District 4 Commissioner Bill Ganz who ran unopposed and District 3 Commissioner RobbContinued from page 1 Richard Rosenzweig, who lead a eld of three candidates for the job. In the rotation that selects the vice mayor, Joe Miller will serve this year; Ben Preston, next.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 22, 2013 The Pink Church Chancel Choir and Soloists with Mark Jones, director of music/ organist present The Lynn University Conservatory Chamber Orchestra with Dr. Jon Robertson, Guest Conductor March 24 at 4 p.m. The acclaimed Pink Church Choir and Soloists present their annual Palm Sunday concert featuring music for Lent and Holy Week, including the beautiful and Requiem of Gabriel Faur. The public is invited. A $10 suggested donation will be received at the door. Reception following concert. The First Presbyterian Faure Requiem at Pink Church service project, the Broward League of Cities team packed more than 1,300 meals that will be delivered to lowincome children to nourish them on weekends when other food might not be available to them. “Studies have shown that poor performance, behavioral problems, and health problems are all part of the effects of hunger,” said Feeding South Florida CEO Paco Vlez. “Thanks to the commitment of volunteer groups like the Broward League of Cities, we can help ll the void between Friday’s school lunch and Monday’s school breakfast with shelfstable, kid-friendly meals that are part of a well-balanced diet.” Feeding South Florida solicits donations of food from a variety of sources, such as farmers and grocers, and distributes it through a network of non-pro t agencies including daycare centers, homeless shelters, youth programs, residential homes for the physically and mentally challenged and many more. The organization distributes about two million pounds of food each month to South Floridians. To participate in the League’s Million Hour Volunteer Challenge, please visit browardleague.org/ volunteerchallenge. League feedContinued from page 7 with FundRazr.com to solicit donations. The effort raised enough to bring Grimaldi’s body home and now the excess will be used to help his daughter. His family, along with dozens of his friends, gathered at Galuppi’s in Pompano Beach on March 14 to reminisce about their lost loved-one and help raise more funds. “Our families grew up together,” said McCarraher, who added that he started the fundraiser so the family could focus on grieving and not worry about how they were going to get their son home. “Tony was your typical guy that everybody loved. Everyone knew Tony by his smile,” said McCarraher. “He always wanted to give and never wanted anything back.” It was that smile, joked friend Brendan Ferrelli, that could be dangerous to guys who brought their girlfriends around him. “The ladies loved him. Those dimples. No way was I going to bring a girlfriend around those dimples.” And like Donald Trump with making money and LeBron James with playing basketball, Ferrelli said Grimaldi had “the natural ability to make everyone to like him,” adding, “Every guy wanted to be him and every girl wanted to be with him.” Visit www.fundrazr.com and type Tony Grimaldi in the search category to donate.GrimaldiContinued from pageChurch ”The Pink Church” is located at 2331 NE 26. Avenue, Pompano Beach. Call 954-941-2308, Music Of ce ext. 112

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14 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – For the rst time in its 13-year history, the Cuisine of the Region, an extravaganza of food and wine tasting, will be held beachside, at the stately Hillsboro Club on the Hillsboro Mile. The larger venue is expected to draw a crowd of up to 300, according to Donna DeFronzo, executive director of the N.E. Focal Point which bene ts from the event. The party is hosted by the N.E. Focal Point CASA, Inc, a group of highly dedicated people who believe in the services offered by DeFronzo and her staff that include day care for Alzheimer’s patients, a senior center with daily social activities, health and wellness programs, transportation and lunch, and a preschool for children ages two to ve. Said Terry Murchie, who along with most of the committee members, was an Cathy Giroux, Joan Gould, Joan Fink, Terry Murchie, Bill Giroux, Nancy Smith, Liz McGill. Not pictured: Richard Sales and Irving & Rhea Weiss. [Photo courtesy of The City of Deer eld Beach] tickets, baskets of cheer and gift certi cates to restaurants and attractions. At the serving stations will be representatives from Casa Maya Grill, Darrel & Oliver’s Caf Maxx, Edible Chefs left to right -Oceans 234, Victor Franco; The Cake Lady, Luisia VivianiGanin; Hillsboro Club, Jacques Noel; Le Val de Loire, Laurent Fabrice; Gourmet Adventures Catering, Joni Goldberg; Punjab Restaurant Cuisine of India, Ramjit Singh, Seema Singh; Angelo’s Station House Grille, Angelo Morinelli and JB’s on the Beach, Mike Hrabovsky.original CASA member and party planner, “It is Donna who keeps us going. She keeps us coming back because of the charity and the ‘family’ we work with both at the Focal Point and in CASA. Co-chairs for this year’s Cuisine which will be held April 17, 5:30 to 9 p.m. are Joan Gould, Bill Giroux and Richard Sales. Among the chefs new to the event is Laurent Fabrice who will serve a Le Val de Loire favorite, beef stew and country pate. Another joining the Cuisine for the rst time is Angelo Morinell from Angelo’s Station House who will tempt palates with his homemade snow ake pasta lled with cheese and sweet pear. And Seema Singh from Punjab Palace, an icon of Indian food since 1981, also makes his rst appearance at Cuisine. Along with food and wine, CASA members assemble grand displays of silent and live auction items that include weekend getaways, airline Arrangements, Gourmet Adventures Catering, The Hillsboro Club, Doubletree by Hilton, JB’s on the Beach, LeVal de Loire, Punjab Cuisine of India, Taverna Kyma, The While Raw Bar, Angelo’s Station House Grille, The Melting Pot, Oceans 234, Olympia Flame Diner and the Cake Lady. Tickets are $50 in advance at 954-480-4460. At the door, the cost is $60. Sponsorships are still available and auction items gratefully accepted. Casa’s Cuisine of the Regions will be held oceanside on April 17

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 22, 2013

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16 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 at the southern end of downtown. Using every inch of the property, the lot will contain 83 parking spaces. The city is working with the property owner and Broward College to establish the school at the site as recommended in a veyear strategic plan prepared by the city’s consultant Redevelopment Management Associates. Justin Prof tt, senior planner, said a consultant evaluated each tree on the site. Ten will be preserved, 21 removed and 13 relocated. The site contains live oaks, slash pines, gumbo limbos, cus, sea grape, a variety of palm species and wild tamarind. The two largest trees targeted for preserving are two laurel oaks, 38 and 35-feet high. A signi cant amount of new canopy is proposed. The city will donate $24,544 to a city Tree Preservation and Replacement Trust Fund. Vice Mayor John Adornato said this was a tough decision. “By day, I’m a paid tree hugger. I work to protect the environment.” He asked about the longterm goal for the property. “Are we paving paradise to put up a parking lot? Is our long-term goal not a parking lot?” Ray Lubomski, community and economic development director said, “It’s a signi cant piece of property to be developed. It’s the gateway into the downtown.” Shank said he understands the parking lot is needed to attract a culinary school. He said he’s not a paid tree hugger, but he’s a conservationist. He was troubled by the removal of the 40-foot oak tree and a couple of the slash pines. “Could we build a parking lot and keep the oak tree?” He asked if the design could be changed up a little. Commissioner Shari McCartney said it was time for the commission to take action on what they’ve set in motion (the proposed culinary arts district.) She agreed it was “very disconcerting to take away a tree of that age and beauty.” McCartney said the commission needs to be careful not to thwart their goal. She noted the site will have signi cantly more foliage than normally required. “Our ultimate goal is for it to be a building or entryway. Calling it “an untenable but necessary decision,” she moved to approve the site plan as presented. Boisvenue argued there was no reason to remove the oak tree. “There’s no contract” (with a school), she said. “We’re going through all this and what if they don’t sign?” Amos Chess, the property owner, urged the commission to move ahead and approve the site plan. “What are you waiting for?” he asked, adding that if they approved the pan, he would donate the funds for the Tree Preservation Fund.OaksContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 22, 2013 City Clerk Renee Shrout swears in Shari McCartney as new vice mayor of Oakland Park, as Shari’s daughter, Sloan, looks on. Newly elected commissioner Tim Lonergan is sworn in with his partner and campaign manager Floyd Adams at his side. Lonergan thanked his supporters and said he will prove their efforts were well invested. Newly elected commissioner Sara Guevrekian takes the oath of of ce and says she’s enthusiastic about working with this team. John Adornato received owers from his mother, Barbara Adornato, after his swearing-in as new mayor of Oakland Park by City Clerk Renee Shrout on Wednesday. The position of mayor rotates annually in the city and goes to the top vote getter in a previous election. Adornato said it was ‘a special moment’ for him and bittersweet, since his father, who had attended ceremonies when he became a commissioner and vice mayor, died late last year. [Staff photos by Judy Vik] City Clerk Renee Shrout applauds Commissioner Jed Shank, who was re-elected without opposition.Newly elected Oakland Park commissioners take the oath of of ce, sharing the moments with friends, families and owers from mom

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 feral colonies into the same pot. Most well maintained colonies you wouldn’t be able to tell that these weren’t someone’s pets as the cats are “fat and happy” because of the care they receive. Maybe it isn’t the ideal location for a colony, maybe it isn’t in the cleanest area, but just because the cats are outside doesn’t mean that they are unhealthy, unhappy, and suffering. These locations are their homes. Many cats were born into these colonies they don’t know what it is like to live inside. Where the suffering comes into play is when someone takes a domesticated cat and “cuts them loose” (to borrow a phrase from David Aycock) or dumps them into a colony. Those are the ones that are used to being taken care of and now are left to the harsh conditions outside dogs, cars, etc. And all these folks who claim to be “animal lovers” and don’t have the slightest idea about trapping or maintaing a feral colony, because they are being fed the sensationalized version of what “sells” what would they think if we weren’t doing what we do with TNR? Let’s educate the public! Information is knowledge. Knowledge is power. Alley Cat Allies is a nationwide organization whose focus is on protecting feral cats and educating the public. They have a website lled with valuable information www.alleycat.org. They have come to our area to meet with the Mayor and the Commissioners to improve the lives of the feral cat community not only in Pompano Beach, but in the entire state. Thank goodness for Mayor Fisher and the rest of the Commissioners who are willing to make a positive difference in the lives of feral cats and potentially set the standard for other cities to follow. Cheryl Knudsen Secretary, Trapper Stray Aid & RescueCatsContinued from page 6Easter CelebrationPompano Beach – The Easter Bunny is hopping over to Pompano Citi Centre, located at the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, on Saturday, March 30 from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Easter egg hunt, arts and crafts, face painting, live music and a bounce house. Vendors can call 954-9434683 to join.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 22, 2013 Coalition, Broward County Women’s Hall of Fame, American Association of University Women, Broward Teachers’ Union and several NOW groups. Prior to the event, O’Neil recounted how her life led her to NOW. Holding a second cup of coffee, she remembers how terms like “battered” and “victim” were no longer part of her vocabulary. “I was ashamed. It’s like saying, ‘Hey, I married a loser who hits.’” Now, her life as an advocate for women, as an attorney and blogger for Huf ngton Post, is a happy one. Happy because she calls herself a workaholic, and her efforts to bring the “War Against Women” up front requires a workaholic. Here are some of NOW’s issues: Pay for women – Women work a lifetime of unequal pay, she says, citing the 77 cents on the dollar that their male counterparts earn. “When we get to retirement, we have smaller savings. Two-thirds of minimum wage earners are women. Women of color are extremely lower in their net worth.” Not enough women elected to of ces – “Research has shown that when 35 percent of decision makers are women, more money is spent on resources for health care, social services and education. Less money is spent on weapons, alcohol and tobacco,” O’Neil said. Today, women make up 18 percent of Congress. “Running a country is not rocket science. Women can look at the whole picture,” she said. NOW is a strong force in supporting Planned Parenthood. “Many Catholic women support NOW because they care about teenage girls; they will not impose their religion on others.” O’Neil wants to see fullyfunded, comprehensive sex education programs in public schools. She wants statistics out in the open: One in ve women are sexually molested [But she notes that not one in ve men are molesters. She wants the population to know that “rape is a serial crime.”] She adds that one is 70 men is sexually molested. “Government agencies are now tracking this information,” she said. The “Woman” question, a phrase coined by O’Neil, is the question legislators are not asking. The “Woman” question can only be answered by women. And that question is “What do you need?” Says O’Neil, “Women who make it to agencies for help have already shown resilience and competence. Don’t treat them as victims. Ask them what they need. They must be in the driver’s seat.” While the applause, cheering and energy of O’Neil’s presence rallied the femaledominated audience at the Doubletree Hilton, O’Neil had some fun with the next round of facts. What she related to this audience is really happening in state legislators. Women are presenting bills that put prohibitions on men seeking Viagra and/or similar prescriptions. In Ohio, one bill required men to undergo a psychological assessment and a cardiac stress tests 90 days prior to receiving the prescription. In Virginia, Sen. Janet Howell’s bill requiring rectal exams for men on erectile dysfunction meds, failed by two votes. There wasn’t a dry eye in the house from uninhibited laughter. Sara Brown, former president of the North Broward Democratic club, listens to NOW president, Terry O’Neil [right], at a brunch hosted by a coalition of local clubs. A photo of the late “Battling Bella” Abzug [Center] served as inspiration to this room of activists.O’NeilContinued from page 1 Ken Evans, State chair of clubs and caucuses; Congresswoman Lois Franel [District 22] and Maggie Davidson, State Committee Woman and president of the Democratic Women’s Club of Northeast Broward. [Staff photos]

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Big tips at the Big House bene t museum By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach These elected of cials were not in danger of violating the county ethics code when they collected big tips for their “waiting” skills. Rather they were praised for their volunteer service to raise funds for the city’s Sample-McDougald House museum. “Breakfast at the Big House” took place March 1 at John Knox Village where local celebrity waiters served guests classic breakfast meals, prepared by the staff at John Knox. Celebrities such as Broward County Mayor Krisitn Jacobs, Mayor Lamar Fisher, Commissioners Rex Hardin, Woody Poitier and Barry Dockswell donned aprons for the event as well. Dan Hobby referred to the breakfast as one of the favorite fund-raisers of the year. Kirk DeJong, president of the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society, traditionally chooses the Champion of the BIG House award. This year that award was to go to Bill Gallo, whose companies have supported the house since it arrived in the city. Dan Hobby, Commissioner Woody Poitier, Justen Shiff, Commissioner Rex Hardin and Tony Spadaccia, Waste Management. John Sobol, Dirk DeJong and Michael Browdy. Gene Pridemore, Neal Murry and Jeff Gillespie. Ralp Johnsen, Oakie Rhinehart and Claudia DuBois. Dev Motwani, Mak Olson and Commissioner Barry Dockswell.So it was a big surprise to DeJong when Breakfast Hostess Dodie Keith-Lazowick, Keith and Associates, turned the tables and surprised Society president Dirk DeJong thanks Rick Carr, Carr Builders, LLC. for construction of the House public bathrooms. Dirk DeJong accepts the award from Dodie Keith-Lazowick, president of Keith and Associates, for Big House Champion.See BIG HOUSE on page 21

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The Pelican 21 Friday, March 22, 2013 DeJong with The Champion award. Gallo was in on the surprise. Rick Carr, president of Carr Builders, was also honored for his donation of the construction of the public bathroom facilities. DeJong said he looked back on that day as a wonderful event that continued to “bring the community together. The Sample-McDougald House is now open for tours; docent training is on-going and local school children are getting some rst-hand history as they tour the house. For more information about the Sample-McDougald House or membership in its Society, call 954-292-8040. Big HouseContinued from page 20His biggest sellers are compactor room odor kill, hospital quality oor nish, oor nish remover/stripper, vehicle hand or pressure wash, all purpose degreaser and sewer drain maintainer. Asked if the products have changed over the years, he says, “Oh yes. They are all less harsh and many are certi ed green which make us all pleased to see that our available products are geared to protecting the environment.” He gives a few impressive examples. “Our paper products, including the boxes they come in are all recyclable. Our 55-gallon drums are made from recycled plastic and they are reusable. Floor pads, used to shine oors, are made from recycled soda bottles.”Clients give him four starsDennis Reddick, Irvington Housing Authority, Irvington, NJ says, “I wish every vendor was like Rich DiMaio. No matter when a snowstorm hits, he’s there with my supplies. I’ve been dealing with him for 10 years and I’m thoroughly pleased.” Jimmy Falco, director of facilities Keansburg Public Works/Boro Hall, Keansburg, NJ,says, “I’ve been dealing with DiMaio for three years and he knows how to run a company. When the hurricane hit, he was right there for us with everything we needed to clean up. He advises us on what to use for every problem and delivers it on the weekend if your need is immediate.” Joe Murry, Port-A-John Co. in the Tri-State area calls DiMaio “a stand-up guy” who delivers better than on time. We’ve worked with him for 10 years and he cares about his customers, has great follow through and he’s quick to deliver what you need when you need it.” Although his home base is in Long Branch, New Jersey, DeMaio can be reached locally for information and quotes. Call 954-946-2927.DeMaioContinued from page 8 4-4 – Sierra Club Meeting at 7:30 p.m at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 S. Lyons Road, Coconut Creek. 954357-5198. Education & Self Development3-27 – Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W Atlantic Blvd. 954-3575579.SightingsContinued from page 7 3-26 – iPad workshop at 10 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. 954-9466398.Events & Activities3-22 – Fish Fry from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at St. Coleman’s Parish Hall, 1200 S. Federal Hwy. Tickets are $8. 954270-2501. 3-28 – Bingo at 1 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. 954-946-6398. 3-29 – Chess Club meets Fridays from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach Branch Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-786-2181. 4-6 – Bike Rodeo from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at McNair Park, 951 NW 27 Ave., Pompano Beach. Bicycle safety education and food. All ages welcome. 954-786-7882. 4-6 – Disc Glow Golf Tournament 7 to 9 p.m. at Easterlin Park, 100 NW 38 St., Oakland Park. Ages 13 and up. Preregistration: $5 plus tax per person; Registration on night of tournament: $8 plus tax per person. $1.50 per person gate fee. Participants must provide their own equipment. 954-357-5190. 4-9 – GFWC Woman’s Club of Deer eld Beach instillation luncheon at 12 p.m. at Wyndham Hotel Resort, 4011 N. Ocean Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $30. Public welcome. 954-421-4700.Holy Week & Easter Services3-24 – Distribution of the Palms at 8 and 10:30 a.m. at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954-9414843. 3-27 – Stations of the Cross at 5 p.m with a soup and bread supper at 6 p.m. at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954-9414843. 3-29 – Good Friday service at 12 p.m. at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954-941-4843. See SIGHTINGS on page 26

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-783-8700 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO. Looking For Good People! Good Opportunity For Right Individual. Qualifications: Good Driving Record – Physically Fit – Professional. No Drugs! Average Tech Earns $600 $1,200 A Week. Wayne 954-868-5560. WANTED WELDERS & LABORERS – Must Be Able To Travel!! $10 Hr. – Laborers…$15 Hr. Welders. CASH!!! 954-803-3087. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTMALE CNA/HHA/ COMPANION – Broward – Former EMT/Certified/ Lt. Massage. Compassionate – References. PT/FT. Ron 954-232-2832. COMPANION/ELDERLY – Housekeeper Or Nanny. Looking For A Job! Excellent References. Full/Part Time. Available Weekends! White American. 954-245-2434. CERTIFIED AIDE/ CAREGIVER – Care For Sick Or Elderly. Very Honest – Reliable & Caring. Light Housekeeping – Shopping & Cooking. 786-444-7043. 3-22 ELDERLY/DISABLED – MY Tamarac Home Or Yours! Car – Experience & Excellent References. 954-242-8656 Or 954-722-8925. 3-22 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-5 CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 4-5 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs – Carpentry – Plumbing – Roo ng – Masonry – Windows – Painting – Decking – Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 – Emergency Calls. CARPET CLEANING!!! 2 ROOMS $59.00 ACTUAL PRICE!!!! NO GIMMICKS!!!!! CALL 954-784-8199 FOR INFORMATION. 3-22 BLADE RUNNERS – Yard Maintenance. FREE ESTIMATE!! Grass Cutting –Trimming Hedges & Shrubs. Mulching. Lic/Ins. Starting At $25 Per Cut. Eddie 954-4941303. 3-29 DISCOUNT PRINTING – ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES – Booklets – Brochures – Business Cards – Carbonless Forms – Color Copies – Door Hangers – Envelopes – Flyers – Invoices – Labels – Postcards – Signs – Banners – Rudy Levy 954825-8108. 4-12 SNOWBIRDS/INVESTORS – Licensed R.E. Broker Offers Property Checks & Services For Out Of Town Owners!! Short Or Long Term – Customized Schedule To Suit Your Needs. Reasonable Rates!! Traci Scharf – Epic R.E. Services. 954-242-2392. 3-29 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill, Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954-818-9538. 3-22 GIGI’S CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable – Honest. More Info. 954-2957033 Or 954-210-2248. 4-5 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C STAMP COLLECTIONSWANTED– ACCUMULATIONS & COLLECTIONS Of Stamps. House Calls Made. Call John 954-467-7128 Or 954-6142562. 3-29 HOMEOWNERS INSURANCEBETTER RATES! BETTER SERVICE! Call KATIE For A FREE Quote! 954-784-9029. www.myersinsures.com 3-29 COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 3-22 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 4-5 2 RECLINER LIFT CHAIRS (Motorized) Brown! Purchased 2 Months Ago $750 Each. Asking $350 Each. Pompano Beach. 954-545-0292 Or 516640-2922. 3-22 THRIFT STORECLF THRIFT STORE – 801 SE 10 St. Deer eld. Monday & Wednesday 10am-3pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-4pm. 20% Off Friday & Saturday ONLY. 954-428-8980. 3-22 DOCKS FOR RENTLIGHT HOUSE POINT – Up To 40’. $10 Per Foot. New Dock – Electric & Water Available! Wide Canal! Close To INLET. No Live-Aboards!! No Fixed Bridges. Cell 412-491-3937. 3-29 LIGHT HOUSE POINT DOCK – Boat Up To 28’. Electric/Water/Whips. 1st Canal To Hillsboro Inlet. Super Location & Price!!. Call 954-942-7433. POMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL – Off NE 14 St. Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water, Electric. Up To 33’ $325 Month. 954-7814994. 3-22

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 22, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-783-8700 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! LIGHTOUSE POINT – UP TO 40’. No Fixed Bridges. 1 Mile To Hillsboro Inlet!! Electric & Water. Locked Secured Area. 954-818-0050. 4-12 CYPRESS CREEK CANAL – Very Close To Marina – Facing The Island Club Condo. 777 S. Federal Hwy. Pompano. Capacity 20 Ft. Electric. $300 Per Month – Negotiable If For 1 Year. Call Yvon 954-5976668. 3-29 CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 – Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954812-5192. ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO – LOOKING TO SHARE My Home With Senior Who Needs Minimum Assistance. Private Room – 14th St. Causeway & Federal Hwy. 954-479-0247. HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE – 2/1 HOME! Just REDUCED! $79,000. 55+ Community! 2 Clubhouses! FREE GOLF. Low Maintenance. Robert Elkins – Charles Rutenberg R.E. 954-782-8968. HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – LEISUREVILLE 3/2 – 1 Car Garage. $1,100 Month Yearly Lease. Utilities Not Included. Available NOW!!!!!!. 954649-8867. ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – FEDERAL & SAMPLE – Private Bath – Entrance. Utilities, Cable, Internet. $500 Month. Walk To Shopping. No Pets. Single Person. 954793-1363.REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-29 POMPANO AEGEAN OCEANFRONT Large South Side 2/2 + Den Or 3rd Bedroom On Sand. Great Oceanview! Tiled & Remodeled. Hurricane Proof Building. 24 Hr Security. Garage Park – 2 Cars. New Exercise Room. Hot Tub, BBQ, Heated Pool. Widest Beach In Area. Dynasty R.E. 954-2952356. 3-22 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony – Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month. 954629-1324. APTS FOR RENTBEACH AREA APT As Low As $475 A Week In Season! (3225 NE 6th St.) 95 Yards To Beach; Bright Airy Apt With Cable, Wireless, Parking, Patio, Charming Furnishings And More. Pet Friendly. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 3-22 LUXURY OCEAN-VIEW APT: $1475 A MONTH IN SEASON! (Ocean Blvd & NE 6th St.) European Style Kitchen, Ultra-Quiet, EcoFriendly, Central Air, Tropical Pool, Ocean Views, Dedicated Parking, Coin Laundry, Premium Cable TV, WI-FI And More. Pets OK. 561-541-0308; Debbie@pax-properties.com BEST DEAL IN POMPANO – 1 Bedroom & Ef ciency With Kitchen. Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly –Seasonal. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 4-5 PRIMO OCEAN BOULEVARD APT For As Low As $68 A Night In Season! (601 N. Ocean Blvd) Great Area, Great Apt. Great Rates. 95 Yards To Beach. Special Weekly & Monthly Rates Too. Cats & Small Dogs Welcome With Pet Fee. Contact Debbie 561-541-0308. Debbie@paxproperties.com POMPANO BEACH NE 1/1 $725 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 – 3/1 New $1250. SW – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 3-22 POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 3-22 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 4-19 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 3-22 LIGHTHOUSE POINT – UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent In A Psychologists Of ce For A SOLO PROFESSIONAL. $950/Month. Located In The GATEWAY CENTRE – 2040 East Sample Rd. Windowed – Unfurnished Of ce! 14’ x 12.5’. Call 954-942-3344. 4-5 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. 4-5 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 3-22 Pelican Classi eds

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Pier will be mended by the Fourth engineer saysDeer eld Beach The International Fishing Pier, the last 100-feet severely damaged in Tropical Storm Sandy will be repaired by July 4, Charlie DeBrusco, director of environmental services told the commission Tuesday. “We are trying to make it a state-of-the-art pier,” DeBrusco said adding he would welcome ideas from the shermen who use the facility. Among the new concepts is underwater lighting. The cost of rebuilding is $250,000 to $300,000 and is covered by the city’s insurance.Residents may apply for GED tuition and get a “2nd Chance”Deer eld Beach – District 2 Commissioner Ben Preston needs 30 students to enroll by the end of March to bring the GED program Project 2nd Chance here. Preston is urging that residents make this opportunity known to young people who are in need of a high school diploma. When the course work is completed, Preston said he will stage a graduation ceremony complete with cap and gown so these students can experience a “proud moment.” Community Development Block Grant funds are available for Deer eld Beach residents. Interested persons should call 954-480-4480. An information session will be held Wednesday, April 3, 6 p.m. at the Central Campus, 401 SW 4 Street.A1A and “S” curve topic of workshop ThursdayDeer eld Beach – A public workshop to update residents on the redesign of the “S” curve on A1A will be held Thursday, Mar. 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Central City Campus,401 SW 4 Street. The engineering design for the area between SE 3 Street and NE 7 Street began last June following federal approval of plans to replace the road and add bike lanes, curb, gutter and sidewalk system, intersection improvements at A1A and Hillsboro Boulevard and at A1A and NE 20 Terrace behind the Wyndham Resort. Construction of the improvements will not be scheduled until funding at the federal level is approved.Egg hunts will keep youngsters hoppingDeer eld Beach – Events here for Easter weekend include three egg hunts at locations around the city. The rst provides additional challenges because it is held in the dark and hunters, children ages 7 to 14, come equipped with ashlights. It begins at 8 p.m. at Constitution Park, 2841 W. Hillsboro Boulevard. On Friday, March 29, Egg-Stravaganza will be held at Westside Park, 4445 SW 2 Street, starting at 6 p.m. This hunt is for children ages 10 and younger. The Annual Easter Egg Run will be held Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. at the Athletic Complex, 501 SE 6 Avenue. Children ages 10 and under are invited. For more information on any of these events, call Constitution Park, 954-480-4495.Summer camps scheduledDeer eld Beach – The city offers a variety of day camps for children of all ages beginning in June 12 and ending August 2. Venues are Deer eld Beach Middle School, Constitution Park and Westside Park and include teen travel opportunities and a drama camp. To learn more, call 954-480-4495. Fees are charged.Help with electric bill offered by Focal PointDeer eld Beach – Low income seniors can now receive nancial help from the N.E. Focal Point to pay electric bills. Assistance is only by appointment with Shauna Monahan, information and referral coordinator, at 954-4804449. Applicants should bring proof of age [at least 60 years old], have a written notice from FPL that a bill is past due or have a nal, disconnect notice, show a photo ID, show social security numbers for all family members, proof of income for all family members and meet certain income requirements.Deer eldContinued from page 2Easter egg huntOakland Park – The Easter Bunny will arrive at Royal Palm Park, 1701 NE 38 St., on Saturday, March 30 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. There will be free ice cream, hot dogs and thousands of Easter eggs filled with candy waiting to be picked-up. Call 954-630-4500.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 22, 2013 Lighthouse Point Chamber members network at new Bank United Lighthouse Point – Members of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce gathered Tuesday at the Bank United branch at 2500 N. Federal Hwy. Previously, the branch was located in the Shoppes of Beacon Light but opened its new stand alone location three months ago. “We’re happy to be on the street where everyone can see us,” said Lucille Pignataro, branch manager and past president of the Chamber. In addition to networking and enjoying refreshments, Lighthouse Point Chamber members also donated $1,500 to the American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life of Deerfield Beach, Lighthouse Point, & Hillsboro Beach. The Relay starts on Saturday, April 13 at 4 p.m. at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, and goes until Sunday, April 14 at 9 a.m. Visit www. relayforlife.org/dblpfl for more information. Michael McLain of Summit Brokerage Services and president of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce, hands Darlene Pearson, of Body & Soul Retreat, a check for $1,500 for the American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life of Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, & Hillsboro Beach. Pearson is the Relay team captain for the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce’s team. Bank United employees Linda Washington, left, Lucille Pignataro, center, and Carmen Turner at the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce’s networking event at Bank United. Dr. Jay Marienthal, left, of Marienthal Chiropractic Health & Wellness Center, and Brian Rask of Comprehensive Dentristry.

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Tell The Pelican your sh stories! 954-783-8700! Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. 3-29 – Good Friday services at 7 p.m. at St. Stephen Evangelical Church, 2500 NE 14 St. Causeway, Pompano Beach. 954-942-4473. 3-30 – Release of butter ies and Easter egg hunt at 5 p.m. at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954-9414843. 3-31 – Easter Sunday services at 6:30 a.m. 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954941-4843. 3-31 – Easter services at Assumption Catholic Church, 2001 S. Ocean Blvd., Lauderdale-By-TheSea, at 6:45 a.m., 8 a.m., 9:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Espanol mass at 12:15 p.m. 954-9417647. 3-31 – Easter Sunday services at 10 a.m. at St. Stephen Evangelical Church, 2500 NE 14 St. Causeway, Pompano SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 27By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – If fishing has been a little light so far for some anglers Jeff Walls, manager at RJ Boyle’s, said springtime fishing should be coming soon and things should improve. “Springtime fishing should be getting better here soon,” he said. But until then, Walls says there’s still some catches to be made. “There’s been a very good Wahoo bite from 100 ft. to 300 ft. of water.” If you do go for some wahoo, Walls suggests using bonita strips as bait and trolling at six knots. “And there’s been some scattered dolphin and a few kings mixed-in.” For those looking for swords this weekend, things may not be as great as last time. “Daytime sword fishing was pretty good last weekend but the weather doesn’t look good for it this weekend,” said Walls. Sailfish might be biting again with the front moving in this weekend. Expect some rain and some breeze Improved shing is on the waySaturday and Sunday. But Walls says the prime time to catch sailfish will be over with once spring arrives. “You’re going to catch a few but not as many.” Fortunately, he added, tuna, grouper, dolphin and “everything else in general” should be getting better. For tips or more information, call RJ Boyle’s at 954-420-5001. Beach. 954-942-4473. 3-31 – Easter sunrise services held by Community Church at 7 a.m. at the pavilion at the east end of Commercial Boulevard in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea There will also be a 10 a.m. service at the church, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. 954-776-5530.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 22, 2013 Pelican Classi eds mean business! 954-783-8700!Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! Pompano Beach This original painting by James Gibson epitomizes the Highwaymen style of Florida landscape art -sea, sky and brilliant tropical flora, particularly a Royal Poinciana in full bloom. Gibson will be one of the eight artists at the Sample-McDougald House, 450 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach, this Saturday, March 23 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost to see the exhibition which takes place inside the House is $5. Net proceeds benefit the Pompano Beach Historical Society. A private reception at the Sample-McDougald House takes place March 22 at the House. Patrons and guests can meet the artists and enjoy food, drinks and entertainment. Tickets are $50 per person. Call 954-292-8040.Highwaymen return to Sample-McDougald House 3-31Easter sunrise services held by Fort Lauderdale Business and Professional Women’s Club on the beach across from Bahia Mar, 801 Seabreeze Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. 954-566-4165.Health & Safety3-23 – Meditation class from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Lisa’s Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Learn the art of meditation. Cost is $50. RSVP at 954-782-6564. 3-27 – Protecting Your Family on the Worst Day of Their Lives seminars at 2 p.m. at Panera Bread, 5975 N., Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. RSVP at 954-7819661. 3-29 – Yoga class at 9 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. 954-946-6398. 3-23 – Meditation class from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Lisa’s Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Cost is $50. RSVP at 954-782-6564. 3-23 – Reiki II class from 1 to 5 p.m. at Lisa’s Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Cost is $100. RSVP at 954-782-6564. Music 3-23 – Indie band Passion Pit performs at 8 p.m. at Lynn University, 3601 North Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets are $50 and $75. 561237-9000 3-24 – Maestro James Brooks-Bruzzese and Symphony of the Americas perform at 2 p.m. at Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are between $25 and $75. 954522-5334. SightingsContinued from page 26

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32 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013



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Friday, March 22, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 12 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Getting into law school was fairly easy for Terry ONeil, but the incentive she had for it was painful. The scene is New Orleans. ONeil had a great job at the French Consulate as a translator. But things werent so hot at home although it was August in New Orleans, the month when heat is hurtful. ONeil was 22. At breakfast, ONeil asked her husband for a divorce. They had no children; the relationship had been spiraling downward and they were both young enough to move on. Thats when her husband started whacking away. Her screams went unnoticed. She found herself on the couch trying to protect her head. And heres the part that is pretty hard to believe. It was time for work. They had one car, and ONeil was the driver. They cleaned up and left. On the way to taking her husband to work, he apologized. Thats when she reiterated the divorce idea, and thats when the apologetic husband whacked her again. This week, ONeil, now president of the National Organization of Women [NOW], a practicing attorney and mother of a daughter, was keynote speaker for Womens History Month, sponsored by a coalition of several groups: Democratic Womens Club of Northeast Broward, Pro-Choice NOW president, Terry ONeil, continues to ght for womens issues she knows rsthand Incumbents and former mayor take their oathsForget outsourcing, Mayor Robb wants to return workers to city hallBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Mayor Jean Robb made her rst move to bring work and wages back to city employees Tuesday night. Soon after being sworn in, Robb pulled a tree-trimming contract from the agenda and said, These are things our workers used to do . it is incumbent on our city manager to look at these people and bring them back. Mayor Jean Robb confers with City Manager Burgess Hanson over an agenda item privatizing tree and palm trimming. Robb was sworn in as mayor Tuesday evening and immediately brought forth one of her issues. [Photo courtesy of Deer eld Beach] See ROBB on page 12 Beach library site tentatively chosen By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach A site for the beach library has been proposed and apparently accepted by city commissioners. The new branch will be built on the corner of Riverside Drive and Northeast 2 Street on cityowned land. The library must move from its current site to make room for redevelopment of the pier parking lot. Goals have been to keep the library in operation and keep it on the barrier island, Nguyen Tran, project manager, said. Before making its site recommendation, Tran said staff looked at several possibilities, See BEACH LIBRARY on page 5 Fisher begins his third term as mayor this week as he takes his oath of of ce. Fisher, home-grown in Pompano Beach, says his win was a mandate to keep redevelopment on the move. Fisher also gained recognition for his Mayors Stimulus package which calls for fast tracking business plans through the citys permitting of ce. The Rev. Ron Harvey, First Baptist Church, holds the Bible as Fisher takes his oath as friends and family look on. [Photo courtesy of Pompano Beach] Removal of trees an issue as parking lot plan is approvedBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park City commissioners on Wednesday approved plans for a public parking lot at 1201-1235 E. Oakland Park Blvd, but not before two of them tried to save a live oak tree at the site. Commissioners Suzanne Boisvenue and Jed Shank tried unsuccessfully to convince the board to change the plan and save the tree. Of the 44 trees on the property, the 40-foot live oak is not recommended for relocation because of a typically low survival rate and the cost, about $19,000. The parking lot is needed to support the establishment of a culinary arts school in the adjacent building at 1299 E. Oakland Park Blvd. and to provide additional public parking See OAKS on page 16 Turtle Nesting Season is March through OctoberSee ONEIL on page 19

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2 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The commission will appoint members to the citys advisory boards in May and are looking for a few good citizens to volunteer. Many board terms expire while vacancies exist on almost all of them. In particular the Deer eld Beach Housing Authority has three seats to ll after the resignation this week of Joan Maurice, Mike Weiss and Sally Potter, all appointees of former mayor Peggy Noland. The resignations reduce the seven man board to four members. Those positions will be lled by the mayor with commission approval. Also in need of new blood is the Cultural Committee which produces the Festival of the Arts in January and concerts throughout the year. Mayor Jean Robb urged commissioners to seek interested residents within their districts, adding we need to get young people on these boards and Commissioner Ben Preston asked his constituents to consider serving. As for the citys representation on the Metropolitan Planning Organization and League of Cities [MPO], the mayor withdrew her name and appointed Commissioner Bill Ganz to the MPO and Commissioner Ben Preston to attend League meetings. Former mayor Peggy Noland has been active in both agencies. Citizens urged to ll board vacancies, mayor to name three for housing authority See DEERFIELD on page 24By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFF Lighthouse Point Tony Grimaldi wont be able to provide for his three-weekold daughter but the friends and family he left behind are trying to make sure she gets as much as help as possible. Grimaldi, 31, a Lighthouse Point resident, who worked in the yachting industry, died March 5 during a trip to the Ukraine to bring his anc and their daughter back to Florida. We really dont how he died, said Brandon McCarraher, Grimaldis longtime friend who spoke for the family. To help the family raise enough money to bring Grimaldis body home, McCarraher set up an account Family, friends raise money for daughter of deceased Lighthouse Point residentSee GRIMALDI on page 13 GRIMALDI

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 22, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Seven tournaments after they won the USSSA World Series last August, the Deer eld Beach Sharks are number one in the U.S. The 12-and-under girls softball team rose to the top through a combination of wins, runs scored and other rating systems used by the USSSA [US Specialty Sports Association] said their general manager Karla Antonio. In the World Series they went The Best The Deer eld Beach Sharks, from left, front rowAJ Chang, Mia Veliz. Back row Chelsea Brown, Taylor Cochrane, Anna Knight, Brooke Antonio, Sami Restrepo, Brandi Antonio, Jorden Taco Grif th, Lindsey Garcia.Sharks are number one! They are strong at the plate, give up few runs undefeated. In their last four games they scored 40 runs against the opponents three. Said Antonio, We thought we shouldnt have allowed those three. For all their games, the team averages seven runs a game while allowing only one run. Tuesday night, the 10-girl squad was honored by the city commission before a packed house there to witness the installation of the mayor and commissioners.See SHARKS on page 9

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4 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Beach Rescue Captain Mike Brown demonstrates the Sea Legs beach buggy that gives persons with disabilities the ability to get into the ocean safely. The buggy is equipped with wheels and pontoons and in the water is in a reclining position. Deer eld Beach and Pompano Beach are the rst two cities in the country to be able to provide the oating chairs, at no cost, to beach visitors. They will be available only on green ag days [smooth seas], Brown said. Money to buy the chairs was raised by Dave and Terri Rittenhouse and made possible by donations from the Isle Casino, the Veterans United Foundation and other. [Staff photo] New beach chairs offer persons with disabilities swimming oating rightsArt 3-24 Riverwalk Sunday Arts from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Esplanade Park, 401 SW 2 St., Fort Lauderdale. Performance artists, dancers, visual artists, photographers, sculptors, story tellers and jewelry designers. 954-462-8190. 3-26 Art classes Tuesdays through Thursdays at Morais Art Gallery, 418 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Classes are from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., 2 to 4 p.m. and 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Registration is $30. Cost is $25 per session. 954-5321534. 4-12 Social Media & The Artists workshop from 7 to 9 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Court. Cost is $5 donation to the Central Area Neighborhood Association of Wilton Manors. Email PoetC7@aol.com or 954-6614740.Auctions & Sales3-23 Womens Club of Coconut Creek hosts a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at North Recreation Complex, 4455 Sol Press Blvd., Coconut Creek. Fundraiser to support scholarships for Coconut Creek residents and charitable programs. 954-326-7480.Auditions & Theater3-23 Pilobolus dance troupe performs at 2 and 8 p.m. at Parker Playhouse, 700 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are $36.50 and $46.50. 954764-1441. 3-30 Magician Jason Bishop performs at 8 p.m. the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, 2855 Coral Springs Drive, Coral Springs. 954-3445999. Tickets are between $25 and $35.Books & Lectures3-23 & 24 Book sale from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Northwest Regional Library, 3151 University Drive, Coral Springs. 954-3577990. 3-27 Afternoon Book Club at 3 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. 954946-6398.Business3-25 Networking Monday Mixer from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at CRA Business See SIGHTNGS on page 7

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 22, 2013 including the second story of the Wells Fargo building, the Sera Martell Martel site at 110 N. Ocean and the Oceanside lot. The bank site was ruled out because it is half the size of the existing library and would have required extensive renovation. There was no workable parking solution at the Martel location. They also looked at moving the existing building to the recommended site, but the cost was estimated at $920,000. The new site is just west of the Wells Fargo building. One of our goals is to create a pedestrian connection from the beach [and pier development] through the site to the Intracoastal Waterway to the west, said planner Natasha Alfonso. Discussions are under way with Wells Fargo of cials to recon gure some of their parking and to share an entrance off Northeast 2 Street. The greenway would be enhanced there and expanded to Riverside Drive. The library building would front on a park, enhancing security there. Conceptual drawings are of a 4,000 square foot Florida vernacular style structure with a 1,400-foot veranda wrapping around a corner. About half the building would be used for meetings and storage. Several residents urged the commission to approve the location, including Jack Rogerson, chair of the East CRA Advisory Board, who said the board voted 6-2 in favor of the site. He said the location has a lot of community support, and is the only option we have. I think we did it right, nally, he said. Phyllis Nackman, a resident of Jamaica House condominium and a nine-year library volunteer, said she has seen the importance of the library, with people using computers, iPads and still those who treasure a book. She said the proposed new location would satisfy the needs of the community. Some residents urged the commission to approve a bigger library, so more programs could be planned for children, and a larger community center area so meetings could take place there. If were looking for a semi-permanent or permanent solution, we need to do something that satis es all the residents, said Sandy Von Staden, vice chair of the East CRA Advisory Board, who voted against the site. She said patrons have been promised programming for families and older residents and were told that a lack of space prevented expanded programming. Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca told commissioners they had a commitment from the county administration to keep operating the library. Commissioner Rex Hardin asked if the library could be larger, so community meetings could be held there. Vice Mayor George Brummer was not satis ed with the proposal. Its haphazard. He said it should rst be determined what is wanted in the library and then decide the size. Its not practical to start planning a building when you dont know what will be in it, he said to audience applause. Brummer questioned whether there would be a charge for parking at the library. Beach said that wasnt envisioned. Brummer said if there was no charge, spaces would be available for beachgoers. The library must be relocated by June 2014. The city recently approved a development agreement between the city and Pompano Pier Associates for redevelopment on the land where the library is now located. Kim Briesemeister, co-executive director of the CRA, said the current discussion was aimed at the beach library relocation. This is about a library, not a community center, she said. Do you approve this site for the library? We will discuss other uses later. Still Brummer persisted, noting, Its wrong to say were just discussing a library now. I cant see a library being built without a community center. We need to know a little more about it. Im not satis ed with what Im seeing here. Commissioner Barry Dockswell said, Our priority is to keep the library and move off the pier development area. He said the proposed plan moves the city in the right direction. Its new, bigger and can enhance programming. Mayor Lamar Fisher suggested negotiating with Wells Fargo to get their site for a community center and visitors center. He said theyve shut down their drivethrough. The cry is so loud to keep the library; this is where we need to go, Fisher said. The proposed library will cost about $1.67 million.Beach LibraryContinued from page 1 The cry is so loud to keep the library this; is where we need to go. Fisher The proposed beach library includes a 4,000 sq. ft. design with a Florida style and is planned for a site just west of the Wells Fargo Bank between Atlantic Boulevard and 14th St. Causeway.

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6 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Circulation Joe McGeeAccount Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XXI, Issue 12 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & LettersPassover, Festival of FreedomBy Rabbi David MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOMOf all Jewish holidays, Passovers theme is the most universal: the message of freedom. Way back in 1400 BCE, during the reign of the mighty Pharaoh Ramses II [or perhaps his son, Merneptah], an invisible God reached out of the heavens and into human history. Let My people go! ordered Moses, His prophet, and, shocked and demoralized by ten plagues which af icted his country, his cattle, and his people, Ramses had no choice but to comply, according to the biblical Book of Exodus. Today, this message continues to resonate in oppressed nations worldwide, where uncounted millions of human beings yearn for the very freedoms which we Americans take for granted: freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of religion, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. What do Jews do during Passover, Pesach in Hebrew? For the seven-day [eight, outside of Israel] period of the holiday, observant Jews refrain from eating leavened foods, and instead eat foods consisting of matzah, the grain of which (usually wheat) has been mixed with water and baked before eighteen minutes have passed, in remembrance of the speed in which the Israelites departed Egypt during the Exodus. Passover is a home-based holiday, and it may be the single festival most responsible for keeping Jews Jewish. Many Jews attend temple services on the High Holy Days, but it is estimated that a full 80 percent will attend a seder [Hebrew, order] meal, the special feast which this year falls on Monday and Tuesday evenings, March 25 and 26. It is a dinner full of ritual, in which the participants partake of four cups of wine, to represent the four promises God made to our ancestors: I took you out of Egypt; I saved you from Pharaohs wrath; I liberated you from slavery; I took you to be My special people. It is a repast full of symbolism: while singing and chanting prayers and songs from a special book called the Hagadah, [Hebrew, the Telling], we eat white horseradish, the bitter herb which reminds us of the bitterness of slavery, and dip green parsley, the symbol of springtime, into salt water, to recall the bitter tears of slavery, while reclining at the table in the attitude of free people. Indeed, the seder represents the earliest audio-visual learning experience known to humankind, and everything we do there is meant to provoke questions and discussion. Outside of mono-seasonal Florida, Passover marks the beginning of the spring harvest season. Accordingly, the temple service during the holiday includes a prayer for dew, representing both Gods visible grace upon the earth, and the gentle rain which sustains the standing barley. May Passover 2013 bring blessings of peace and freedom for all! To the editor As the owner of one rescued feral cat, (2 others lived their remaining lives with me), I would encourage both sides to work together to nd a compromise. No one wants animals to suffer, nor does anyone want to force neighbors to deal with animals that they dont want. I believe, the moratorium will enable Pompano Beach, the citizen advocates/activists, and Pompano Beach Animal Control to have some dialogue. For now, the rhetoric appears to be in ammatory. I applaud Mayor Lamar Fisher and the Pompano Beach City Commission for attempting to resolve the matter in a manner that is equitable to the City, its residents, and the cats. I hope that everyone with a stake in the outcome will offer their input to those trying to make things better. Name withheldReaders want Pompano Beach to take actions to stop cat suffering To the editor, I was at that commission meeting. There was only one negative person on that council that gave a NO vote. Well, now that the political season is over, maybe Commissioner Dockswell can open his mind, to what the cat situation in Pompano and every city in Broward County is facing and possibly learn something. We have a population of 1.8 million people in Broward County. We also have a feral/stray/free roaming cat population in Broward County of 300,000 as well. David Aycock claimed that only 2 percent of free roaming cats are neutered. I dont know where he gets his information from. Stray Aid & Rescue performed over 1800 surgeries on feral cats alone in 2011. If only 2% (of 300,000) were sterilized, that would only be 6,000 in the entire county. Stray Aid and Rescue did 3.3% of the surgeries working 4 days a week. I am sure other spay/neuter clinics such as the Humane Society of Broward County, Cats Exclusive, and Discount Pet Clinic to name just a few could show even greater percentages of feral spay/neuter surgeries that would far exceed 6,000. Pompano does not have more than the norm when it comes to the number of feral cats. Here is what happens when just one pair of cats is allowed to breed uncontrolled it is called The Cat Multiplier: Start with one young breeding pair of cats. Assume they have two litters of kittens each year, 2.8 kittens in each litter will survive, and the cats will continue to breed for 10 years. Factor in all the cats born into the formula, and this is how overpopulation occurs: In year 1, there will be 12 cats. In year 2, there will be 66 cats. In year 3, there will be 382 cats. In year 4, there will be 2,201 cats. In year 5, there will be 12,680 cats. In year 6, there will be 73,041 cats. In year 7, there will be 420,715 cats. In year 8, there will be 2,423,316 cats. In year 9, there will be 13,968,290 cats. In year 10, there will be 80,399,780 cats YES, 80 MILLION. I personally made sure that everyone on the Commission received a copy of The Cat Multiplier the night of the Commission meeting. Everyone knows that cats continue to have kittens, a lot of them. But when you see it in print, it is truly eye opening. This is why TNR is so important. No, University of Florida researchers, we CANT get them ALL, but we make the effort to get out there to trap, neuter, and return as many cats as we possibly can. Some colonies are small, some are large and contained meaning that all the cats withing the colony have been spayed/neutered. Generally, new cats do not come in. On occasion, someone may dump a cat because they see that someone is feeding. David Aycock makes it sound like a feral colony is full of sickly, suffering cats. These might be isolated cases and I am certain he has seen his fair share. But you cant See CATS on page 18 Rollie/Velcro is three months old and paralyzed in the back hindquarters. She was found at Quiet Waters Park. To pay for a mobility cart and surgery, The Florida Humane Society is raising money. To donate, visit www. oridahumanesociety.org or call 954-974-6152. The Florida Humane Society, a non-pro t/no-kill organization, is located at 3870 N. Powerline Rd., Pompano Beach., has dogs and cats available for adoption. [Photo courtesy of the Florida Humane Society]Take me home . In Lighthouse PointOfferdahls, 2400 N. Federal Hwy. Publix at Venetian Isles; Red Fox Diner, 3640 N. Federal Hwy. Publix at The Shoppes of Beacon Light Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St Bone sh Macs, 2002 E. Sample Rd. Packys 4480 N. Federal Hwy Get together for the cats

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 22, 2013 League of cities takes on hunger issues in South FloridaSPECIAL TO THE PELICANThe Broward League of Cities, a non-pro t organization representing the Lauderhill Vice Mayor Ken Thurston, Pembroke Park Mayor Ashira Mohammed, Hollywood Commissioner Patricia Asseff, Fort Lauderdale Commissioner Bobby DuBose, Hollywood Commissioner Kevin Biederman, Margate Commissioner Joanne Simone, Wilton Manors Commissioner Tom Green. [Photo courtesy of The Broward League of Cities]31 municipal governments and more than 80 associate government, non-pro t and business organizations within Broward County, recently hosted a service project at Feeding South Florida with more than 40 elected of cals, city staff and associate members sorting and packing nutritious food for lowincome children. During his tenure as president of the League, Fort Lauderdale City Commissioner Bobby DuBose is highlighting the power of volunteerism by adopting Together We Serve as his platform and issuing a Million-Hour Volunteer Challenge to the local communities. The Feeding South Florida service project kicks off a series of community events being planned this spring as part of DuBoses Together We Serve platform. During the Resource Center, 501 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach, 954586-1111. 3-28 Wilton Manors Business Association meets for lunch networking from 12 to 1 p.m. at Lotus Chinese Kitchen, 1434 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Visit wiltonmanors businessassociation.com.Children & Family3-23 Easter Bunny from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Community Park, 820 NE 8 Ave. Free games, face painting egg hunts, arts and crafts and more. 954-786-4111. 3-29 Madagascar 3 plays at sundown at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. Event is free. 954-360-4507. 3-30 Easter Bunny visits Pompano Citi Centre, corner of Federal Highway and Copans Road, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Photos, food, arts and crafts, egg hunt and other kids activities. 954943-4683. Clubs & Charity3-22 Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SightingsContinued from page 4 See SIGHTINGS on page 21 See LEAGUE FEED on page 13

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8 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 BriefsBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRichard N. DeMaio, president and owner of his maintenance supply company, says hes been working the East Coast for 24 years. He knows his customers needs well. Because I have local warehouses up and down the coast, I can offer many nancial advantages to large consumers of janitorial supplies, he explains. Right now in Pompano Beach and the tri-county area, I sell large quantities of supplies to housing authorities, schools, sewer plants, public works and more. Working with volume from locations near my customers gives me an edge over competition. I can deliver large quantities quickly to accommodate my clients, and I can keep prices very competitive because of the volume of business I do. Both his grandfather and his father were in the plumbing and supply business, so DeMaio was raised around the business and as in all families, he helped out from childhood and became familiar with the supply side of the business. He says, When I graduated from college, I went to work for a company, but soon decided I wanted to be my own boss. I took the risk, and it has worked out well, partly because I began a business selling products I understood. He expanded his business from the north east into the Tri-counties of southern Florida and Pompano Beach in 2005, and spends most of his time here. I want to be available in-person to my newer accounts to build relationships with them, he says. My long time accounts in the northeast do not require in-person contact. I handle much of that business on the phone. Most of his clients buy large quantities of product in ve-gallon pails, 30 or 55 gallon drums because it is both ef cient and cost effective. R.N. DeMaio, distributor from Florida to Maine, delivers wholesale janitorial supplies locallySee DEMAIO on page 21Richard DeMaio keeps busy in one of his many warehouses where he stores janitorial supplies for local businesses. [Photo courtesy of R.N. DeMaio]Bicycle RodeoPompano Beach The City of Pompano Beach, in conjunction with Florida Bicycle Month, will hold its Bicycle Rodeo on Saturday, April 6 from 8 to 1 p.m. at McNair Park, 951 NW 27 Ave. There will be bicycle safety information, food and more for families and children of all ages. The event is free. Call 954-786-7882. Healthy Aging workshop Pompano Beach The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the City of Pompano Beach are hosting a workshop that focuses on using urban planning to improve neighborhoods for elderly residents. The workshop will be held on Wednesday, April 3 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Blvd. The neighborhoods discussed will be Leisureville, Kendall Green and Loch Lomond. Register for this free event by April 1 by calling Kevin Gurley, Pompanos neighborhood planner, at 954-786-7921.Dinner Under the StarsLighthouse Point The 8th Annual Dinner Under the Stars will be held Saturday, April 6 from 5 to 9:30 p.m. at Frank McDonough Park, 3500 NE 27 Ave. There will be live music, dancing and dining with prizes awarded to participants who have the best decorated table. The event, which sold out last year, has limited seating. Table reservations must be made by March 29. Cost is $10 per table. Each table seats 10. To RSVP, call John Trudel at 954-784-3439.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 22, 2013 Said Jose Antonio, These are the 10 most talented softball players in Florida, maybe the country. This weekend, the Sharks are playing in Georgia but the start of the spring season and bigger tournaments are just ahead. They will return to the World Series in July already eyeing their stiffest competition, Jacksonville, Orlando and Pembroke Pines. The Sharks success has attracted players from Boynton Beach to Davie. One of their best is Chelsea Brown, a 6th grader who is the starting shortstop at Westminster Academy. Brown is a very strong hitter as are Grif th and Restrepo who was the MVP at the World Series. Sharing mound duties are Taylor Cochrane who also plays out eld and Brandi Antonio often on rst base. The two were named Co-MVPs of the Series. Contributing speed to the game are really fast runners Brooke Antonio, Mia Veliz and Lindsey Garcia. Defensive standouts Anna Knight and AJ Chang add versatility, playing several positions and hitting both left and right handed. Each girl on the small squad gets lots of playing time which, according to Karla Antonio, is the way they like it. Despite their young ages, four of them also play high school ball. The Sharks received public acclaim two years ago when they were fth in the nation in the 10-and-under division. Now they are eyeing the 14-and-under competition. And the Antonios will move along with them. The local couple started the team four seasons ago emphasizing stress conditioning, speed and agility. They also have given the girls the advantage of working out with softball coaches at Lynn University and Nova SE University.SharksContinued from page 33-26 Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets Tuesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. 3-26 Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets Tuesdays at 12:15 p.m. at Deer Creek Country Club, 2801 Country Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 866976-8279 3-26 Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale/Cypress Creek meets Tuesdays at 12 p.m. at Westin Cypress Creek Hotel, 400 Corporate Drive. 954-492-8254. 3-27 Kiwanis Club of Oakland Park meets Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. 3-27 Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach meets every Wednesday at 12 p.m. at Sea Side Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954783-4999. 3-27 Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at SightingsContinued from page 7 See SIGHTINGS on page

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10 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Pelican sat down with Yvonne Womack, a dedicated volunteer and team leader of the Blessings Food Pantry, located on the Christ Church campus at 210 NE 3 St. in Pompano Beach. Cynthia Metzger Phipps, church communications director, sat in on this interview. I responded to an ad for volunteers in this pantry for threehours a week, says Yvonne who now volunteers at the pantry the equal of a regular work week. This place is a passion for me and its a wonderful, gratifying way to spend my week. Im also a mentor at Bennett Elementary School which is a two-hour weekly commitment for me. Im from Michigan where I worked for an architectural rm as of ce manager. Although we came to Florida to retire, my husband works and I volunteer full time. She offers a brief tour of the space provided by the church which shows well organized boxes of clothing and shoes in one area, hygiene items in another. A room with refrigerated produce is lled with box after box of bagged groceries ready to go. We treat our clients with dignity and respect, Yvonne says referring to the homeless and hungry families in Broward County. We understand and we tell them that we are just like thema pay check away from needing the same kind of help. We started this pantry in the church kitchen in 2007, feeding 10 people on a busy day. This space feels like a mansion by comparison, and we need it because we feed well over 200 people each week. Cynthia chimes in with a few statistics. This food pantry served 10,500 people in 2012. Thats an increase of 7.5 percent over 2011. We have over 40 volunteers who keep the pantry operating by conducting food drives, transporting and distributing food, meeting with clients, creating and maintaining client records. At the end of last year, we became part of the United Way of Browards Project Lifeline so we now receive fresh fruits and vegetables twice a month to give to the countys hungry. The homeless are welcomed twice a month to pick up packed nonperishable foods with pop top tabs and clean clothing. Hungry families send a family representative once a month to receive their food. The size of the family determines the number of bags handed to them. Asked how these clients hear about Blessings Pantry, Yvonne says, Pasta dinner to bene t Boy ScoutsDeer eld Beach The annual pasta dinner night for Troop 119, Lighthouse District is planned for March 23 from 4:30 to 7 p.m. at St. Ambrose Catholic Church Rectory Social Hall, 380 S. Federal Highway, Deer eld Beach. Price of the dinner is $5 and includes salad, dessert, and beverage. Children under ve are free. Tickets are available at the door. The evening also includes raf es with items donated from local businesses. This troop has been in existence for over 50 years. Monies raised from this dinner will help scouts attend campouts, jamborees, and summer camp. Call 954 675-5683. Those blessed share time and treasures volunteering at Blessings Food Pantry in Christ Church Dedicated volunteer, Yvonne Womack, team leader of Blessings Pantry on the campus of Christ Church 210 NE 3rd St. stands in front of a wall of pictures of the 40 volunteers who assist her in running the pantry. With smiles and caring hearts they have distributed food to 10,500 homeless and hungry Broward residents in 2012. Womack says, We tell them that we are one paycheck away from being in their shoes. They may be homeless and or hungry, but they deserve our respect and their own dignity.See BLESSINGS on page 11 Threads of LovePompano Beach Every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. the women of the Threads of Love quilting group come together to make quilts at St. Stephen Evangelical Lutheran Church, 2500 NE 14 St. Causeway. The group, consisting of about 18 members, has made over 16,500 quilts since it was founded over 25 years ago. This past year, they made 431 quilts. Once completed, the quilts are donated to local charities and organizations such as Women In Distress, John Knox Village, the Pompano Rehab Center and Community Church at Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea. To join, call Lynn Vatral at 954-782-9967.Recycling carts readyLighthouse Point Residents who want new 48-gallon or 64-gallon recycling carts can get one by calling 954-946-7386. The old green bins can also be recycled by placing them on the curb on recycling day. Recycling service is provided once a week. Recycling items will be collected on the rst day of scheduled garbage collection.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 22, 2013 They hear about us from one another. Some are referred by case workers, hospitals and other pantries and then there is the Broward Hot Line, 211. Those who no longer need us, thrill us when they stop by to say, Ive got a job and will now provide for my own family. Sometimes we get a postcard from families who have moved away. Were always happy to hear good news. Cynthia adds, No one in America should go hungry. We want the children who come with a parent to remember this as a happy time so we always have juice, cookies and a toy on hand for all who visit. Yvonne explains that a system has been devised in order to provide properly. We have a greeting room so when clients comes in, volunteers pull their les. We visit with them, trying to make it a personal experience. The vast majority would prefer to be shopping at Publix like we do and they are usually embarrassed and grateful. We try to treat them with the same courtesy we would want and respond in kind. Next, we hand them their food and all of the information we have on other pantries and agencies which may be of help. We wish we could give them enough food for the month but we just dont have it. A number of generous businesses and local groups keep the pantry stocked. Cynthia ticks off a list of major supporters including Winn Dixie Foundation, Whole Foods, Gordon Food Service, Farm Share, a USDA distributor, Oakland Park Kiwanis, Christ Church School PTO, Christ Church, The Spice Quarter, Templeton Funds Fort Lauderdale, Bishop Gallagher High School, Zion Lutheran Christian School, Curves of Lighthouse Point, Upward Soccer and Upward Basketball. In addition to Project Lifeline, two community gardens, The Need to Feed on Christ Church campus and The Fruitful Field in Pompano Beach, donate fresh produce. When it arrives, the fresh produce is spread out attractively on tables and clients pick and choose just like they would do at Whole Foods. Blessings Pantry is totally volunteer driven. No one is paid. The 40 volunteers work in shifts. Team meetings keep the pantry functioning smoothly. Volunteer Cynthia Buehl says, Its a delight to work here because everyone is grateful to be helping others. I work in the storage area where we pack the food in bags and receive donations for our clients. Its heartwarming to know how many people care and donate. Another volunteer, Christina Abrams, is a retired executive who nds this volunteer job a wonderful way to give back to the community. The pantry is open 52 weeks a year from 9 a.m. to 12 noon Mon. through Fri. Pastor Fawn Mikel is available once a week to provide spiritual help, and occasional nancial assistance. Yvonne wraps up the interview saying, We have clients who have lost their homes and live in their cars if they are lucky enough to still have a car. The work we do may sound depressing but it is also gratifying because we are helping. We have to accept the idea that we are doing the best we can. The need seems to grow and we all wish there were more resources for them and ways to help them to get jobs and regain their self respect. Thank you Yvonne Womack and your team of 40 volunteers for your generous hearts and hands that keep Blessings Pantry open for those in need. To donate, bring nonperishable foods that have not expired with pull tab tops if possible. Hygiene items are also welcome. To volunteer or donate, call 954-943-0404, ext. 207 Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Three Easter egg hunts for children of various ages, a bonnet contest and visit by BlessingsContinued from page 8Plenty of egg hunts planned the Easter bunny are planned during Easter-By-The-Sea from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, March 30, on the grounds of Town Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Drive. Volunteers are needed to help stuff Easter eggs from 5 to 7:30 p.m. in Jarvis Hall, next to Town Hall, on Friday, March 22, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Call 954-254-1743

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12 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Send news to mdpelican@yahoo.com Two years ago the city laid off 106 employees, most of them maintenance workers, citing budget constraints. Re-assigning the work to city crews will cost $250,000, City Manager Burgess Hanson said, while the pending contract with Complete Property Services is for $93,000. Hanson reminded the commission they had made the decision to privatize some services. The contract is for tree trimming on Powerline Road which Hanson said could be dangerous work for the employees and raises workmans comp issues. Some of these trees have not been cut in ve years . . It is more ef cient to get it done now, the manager said. The mayor countered saying, It is important to take care of our own . it is a small price to pay for our residents to work here. Commissioner Bill Ganz said the function was privatized at a tremendous savings . we need to spend taxpayers dollars wisely . right now we need to be responsible. Commissioner Ben Preston said the commission should look at transitioning and restoring jobs as nances improve, and Vice Mayor Joe Miller pointed out the trees must be trimmed before hurricane season. I wouldnt want anyone other than an arborist out there, he added. A motion to approve the contract with Complete Property Services was passed 3-2 with Preston and the mayor casting the no votes and urging Hanson to come to the next meeting with a progress report on reinstating the workers. Earlier in the meeting, Robb, who won a very tight election race, took the gavel saying she was humbled to have been chosen to serve. She also brought to the podium her special guests, former vice mayor Don Thomas, former mayor Oren Woodward and former mayor and county commissioner Sylvia Poitier, all of whom provided brief glimpses of the citys political history. Woodward retired his position 33 years ago when Robb was rst elected mayor. Thomas was vice mayor at the time and Robb ran against him. Tuesday, Thomas was still the graceful loser saying I think the best person won . Jean belongs to the City of Deer eld Beach. Poitier, who served on the commission before and after Robbs terms in the 90s spoke of her as a loving friend. She also pointed out that with 5,000 voters, District 2 can now elect a mayor. We have the mayor now, Poitier said Century Village has to give it up. Also installed Tuesday were District 4 Commissioner Bill Ganz who ran unopposed and District 3 Commissioner RobbContinued from page 1 Richard Rosenzweig, who lead a eld of three candidates for the job. In the rotation that selects the vice mayor, Joe Miller will serve this year; Ben Preston, next.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 22, 2013 The Pink Church Chancel Choir and Soloists with Mark Jones, director of music/ organist present The Lynn University Conservatory Chamber Orchestra with Dr. Jon Robertson, Guest Conductor March 24 at 4 p.m. The acclaimed Pink Church Choir and Soloists present their annual Palm Sunday concert featuring music for Lent and Holy Week, including the beautiful and Requiem of Gabriel Faur. The public is invited. A $10 suggested donation will be received at the door. Reception following concert. The First Presbyterian Faure Requiem at Pink Church service project, the Broward League of Cities team packed more than 1,300 meals that will be delivered to lowincome children to nourish them on weekends when other food might not be available to them. Studies have shown that poor performance, behavioral problems, and health problems are all part of the effects of hunger, said Feeding South Florida CEO Paco Vlez. Thanks to the commitment of volunteer groups like the Broward League of Cities, we can help ll the void between Fridays school lunch and Mondays school breakfast with shelfstable, kid-friendly meals that are part of a well-balanced diet. Feeding South Florida solicits donations of food from a variety of sources, such as farmers and grocers, and distributes it through a network of non-pro t agencies including daycare centers, homeless shelters, youth programs, residential homes for the physically and mentally challenged and many more. The organization distributes about two million pounds of food each month to South Floridians. To participate in the Leagues Million Hour Volunteer Challenge, please visit browardleague.org/ volunteerchallenge. League feedContinued from page 7 with FundRazr.com to solicit donations. The effort raised enough to bring Grimaldis body home and now the excess will be used to help his daughter. His family, along with dozens of his friends, gathered at Galuppis in Pompano Beach on March 14 to reminisce about their lost loved-one and help raise more funds. Our families grew up together, said McCarraher, who added that he started the fundraiser so the family could focus on grieving and not worry about how they were going to get their son home. Tony was your typical guy that everybody loved. Everyone knew Tony by his smile, said McCarraher. He always wanted to give and never wanted anything back. It was that smile, joked friend Brendan Ferrelli, that could be dangerous to guys who brought their girlfriends around him. The ladies loved him. Those dimples. No way was I going to bring a girlfriend around those dimples. And like Donald Trump with making money and LeBron James with playing basketball, Ferrelli said Grimaldi had the natural ability to make everyone to like him, adding, Every guy wanted to be him and every girl wanted to be with him. Visit www.fundrazr.com and type Tony Grimaldi in the search category to donate.GrimaldiContinued from pageChurch The Pink Church is located at 2331 NE 26. Avenue, Pompano Beach. Call 954-941-2308, Music Of ce ext. 112

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14 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach For the rst time in its 13-year history, the Cuisine of the Region, an extravaganza of food and wine tasting, will be held beachside, at the stately Hillsboro Club on the Hillsboro Mile. The larger venue is expected to draw a crowd of up to 300, according to Donna DeFronzo, executive director of the N.E. Focal Point which bene ts from the event. The party is hosted by the N.E. Focal Point CASA, Inc, a group of highly dedicated people who believe in the services offered by DeFronzo and her staff that include day care for Alzheimers patients, a senior center with daily social activities, health and wellness programs, transportation and lunch, and a preschool for children ages two to ve. Said Terry Murchie, who along with most of the committee members, was an Cathy Giroux, Joan Gould, Joan Fink, Terry Murchie, Bill Giroux, Nancy Smith, Liz McGill. Not pictured: Richard Sales and Irving & Rhea Weiss. [Photo courtesy of The City of Deer eld Beach] tickets, baskets of cheer and gift certi cates to restaurants and attractions. At the serving stations will be representatives from Casa Maya Grill, Darrel & Olivers Caf Maxx, Edible Chefs left to right -Oceans 234, Victor Franco; The Cake Lady, Luisia VivianiGanin; Hillsboro Club, Jacques Noel; Le Val de Loire, Laurent Fabrice; Gourmet Adventures Catering, Joni Goldberg; Punjab Restaurant Cuisine of India, Ramjit Singh, Seema Singh; Angelos Station House Grille, Angelo Morinelli and JBs on the Beach, Mike Hrabovsky.original CASA member and party planner, It is Donna who keeps us going. She keeps us coming back because of the charity and the family we work with both at the Focal Point and in CASA. Co-chairs for this years Cuisine which will be held April 17, 5:30 to 9 p.m. are Joan Gould, Bill Giroux and Richard Sales. Among the chefs new to the event is Laurent Fabrice who will serve a Le Val de Loire favorite, beef stew and country pate. Another joining the Cuisine for the rst time is Angelo Morinell from Angelos Station House who will tempt palates with his homemade snow ake pasta lled with cheese and sweet pear. And Seema Singh from Punjab Palace, an icon of Indian food since 1981, also makes his rst appearance at Cuisine. Along with food and wine, CASA members assemble grand displays of silent and live auction items that include weekend getaways, airline Arrangements, Gourmet Adventures Catering, The Hillsboro Club, Doubletree by Hilton, JBs on the Beach, LeVal de Loire, Punjab Cuisine of India, Taverna Kyma, The While Raw Bar, Angelos Station House Grille, The Melting Pot, Oceans 234, Olympia Flame Diner and the Cake Lady. Tickets are $50 in advance at 954-480-4460. At the door, the cost is $60. Sponsorships are still available and auction items gratefully accepted. Casas Cuisine of the Regions will be held oceanside on April 17

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 22, 2013

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16 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 at the southern end of downtown. Using every inch of the property, the lot will contain 83 parking spaces. The city is working with the property owner and Broward College to establish the school at the site as recommended in a veyear strategic plan prepared by the citys consultant Redevelopment Management Associates. Justin Prof tt, senior planner, said a consultant evaluated each tree on the site. Ten will be preserved, 21 removed and 13 relocated. The site contains live oaks, slash pines, gumbo limbos, cus, sea grape, a variety of palm species and wild tamarind. The two largest trees targeted for preserving are two laurel oaks, 38 and 35-feet high. A signi cant amount of new canopy is proposed. The city will donate $24,544 to a city Tree Preservation and Replacement Trust Fund. Vice Mayor John Adornato said this was a tough decision. By day, Im a paid tree hugger. I work to protect the environment. He asked about the longterm goal for the property. Are we paving paradise to put up a parking lot? Is our long-term goal not a parking lot? Ray Lubomski, community and economic development director said, Its a signi cant piece of property to be developed. Its the gateway into the downtown. Shank said he understands the parking lot is needed to attract a culinary school. He said hes not a paid tree hugger, but hes a conservationist. He was troubled by the removal of the 40-foot oak tree and a couple of the slash pines. Could we build a parking lot and keep the oak tree? He asked if the design could be changed up a little. Commissioner Shari McCartney said it was time for the commission to take action on what theyve set in motion (the proposed culinary arts district.) She agreed it was very disconcerting to take away a tree of that age and beauty. McCartney said the commission needs to be careful not to thwart their goal. She noted the site will have signi cantly more foliage than normally required. Our ultimate goal is for it to be a building or entryway. Calling it an untenable but necessary decision, she moved to approve the site plan as presented. Boisvenue argued there was no reason to remove the oak tree. Theres no contract (with a school), she said. Were going through all this and what if they dont sign? Amos Chess, the property owner, urged the commission to move ahead and approve the site plan. What are you waiting for? he asked, adding that if they approved the pan, he would donate the funds for the Tree Preservation Fund.OaksContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 22, 2013 City Clerk Renee Shrout swears in Shari McCartney as new vice mayor of Oakland Park, as Sharis daughter, Sloan, looks on. Newly elected commissioner Tim Lonergan is sworn in with his partner and campaign manager Floyd Adams at his side. Lonergan thanked his supporters and said he will prove their efforts were well invested. Newly elected commissioner Sara Guevrekian takes the oath of of ce and says shes enthusiastic about working with this team. John Adornato received owers from his mother, Barbara Adornato, after his swearing-in as new mayor of Oakland Park by City Clerk Renee Shrout on Wednesday. The position of mayor rotates annually in the city and goes to the top vote getter in a previous election. Adornato said it was a special moment for him and bittersweet, since his father, who had attended ceremonies when he became a commissioner and vice mayor, died late last year. [Staff photos by Judy Vik] City Clerk Renee Shrout applauds Commissioner Jed Shank, who was re-elected without opposition.Newly elected Oakland Park commissioners take the oath of of ce, sharing the moments with friends, families and owers from mom

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 feral colonies into the same pot. Most well maintained colonies you wouldnt be able to tell that these werent someones pets as the cats are fat and happy because of the care they receive. Maybe it isnt the ideal location for a colony, maybe it isnt in the cleanest area, but just because the cats are outside doesnt mean that they are unhealthy, unhappy, and suffering. These locations are their homes. Many cats were born into these colonies they dont know what it is like to live inside. Where the suffering comes into play is when someone takes a domesticated cat and cuts them loose (to borrow a phrase from David Aycock) or dumps them into a colony. Those are the ones that are used to being taken care of and now are left to the harsh conditions outside dogs, cars, etc. And all these folks who claim to be animal lovers and dont have the slightest idea about trapping or maintaing a feral colony, because they are being fed the sensationalized version of what sells what would they think if we werent doing what we do with TNR? Lets educate the public! Information is knowledge. Knowledge is power. Alley Cat Allies is a nationwide organization whose focus is on protecting feral cats and educating the public. They have a website lled with valuable information www.alleycat.org. They have come to our area to meet with the Mayor and the Commissioners to improve the lives of the feral cat community not only in Pompano Beach, but in the entire state. Thank goodness for Mayor Fisher and the rest of the Commissioners who are willing to make a positive difference in the lives of feral cats and potentially set the standard for other cities to follow. Cheryl Knudsen Secretary, Trapper Stray Aid & RescueCatsContinued from page 6Easter CelebrationPompano Beach The Easter Bunny is hopping over to Pompano Citi Centre, located at the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, on Saturday, March 30 from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Easter egg hunt, arts and crafts, face painting, live music and a bounce house. Vendors can call 954-9434683 to join.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 22, 2013 Coalition, Broward County Womens Hall of Fame, American Association of University Women, Broward Teachers Union and several NOW groups. Prior to the event, ONeil recounted how her life led her to NOW. Holding a second cup of coffee, she remembers how terms like battered and victim were no longer part of her vocabulary. I was ashamed. Its like saying, Hey, I married a loser who hits. Now, her life as an advocate for women, as an attorney and blogger for Huf ngton Post, is a happy one. Happy because she calls herself a workaholic, and her efforts to bring the War Against Women up front requires a workaholic. Here are some of NOWs issues: Pay for women Women work a lifetime of unequal pay, she says, citing the 77 cents on the dollar that their male counterparts earn. When we get to retirement, we have smaller savings. Two-thirds of minimum wage earners are women. Women of color are extremely lower in their net worth. Not enough women elected to of ces Research has shown that when 35 percent of decision makers are women, more money is spent on resources for health care, social services and education. Less money is spent on weapons, alcohol and tobacco, ONeil said. Today, women make up 18 percent of Congress. Running a country is not rocket science. Women can look at the whole picture, she said. NOW is a strong force in supporting Planned Parenthood. Many Catholic women support NOW because they care about teenage girls; they will not impose their religion on others. ONeil wants to see fullyfunded, comprehensive sex education programs in public schools. She wants statistics out in the open: One in ve women are sexually molested [But she notes that not one in ve men are molesters. She wants the population to know that rape is a serial crime.] She adds that one is 70 men is sexually molested. Government agencies are now tracking this information, she said. The Woman question, a phrase coined by ONeil, is the question legislators are not asking. The Woman question can only be answered by women. And that question is What do you need? Says ONeil, Women who make it to agencies for help have already shown resilience and competence. Dont treat them as victims. Ask them what they need. They must be in the drivers seat. While the applause, cheering and energy of ONeils presence rallied the femaledominated audience at the Doubletree Hilton, ONeil had some fun with the next round of facts. What she related to this audience is really happening in state legislators. Women are presenting bills that put prohibitions on men seeking Viagra and/or similar prescriptions. In Ohio, one bill required men to undergo a psychological assessment and a cardiac stress tests 90 days prior to receiving the prescription. In Virginia, Sen. Janet Howells bill requiring rectal exams for men on erectile dysfunction meds, failed by two votes. There wasnt a dry eye in the house from uninhibited laughter. Sara Brown, former president of the North Broward Democratic club, listens to NOW president, Terry ONeil [right], at a brunch hosted by a coalition of local clubs. A photo of the late Battling Bella Abzug [Center] served as inspiration to this room of activists.ONeilContinued from page 1 Ken Evans, State chair of clubs and caucuses; Congresswoman Lois Franel [District 22] and Maggie Davidson, State Committee Woman and president of the Democratic Womens Club of Northeast Broward. [Staff photos]

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Big tips at the Big House bene t museum By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach These elected of cials were not in danger of violating the county ethics code when they collected big tips for their waiting skills. Rather they were praised for their volunteer service to raise funds for the citys Sample-McDougald House museum. Breakfast at the Big House took place March 1 at John Knox Village where local celebrity waiters served guests classic breakfast meals, prepared by the staff at John Knox. Celebrities such as Broward County Mayor Krisitn Jacobs, Mayor Lamar Fisher, Commissioners Rex Hardin, Woody Poitier and Barry Dockswell donned aprons for the event as well. Dan Hobby referred to the breakfast as one of the favorite fund-raisers of the year. Kirk DeJong, president of the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society, traditionally chooses the Champion of the BIG House award. This year that award was to go to Bill Gallo, whose companies have supported the house since it arrived in the city. Dan Hobby, Commissioner Woody Poitier, Justen Shiff, Commissioner Rex Hardin and Tony Spadaccia, Waste Management. John Sobol, Dirk DeJong and Michael Browdy. Gene Pridemore, Neal Murry and Jeff Gillespie. Ralp Johnsen, Oakie Rhinehart and Claudia DuBois. Dev Motwani, Mak Olson and Commissioner Barry Dockswell.So it was a big surprise to DeJong when Breakfast Hostess Dodie Keith-Lazowick, Keith and Associates, turned the tables and surprised Society president Dirk DeJong thanks Rick Carr, Carr Builders, LLC. for construction of the House public bathrooms. Dirk DeJong accepts the award from Dodie Keith-Lazowick, president of Keith and Associates, for Big House Champion.See BIG HOUSE on page 21

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The Pelican 21 Friday, March 22, 2013 DeJong with The Champion award. Gallo was in on the surprise. Rick Carr, president of Carr Builders, was also honored for his donation of the construction of the public bathroom facilities. DeJong said he looked back on that day as a wonderful event that continued to bring the community together. The Sample-McDougald House is now open for tours; docent training is on-going and local school children are getting some rst-hand history as they tour the house. For more information about the Sample-McDougald House or membership in its Society, call 954-292-8040. Big HouseContinued from page 20His biggest sellers are compactor room odor kill, hospital quality oor nish, oor nish remover/stripper, vehicle hand or pressure wash, all purpose degreaser and sewer drain maintainer. Asked if the products have changed over the years, he says, Oh yes. They are all less harsh and many are certied green which make us all pleased to see that our available products are geared to protecting the environment. He gives a few impressive examples. Our paper products, including the boxes they come in are all recyclable. Our 55-gallon drums are made from recycled plastic and they are reusable. Floor pads, used to shine oors, are made from recycled soda bottles.Clients give him four starsDennis Reddick, Irvington Housing Authority, Irvington, NJ says, I wish every vendor was like Rich DiMaio. No matter when a snowstorm hits, hes there with my supplies. Ive been dealing with him for 10 years and Im thoroughly pleased. Jimmy Falco, director of facilities Keansburg Public Works/Boro Hall, Keansburg, NJ,says, Ive been dealing with DiMaio for three years and he knows how to run a company. When the hurricane hit, he was right there for us with everything we needed to clean up. He advises us on what to use for every problem and delivers it on the weekend if your need is immediate. Joe Murry, Port-A-John Co. in the Tri-State area calls DiMaio a stand-up guy who delivers better than on time. Weve worked with him for 10 years and he cares about his customers, has great follow through and hes quick to deliver what you need when you need it. Although his home base is in Long Branch, New Jersey, DeMaio can be reached locally for information and quotes. Call 954-946-2927.DeMaioContinued from page 8 4-4 Sierra Club Meeting at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 S. Lyons Road, Coconut Creek. 954357-5198. Education & Self Development3-27 Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W Atlantic Blvd. 954-3575579.SightingsContinued from page 7 3-26 iPad workshop at 10 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. 954-9466398.Events & Activities3-22 Fish Fry from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at St. Colemans Parish Hall, 1200 S. Federal Hwy. Tickets are $8. 954270-2501. 3-28 Bingo at 1 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. 954-946-6398. 3-29 Chess Club meets Fridays from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach Branch Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-786-2181. 4-6 Bike Rodeo from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at McNair Park, 951 NW 27 Ave., Pompano Beach. Bicycle safety education and food. All ages welcome. 954-786-7882. 4-6 Disc Glow Golf Tournament 7 to 9 p.m. at Easterlin Park, 100 NW 38 St., Oakland Park. Ages 13 and up. Preregistration: $5 plus tax per person; Registration on night of tournament: $8 plus tax per person. $1.50 per person gate fee. Participants must provide their own equipment. 954-357-5190. 4-9 GFWC Womans Club of Deer eld Beach instillation luncheon at 12 p.m. at Wyndham Hotel Resort, 4011 N. Ocean Blvd., Deereld Beach. Cost is $30. Public welcome. 954-421-4700.Holy Week & Easter Services3-24 Distribution of the Palms at 8 and 10:30 a.m. at St. Martins Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954-9414843. 3-27 Stations of the Cross at 5 p.m. with a soup and bread supper at 6 p.m. at St. Martins Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954-9414843. 3-29 Good Friday service at 12 p.m. at St. Martins Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954-941-4843. See SIGHTINGS on page 26

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-783-8700 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO. Looking For Good People! Good Opportunity For Right Individual. Qualifications: Good Driving Record Physically Fit Professional. No Drugs! Average Tech Earns $600 $1,200 A Week. Wayne 954-868-5560. WANTED WELDERS & LABORERS Must Be Able To Travel!! $10 Hr. Laborers$15 Hr. Welders. CASH!!! 954-803-3087. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTMALE CNA/HHA/ COMPANION Broward Former EMT/Certified/ Lt. Massage. Compassionate References. PT/FT. Ron 954-232-2832. COMPANION/ELDERLY Housekeeper Or Nanny. Looking For A Job! Excellent References. Full/Part Time. Available Weekends! White American. 954-245-2434. CERTIFIED AIDE/ CAREGIVER Care For Sick Or Elderly. Very Honest Reliable & Caring. Light Housekeeping Shopping & Cooking. 786-444-7043. 3-22 ELDERLY/DISABLED MY Tamarac Home Or Yours! Car Experience & Excellent References. 954-242-8656 Or 954-722-8925. 3-22 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-5 CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 4-5 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs Carpentry Plumbing Roo ng Masonry Windows Painting Decking Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 Emergency Calls. CARPET CLEANING!!! 2 ROOMS $59.00 ACTUAL PRICE!!!! NO GIMMICKS!!!!! CALL 954-784-8199 FOR INFORMATION. 3-22 BLADE RUNNERS Yard Maintenance. FREE ESTIMATE!! Grass Cutting Trimming Hedges & Shrubs. Mulching. Lic/Ins. Starting At $25 Per Cut. Eddie 954-4941303. 3-29 DISCOUNT PRINTING ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES Booklets Brochures Business Cards Carbonless Forms Color Copies Door Hangers Envelopes Flyers Invoices Labels Postcards Signs Banners Rudy Levy 954825-8108. 4-12 SNOWBIRDS/INVESTORS Licensed R.E. Broker Offers Property Checks & Services For Out Of Town Owners!! Short Or Long Term Customized Schedule To Suit Your Needs. Reasonable Rates!! Traci Scharf Epic R.E. Services. 954-242-2392. 3-29 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill, Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954-818-9538. 3-22 GIGIS CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable Honest. More Info. 954-2957033 Or 954-210-2248. 4-5 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C STAMP COLLECTIONSWANTED ACCUMULATIONS & COLLECTIONS Of Stamps. House Calls Made. Call John 954-467-7128 Or 954-6142562. 3-29 HOMEOWNERS INSURANCEBETTER RATES! BETTER SERVICE! Call KATIE For A FREE Quote! 954-784-9029. www.myersinsures.com. 3-29 COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 3-22 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 4-5 2 RECLINER LIFT CHAIRS (Motorized) Brown! Purchased 2 Months Ago $750 Each. Asking $350 Each. Pompano Beach. 954-545-0292 Or 516640-2922. 3-22 THRIFT STORECLF THRIFT STORE 801 SE 10 St. Deer eld. Monday & Wednesday 10am-3pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-4pm. 20% Off Friday & Saturday ONLY. 954-428-8980. 3-22 DOCKS FOR RENTLIGHT HOUSE POINT Up To 40. $10 Per Foot. New Dock Electric & Water Available! Wide Canal! Close To INLET. No Live-Aboards!! No Fixed Bridges. Cell 412-491-3937. 3-29 LIGHT HOUSE POINT DOCK Boat Up To 28. Electric/Water/Whips. 1st Canal To Hillsboro Inlet. Super Location & Price!!. Call 954-942-7433. POMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL Off NE 14 St. Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water, Electric. Up To 33 $325 Month. 954-7814994. 3-22

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 22, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-783-8700 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! LIGHTOUSE POINT UP TO 40. No Fixed Bridges. 1 Mile To Hillsboro Inlet!! Electric & Water. Locked Secured Area. 954-818-0050. 4-12 CYPRESS CREEK CANAL Very Close To Marina Facing The Island Club Condo. 777 S. Federal Hwy. Pompano. Capacity 20 Ft. Electric. $300 Per Month Negotiable If For 1 Year. Call Yvon 954-5976668. 3-29 CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954812-5192. ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO LOOKING TO SHARE My Home With Senior Who Needs Minimum Assistance. Private Room 14th St. Causeway & Federal Hwy. 954-479-0247. HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 2/1 HOME! Just REDUCED! $79,000. 55+ Community! 2 Clubhouses! FREE GOLF. Low Maintenance. Robert Elkins Charles Rutenberg R.E. 954-782-8968. HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 3/2 1 Car Garage. $1,100 Month Yearly Lease. Utilities Not Included. Available NOW!!!!!!. 954649-8867. ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH FEDERAL & SAMPLE Private Bath Entrance. Utilities, Cable, Internet. $500 Month. Walk To Shopping. No Pets. Single Person. 954793-1363.REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-29 POMPANO AEGEAN OCEANFRONT Large South Side 2/2 + Den Or 3rd Bedroom On Sand. Great Oceanview! Tiled & Remodeled. Hurricane Proof Building. 24 Hr Security. Garage Park 2 Cars. New Exercise Room. Hot Tub, BBQ, Heated Pool. Widest Beach In Area. Dynasty R.E. 954-2952356. 3-22 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month. 954629-1324. APTS FOR RENTBEACH AREA APT As Low As $475 A Week In Season! (3225 NE 6th St.) 95 Yards To Beach; Bright Airy Apt With Cable, Wireless, Parking, Patio, Charming Furnishings And More. Pet Friendly. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com. FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 3-22 LUXURY OCEAN-VIEW APT: $1475 A MONTH IN SEASON! (Ocean Blvd & NE 6th St.) European Style Kitchen, Ultra-Quiet, EcoFriendly, Central Air, Tropical Pool, Ocean Views, Dedicated Parking, Coin Laundry, Premium Cable TV, WI-FI And More. Pets OK. 561-541-0308; Debbie@pax-properties.com. BEST DEAL IN POMPANO 1 Bedroom & Ef ciency With Kitchen. Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Yearly Seasonal. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 4-5 PRIMO OCEAN BOULEVARD APT For As Low As $68 A Night In Season! (601 N. Ocean Blvd) Great Area, Great Apt. Great Rates. 95 Yards To Beach. Special Weekly & Monthly Rates Too. Cats & Small Dogs Welcome With Pet Fee. Contact Debbie 561-541-0308. Debbie@paxpr operties.com. POMP ANO BEACH NE 1/1 $725 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 3/1 New $1250. SW 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 3-22 POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 3-22 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 4-19 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 3-22 LIGHTHOUSE POINT UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent In A Psychologists Of ce For A SOLO PROFESSIONAL. $950/Month. Located In The GATEWAY CENTRE 2040 East Sample Rd. Windowed Unfurnished Of ce! 14 x 12.5. Call 954-942-3344. 4-5 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. 4-5 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 3-22 Pelican Classi eds

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Pier will be mended by the Fourth engineer saysDeer eld Beach The International Fishing Pier, the last 100-feet severely damaged in Tropical Storm Sandy will be repaired by July 4, Charlie DeBrusco, director of environmental services told the commission Tuesday. We are trying to make it a state-of-the-art pier, DeBrusco said adding he would welcome ideas from the shermen who use the facility. Among the new concepts is underwater lighting. The cost of rebuilding is $250,000 to $300,000 and is covered by the citys insurance.Residents may apply for GED tuition and get a nd ChanceDeer eld Beach District 2 Commissioner Ben Preston needs 30 students to enroll by the end of March to bring the GED program Project 2nd Chance here. Preston is urging that residents make this opportunity known to young people who are in need of a high school diploma. When the course work is completed, Preston said he will stage a graduation ceremony complete with cap and gown so these students can experience a proud moment. Community Development Block Grant funds are available for Deer eld Beach residents. Interested persons should call 954-480-4480. An information session will be held Wednesday, April 3, 6 p.m. at the Central Campus, 401 SW 4 Street.A1A and S curve topic of workshop ThursdayDeer eld Beach A public workshop to update residents on the redesign of the S curve on A1A will be held Thursday, Mar. 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Central City Campus,401 SW 4 Street. The engineering design for the area between SE 3 Street and NE 7 Street began last June following federal approval of plans to replace the road and add bike lanes, curb, gutter and sidewalk system, intersection improvements at A1A and Hillsboro Boulevard and at A1A and NE 20 Terrace behind the Wyndham Resort. Construction of the improvements will not be scheduled until funding at the federal level is approved.Egg hunts will keep youngsters hoppingDeer eld Beach Events here for Easter weekend include three egg hunts at locations around the city. The rst provides additional challenges because it is held in the dark and hunters, children ages 7 to 14, come equipped with ashlights. It begins at 8 p.m. at Constitution Park, 2841 W. Hillsboro Boulevard. On Friday, March 29, Egg-Stravaganza will be held at Westside Park, 4445 SW 2 Street, starting at 6 p.m. This hunt is for children ages 10 and younger. The Annual Easter Egg Run will be held Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. at the Athletic Complex, 501 SE 6 Avenue. Children ages 10 and under are invited. For more information on any of these events, call Constitution Park, 954-480-4495.Summer camps scheduledDeer eld Beach The city offers a variety of day camps for children of all ages beginning in June 12 and ending August 2. Venues are Deer eld Beach Middle School, Constitution Park and Westside Park and include teen travel opportunities and a drama camp. To learn more, call 954-480-4495. Fees are charged.Help with electric bill offered by Focal PointDeer eld Beach Low income seniors can now receive nancial help from the N.E. Focal Point to pay electric bills. Assistance is only by appointment with Shauna Monahan, information and referral coordinator, at 954-4804449. Applicants should bring proof of age [at least 60 years old], have a written notice from FPL that a bill is past due or have a nal, disconnect notice, show a photo ID, show social security numbers for all family members, proof of income for all family members and meet certain income requirements.Deer eldContinued from page 2Easter egg huntOakland Park The Easter Bunny will arrive at Royal Palm Park, 1701 NE 38 St., on Saturday, March 30 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. There will be free ice cream, hot dogs and thousands of Easter eggs filled with candy waiting to be picked-up. Call 954-630-4500.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 22, 2013 Lighthouse Point Chamber members network at new Bank United Lighthouse Point Members of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce gathered Tuesday at the Bank United branch at 2500 N. Federal Hwy. Previously, the branch was located in the Shoppes of Beacon Light but opened its new stand alone location three months ago. Were happy to be on the street where everyone can see us, said Lucille Pignataro, branch manager and past president of the Chamber. In addition to networking and enjoying refreshments, Lighthouse Point Chamber members also donated $1,500 to the American Cancer Societys Relay For Life of Deerfield Beach, Lighthouse Point, & Hillsboro Beach. The Relay starts on Saturday, April 13 at 4 p.m. at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, and goes until Sunday, April 14 at 9 a.m. Visit www. relayforlife.org/dblpfl for more information. Michael McLain of Summit Brokerage Services and president of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce, hands Darlene Pearson, of Body & Soul Retreat, a check for $1,500 for the American Cancer Societys Relay For Life of Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, & Hillsboro Beach. Pearson is the Relay team captain for the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerces team. Bank United employees Linda Washington, left, Lucille Pignataro, center, and Carmen Turner at the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerces networking event at Bank United. Dr. Jay Marienthal, left, of Marienthal Chiropractic Health & Wellness Center, and Brian Rask of Comprehensive Dentristry.

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 22, 2013 Tell The Pelican your sh stories! 954-783-8700! Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. 3-29 Good Friday services at 7 p.m. at St. Stephen Evangelical Church, 2500 NE 14 St. Causeway, Pompano Beach. 954-942-4473. 3-30 Release of butteries and Easter egg hunt at 5 p.m. at St. Martins Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954-9414843. 3-31 Easter Sunday services at 6:30 a.m. 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at St. Martins Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954941-4843. 3-31 Easter services at Assumption Catholic Church, 2001 S. Ocean Blvd., Lauderdale-By-TheSea, at 6:45 a.m., 8 a.m., 9:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Espanol mass at 12:15 p.m. 954-9417647. 3-31 Easter Sunday services at 10 a.m. at St. Stephen Evangelical Church, 2500 NE 14 St. Causeway, Pompano SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 27By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point If fishing has been a little light so far for some anglers Jeff Walls, manager at RJ Boyles, said springtime fishing should be coming soon and things should improve. Springtime fishing should be getting better here soon, he said. But until then, Walls says theres still some catches to be made. Theres been a very good Wahoo bite from 100 ft. to 300 ft. of water. If you do go for some wahoo, Walls suggests using bonita strips as bait and trolling at six knots. And theres been some scattered dolphin and a few kings mixed-in. For those looking for swords this weekend, things may not be as great as last time. Daytime sword fishing was pretty good last weekend but the weather doesnt look good for it this weekend, said Walls. Sailfish might be biting again with the front moving in this weekend. Expect some rain and some breeze Improved shing is on the waySaturday and Sunday. But Walls says the prime time to catch sailfish will be over with once spring arrives. Youre going to catch a few but not as many. Fortunately, he added, tuna, grouper, dolphin and everything else in general should be getting better. For tips or more information, call RJ Boyles at 954-420-5001. Beach. 954-942-4473. 3-31 Easter sunrise services held by Community Church at 7 a.m. at the pavilion at the east end of Commercial Boulevard in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea There will also be a 10 a.m. service at the church, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. 954-776-5530.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 22, 2013 Pelican Classi eds mean business! 954-783-8700!Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! Pompano Beach This original painting by James Gibson epitomizes the Highwaymen style of Florida landscape art -sea, sky and brilliant tropical flora, particularly a Royal Poinciana in full bloom. Gibson will be one of the eight artists at the Sample-McDougald House, 450 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach, this Saturday, March 23 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost to see the exhibition which takes place inside the House is $5. Net proceeds benefit the Pompano Beach Historical Society. A private reception at the Sample-McDougald House takes place March 22 at the House. Patrons and guests can meet the artists and enjoy food, drinks and entertainment. Tickets are $50 per person. Call 954-292-8040.Highwaymen return to Sample-McDougald House 3-31Easter sunrise services held by Fort Lauderdale Business and Professional Womens Club on the beach across from Bahia Mar, 801 Seabreeze Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. 954-566-4165.Health & Safety3-23 Meditation class from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Lisas Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Learn the art of meditation. Cost is $50. RSVP at 954-782-6564. 3-27 Protecting Your Family on the Worst Day of Their Lives seminars at 2 p.m. at Panera Bread, 5975 N., Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. RSVP at 954-7819661. 3-29 Yoga class at 9 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. 954-946-6398. 3-23 Meditation class from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Lisas Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Cost is $50. RSVP at 954-782-6564. 3-23 Reiki II class from 1 to 5 p.m. at Lisas Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Cost is $100. RSVP at 954-782-6564. Music 3-23 Indie band Passion Pit performs at 8 p.m. at Lynn University, 3601 North Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets are $50 and $75. 561237-9000 3-24 Maestro James Brooks-Bruzzese and Symphony of the Americas perform at 2 p.m. at Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are between $25 and $75. 954522-5334. SightingsContinued from page 26

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