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Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 03-15-2013
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Friday, March 15, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 11 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea residents said farewell this month to Oscar Llerena, district chief with the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce and welcomed his replacement, Capt. Fred Wood. Wood, shown at right, has served as executive of cer of the BSO Tamarac district of ce since June 2007. He has been with BSO for 23 years serving in various areas, including road patrol, honor guard, eld force, bicycle patrol and community policing. Llerena recently promoted to major, was selected to lead BSO’s Youth Intervention & Enforcement Division. Town commissioners issued a proclamation commending him on his work in LBTS. The new executive of cer in LBTS is Holly Greene, who worked in internal affairs for 4-1/2 years. She replaces Angelo Cedeno who has been assigned to internal affairs. BSO changes bring new faces to LauderdaleBy-The-SeaPompano Beach – When two women were given a $50 citation for feeding homeless cats holed up in an abandoned Burger King, animal rights activists howled. The protest grew when ‘Help Me Howard’ aired the incident and incorrectly said the women were feeding just two cats. “The phones lit up,” Public Information Of cer Sandra King said. “The thing spiraled out of control.” According to King, there were dozens of cats in the old BK and nearby business owners were complaining. The situation got so City reviewing feral cat policies as animal advocates urge neuter and releasebad that Pompano Beach Animal Control installed cameras that eventually caught the cat feeders. But the resulting bad publicity prompted city commissioners to impose a 90day moratorium on issuing citations to violators of a city ordinance prohibiting feeding of feral cats. “They put a moratorium on an ordinance we don’t enforce anyway,” said David Aycock, the city’s animal control of cer. King concurred that citations are rarely issued. Commissioner Barry Dockswell also thought the moratorium unnecessary. “It’s a knee jerk reaction in a political season,” Dockswell said. “We’re being stampeded and hearing only one view.” But Mayor Lamar Fisher and three other commissioners defended the moratorium. “This will be healthy input for us. Don’t see the See CATS on page 16 Oakland Park Floyd Adams, Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue, Commissioner Elect Tim Lonergan. Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher chats with a supporter. Pompano Beach Charlotte Burrie takes District 2 win. Deer eld Beach Richard Rofezweig, District 3. Woody Poitier with wife, Cynthia, relax after early count predicts his win in District 4. Winners elated; Deer eld Beach to recount Still counting JeanRobb [left] v. Peggy Noland in Deer eld Beach. Oakland Park Commissionerelect Sara Guevrekian

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2 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFF Wilton Manors – This city is looking to make improvements on two speci c business districts, Wilton Drive and Andrews Avenue. And town of cials are hoping the property owners will pay for the improvements through a special assessment. To do that, the city will create two Business Improvement Districts, or BIDs. On Tuesday, city commissioners and the city’s Economic Development Task Force held a workshop to discuss the BIDs. City of cials have ideas for improving the two streets but want to hear rst from the property owners who could New tax assessment needed to revitalize business districtsend up paying. “Let’s get boots on the ground [and survey the business and property owners],” said Nick Berry, chair of the Economic Task Force and co-owner of Courtyard Caf and Rumors Bar & Grill, both on Wilton Drive. The BIDs, which would have to be approved by a majority of property owners, create special tax assessment districts. Each BID would levy additional taxes on property owners that would in turn be used to improve the area. In this case the funds could be used to pay for improvements to each street. The money generated by a BID would only be used to bene t that street. Heidi Shafran, Community Development Services Department director, said each BID would be overseen by a board mostly made-up of property owners and tenants. The boards, which would be formed as non-pro t entities, would have the nal say over how the money in each district is spent and would not estimates that the increase, depending on the millage rate, could generate between $38,000 and $152,000 annually for Wilton Drive and $7,000 and $31,000 per year for Andrews Avenue. Resnick said the city could also use funds to market the Indian-themed business on Andrews Avenue and Oakland Park Boulevard. “We could market it as the Indian Village of Wilton Manors.” Dean Trantalis, a member of the Economic Task Force whose law rm is on Wilton Drive, said he thinks owners won’t approve unless the goal is to make capital improvements. Increasing taxes to pay for trash cans, he said, won’t work. Commissioner Scott Newton urged caution, saying that the city needs to make sure it’s not on the hook for any expenses when the BIDs expire. need commission approval. Property owners would also vote on the number of years the additional taxes would be levied. There are plenty of suggestions for BID funds. Commissioner Tom Green suggested landscaping could be added to the median along Andrews Avenue. “We need to improve the streets there to attract businesses,” said Mayor Gary Resnick and Ilene Schnall, vice chair of the Economic Task Force, wanted more attention paid to the Avenue. Wilton Drive would most likely see BID money dedicated to transforming the street from four to twolanes with landscaping in the median and parking on both sides. Vice Mayor Julie Carson said Powerline Road has also been neglected. To improve Powerline and the city’s portion of Oakland Park Boulevard, staff will hire a rm to make recommendations for rezoning. To fund the BIDs, tax increases would be between 0.5 and 2.0 mills. Shafran Property owners will make nal decisionSend your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 15, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – Voters in this city chose two political newcomers over two former commissioners in Tuesday’s municipal election. In the race for Seat 1, Sara Guevrekian received 898 votes to 809 for Steve Arnst. In the contest for Seat 5, Tim Lonergan beat Layne Dallett Walls. Lonergan had 1,027 votes and Walls had 754. Voter turnout was 7.7 percent in Oakland Park and 8.14 percent in Broward County. The winners will be sworn in at the start of the commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 20. Guevrekian, 46, has been active as an organizer and of cer of the Royal Palm Isles Neighborhood Group and as a community volunteer and activist. She is employed as administrator for Commercial Metal Building Service. During the campaign, she Oakland Park voters elect new faces to lead citysaid she would bring a “new, fresh energy” to the dais. “Now the real work begins. I’m happy to put my best foot forward for the betterment of the city of Oakland Park,” Guevrekian said. She has the same goals she has always had as Jane Q. Citizen, “to be an advocate for people who call Oakland Park home and for the community of Oakland Park.” Lonergan, 51, is a project manager for United Health Care. He has volunteered for many city organizations and worked to rid the city of snipe signs. “I’m thrilled to death to be elected to Seat 5 for the City Commission,” Lonergan said. “I owe it all to the volunteers who supported me. We worked hard and got the message out that we need to take Oakland Park successfully into the future. I’m ready to roll up my sleeves and get to work and make Oakland Park a better place for everyone.” Democratic chair to speak at clubPompano Beach The North Broward Democratic Club will host Mitch Caesar, Broward Democratic Party chair, March 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Center, 1801 NE 6 St. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-7838232. See OAKLAND PARK ELECTION on page 21

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4 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@ yahoo.com By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – A collective sigh in triplicate was palpable here Tuesday as Lamar Fisher was returned to the mayor’s seat; Charlotte Burrie to District 2 and Woodrow “Woody” Poitier to District 4. Early on these three candidates began to relax as absentee vote pro les indicated positive results for them. In the end Fisher took 84.2 percent of the 6,290 votes cast; Burrie took 66.67 percent of the 762 votes, and Poitier took 55.75 from his two challengers who shared the remaining 1,121 votes. The public showed strong support of this commission’s moves to change the Voters return incumbents to of ce with mandate to keep on goingface of this city through redevelopment actions. Said Fisher, who has been returned to of ce for the fourth time, three terms as mayor, “This was an overwhelming mandate to continue our work. That includes the CRA, the overall health of the city which includes our healthy reserves, lower tax base, debt-free status and concentrated efforts on other portions of our city. This commission works well together. That’s why the mandate is there.” Fisher’s victory party was well in the works by 8 p.m. at Galuppi’s Restaurant. With over 80 percent of the votes in, this party was full of life. Former Mayor John Rayson and his wife, Cathy, were among the well-wishers who arrived. Burrie met with her supporters at the Elks Lodge where a at-screen television rolled out results that proffered applause on her behalf. Burrie said the results validated her years in of ce. “I’ve been in the community and for my people in the district and the city, and from these results I know they want me to continue to do that.” And she plans to do just that and more. “For six years, I have wanted to break ground on a civic center. I want to see that soon,” she said. In District 4, Poitier knocked out his two challengers, Ed Phillips and Joseph Wells, who shared less than 45 percent of the votes Poitier, who has been a strong gure in his community for decades as a retired re ghter and longtime funeral director said, “It’s not about me. It’s about the district and the community. People know I am loyal and trustworthy. I don’t do anything for Woody. Nobody lost jobs; nobody was laid off [referring to budget constraints].” Poitier celebrated his victory party at his home with family and close friends. While Poitier kept his iPad close at hand, which carried election results, he kept his eyes on the Miami Heat game, Mayor Lamar Fisher greets former Pompano Beach mayor and supporter John Rayson on Tuesday. Art 3-15 – Island City Art Walk from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Businesses on Wilton Drive showcase local artists and provide free refreshments. Visit www. islandcityartwalk.com. See SIGHTINGS on page 11as did his guests. The next morning, Poitier and the Heat had taken the day. Fisher, Burrie and Poitier will be sworn in on March 19 at noon at city hall commission chambers, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 15, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Four elementary school principals have found space in their already overtaxed buildings to build community reading rooms, an initiative sponsored by Scholastic Book Fairs and its community partners. The rst Reading Oasis was opened last year at Deer eld Park Elementary when the local Kiwanis Club put up matching funds. Now, the Broward Sheriff’s District 10 Of ce is tapping its Law Enforcement Trust Fund for $24,400, enough to build an Oasis at Deer eld Beach Elementary, Park Ridge Elementary, Tedder Elementary and Quiet Waters Elementary. Scholastic Book Fairs match that amount and provide materials, 1,200 books, book shelves, bean bag chairs, a colorful rug, a stereo listening BSO chips in so four more reading rooms coming to Deer eld elementary schoolscenter, CDs and a SMART board. At Deer eld Park, Oasis is a brightly decorated haven for children and their parents to enjoy reading. Principal Jocelyn Reid uses the Oasis in the aftercare program and as a reward for students who do well. To ramp up interest, she brings in special guests to read to the kids. The addition of four schools to the Oasis program puts Deer eld Beach “at the head of the pack,” Tony Smith, general manager of Scholastic Book Fairs said. Smith put the rst Oasis in Orlando. Deer eld Park followed and now BSO’s contribution makes this city on the cutting edge of the program. Smith said, “It’s been an incredible journey here in Deer eld Beach . It just makes such good sense to do this.” High dropout rates have been linked to poor reading skills. Children who lack reading skills by the third grade are prone to leave school and everyday in this country, 7,000 of them do, Smith said. And 70 percent of people in prison can’t read above a fourth grade level. Scholastic’s program is about making it easy to read a little every day. With in-home libraries almost non-existent in some school districts, the Oases provide a place for children and their parents to read together. The reading rooms will be constructed at each school and grand openings will be held in May, the rst May 6 at Tedder, followed by Quiet Waters May 21 and Deer eld Elementary, May 29. Park Ridge will hold its grand opening sometime between May 13 and 17. In conjunction with the openings, Scholastic will hold book fairs at each school.By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Sgt. Gary Blocker is on a mission to clean up this city, but he can’t do it until the commission gives him better tools. Blocker, supervisor of the code compliance unit, went before commissioners Tuesday to ask them to revamp the city’s code of ordinances so that his code compliance of cers could address many problems not allowed under the current system. Currently, the city has no mechanism to force property owners to x dilapidated roofs, gutters, windows, doors, ripped blue tarps or other unsightly problems. Blocker said the changes in the code would improve the safety of residents, make the city look better and further improve property values, which saw a 22 percent increase this year. “But I’m telling you we’re not done,” said Blocker about raising property values. One of the city’s worst eyesores is an old bar near Five Points on Wilton Drive. Unused as a place of business for years, the green building is in need of a new paint job and has major damage to its roof line, panels and fascia board. Commissioner Tom Green said he’s received complaints from several business owners who consider the building an eyesore. Jonathan Dalgarn, owner of Vertigo Salon, located near the site, said the run-down building is interesting and “part of the history of Wilton Drive but it’s an eyesore and needs to go.” Commissioners voted 40 to approve the changes to Code to commission: Give us better toolsSee TOOLS FOR CODES on page 30

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6 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XXI, Issue 11 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & LettersCorrectionsIn the story about Pompano Beach Elementary School students and hydroponic gardening in the March 8 issue, The Pelican mistakenly referred to Kimberly Cohen as the kindergarten teacher. Blake Cian one is the correct name of the teacher. In the Ali Building story on March 8, Laura Rollins was mistakenly refffered to as Laura Collins. The Pelican regrets the errors.Passover meetings rescheduled, cancelledBroward – The municipalities of Pompano Beach and Lauderdale-By-TheSea have rescheduled their March 26 meetings because of Passover. Pompano will meet on Thursday, March 28 at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd., and Lauderdale-By-The-Sea will meet on Tuesday, April 2 at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. The City of Wilton Manors has cancelled it’s March 26 meeting. Social media workshopWilton Manors – Art Gallery 21 presents Social Media & The Artist, Part 2 on Friday, April 12 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court. Michelle Solomon, former executive producer at Local 10 WPLG-TV, and current managing director of Editorial Content Providers, will provide a workshop assisting artists with Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms. Participants are invited to bring their laptop, tablet or smart phone. Wi-Fi will be available. Cost is a $5 donation to the Central Area Neighborhood Association of Wilton Manors. Email Constance Ruppender at PoetC7@aol.com or call 954-661-4740.ArtHall meets Henry FlaglerPompano Beach – Take a trip back in time to the era of Henry Flagler through “Art and Arbor” during ArtHall on Wednesday, March 20 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the CRA Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. Local artists Pat Anderson and Capt. John Wetzstein will showcase their watercolor and driftwood-themed artwork. Admission is free and refreshments will be served. For more information, call 954-586-1111.Goals and objectives meetingWilton Manors – City of cials will hold a workshop to discuss the goals and objectives of the city’s departments on Thursday, April 4 at 6 p.m. at Richardson Park, 1937 Wilton Drive. 954-390-2100. Sharon CeCe, owner of a Deer eld Beach thrift shop, goes ‘sleuth’ for goodAn act of honesty pays off for everyoneBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach –The only things in Maryhelen Schmidt’s lost wallet was a business card, $100 in cash, a driver’s registration card (not hers) and her last remaining baby picture. The business card was for Beach Dry Cleaners, the registration was her boss’s, the $100 was generic and the picture, well it could have been any cute baby. Yet about a week after discovering her loss, Schmidt had her wallet back thanks to two diligent ladies intent on nding her. Schmidt, who lives in Pompano Beach, had been showing visitors around the area concentrating on thrift stores. One of them was Pack Rats Thriftique in The Cove in Deer eld Beach. Several stops later on Commercial Blvd. reaching for her purse and change for a parking meter, she found her wallet missing. Retracing the many, many steps she had taken that day, she did not nd her wallet. But a week later, while dropping of a pair of her boss’s pants at Beach Dry Cleaners, a clerk there recognized the name on the laundry slip. It was the same as the name on the car registration in Schmidt’s wallet. Sharon CeCe, Pack Rats owner, had found the wallet and using the only clue she had, the cleaner’s business card, called and asked if they had a customer with the name on the car registration. They had a few, but mindful that someone had lost $100, they were especially alert and when Schmidt came in a few days later and used her boss’s name on the laundry slip, the trail went hot. Schmidt was told to call Pack Rats where her wallet was waiting. “I just knew that anyone who found the wallet with no ID will have no way of returning it to me,” Schmidt said. “So I prayed it that whoever found it would need the $100 and could keep it with a clear conscience.” But that is not how it turned out. Schmidt’s wallet was intact with its contents and the $100. To show her gratitude, she split the cash between the two ‘ nders.’ “That was so nice of her,” CeCe said. “I found the wallet right on the counter, and when I saw there was a lot of money in it, even tried to contact the Motor Vehicle Department.” “I was so happy to have my wallet back and even happier to see rsthand there are still honest people out there, “ Schmidt said. She is urging her friends and Pelican readers, “If you go into those shops, thank them again for me.” Sharon CeCe, owner of a Deer eld Beach thrift shop, is the ‘sleuth’ whose concern got a customer her wallet back.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 15, 2013 Democrat backers elect Rosenzweig in District 3By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Richard Rosenzweig was elected to represent Century Village and Crystal Lake on Tuesday but the race for mayor remained undecided at press time. Jean Robb, a former mayor, outpolled incumbent mayor Peggy Noland by 27 votes, within the threshold for an automatic recount. Thursday evening, however, provisional ballots were counted. If that count gave Robb a more substantial lead, the recount may not occur. In Tuesday’s balloting, Robb received 2,773 votes; Noland, 2746. Rosenzweig won the District 3 election with 623 votes to Donna Capobianco’s 555 and Caryl Berner’s 201. Election’s of ce spokesperson Mary Cooney said the number of provisional votes – ballots taken from people not on the voting rolls Shift in voting population gives Robb apparent win in Deer eld Beach– would not be known until the canvassing board met. However, county wide there were not “that many,” she said. This is not the rst time Noland who has served 16 years on the commission has been upset at the polling place. In 2005, Pam Militello, backed by the Original Save Our Beach organization, received about 1,000 votes in a ve-man eld, enough to take the District 1 election from Noland. Tuesday, Robb’s apparent win came from voters in District 2 where she outpolled Noland by about 750 votes. Two precincts 24A and 15A were lopsided in their support of Robb. In The Palms, a DB Housing Authority apartment building, 481 votes were cast, 431 for Robb. In 15A, Robb took another big lead collecting 271 votes to Noland’s 24. The numbers re ect a shift in voting power. The assumption that winning in Century Village, where Noland did prevail, was tantamount to winning the election was not the case Tuesday. In District 2, Noland may have taken the blame for city employee layoffs two years ago and behind the scenes former District 2 Commissioner Sylvia Poitier may have wielded her in uence. Early in her four-year term, Noland called for Poitier to resign her commission seat. Wednesday Robb readily admitted she courted District 2 votes. “I visited 16 black churches,” she said. Robb also drew more support in the Cove precincts, while Noland prevailed in northwest Deer eld. Robb, 81, was mayor here 1980-1993, and has tried to regain the commission twice before. Wednesday she said, “I think we won. I am very happy. The voters have spoken. It’s time to move forward.” Robb said she had more supporters in this election than in any of her previous runs and both she and Noland received more votes than ever before. Noland, who hosted a gathering at the Tipperary Pub after the polls closed, was visibly shaken as were her supporters including some elected of cials and their representatives. She was endorsed by two newspapers and many organizations. Wednesday morning Rosenzweig said his win was “surreal … Now I have to start acting like an elected of cial.” But according to his wife Verna, Rosenzweig, 74, has always had a yen for public service. “He has always cared about people. His family were community activists.” Rosenzweig takes over for term-limited Marty Popelsky, who due to illness has been largely absent from the dais for the last year. The new commissioner said he is contacting homeowner groups in the district to learn their See DEERFIELD ELECTIONS on page 12

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8 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Briefs Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF“There’s still time to get professional help preparing income tax for 2012,” says John Kubinec, owner of Pinnacle Computation, Inc. located in suite 202, at 2641 E. Atlantic Blvd., an elevator building in Pompano Beach. “We’ll be moving up to the third oor soon because we need more space,” he says. “My associates are CPA Lindsey Lennon and my dad, Kenneth, a CPA here in Pompano for the past 15 years.” Continuing, John says, “I’ve been doing accounting since I was 18. I graduated from the University of Central Florida, worked in New York and returned to open of ces here ve years ago. We specialize in helping small businesses with their year ‘round accounting and taxes, but we welcome new businesses and individual clients.” The rm offers free consultation which John describes as a meet and greet opportunity plus a super cial analysis of how he and his staff can help. “We’re a team effort, each with our own expertise. Every client gets the bene t of our combined knowledge.” He advises people who come for a free consult or actual preparation to bring the last two year’s tax returns and all current tax forms received. “Deductions are different for every individual, depending upon circumstances,” he explains. “That’s why a consultation is very helpful. In our review, we often spot missed opportunities for deductions which can be amended, bringing a client an unexpected refund.” He adds, “People who do their own taxes often miss deductions they are entitled to get. The tax codes keep changing, and it’s our job to be up on every change. Many times it pays to seek the advice of a professional. Individuals, businesses turn to Pinnacle for yearround accounting and income tax preparation Some of the things that have signi cant tax implications are short sales, foreclosures, cancellation of debt, rental properties, second homes, investments, change in marital status and more. Every day we help clients achieve the best tax outcome in all of these situations.” Unlike the seasonal pop up shops, Pinnacle Computations, Inc. handles accounting and taxes year ‘round, putting them and their clients at a distinct advantage. The company handles book keeping, pay roll services, incorporation, IRS issues, sales tax lings and everything that happens in a business including the unexpected. Claude Villard, president of LaMarquise Desserts, Inc. of Coral Springs, writes, “John and Lindsey have helped my business grow and become more pro table each year. From monthly payroll to end of the year tax questions, they are always there to assist us and offer advice. Never too busy to answer questions, we recommend them to anyone looking for accounting, bookkeeping and tax services.” David Goldstein, Hollywood, says, “I have been using John and his team for years now and I have never had a complaint with them. Lindsey is great with her detailed Owner of Pinnacle Computation, Inc., John Kubinec goes over some details with his associate, CPA Lindsey Lennon. John’s father, Kenneth Kubinec, a CPA who has been in the area for many years, is part of the Pinnacle team. [Photo courtesy of John Kubinec]See PINNACLE on page 25Beach branch library topic of meetingPompano Beach – There will be a special city commission meeting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 19 in the city commission chambers, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd., to discuss the Beach Branch Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd. City of cials discussed the possibility of building a city parking garage on the site where the current library is located. If so, they have promised to build a new library close to the parking garage. The discussion will take place after Community Redevelopment Agency meeting. Call 954-786-7824.Free health expoFort Lauderdale – The 7th Annual Community Health Expo takes place Saturday, March 16 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall, 5555 N. Federal Hwy. Hosted by the Light of the World Clinic, the fair will provide free screenings for diabetes, cholesterol, height/weight, BMI, HIV and vision. There will also be u shots and a blood drive. Many resource agencies will be also available to provide assistance and information regarding Social Security, Medicaid, Florida Kidcare and Guardian ad Litem. Visit www. afreeclinic.org www.clinicaluzdelmundo.com or call 954-563-9876.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 15, 2013 Oakland Park – This city’s 56th annual edition of Youth Day gets under way with a parade starting at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 16, at City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. Theme of this year’s celebration, sponsored by the parks and leisure Services Department, is “There’s No Place Like Youth Day.” The parade travels south on Northeast 12 Avenue to Northeast 34 Court, west to Northeast 6 Avenue, then north to Northeast 38 Street, west to Northeast 5 Avenue and north to Wimberly Field, 4000 NE 3 Ave. Opening ceremonies start at 11:30 a.m. with the presentation of colors, introduction of of cials and parade awards presentations. Game booths and rides are open from noon to 8:30 p.m. Armbands can be purchased the day of the event at the ticket booth for $20. Individual tickets are $1. A Kiddie Wonderland, with free bounce house, face painting and pony rides, sponsored by the Oakland Park Library, is open from noon to 4 p.m.The entertainment schedule includes:1 p.m.: Mai Kai Polynesian Revue. 1:45 p.m.: Little Miss Oakland Park Contest (by advanced registration only.) 3 p.m.: North Andrews Gardens Elementary School Show Choir. 3:20 p.m.: North Andrews Gardens Elementary School Band. 4 p.m.: Academy of Martial Arts. 4:30 p.m.: Rickards Middle School cheerleaders. 5 p.m.: Penn House Productions will entertain crowds with a blend of music, education and audience participation. 7 p.m.: The Weedline Band, a rock and roll party band that plays classic rock, modern rock, country, blues, funk and originals, will entertain. The day concludes with reworks at 8:45 p.m. For more information, call 954-630-4500. Youth day aims to please the entire family, March 16By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Commissioners reconsidered an earlier decision and decided now is the time after all to hire a rm to devise a town marketing strategy and plan. Commissioner Stuart Dodd, who had favored a delay, brought the matter back up on Tuesday saying, “Maybe we could revamp the contract and not do so much surveying.” Dodd said he did not want to spend public money on promoting hotels or asking tourists why they come here. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said that last year the commission kept asking about the town’s overall marketing strategy. “You asked for a marketing study Survey and marketing plan at rst rejected, is now acceptedand a plan proposal,” she said. In January, Hoffman, in response to the commission’s request for a marketing strategy, recommended hiring Ambit for $64,500 but commissioners voted 32 to defer the matter for six months until Commercial Boulevard improvements were completed. “There’s a broad misconception that we were going to spend $64,000 on surveys,” Hoffmann said. “The plan is to spend in the low $20s for surveying and research and the rest on how to best market ourselves. We’re putting a new face on the town,” she said, referring to plans for redevelopment and beauti cation on Commercial Boulevard. “This is about how to keep people coming and what’s the best way to market LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, to get the word out that this is a unique and amazing place.” Mayor Roseann Minnet and Commissioner Chris Vincent said they were still supportive of implementing the plan. Commissioner Mark Brown, who earlier favored delay, asked if Ambit could provide a plan without the cost of a survey. Kathy Koch, a principal with Ambit, said, “There’s strength to research. It makes sense to understand the habits of those you’re trying to reach. Without the survey, you’re not on a rm foundation,” she said. Koch said LBTS is “very, very unique.” She said with the research, her rm will nd out what can be done to bring See SURVEY on page 25

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10 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFChristy Keyes, director of Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point Library, and Doreen Gauthier were elated to have playwrite Emil Sher come to the library on March 7 to speak to school children about his play. Keyes welcomed the fourth and fth graders from Trinity Christian School, Highlands Christian Academy, and home school programs as they arrived to hear, question and meet Sher, author of Hana’s Suitcase on Stage They were studying the Holocaust and were very excited to have an inperson contact with a live author of a play about a child who died in the gas chamber at Auschwitz concentration camp. Gauthier, who co-hosted the event, says, “As I was reviewing information for Emil’s event, I visited the book’s website www.hanassuitcase.ca. On the website they list the ‘Restricted Rights of Jews in Czechoslovakia and in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia 1939 1941.’ One of the restrictions listed (1941) was that ‘Jews are banned from public libraries.’ That really hit home for me.” The squirming, twisting and poking, typical of this age group, stopped the moment Sher began to speak. About one hundred people in attendance were mesmerized as Sher told the story about a young Japanese educator, Fumiko Ishioka who wanted Japanese school children to learn about the Holocaust. After years of intense research, she tracked down a suitcase belonging to Hana Brady, and used it to involve Japanese boys and girls in the story of just one of a million and half children who were murdered in Hitler’s Auschwitz camp. Hana’s story became a book written by Karen Levine. Sher, in his introduction to his play, gives thanks to Karen Levine for the book, George Brady, Hana’s surviving brother, Fumiko Ishioka and Allen McInnis “for tilling the soil so a play could ourish.” Not a sound was heard as Sher told the sad story of Hana along with the uplifting part about nding her brother, Brady, who survived. Brady shared memories of Hana’s brief life and terrible ending. The children began to wave their hands hoping to ask questions. One poignant question was “Does it make you sad to talk about it?” “Yes it does,” Sher responds, “but we do this so that your generation will learn the lessons of the Holocaust and make sure that such a tragedy will never happen again.” “Why didn’t the Nazis murder Hana’s brother George?” Sher replied. “George was lucky. He had plumbing skills. He was good with machines and the Germans used him in the work camps. He has to live Author of the play, Hana’s Suitcase on Stage wowed school children at Lighthouse Point Library March 7 Lecturer and playwrite Emil Sher posed with his mother, Olga {center} and school children who came to hear about Hana’s Suitcas e on March 7 at the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point Library. [Photos courtesy of Christy Keyes]See HANA on page 24 Meet the Easter BunnyPompano Beach – The Easter Bunny will make an appearance on Saturday, March 23 from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Community Park, 820 NE 8 Ave. Along with photo opportunities with the Easter Bunny, there will also be free games, face painting, Easter egg hunts, arts and crafts and more. Call 954-786-4111.Nan Rich speaks at Democratic Club meetingPompano Beach – Democrat Nan Rich, former state senator, will speak at the Palm Aire/Cypress Bend Democratic Club on Monday, April 1 at 7 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave. Rich is a candidate for the 2014 gubernatorial race against Republican Governor Rick Scott. Refreshments served. Call Ashley Protheroe at 786-877-1644 or Jeannie Wilson at 954-973-6081.so be free games, face painting, Easter egg hunts, arts and crafts and more. Call 954-786-4111.Small business loansPompano Beach – Those looking for a small business loan can attend the Microenterprise Business Loan Fund Program meeting on Thursday, March 21 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 MLK Blvd. The City of Pompano Beach provides loans to residents who live in the Northwest CRA district or have their business located there. The program entails weekly training workshops and business consultations. Call 954-5861111.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 15, 2013 Pompano Beach Broward Sheriff’s Of ce detectives have released surveillance video from a cell phone store robbery in Pompano Beach. Just after 3:30 p.m. on Feb. 1, a black male wearing a hooded sweatshirt and blue jeans bolted into the Metro PCS store at 317 E. Copans Rd. He ran right up to the counter and said “give me all the [expletive] money.” The clerk laughed at the scruffy-faced subject, who then pulled out a silver handgun, pointed it at the clerk and reiterated his demand. The clerk handed over cash and the gunman bolted out of the store – all in a matter of 18 seconds. The robber is believed to be in his 20’s, around 5-foot-6 and 120 pounds. Anyone with information should call BSO Det. Steven Hoover at 954-321-4270 or Broward Crime Stoppers, anonymously, at 954-493-TIPS-8477 or online at www. BrowardCrimeStoppers.org. A cash reward of up to $1,000 to tipsters who call Crime Stoppers leading to an arrest.Robber walks in, walks out with cash in 18 seconds 3-15 – “Body Awareness” at Empire Stage 1140 N. Flagler Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Productions Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 5 p.m. until April 4. Tickets $20. www.islandcitystage.org or 954-678-1496. 3-19 & 21 – Rossetti Fine Art Life Drawing Classes at Pearl Arts and Crafts, 1033 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park, on Tuesdays from 6 to 9 p.m. and Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Cost is $125 for four sessions. 954247-9580. 3-21 – Ernestine Maat Ray will discuss “Colors and Textures of our African Legacy” from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Dr., Lauderdale-By-TheSea. 954-785-7408.Auctions & Sales3-16 – Granny’s Attic from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Bargains on various items. 954-7864111. 3-16 – Tropical Plant Fair from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Equality Park, 2040 N. Dixie Hwy., Wilton Manors. Vendor space available. 954-2572317. 3-23 – Women’s Club of Coconut Creek hosts a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at North Recreation Complex, 4455 Sol Press Blvd., Coconut Creek. Fundraiser to support scholarships for Coconut Creek residents and charitable programs. 954-326-7480.Auditions & Theatre3-15 – “Jerry’s Girls” at The Stage Door Theatre, 8036 W. Sample Road, Coral Springs. Play performed now through March 24 on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $38. Group rates available. 954-344-7765. 3-20 – My Son The SightingsContinued from page 4 See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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12 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 needs and problems. While campaigning, he noted that Green Road presents severe traf c problems for residents of Crystal Lake and that a planned athletic complex in a neighborhood of elderly people could present some problems. Within Century Village, acquiring the Hillsboro Pines Golf Course if the master homeowners’ association can afford to, is a priority. In no case would he favor changing the current recreational zoning, Rosenzweig said. Although it was a nonpartisan election, Rosenzweig drew much of his support from the Deer eld Beach Democratic Club. “They threw me under the bus,” he joked, “But they worked hard to get me elected.” Donna Capobianco, who lost her second run for the seat told her backers, “I am happy knowing we did great against the CVE political machine. What a run. You were behind me all the way and what a joy that has been. I believe things happen for a reason. We pick up, move forward and face the next challenge life puts in our path . Now I can do what I had planned. Enjoy more tennis.” Caryl Berner, the third person in the race would not comment on her position but did say, “I am glad Jean Robb will be sitting on the dais.” Hollywood – The South East Police Motorcycle Rodeo to Bene t C.O.P.S. [Concerns of Police Survivors] will take place on Saturday, April 27, 2013 at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, 1 Seminole Way, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Approximately 150 riders will compete from over 20 agencies throughout Florida and the East Coast, all with the goal of raising money for C.O.P.S. There will also be food, sponsor and trade booths, a Kids Zone and a multitude Rodeo to bene t C.O.P.S.of family activities. Raf e prizes will also be available, including a 2013 HarleyDavidson X883 Iron Edition Sportster motorcycle with a ramp free motorcycle trailer. Raf e tickets can be purchased during the rodeo for $1 per ticket or 25 for $20. Call 954-288-7201 to become a sponsor.Deer eld electionsContinued from page 7

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 15, 2013 Send news to mdpelican@yahoo.com Thief sought for stealing electronics from vesselsLighthouse Point – The police here are seeking help from the community in locating a thief or thieves who are boarding and stealing electronic equipment from docked vessels.. Over the past few weeks, several boats have been robbed during the overnight hours. Police believe that individuals are walking the seawalls and boarding vessels where electronic equipment is displayed. Police are following several leads provided by surveillance cameras from some of the theft locations. Meanwhile the police are asking the community to be alert and immediately report any suspicious activity to 954-9428080. They further ask boaters to secure their vessels, increase illumination and secure fences that lead to docks.

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14 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Send your events for publication to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Pompano Beach – The Men’s Club of St. Coleman’s Parish will hold its Fish Fry on Friday, March 22 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at St. Coleman’s Parish Hall, 1200 S. Federal Hwy. Tickets are $8 and include choice of entre: two pieces of tilapia, two crab cakes or shrimp. Choice of side: clam chowder, Caesar salad, macaroni and cheese or French fries. A dinner roll comes with each meal. Desserts and refreshments sold separately. Proceeds bene t sports programs and other initiatives at St. Coleman’s. Call 954270-2501.Men’s Club Fish Fry Waiter – A Jewish Tragedy at The Stage Door Theatre, 8036 W. Sample Road, Coral Springs. Play performed March 20 through April 14 on Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. and Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. Tickets are $38. Group rates available. 954-344-7765.Books & Lectures3-15 & 16 – Book sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Dixon Hall, 2200 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. 954-946SightingsContinued from page See SIGHTINGS on page 15Power BreakfastLauderdale-By-TheSea – The spring “Power Breakfast” is set for Friday, March 22 from 7:30 to 8:45 a.m. at Blue Moon Fish Co., 4405 W. Tradewinds Ave. The guest speaker will be Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Mayor Roseann Minnet who will provide an update and answer questions about the upcoming beauti cation project on Commercial Boulevard. Gourmet breakfast served. Cost is $20. 954-2679888. Men’s Club Comedy ShowPompano Beach – The Saint Coleman Men’s Club will hold its annual Comedy Show on Friday, April 26 at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. This year’s comedians are Paul Nardizzi and Dennis Regan. The shows will be held at Galuppi’s Restaurant, 1103 N. Federal Hwy. Tickets for the early show are $20 and tables of eight are $150. Tickets for the late show are $25 and tables of eight are $175. The late show has sold out every year so get tickets early. Priority seating is given to those who purchase tables. You can buy tickets and see the seating chart at the Men’s Club website, www.stcmc.org or call Steve Feeley at 954-235-9119 or Jim Hoy 954-495-1296.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 15, 2013 6398. 3-16 – Book fair from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Margate Library, 5810 Park Drive. New and “like new” books, videos and CDs. 954-3577500. 3-23 & 24 – Book sale from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Northwest Regional Library, 3151 University Drive, Coral Springs. 954-357-7990.Business3-21 – Greater Pompano Beach Chamber membership breakfast from 7:45 to 9 a.m. at Auto Tech & Body, 429 N. Dixie Hwy., Pompano Beach. RSVP at www. PompanoBeachChamber.com. 3-25 – Networking Monday Mixer from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at CRA Business Resource Center, 501 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach, 954586-1111. 3-28 – Wilton Manors Business Association meets for lunch networking from 12 to 1 p.m. at Lotus Chinese Kitchen, 1434 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Visit wiltonmanors businessassociation.com. Children & Family 3-16 – Pony rides at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. Rides held every third Saturday. 954786-4507. 3-16 – 56th Annual Youth Day at 10 a.m. at Wimberly Field Athletic Complex, 3900 NE 3 Ave., Oakland Park. Sponsors wanted. 954-630-4500. 3-23 – Easter Bunny from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Community Park, 820 NE 8 Ave. Free games, face painting egg hunts, arts and crafts and more. 954-786-4111. 3-29 – Madagascar 3 plays at sundown at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. Event is free. 954-360-4507. 3-30 – Easter Bunny visits Pompano Citi Centre, corner of Federal Highway and Copans Road, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Photos, food, arts and crafts, egg hunt and other kids activities. 954943-4683. Clubs & Charity3-15 – Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Meets every Friday. 954-786-3274. 3-19 – Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Club meets every Tuesday. 954972-7178. 3-19 – Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets at 12:15 SightingsContinued from page 14 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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16 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 harm in it. [Changes] will give us an opportunity to be unique, a model,” Fisher said. At the meeting, animal activists urged the commission to adopt TNR, a trap, neuter, vaccinate and release policy favored by many. Advocates say it is about half the cost of trapping, holding and then euthanizing if the cat is not adopted. In fact, during this moratorium they publically urged organizations that practice TNR to go into the city’s cat colonies in the hopes of reducing their numbers. Aycock, however, cautioned that TNR has merit only in controlled situations. The feral cats can be trapped only once and a rabies vaccination lasts only three years. The colonies become infested with illnesses and the cats are almost impossible to catch and treat, he said. “This is about ethics. Animals in the wild suffer like you can’t imagine. We have bred cats to need care. When we cut them lose, how do we protect them?” Only two percent of roaming cats are neutered, Aycock said. “TNR does not work. If it did I would give it my good graces.” Aycock is the author of the city’s present ordinance which makes it illegal to abandon a cat and to feed feral cats. “We have a sound ordinance,” he said. “We talk to the feeders and often can convince them they are not doing a good thing . We are always about protecting the animals.” The ordinance does allow feeders to obtain permits but requires the cats to be contained and to be sterilized and vaccinated. Cats in the wild face all sorts of dangers, among them being poisoned or shot by people living near them. ”You can’t force someone to live next to a colony,” Aycock said. A University of Florida study of TNR also does not advocate it as a method of controlling the feral cat population. Those studies show that it is impossible to catch all the cats and neuter them and when they are returned to the wild, they attract other cats which proceed to produce litters. The colonies grow in numbers rather than decrease. The report speaks of the dangers the cats present to other wildlife and of the inhumane and cruel life the cats themselves endure. Two years is their normal life span. King says cat feeders see themselves as saving the abandoned and feral cats but are not recognizing studies that show the animals live meager lives, shortened by disease, people who poison or shoot them, dog attacks, or being hit by cars. “Unfortunately, Animal Control is being portrayed as being against the cats . .nothing could be further from the truth. Janice Grif n is one resident who wants to keep the ordinance intact.”I do not want the city to make it any easier to have these colonies. As an animal lover myself, I can’t see perpetuating that kind of life for an animal. Any policy that encourages colonies is not good. No animal lover would want this.” a program she calls “quite successful.” Candace West, a trapper from Tamarac, urged commissioners at a February meeting to consider TNR as an option. She and others present said to the commission, “give us time to develop a program.” Faced with the public’s growing awareness of TNR, Aycock said, “I have asked for alternatives. If they can produce variations [on the ordinance] that give me the ability to satisfy the citizens, I would entertain that.” CatsContinued from page 1Pompano Beach High School Booster Club hosts its 7th Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, May 4 at the Pompano Beach Municipal Golf Course, 1101 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and tee off is 8:30 with a shotgun start. Lunch, raf es, live and silent auctions will follow at Galuppi’s Restaurant. Proceeds bene t athletic scholarships and team sports. For more info email PBHSBooster1@yahoo.com. Fees are as follow: Individual Golfer $100; Tee Sponsor $150; Silver Sponsor $500; Gold Sponsor $750; Platinum Sponsor $1000. Grif n said the cats presents issues in neighborhoods where they use homeowner’s yards as a potty. “That is not a good situation for anyone,” she said. But animal activists don’t agree. The national organization, Best Friends Animal Society, has introduced two bills in the Florida Legislature making it legal to feed feral/free roaming cats if they have been sterilized and vaccinated which is indicated by clipping an ear. Protection is also given for the care givers. Carol Ebert, executive director of the Florida Humane Society, a no-kill shelter, said she favors TNR. But she points out that spring is the breeding season and all the unsprayed ferals will be pregnant. Her shelter is at capacity now – 100 cats – and cannot accept any more. The Society does adopt out kittens at the PetSmart stores in Coral Springs and Boca Raton, Boosters need boost for PBHS

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 15, 2013 Angelo’s Station House & Tapas Bar Cove Shopping Center 1544 SE 3 Court Deer eld Beach 954-227-5961 Open Daily 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Hip and stylish, Deer eld Beach’s Angelo’s Station House serves up top-notch Italian fare in friendly ambianceBy Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFProprietor Silvio Trentalange and his wife Marianne are truly seasoned restaurateurs. Having owned and operated 19 eateries in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Acapulco, Mexico, this gregarious couple brings over 50 years of experience to their latest venture – Angelo’s StaA whimsical Chef’s creation: tender chicken breast with asparagus, Fontina cheese and homemade gravy. original recipe.” A great feature of the recently opened Angelo’s Station House is the tapas menu. These smaller portions are designed to be shared amongst friends over a glass a wine and spirited conversation. Some of the highlights See ANGELO’S on page 19tion House. “We had actually moved to Florida to retire but after talking with Executive Chef Angelo Morinelli, we decided to open a new restaurant here in Deer eld Beach,” says Silvio with slight bewilderment. “As you can tell, it is named after him.” And with good reason, Chef Angelo has been in the business for 40 years and has cultivated a culinary savoirfaire that is truly unparalleled. “I ran my own restaurant continuously in Mineola, NY for 30 years. Then I decided to come to Florida where I owned “Tanzy” in Mizner Park. Now, I am excited about this newest project,” says the friendly Chef who was born in Naples, Italy. “My style of cooking is very contemporary but I always respect the essence and ingredients of the

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Pompano ArtHall in full swing as artists honor Black History Month Pompano Beach – Every month, ArtHall combines art and networking at this city’s CRA Business Center, 50 NE 1 St. But February’s event featured a focus on Black History Month. Ras David Williams and LaVaughn Wright filled the CRA Business Center with African and African American-themed art work, including Williams’ painting of President Barack Obama. And guitarist Eugene Grey entertained those who attended the event. [Photos by Michael d’Oliveira]Hail to the Chief Ras David Williams [Above] and his painting of President Obama. [Top Right] LaVaughn Wright with three of his paintings. [Right] Eugene Grey entertains attendees with his guitar.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 15, 2013 include the grilled sirloin tips with caramelized onions, the mini crab cakes, the tuna Angelo’sContinued from page 17carpaccio, the fried calamari, the PEI mussels in white wine sauce and the delightful hot or cold seafood antipasti dishes. “Our tapas bar is always packed. People just love it!” says General Manager David Green eld, an industry veteran specializing in highend steakhouses. “We also offer $5 glasses of wine all day long and a great Happy Hour from 4 to 7 pm when all drinks are half-price.” Healthy salads, veggies and soups along with a long list of mouthwatering appetizers such grilled octopus, Portobello mushrooms stuffed with spinach & mozzarella, eggplant Napolitano and Silvio’s favorite Clams Casino make a great start to an enjoyable gastronomic voyage to Italy. Of course, there are plenty of enticing pasta dishes including porcini mushroom Papardelle, Tagliatelle Bolognese and Linguini Vongole. “The Fiocchi Quattro Formaggi is outstanding,” says Marianne. “It features pillow shaped pasta stuffed with four cheeses and roasted pear.” Meat lovers can enjoy avorful grilled NY strip steak, tender let mignon and even braised lamb shank. A few choice chicken dishes also make an appearance. “Our veal chop and sh plates are specialties of the house,” says Angelo who is clearly passionate about his food. “And our 2 lbs. lobster dishes are outstanding.” Indeed, lobster a cionados can indulge in a variety of preparations such as the classic steamed or grilled with butter but also the Oreganato version with garlic, breadcrumbs and herbs or the Fra Diavolo with spicy marinara over linguini. Shell sh lovers can order the lobster “Arianchata” which includes mussels, clams, scallops, calamari and shrimp in a spicy white wine sauce over linguini. “We buy our seafood daily in smaller quantities. This way, customers can be assured that it is always extremely fresh,” adds the affable Angelo. “And all our sauces are made fresh in house so that everything we serve is truly of the highest quality.” This elegant trattoria prides itself of providing superlative customer service, an evocative Mediterranean atmosphere and delectable fare whilst maintaining a price point that is accessible to all. There is a great private party room that can accommodate up to 35 guests. It is ideal for birthday parties, business functions, or any other special event that requires good food in a pleasant setting. Most tapas dishes are priced between $6-$8, appetizers between $6-$13 while main courses range from $14 to $25. Get there before 6 pm and enjoy the Early Dinner that includes soup or salad, entre and dessert for $16.95. There is also an eye-popping wine list with excellent vintages starting at $24. Of course, full bar service is equally offered. On the dessert front, Angelo’s Station House delivers all the required classics such as tiramisu, zabaglione with fresh fruit, cannoli, tartufo and chocolate lava cake. For a novel taste sensation, patrons should give the “olive oil gelato” a try. Buon appetito! Silvio and Marianne Trentalange show off a few of Angelo’s Station House specialties. The Linguini Pescatore is a customer favorite. It comes loaded with fresh mussels, clams, scallops, calamari and shrimp in a zesty tomato sauce over “al dente” pasta.

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFOnce again this year, the great white tent on El Mar Drive signaled the coming of Lauderdale-by-the-Sea’s much anticipated annual culinary event. Despite inclement weather, hundreds of area residents and visitors attended the classic gastronomic soire known as Taste of the Beach. Presented by the LBTS Chamber of Commerce, the celebrated Taste of the Beach lived up to expectations by featuring over 30 area restaurants, live entertainment and additional vendors all displaying the very best of their respective specialties. The maelstrom of aromatic scents, lively music and good cheer created the perfect atmosphere to enjoy the wide variety of delectable dishes served up by several local eateries. “Everyone seems to be having a good time” said event organizer Guy Contrada as he walked the floor making sure guests and restaurateurs were enjoying the experience. From tender meats to grilled seafood, fresh oysters to lobster bisque, sultry salads to decadent desserts, there was a wealth of tasty temptations for every palate. In addition, several wine and spirits purveyors were also present to showcase their particular brands of tonic. Ambrosial vintages, flavored vodkas and frosty beers were great complements to the toothsome fare on hand. “We also had many fantastic gift baskets and prizes for the silent auction,” added Chamber President Mark Great food and lively ambiance make Lauderdale-By-The-Sea’s Taste of the Beach a resounding success The ladies from Chart House restaurant [above] show off their avorful seared tuna nachos. [Photo by Malcolm McClintock] Lenore and her chef from the Lenore Nolan-Ryan Cooking School serve up tasty Asian noodles and homemade brownies. [Photo by Sunny Eckhardt]See TASTE on page 21

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The Pelican 21 Friday, March 15, 2013 Kerry McNarara Silver. One of the most rewarding evenings of the year, Taste of the Beach is a memorable occasion that should always be marked on one’s calendar. Simply drop by the Chamber Welcome Center to plan next year’s visit! TasteContinued from page 20 [Above] Event organizer Guy Contrada, Aruba Beach Caf, and High Noon proprietor Paul Novak enjoy the festivities. The folks from Azteca Fresh Grill [Right] showcase tempting Mexican specialties. [Photos by Sunny Eckhardt] Lonergan said he faced “kind of an uphill battle, since my opponent had previous experience. Overall, the people want fresh ideas and new energy. I offer that. I’m so proud to be able to serve all the residents of Oakland Park.” Asked what issues he wants to tackle soon, he said he is concerned with home break-ins going on throughout the city. “I want to focus on crime and work with Chief (Al) Hubrig from BSO and make sure we’re on track to reduce crime statistics throughout the city. It’s important that residents feel safe in Oakland Park. It’s a great city, and we have the potential to become even better.” Voters approved all six proposed charter amendments. One calls for moving the municipal election from March to November. Another eliminates numbered, individual seats. Instead, candidates would run as a group with the top two or three winning election. Guevrekian said she is eager to see how the move to November elections will affect future elections. “I’m certain there will be an increase in turnout, and that’s a good thing for the city.” Lonergan said he was happy to see all the amendments pass. With the move of the election to November, the money spent on March elections can be used in better places, he said. Oakland Park electionsContinued from page 3

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Highwaymen showSaturday, April 6th, the Oakland Park Historical Society will be holding its 3rd Annual Highwaymen Show, featuring R.L. Lewis and fellow Highwayman Hall of Fame Artists and their work. The show will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Jaco Pastorius Community Center in Oakland Park, located at 4000 N. Dixie Highway. Strawberry FestivalWilton Manors – New Presbyterian Church will host its Strawberry Festival on Saturday, March 16 at 4 p.m. at its Rejoice School, 512 NE 26 St. There will be strawberries, homemade pound cake and whipped cream to enjoy. There will also be a silent auction in the church’s newly renovated courtyard. Suggested donation is $5. Proceeds will benefit students at Rejoice. Call 954-946-4380. See SIGHTINGS on page 23 SightingsContinued from page 15p.m. at 2801 Country Blvd. 866-976-8279 3-19 – Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale/Cypress Creek meets at 12 p.m. at Westin Cypress Creek Hotel, 400 Corporate Drive. Club meets every Tuesday. 954492-8254. 3-20 – Kiwanis Club of Oakland Park meets Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd. 954-5669957. 3-20 – Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave. 954-5607813. 3-21 – Kiwanis Club of Deer eld Beach meets on Thursdays at 12 p.m. at DoubleTree Hilton, 100 Fairway Drive. 754-333-0565. 3-21 – Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets on Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 North Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. 3-23 – Kiwanis Club of Deer eld Beach West meets second and fourth Saturday at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St. 954-54-732-9883.Education & Self Development3-18 – Toastmasters Toast of Goldcoast meets at 7 p.m. at Denny’s, 3151 Powerline Road, Oakland Park. 954-718-0543. 3-19 – Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Deer eld Beach City Hall, 150 NE 2 Ave., Deer eld Beach. 954-357-5579.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 15, 2013 SightingsContinued from page 22 See SIGHTINGS on page 25Small business loansPompano Beach – Those looking for a small business loan can attend the Microenterprise Business Loan Fund Program meeting on Thursday, March 21 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 MLK Blvd. The City of Pompano Beach provides loans to residents who live in the Northwest CRA district or have their business located there. The program entails weekly training workshops and business consultations. Call 954-5861111. 3-19 – Prearranging your Cremation or Funeral Services workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Asia Buffett 240 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach. Free lunch. RSVP at 954-7819661. 3-21 – Prearranging your Cremation or Funeral Services workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Bobby Rubinos, 2501 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Free lunch. RSVP at 954-781-9661. 3-27 – Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W Atlantic Blvd. 954357-5579.Events & Activities3-15 & 16 – 12th Biennial Quilt Show from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 1 St., Fort Lauderdale. 3-16 – Grand opening of Peaceful Ridge Rescue 3004 Peaceful Ridge Drive, Davie, takes place at 11 a.m. Peaceful Ridge is dedicated to caring for abused and abandoned horses. www. PeacefulRidgeRescue.com or 954-240-6080. 3-16 – Kayak rentals from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Richardson Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Rates are $16 per hour for a single kayak [$40 for 4 hours] and $24 per hour [$58 for 4 hours] for a double kayak. 954-7810073 or 954-854-1014. 3-16 – Photographer Jerry Saxon presents a slide program centering on the natural beauty of South Florida parks, speci cally Quiet Waters Park, from 2 to 3 p.m. at Deer eld Beach Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd. Light refreshments served. 954-3577680. 3-17 – Classic Car Show from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Diamond Strike Lanes, 2200 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Music, food, raf e and door prizes. 954-941-0968. 3-20 – Spaghetti Dinner from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Music provided by DJ TJ. Dinner includes spaghetti, meatballs, salad, dessert and drink. Tickets are $8 per person and $15 per couple. Bring your own wine. 954-390-2120. 3-31 – Easter sunrise services held by Community Church at 7 a.m. at the pavilion at the east end of Commercial Boulevard in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea There will also be a 10 a.m. service at the church, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea. 954-776-5530. 3-31Easter sunrise services held by Fort Lauderdale Business and Professional Women’s Club on the beach across from Bahia Mar, 801 Seabreeze Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. 954-566-4165. 4-9 – GFWC Woman’s Club of Deer eld Beach instillation luncheon at 12 p.m. at Wyndham Hotel Resort, 4011 N. Ocean Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $30. Public welcome. 954-421-4700.

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad with the knowledge of the horrible deaths of his mother, father and sister. George now lives in Montreal with his wife and children of his own but he never forgets the horror of his childhood. Once he learned of Fumiko’s years of research and Hana’s suitcase, he visited her in Japan and talked to her “Small Wings” group. He was so moved by the experience that he joined Fumiko in lecturing about the Holocaust around the world so that no one will forget his family and the six million Jews who died because they were Jewish.” Then Emil’s face breaks into a smile as he says, “We have a Holocaust survivor in the audience…my mother, Olga Sher. Come up, Mother and help me answer these questions.” Everyone clapped as a tiny woman, the size of a fth grader, stepped up to the podium beside her son. He held out an armband with a Jewish star on it, saying “This was Mother’s armband which she had to wear at all time during Hitler’s purge of Jews.” A young voice called out to Olga, “Did you hate the Germans?” With a sweet smile, Olga answered. “No. Many good people helped us. There’s a list of those good people too. These people did not want to be part of Hitler’s madness. Different families hid me in their attics for four years. When I was lucky to come out alive, I saw a school acquaintance holding a baby and I realized that life had been happening while I struggled to survive from 1941 to 1944. You have to forgive. In Warsaw there is a monument documenting the Holocaust. As I stood reading the words, I saw a German prisoner sweeping the streets. He was very thin and looked to be a sad soul. I felt pity, not anger. You must be able to forgive. I have had a good life since that terrible time. In Canada, I married a loving husband and we had two wonderful sons. I am now a snowbird from Montreal. When I am here, I get to volunteer in this wonderful library.” Olga Sher’s nal words to the group were “As Doreen can tell you, when Hitler gained control in Germany, one of the rst rights he took from us was forbidding Jews the use of libraries. Perhaps that is why I love volunteering in this library and welcoming all who come to use it.” Parents and children lined up to buy Sher’s book, Hana’s Suitcase on Stage. He signed copies of the book and one of his daughters acted as cashier. The audience left, emotionally drained, to digest this reminder of the 6,000,000 people who died because they were Jews. The last page of the book, and Sher’s play end with this poem written by Japanese children. Hana Brady, thirteen years old was the owner of this suitcase. Fifty ve years ago, May 18, 1942, two days after Hana’s eleventh birthday, she was taken to Terezin in Czechoslovakia. October 23, 1944, crowded in a freight train, she was sent to Auschwitz. She was taken to the gas chamber right after. People were allowed to take only one suitcase with them. I wonder what Hana put in her suitcase. Hana would have been sixty nine years old today, but her life stopped when she was thirteen. I wonder what kind of a girl she was. The few drawings she made at Terezin—these are the only things she left for us. What do these drawings tell us? Happy memories of her family? Dreams and hopes for the future? Why was she killed? There was one reason. She was born Jewish. Name: Hana Brady. Date of Birth: May 16, 1931. Orphan. We, Small Wings, will tell every child in Japan what happened to Hana. We, Small Wings, will never forget what happened to one and a half million Jewish children. We children can make a difference in building peace in the world—so that the Holocaust will never happen again. By Small Wings, December 2000,Tokyo, Japan Translated from Japanese by Fumiko Ishioka HanaContinued from page 10 Seder nightsTwo Seders will take place in honor of Passover next week. The meals are open to families with an emphasis on children.First Seder Night Monday, March 25 at 7:30 p.m. Second Seder Night Tuesday, March 26 at 7:30 p.m. Seders will take place at 4431 NE 27 Ave., Lighthouse Point. Call Rabbi Tzvi Dechter at 347-410-1106 or visit www. JewishLHP.com.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 15, 2013 work and they always have my taxes in order. I can reach someone in their of ce at all times, and that is reassuring to me. I recommend their services to everybody who wants reliable accounting services.” George Spain Jr., owner of G.Cutz, LLC, Pompano, writes John and his team have helped me in more ways than I can count. Anytime I have an accounting or tax related question, John is always there giving me guidance. Being local is important to me as is face to face contact.” Randall Stevens, Pompano, credits Pinnacle for digging him out of a messy situation. “ I can never thank John enough for straightening out my situation with the IRS so that I could move forward and get on the right track. I highly recommend them PinnacleContinued from page 8 the visitors back. Brown questioned whether the survey should be done before the downtown is revamped. Koch said now is the best time, since so many more people are here. “We want to know what brought them here, and what will make their experience better. That answer won’t change based on improvements you’re making.” Malcolm McClintock, executive director of the LBTS Chamber of Commerce, and Mark Silver, chamber president, urged approval. Commissioners agreed by a vote of 4-0 to hire Ambit to develop the marketing plan. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser, who had favored deferral of the plan, was not at the meeting. SurveyContinued from page 9 whether you have issues with the IRS or are just looking for consistent, great tax and accounting services.” Pleased to pass on these testimonials, John concludes with ”We’re very innovative in using technology, which means we cut the time involved in preparation and pass the savings on to the client.” Open Mon. to Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The April 15 deadline is fast approaching. Call 954933-2893 for a free consultation. SightingsContinued from page 23 See SIGHTINGS on page 28Health & Safety3-16 – Health Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at MEC Ministries, 115 NE 3 St., Pompano Beach. HIV/AIDS and cholesterol testing, bounce houses and more. 954785-9546. 3-16 – Health Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at MEC Ministries Pompano, 115 NE 3 St. HIV/AIDS tests, cholesterol tests and more. 954-7859546. 3-16 – Chiropractic intern Kevin Kustarz will talk about chiropractic medicine and “God’s healing potential” at 12:30 p.m. at Hedglon Chiropractic Center, 1313 E. Sample Rd., Pompano Beach. RSVP at 954-946-1799. 3-16 – U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary About Boating Safely class from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Spanish River Park,

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-783-8700 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 3-29 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO. Looking For Good People! Good Opportunity For Right Individual. Qualifications: Good Driving Record – Physically Fit – Professional. No Drugs! Average Tech Earns $600 $1,200 A Week. Wayne 954-868-5560. 3-15 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTMALE CNA/HHA/ COMPANION – Broward – Former EMT/Certified/ Lt. Massage. Compassionate – References. Ron 954-2322832. 3-15 COMPANION/ELDERLY – Housekeeper Or Nanny. Looking For A Job! Excellent References. Full/Part Time. Available Weekends! White American. 954-245-2434. 322 CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AIDE – Will Care For The Elderly! Honest And Reliable. 20 Years Experience. Please Call 954-486-7630. 3-15 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-5 CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 4-5 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs – Carpentry – Plumbing – Roo ng – Masonry – Windows – Painting – Decking – Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 – Emergency Calls. 4-5 CARPET CLEANING!!! 2 ROOMS $59.00 ACTUAL PRICE!!!! NO GIMMICKS!!!!! CALL 954-784-8199 FOR INFORMATION. 3-22 BLADE RUNNERS – Yard Maintenance. FREE ESTIMATE!! Grass Cutting –Trimming Hedges & Shrubs. Mulching. Lic/Ins. Starting At $25 Per Cut. Eddie 954-4941303. 3-29 M.M. CARPET INSTALLATION – REPAIRS AND RESTRETCH. CALL 954-675-3810. 3-15 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill, Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954-818-9538. 3-22 GIGI’S CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable – Honest. More Info. 954-2957033 Or 954-210-2248. 4-5 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 315 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CSTAMP COLLECTIONSWANTED– ACCUMULATIONS & COLLECTIONS Of Stamps. House Calls Made. Call John 954-467-7128 Or 954-6142562. 3-15 HOMEOWNERS INSURANCEBETTER RATES! BETTER SERVICE! Call KATIE For A FREE Quote! 954-784-9029. www.myersinsures.com 3-29 COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 3-22 GARAGE SALESPOMPANO NEW AND OLD SALE!!!! Parliament House – 405 N Ocean Blvd. Saturday March 16 – 9am – 2pm. Books – Toys – Dcor – Household Items!! Clothes – Crafts – MUCH MORE. 3-15 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 4-5 COCKTAIL TABLE – 50Lx30W – Partial Leather Top – Walnut Mahogany Solid Wood – Beautiful Carved Legs – 2 Drawers. $200. Hillsboro Beach A1A. 954-360-7092. 3-15 THRIFT STORECLF THRIFT STORE – 801 SE 10 St. Deer eld. Monday & Wednesday 10am-3pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-4pm. 20% Off Friday & Saturday ONLY. 954-428-8980. 3-15 DOCKS FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT – Up To 40’. $10 Per Foot. New Dock – Electric & Water Available! Wide Canal! Close To INLET. No Live-Aboards!! No Fixed Bridges. Cell 412-491-3937. 3-15 POMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL – Off NE 14 St. Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water, Electric. Up To 33’ $325 Month. 954-7814994. 3-15 CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 – Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954812-5192.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 15, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-783-8700 1994 CHEVY CAVALIER – 4 Cyl. Low Miles. Economical! Sporty! Ice A/C. CD – Tint. New Battery & Tires. $1700 OBO. 954-632-0476. 3-15 OPEN HOUSESPOMPANO – 1500 N OCEAN BLVD. UNIT 801. Sunday 14pm. Completely Renovated 2/2. Small Pet OK! Washer/ Dryer In Unit. Oceanfront Bldg. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. 954-803-4174. 3-15 HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE – 2/1 HOME! Just REDUCED! $79,000. 55+ Community! 2 Clubhouses! FREE GOLF. Low Maintenance. Robert Elkins – Charles Rutenberg R.E. 954-782-8968. 3-22 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – LEISUREVILLE 3/2 – 1 Car Garage. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease. Utilities Not Included. Available NOW!!!!!!. 954-6498867. 3-15 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19REAL ESTATE FOR SALEPOMPANO BEST BUYS!!!! LOW FEES!!!!!! 3228 T/H / VILLA– 2/2 One Floor Only! Totally Renovated, Approx. 1/2 Block To Ocean $279,999 – MAKE OFFER.. RIVERGATE – TH Rarely Available. 3 Bedrm. 2.5 Bath/1 CG – ICW View $475K. SEA HAVEN #321 B – Remodeled. 2/2 – Adjacent To Marina $155K. GARDEN AIRE VILLAGE S. #415, 2/2 Approx. 1 Mile To Sea! $110K. Contact PJ Carswell, Atlantic Prop. Int. Inc. – 954-242-4260. pj@atlanticprop.com 3-15 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-29CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony – Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month. 954-6291324. 3-29 POMPANO BEACH – MARINE COLONY 2/2. Close To Beach. Direct Ocean AccessDock Space Available. Pretty Canal View. Screened Balcony. Small Pet OK! Large Walk-in Closets. Near Public Golf Course. Tennis Courts. Shopping Mall. Non-Smoking. Available April 1st $1,200 Per Month. 954-695-3493. 3-15 APTS FOR RENTBEACH AREA APT As Low As $475 A Week In Season! (3225 NE 6th St.) 95 Yards To Beach; Bright Airy Apt With Cable, Wireless, Parking, Patio, Charming Furnishings And More. Pet Friendly. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com 3-15 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 3-22 LUXURY OCEAN-VIEW APT: $1475 A MONTH IN SEASON! (Ocean Blvd & NE 6th St.) European Style Kitchen, Ultra-Quiet, EcoFriendly, Central Air, Tropical Pool, Ocean Views, Dedicated Parking, Coin Laundry, Premium Cable TV, WI-FI And More. Pets OK. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com 3-15 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 APT. All New! Screened Florida Room. Ceramic – Granite. Upscale Residential Neighborhood. $975 Month. 609-638-1291. 3-15 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO – 1 Bedroom & Ef ciency With Kitchen. Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly –Seasonal. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 4-5 PRIMO OCEAN BOULEVARD APT For As Low As $68 A Night In Season! (601 N. Ocean Blvd) Great Area, Great Apt. Great Rates. 95 Yards To Beach. Special Weekly & Monthly Rates Too. Cats & Small Dogs Welcome With Pet Fee. Contact Debbie 561-541-0308. Debbie@paxproperties.com 3-15 POMPANO BEACH NE 1/1 $725 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 – 3/1 New $1250. SW – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 3-22 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 4-19 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. LIGHTHOUSE POINT – UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent In A Psychologists Of ce For A SOLO PROFESSIONAL. $950/Month. Located In The GATEWAY CENTRE – 2040 East Sample Rd. Windowed – Unfurnished Of ce! 14’ x 12.5’. Call 954-942-3344. 4-5 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723.

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28 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. SightingsContinued from page 25By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – RJ Boyle, of RJ Boyle Studios, says there’s plenty of fish to choose from this weekend, including a chance for anglers Bad weather’s departure brings good to go back out and catch a swordfish. “We finally have a chance to go out sword fishing, due to the weather backing off. And I know at least 15 to 20 boats will be headed out Saturday and Sunday,” he said. “The weather should be great both ways.” And that’s not all. “Tons of dolphin have been caught at 200 ft. There’s also been some nice kingfish around.” But if you don’t have the ability to go out that far, said Boyle, try some inshore fishing. “And if all else fails, you might want to try wahoo fishing. They feed as the full Moon’s approaching,” he added. If you do go out for wahoo, Boyle recommends trolling at high speeds. “Last week was good for wahoo.” For those who need a few tips about catching a swordfish, Boyle will be teaching a class at the International Game Fish Association, 300 Gulf Stream Way, Dania Beach, on Saturday, April 9 from 7 to 10 p.m. Call 954-420-5001. 3939 N. Ocean Blvd., Boca Raton. Cost is $35. Bring lunch. RSVP at 561-3913600. 3-16 – Reiki II class from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Lisa’s Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Cost is $100. RSVP at 954-782-6564. 3-18 & 27 – Protecting Your Family on the Worst Day of Their Life seminar at 2 p.m. at Panera Bread, 5975 N., Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. RSVP at 954781-9661. 3-20 – Protecting your Family if you pass more than 75 miles from your Residence workshop at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. at Starbucks, 1015 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. RSVP at 954-781-9661. 3-23 – Meditation class from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Lisa’s Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Learn the art of meditation. Cost is $50. RSVP at 954-782-6564.Music 3-16 – St. Patrick’s and St. Joseph’s Festival at 6:30 p.m. at Assumption Catholic Church, 2001 S. Ocean Blvd., Lauderdale By-The-Sea. Irish and Italian food, music by Marcel Rasa. 50/50 raf es. Tickets are $25. 954-9417647. 3-17 – Organist Samuel Metzger performs at 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach High School, 600 NE 13 Ave. Sponsored by New Presbyterian Church. Admission is free. Donations are accepted. 954-946-4380.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, March 15, 2013 Martin Lenkowsky PELICAN WRITER When it comes to newly hatched sea turtles, Richard Whitecloud wants Broward County residents “seeing things in a different light,” but the tiny mammals should see only a minimum of light. Whitecloud is founder of It’s turtle season and once again STOP will rescue hatchlings from man-made dangersSTOP, Sea Turtle Oversight Protection, an organization of volunteers dedicated to making Broward County’s miles of shoreline safe for the newly hatched animals to make it back to the beckoning surf from their nests buried in the sand. Members of the organization addressed a meeting of the Broward County Sierra Club Thursday evening at Fern Forest Nature Center in Coconut Creek. It’s their goal to limit the amount of artificial lighting so prevalent along our area’s beaches. Ann Wiley, a STOP volunteer on Fort Lauderdale beach, explained how sea turtles’ instincts are to follow the natural ambient light caused by the moon and stars reflecting off the water’s surface. Conversely, their instinct is to avoid the darkness of dunes and vegetation away from the water’s edge. Because of the prevalence of man-made light emanating from hotels, condos, businesses, and traffic signals along A1A, many hatchlings are attracted to these artificial light sources rather than the water and head in the wrong direction. Sadly, many of them are killed, usually run over by cars. Wiley wants to see “turtle safe” lighting surrounding area beaches. “The solution is simple,” she said. “Keep the lighting long, low and shielded.” By long, she is referring to long wave-length light which is a more subdued form of lighting. Examples of this type of lighting might be either red or amber. Their organization’s goal gets straight to the point: “To STOP sea turtle disorientation in Broward County.” STOP has been working closely with the county, various municipalities, and business owners to make beach area lighting safer for hatchlings. The organization’s actions do not stop there. Throughout sea turtle nesting STOP volunteer Ann Wiley discusses sea turtles with Sierra Club member E.C. Burleson Jr. at Fern Forest Nature Center. [Staff photo] See TURTLES on page 31

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30 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 make the changes. Mayor Gary Resnick was absent because he was attending a National League of Cities conference in Washington, D.C. Commissioners also approved an ordinance that would give code greater power to cite boat owners who leave unsightly vessels on their yard or use their homes to do commercial boat repair for an extended period of time. “If you’re going to make money, go rent a warehouse,” said Commissioner Scott Newton. But while they want the city to look better, commissioners also asked Blocker to make sure the new code of ordinances wasn’t unnecessarily harsh on residents or didn’t have the opposite effect of making the city look less appealing. “I just don’t want people to be chopping away at a limb over the sidewalk,” said Green. Vice Mayor Julie Carson asked Blocker if code compliance was too focused on penalizing people and risked pushing them out of the city. “No ma’am, I don’t,” responded Blocker, who added that code compliance has reached out to churches and other organizations to try and get them to help residents rectify their violations. Carson added that she wants to “make it exciting” for residents to help their neighbors with code problems, possibly even providing grants to spur organizations that help. Spring Fling to close part of Wilton Drive Wilton Manors – The Rainbow Business Coalition [RBC] has found its third major event and they want to close the southern end of Wilton Drive from the bridge to Northeast 21 Court during the festivities. Spring Fling, an event that includes food trucks, children’s activities and entertainment, is scheduled for May 4 from 12 to 8 p.m. Last year, RBC organized Stonewall in June and Wicked Wilton in October. The city has set aside ve Wilton Drive closings this year and will have one left after Spring Fling; the fourth was the city-run Hearts on the Drive in February. Organized by RBC and Pride United Broward, Spring Fling would be centered at Richardson Park and include the southern end of Wilton Drive. Greg Hardy, president of RBC, and Jeff Shincarick, vice president of RBC, said they want it to be something for the whole community. “It’s not a gay event, it’s not a straight event,” said Hardy to commissioners. Eventually, they hope it will morph into a food, wine and arts and crafts event. Commissioner Scott Newton gave RBC credit for doing something on the south end of the street. “It seems like [the businesses there are] always being pushed off.” City staff and event organizers are still working on the details of the street closure and Northeast 20 Street may be kept open during the event. Hardy and Shincarick said since Wicked Wilton focused more on the north end of Wilton Drive they wanted to make sure the south end got some attention as well. The two estimate between 5,000 and 6,000 people will attend. “It’s a nice draw in the spring,” said Hardy.Tools for codesContinued from page 5 The Pelican 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 31 Friday, March 15, 2013 season, as many as 150 volunteers monitor sea turtle nests throughout the county. They spend countless nights on the beach documenting the number of turtles hatching from their nests. Hatchlings taking nature’s designed route toward the east are left alone. Those disoriented by artificial lighting are recovered in buckets and sent on a proper seafaring journey. Sea turtle nesting season in South Florida begins in March when the leatherbacks arrive. Loggerheads arrive in May, and green sea turtles get here in the middle of June. All told, it means many months of sleepless nights on the beach for STOP volunteers. When female sea turtles first arrive on the beach, they dig a hole in the sand, lay their many eggs and head back toward the water. They first cover the nest with sand to hide it from predators before they depart. For the most part, STOP has had great cooperation from beachfront cities, businesses, and residents. Wiley points to the willingness of the Ritz Carlton resort on Fort Lauderdale in particular in its efforts to make its property “turtle friendly” in terms of lighting. Whitecloud sees STOP as a conduit between animals and people. He’s proud of the fact most individuals are supportive of their goals. “We see many municipalities that didn’t have beach lighting ordinances now have them,” he said, adding since sea turtles are classified as an endangered species many state and federal laws were already in place protecting these beautiful creatures from harm. Sea turtles have been on the planet for hundreds of millions of years. Prior to the arrival of human beings, their only threat was predatory animals. Whitecloud says not all people are as friendly toward helping other species. “Some people are totally disgruntled about having to help because of the ‘human superiority’ aspect,” he said. In other words, he explained some folks feel it’s not our problem to worry about other species. Whitecloud describes the volunteers as individuals who take time out from their own TurtlesContinued from page 29busy life schedules to protect these animals from harm by spending many nighttime hours at the beach. Out of approximately 54,000 sea turtle hatchlings recorded last season, more than 20,000 became disoriented and started heading in the wrong direction before being rescued from probable harm. The sea turtle nesting season in Florida runs from March through October. Here are a few simple things to help protect them: Remember, it is against the law to touch or disturb nesting sea turtles, hatchlings, or their nests. Sea turtles are protected by both the Federal Endangered Species Act and the Florida Marine Protection Act. Report injured or dead sea turtles, by calling 1-888-404FWCC (3922) or *FWC from your cell phone. If you must be on the beach at night, limit your walking and do not use flashlights or flash photography. That can abort the nesting process, or other sea turtles nearby may be discouraged from nesting if there are lights on the beach. Turn off outside patio lights and shield indoor lights from shining directly onto the beach by closing the drapes at night. Check the laws in your city to be in compliance.. For more about Sea Turtle Watching Tips by SEEturtles.org Maternity room etiquette for sea turtles .

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Friday, March 15, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 11 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea residents said farewell this month to Oscar Llerena, district chief with the Broward Sheriffs Of ce and welcomed his replacement, Capt. Fred Wood. Wood, shown at right, has served as executive of cer of the BSO Tamarac district of ce since June 2007. He has been with BSO for 23 years serving in various areas, including road patrol, honor guard, eld force, bicycle patrol and community policing. Llerena recently promoted to major, was selected to lead BSOs Youth Intervention & Enforcement Division. Town commissioners issued a proclamation commending him on his work in LBTS. The new executive of cer in LBTS is Holly Greene, who worked in internal affairs for 4-1/2 years. She replaces Angelo Cedeno who has been assigned to internal affairs. BSO changes bring new faces to LauderdaleBy-The-SeaPompano Beach When two women were given a $50 citation for feeding homeless cats holed up in an abandoned Burger King, animal rights activists howled. The protest grew when Help Me Howard aired the incident and incorrectly said the women were feeding just two cats. The phones lit up, Public Information Of cer Sandra King said. The thing spiraled out of control. According to King, there were dozens of cats in the old BK and nearby business owners were complaining. The situation got so City reviewing feral cat policies as animal advocates urge neuter and releasebad that Pompano Beach Animal Control installed cameras that eventually caught the cat feeders. But the resulting bad publicity prompted city commissioners to impose a 90day moratorium on issuing citations to violators of a city ordinance prohibiting feeding of feral cats. They put a moratorium on an ordinance we dont enforce anyway, said David Aycock, the citys animal control of cer. King concurred that citations are rarely issued. Commissioner Barry Dockswell also thought the moratorium unnecessary. Its a knee jerk reaction in a political season, Dockswell said. Were being stampeded and hearing only one view. But Mayor Lamar Fisher and three other commissioners defended the moratorium. This will be healthy input for us. Dont see the See CATS on page 16 Oakland Park Floyd Adams, Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue, Commissioner Elect Tim Lonergan. Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher chats with a supporter. Pompano Beach Charlotte Burrie takes District 2 win. Deer eld Beach Richard Rofezweig, District 3. Woody Poitier with wife, Cynthia, relax after early count predicts his win in District 4.Winners elated; Deer eld Beach to recount Still counting JeanRobb [left] v. Peggy Noland in Deer eld Beach. Oakland Park Commissionerelect Sara Guevrekian

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2 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFF Wilton Manors This city is looking to make improvements on two speci c business districts, Wilton Drive and Andrews Avenue. And town of cials are hoping the property owners will pay for the improvements through a special assessment. To do that, the city will create two Business Improvement Districts, or BIDs. On Tuesday, city commissioners and the citys Economic Development Task Force held a workshop to discuss the BIDs. City of cials have ideas for improving the two streets but want to hear rst from the property owners who could New tax assessment needed to revitalize business districtsend up paying. Lets get boots on the ground [and survey the business and property owners], said Nick Berry, chair of the Economic Task Force and co-owner of Courtyard Caf and Rumors Bar & Grill, both on Wilton Drive. The BIDs, which would have to be approved by a majority of property owners, create special tax assessment districts. Each BID would levy additional taxes on property owners that would in turn be used to improve the area. In this case the funds could be used to pay for improvements to each street. The money generated by a BID would only be used to bene t that street. Heidi Shafran, Community Development Services Department director, said each BID would be overseen by a board mostly made-up of property owners and tenants. The boards, which would be formed as non-pro t entities, would have the nal say over how the money in each district is spent and would not estimates that the increase, depending on the millage rate, could generate between $38,000 and $152,000 annually for Wilton Drive and $7,000 and $31,000 per year for Andrews Avenue. Resnick said the city could also use funds to market the Indian-themed business on Andrews Avenue and Oakland Park Boulevard. We could market it as the Indian Village of Wilton Manors. Dean Trantalis, a member of the Economic Task Force whose law rm is on Wilton Drive, said he thinks owners wont approve unless the goal is to make capital improvements. Increasing taxes to pay for trash cans, he said, wont work. Commissioner Scott Newton urged caution, saying that the city needs to make sure its not on the hook for any expenses when the BIDs expire. need commission approval. Property owners would also vote on the number of years the additional taxes would be levied. There are plenty of suggestions for BID funds. Commissioner Tom Green suggested landscaping could be added to the median along Andrews Avenue. We need to improve the streets there to attract businesses, said Mayor Gary Resnick and Ilene Schnall, vice chair of the Economic Task Force, wanted more attention paid to the Avenue. Wilton Drive would most likely see BID money dedicated to transforming the street from four to twolanes with landscaping in the median and parking on both sides. Vice Mayor Julie Carson said Powerline Road has also been neglected. To improve Powerline and the citys portion of Oakland Park Boulevard, staff will hire a rm to make recommendations for rezoning. To fund the BIDs, tax increases would be between 0.5 and 2.0 mills. Shafran Property owners will make nal decisionSend your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 15, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Voters in this city chose two political newcomers over two former commissioners in Tuesdays municipal election. In the race for Seat 1, Sara Guevrekian received 898 votes to 809 for Steve Arnst. In the contest for Seat 5, Tim Lonergan beat Layne Dallett Walls. Lonergan had 1,027 votes and Walls had 754. Voter turnout was 7.7 percent in Oakland Park and 8.14 percent in Broward County. The winners will be sworn in at the start of the commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 20. Guevrekian, 46, has been active as an organizer and of cer of the Royal Palm Isles Neighborhood Group and as a community volunteer and activist. She is employed as administrator for Commercial Metal Building Service. During the campaign, she Oakland Park voters elect new faces to lead citysaid she would bring a new, fresh energy to the dais. Now the real work begins. Im happy to put my best foot forward for the betterment of the city of Oakland Park, Guevrekian said. She has the same goals she has always had as Jane Q. Citizen, to be an advocate for people who call Oakland Park home and for the community of Oakland Park. Lonergan, 51, is a project manager for United Health Care. He has volunteered for many city organizations and worked to rid the city of snipe signs. Im thrilled to death to be elected to Seat 5 for the City Commission, Lonergan said. I owe it all to the volunteers who supported me. We worked hard and got the message out that we need to take Oakland Park successfully into the future. Im ready to roll up my sleeves and get to work and make Oakland Park a better place for everyone. Democratic chair to speak at clubPompano Beach The North Broward Democratic Club will host Mitch Caesar, Broward Democratic Party chair, March 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Center, 1801 NE 6 St. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-7838232. See OAKLAND PARK ELECTION on page 21

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4 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@ yahoo.com By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach A collective sigh in triplicate was palpable here Tuesday as Lamar Fisher was returned to the mayors seat; Charlotte Burrie to District 2 and Woodrow Woody Poitier to District 4. Early on these three candidates began to relax as absentee vote pro les indicated positive results for them. In the end Fisher took 84.2 percent of the 6,290 votes cast; Burrie took 66.67 percent of the 762 votes, and Poitier took 55.75 from his two challengers who shared the remaining 1,121 votes. The public showed strong support of this commissions moves to change the Voters return incumbents to of ce with mandate to keep on goingface of this city through redevelopment actions. Said Fisher, who has been returned to of ce for the fourth time, three terms as mayor, This was an overwhelming mandate to continue our work. That includes the CRA, the overall health of the city which includes our healthy reserves, lower tax base, debt-free status and concentrated efforts on other portions of our city. This commission works well together. Thats why the mandate is there. Fishers victory party was well in the works by 8 p.m. at Galuppis Restaurant. With over 80 percent of the votes in, this party was full of life. Former Mayor John Rayson and his wife, Cathy, were among the well-wishers who arrived. Burrie met with her supporters at the Elks Lodge where a at-screen television rolled out results that proffered applause on her behalf. Burrie said the results validated her years in of ce. Ive been in the community and for my people in the district and the city, and from these results I know they want me to continue to do that. And she plans to do just that and more. For six years, I have wanted to break ground on a civic center. I want to see that soon, she said. In District 4, Poitier knocked out his two challengers, Ed Phillips and Joseph Wells, who shared less than 45 percent of the votes Poitier, who has been a strong gure in his community for decades as a retired re ghter and longtime funeral director said, Its not about me. Its about the district and the community. People know I am loyal and trustworthy. I dont do anything for Woody. Nobody lost jobs; nobody was laid off [referring to budget constraints]. Poitier celebrated his victory party at his home with family and close friends. While Poitier kept his iPad close at hand, which carried election results, he kept his eyes on the Miami Heat game, Mayor Lamar Fisher greets former Pompano Beach mayor and supporter John Rayson on Tuesday. Art 3-15 Island City Art Walk from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Businesses on Wilton Drive showcase local artists and provide free refreshments. Visit www. islandcityartwalk.com. See SIGHTINGS on page 11as did his guests. The next morning, Poitier and the Heat had taken the day. Fisher, Burrie and Poitier will be sworn in on March 19 at noon at city hall commission chambers, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 15, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Four elementary school principals have found space in their already overtaxed buildings to build community reading rooms, an initiative sponsored by Scholastic Book Fairs and its community partners. The rst Reading Oasis was opened last year at Deer eld Park Elementary when the local Kiwanis Club put up matching funds. Now, the Broward Sheriffs District 10 Of ce is tapping its Law Enforcement Trust Fund for $24,400, enough to build an Oasis at Deer eld Beach Elementary, Park Ridge Elementary, Tedder Elementary and Quiet Waters Elementary. Scholastic Book Fairs match that amount and provide materials, 1,200 books, book shelves, bean bag chairs, a colorful rug, a stereo listening BSO chips in so four more reading rooms coming to Deer eld elementary schoolscenter, CDs and a SMART board. At Deer eld Park, Oasis is a brightly decorated haven for children and their parents to enjoy reading. Principal Jocelyn Reid uses the Oasis in the aftercare program and as a reward for students who do well. To ramp up interest, she brings in special guests to read to the kids. The addition of four schools to the Oasis program puts Deer eld Beach at the head of the pack, Tony Smith, general manager of Scholastic Book Fairs said. Smith put the rst Oasis in Orlando. Deer eld Park followed and now BSOs contribution makes this city on the cutting edge of the program. Smith said, Its been an incredible journey here in Deer eld Beach . It just makes such good sense to do this. High dropout rates have been linked to poor reading skills. Children who lack reading skills by the third grade are prone to leave school and everyday in this country, 7,000 of them do, Smith said. And 70 percent of people in prison cant read above a fourth grade level. Scholastics program is about making it easy to read a little every day. With in-home libraries almost non-existent in some school districts, the Oases provide a place for children and their parents to read together. The reading rooms will be constructed at each school and grand openings will be held in May, the rst May 6 at Tedder, followed by Quiet Waters May 21 and Deer eld Elementary, May 29. Park Ridge will hold its grand opening sometime between May 13 and 17. In conjunction with the openings, Scholastic will hold book fairs at each school.By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Sgt. Gary Blocker is on a mission to clean up this city, but he cant do it until the commission gives him better tools. Blocker, supervisor of the code compliance unit, went before commissioners Tuesday to ask them to revamp the citys code of ordinances so that his code compliance of cers could address many problems not allowed under the current system. Currently, the city has no mechanism to force property owners to x dilapidated roofs, gutters, windows, doors, ripped blue tarps or other unsightly problems. Blocker said the changes in the code would improve the safety of residents, make the city look better and further improve property values, which saw a 22 percent increase this year. But Im telling you were not done, said Blocker about raising property values. One of the citys worst eyesores is an old bar near Five Points on Wilton Drive. Unused as a place of business for years, the green building is in need of a new paint job and has major damage to its roof line, panels and fascia board. Commissioner Tom Green said hes received complaints from several business owners who consider the building an eyesore. Jonathan Dalgarn, owner of Vertigo Salon, located near the site, said the run-down building is interesting and part of the history of Wilton Drive but its an eyesore and needs to go. Commissioners voted 40 to approve the changes to Code to commission: Give us better toolsSee TOOLS FOR CODES on page 30

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6 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XXI, Issue 11 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & LettersCorrectionsIn the story about Pompano Beach Elementary School students and hydroponic gardening in the March 8 issue, The Pelican mistakenly referred to Kimberly Cohen as the kindergarten teacher. Blake Cian one is the correct name of the teacher. In the Ali Building story on March 8, Laura Rollins was mistakenly refffered to as Laura Collins. The Pelican regrets the errors.Passover meetings rescheduled, cancelledBroward The municipalities of Pompano Beach and Lauderdale-By-TheSea have rescheduled their March 26 meetings because of Passover. Pompano will meet on Thursday, March 28 at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd., and Lauderdale-By-The-Sea will meet on Tuesday, April 2 at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. The City of Wilton Manors has cancelled its March 26 meeting. Social media workshopWilton Manors Art Gallery 21 presents Social Media & The Artist, Part 2 on Friday, April 12 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court. Michelle Solomon, former executive producer at Local 10 WPLG-TV, and current managing director of Editorial Content Providers, will provide a workshop assisting artists with Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms. Participants are invited to bring their laptop, tablet or smart phone. Wi-Fi will be available. Cost is a $5 donation to the Central Area Neighborhood Association of Wilton Manors. Email Constance Ruppender at PoetC7@aol.com or call 954-661-4740.ArtHall meets Henry FlaglerPompano Beach Take a trip back in time to the era of Henry Flagler through Art and Arbor during ArtHall on Wednesday, March 20 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the CRA Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. Local artists Pat Anderson and Capt. John Wetzstein will showcase their watercolor and driftwood-themed artwork. Admission is free and refreshments will be served. For more information, call 954-586-1111.Goals and objectives meetingWilton Manors City of cials will hold a workshop to discuss the goals and objectives of the citys departments on Thursday, April 4 at 6 p.m. at Richardson Park, 1937 Wilton Drive. 954-390-2100. Sharon CeCe, owner of a Deer eld Beach thrift shop, goes sleuth for goodAn act of honesty pays off for everyoneBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The only things in Maryhelen Schmidts lost wallet was a business card, $100 in cash, a drivers registration card (not hers) and her last remaining baby picture. The business card was for Beach Dry Cleaners, the registration was her bosss, the $100 was generic and the picture, well it could have been any cute baby. Yet about a week after discovering her loss, Schmidt had her wallet back thanks to two diligent ladies intent on nding her. Schmidt, who lives in Pompano Beach, had been showing visitors around the area concentrating on thrift stores. One of them was Pack Rats Thriftique in The Cove in Deer eld Beach. Several stops later on Commercial Blvd. reaching for her purse and change for a parking meter, she found her wallet missing. Retracing the many, many steps she had taken that day, she did not nd her wallet. But a week later, while dropping of a pair of her bosss pants at Beach Dry Cleaners, a clerk there recognized the name on the laundry slip. It was the same as the name on the car registration in Schmidts wallet. Sharon CeCe, Pack Rats owner, had found the wallet and using the only clue she had, the cleaners business card, called and asked if they had a customer with the name on the car registration. They had a few, but mindful that someone had lost $100, they were especially alert and when Schmidt came in a few days later and used her bosss name on the laundry slip, the trail went hot. Schmidt was told to call Pack Rats where her wallet was waiting. I just knew that anyone who found the wallet with no ID will have no way of returning it to me, Schmidt said. So I prayed it that whoever found it would need the $100 and could keep it with a clear conscience. But that is not how it turned out. Schmidts wallet was intact with its contents and the $100. To show her gratitude, she split the cash between the two nders. That was so nice of her, CeCe said. I found the wallet right on the counter, and when I saw there was a lot of money in it, even tried to contact the Motor Vehicle Department. I was so happy to have my wallet back and even happier to see rsthand there are still honest people out there, Schmidt said. She is urging her friends and Pelican readers, If you go into those shops, thank them again for me. Sharon CeCe, owner of a Deer eld Beach thrift shop, is the sleuth whose concern got a customer her wallet back.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 15, 2013 Democrat backers elect Rosenzweig in District 3By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Richard Rosenzweig was elected to represent Century Village and Crystal Lake on Tuesday but the race for mayor remained undecided at press time. Jean Robb, a former mayor, outpolled incumbent mayor Peggy Noland by 27 votes, within the threshold for an automatic recount. Thursday evening, however, provisional ballots were counted. If that count gave Robb a more substantial lead, the recount may not occur. In Tuesdays balloting, Robb received 2,773 votes; Noland, 2746. Rosenzweig won the District 3 election with 623 votes to Donna Capobiancos 555 and Caryl Berners 201. Elections of ce spokesperson Mary Cooney said the number of provisional votes ballots taken from people not on the voting rolls Shift in voting population gives Robb apparent win in Deer eld Beach would not be known until the canvassing board met. However, county wide there were not that many, she said. This is not the rst time Noland who has served 16 years on the commission has been upset at the polling place. In 2005, Pam Militello, backed by the Original Save Our Beach organization, received about 1,000 votes in a ve-man eld, enough to take the District 1 election from Noland. Tuesday, Robbs apparent win came from voters in District 2 where she outpolled Noland by about 750 votes. Two precincts 24A and 15A were lopsided in their support of Robb. In The Palms, a DB Housing Authority apartment building, 481 votes were cast, 431 for Robb. In 15A, Robb took another big lead collecting 271 votes to Nolands 24. The numbers re ect a shift in voting power. The assumption that winning in Century Village, where Noland did prevail, was tantamount to winning the election was not the case Tuesday. In District 2, Noland may have taken the blame for city employee layoffs two years ago and behind the scenes former District 2 Commissioner Sylvia Poitier may have wielded her in uence. Early in her four-year term, Noland called for Poitier to resign her commission seat. Wednesday Robb readily admitted she courted District 2 votes. I visited 16 black churches, she said. Robb also drew more support in the Cove precincts, while Noland prevailed in northwest Deer eld. Robb, 81, was mayor here 1980-1993, and has tried to regain the commission twice before. Wednesday she said, I think we won. I am very happy. The voters have spoken. Its time to move forward. Robb said she had more supporters in this election than in any of her previous runs and both she and Noland received more votes than ever before. Noland, who hosted a gathering at the Tipperary Pub after the polls closed, was visibly shaken as were her supporters including some elected of cials and their representatives. She was endorsed by two newspapers and many organizations. Wednesday morning Rosenzweig said his win was surreal Now I have to start acting like an elected of cial. But according to his wife Verna, Rosenzweig, 74, has always had a yen for public service. He has always cared about people. His family were community activists. Rosenzweig takes over for term-limited Marty Popelsky, who due to illness has been largely absent from the dais for the last year. The new commissioner said he is contacting homeowner groups in the district to learn their See DEERFIELD ELECTIONS on page 12

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8 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Briefs Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFTheres still time to get professional help preparing income tax for 2012, says John Kubinec, owner of Pinnacle Computation, Inc. located in suite 202, at 2641 E. Atlantic Blvd., an elevator building in Pompano Beach. Well be moving up to the third oor soon because we need more space, he says. My associates are CPA Lindsey Lennon and my dad, Kenneth, a CPA here in Pompano for the past 15 years. Continuing, John says, Ive been doing accounting since I was 18. I graduated from the University of Central Florida, worked in New York and returned to open of ces here ve years ago. We specialize in helping small businesses with their year round accounting and taxes, but we welcome new businesses and individual clients. The rm offers free consultation which John describes as a meet and greet opportunity plus a super cial analysis of how he and his staff can help. Were a team effort, each with our own expertise. Every client gets the bene t of our combined knowledge. He advises people who come for a free consult or actual preparation to bring the last two years tax returns and all current tax forms received. Deductions are different for every individual, depending upon circumstances, he explains. Thats why a consultation is very helpful. In our review, we often spot missed opportunities for deductions which can be amended, bringing a client an unexpected refund. He adds, People who do their own taxes often miss deductions they are entitled to get. The tax codes keep changing, and its our job to be up on every change. Many times it pays to seek the advice of a professional. Individuals, businesses turn to Pinnacle for yearround accounting and income tax preparation Some of the things that have signi cant tax implications are short sales, foreclosures, cancellation of debt, rental properties, second homes, investments, change in marital status and more. Every day we help clients achieve the best tax outcome in all of these situations. Unlike the seasonal pop up shops, Pinnacle Computations, Inc. handles accounting and taxes year round, putting them and their clients at a distinct advantage. The company handles book keeping, pay roll services, incorporation, IRS issues, sales tax lings and everything that happens in a business including the unexpected. Claude Villard, president of LaMarquise Desserts, Inc. of Coral Springs, writes, John and Lindsey have helped my business grow and become more pro table each year. From monthly payroll to end of the year tax questions, they are always there to assist us and offer advice. Never too busy to answer questions, we recommend them to anyone looking for accounting, bookkeeping and tax services. David Goldstein, Hollywood, says, I have been using John and his team for years now and I have never had a complaint with them. Lindsey is great with her detailed Owner of Pinnacle Computation, Inc., John Kubinec goes over some details with his associate, CPA Lindsey Lennon. Johns father, Kenneth Kubinec, a CPA who has been in the area for many years, is part of the Pinnacle team. [Photo courtesy of John Kubinec]See PINNACLE on page 25Beach branch library topic of meetingPompano Beach There will be a special city commission meeting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 19 in the city commission chambers, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd., to discuss the Beach Branch Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd. City of cials discussed the possibility of building a city parking garage on the site where the current library is located. If so, they have promised to build a new library close to the parking garage. The discussion will take place after Community Redevelopment Agency meeting. Call 954-786-7824.Free health expoFort Lauderdale The 7th Annual Community Health Expo takes place Saturday, March 16 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall, 5555 N. Federal Hwy. Hosted by the Light of the World Clinic, the fair will provide free screenings for diabetes, cholesterol, height/weight, BMI, HIV and vision. There will also be u shots and a blood drive. Many resource agencies will be also available to provide assistance and information regarding Social Security, Medicaid, Florida Kidcare and Guardian ad Litem. Visit www. afreeclinic.org www.clinicaluzdelmundo.com or call 954-563-9876.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 15, 2013 Oakland Park This citys 56th annual edition of Youth Day gets under way with a parade starting at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 16, at City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. Theme of this years celebration, sponsored by the parks and leisure Services Department, is Theres No Place Like Youth Day. The parade travels south on Northeast 12 Avenue to Northeast 34 Court, west to Northeast 6 Avenue, then north to Northeast 38 Street, west to Northeast 5 Avenue and north to Wimberly Field, 4000 NE 3 Ave. Opening ceremonies start at 11:30 a.m. with the presentation of colors, introduction of of cials and parade awards presentations. Game booths and rides are open from noon to 8:30 p.m. Armbands can be purchased the day of the event at the ticket booth for $20. Individual tickets are $1. A Kiddie Wonderland, with free bounce house, face painting and pony rides, sponsored by the Oakland Park Library, is open from noon to 4 p.m.The entertainment schedule includes:1 p.m.: Mai Kai Polynesian Revue. 1:45 p.m.: Little Miss Oakland Park Contest (by advanced registration only.) 3 p.m.: North Andrews Gardens Elementary School Show Choir. 3:20 p.m.: North Andrews Gardens Elementary School Band. 4 p.m.: Academy of Martial Arts. 4:30 p.m.: Rickards Middle School cheerleaders. 5 p.m.: Penn House Productions will entertain crowds with a blend of music, education and audience participation. 7 p.m.: The Weedline Band, a rock and roll party band that plays classic rock, modern rock, country, blues, funk and originals, will entertain. The day concludes with reworks at 8:45 p.m. For more information, call 954-630-4500. Youth day aims to please the entire family, March 16By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Commissioners reconsidered an earlier decision and decided now is the time after all to hire a rm to devise a town marketing strategy and plan. Commissioner Stuart Dodd, who had favored a delay, brought the matter back up on Tuesday saying, Maybe we could revamp the contract and not do so much surveying. Dodd said he did not want to spend public money on promoting hotels or asking tourists why they come here. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said that last year the commission kept asking about the towns overall marketing strategy. You asked for a marketing study Survey and marketing plan at rst rejected, is now acceptedand a plan proposal, she said. In January, Hoffman, in response to the commissions request for a marketing strategy, recommended hiring Ambit for $64,500 but commissioners voted 32 to defer the matter for six months until Commercial Boulevard improvements were completed. Theres a broad misconception that we were going to spend $64,000 on surveys, Hoffmann said. The plan is to spend in the low $20s for surveying and research and the rest on how to best market ourselves. Were putting a new face on the town, she said, referring to plans for redevelopment and beauti cation on Commercial Boulevard. This is about how to keep people coming and whats the best way to market LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, to get the word out that this is a unique and amazing place. Mayor Roseann Minnet and Commissioner Chris Vincent said they were still supportive of implementing the plan. Commissioner Mark Brown, who earlier favored delay, asked if Ambit could provide a plan without the cost of a survey. Kathy Koch, a principal with Ambit, said, Theres strength to research. It makes sense to understand the habits of those youre trying to reach. Without the survey, youre not on a rm foundation, she said. Koch said LBTS is very, very unique. She said with the research, her rm will nd out what can be done to bring See SURVEY on page 25

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10 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFChristy Keyes, director of Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point Library, and Doreen Gauthier were elated to have playwrite Emil Sher come to the library on March 7 to speak to school children about his play. Keyes welcomed the fourth and fth graders from Trinity Christian School, Highlands Christian Academy, and home school programs as they arrived to hear, question and meet Sher, author of Hanas Suitcase on Stage. They were studying the Holocaust and were very excited to have an inperson contact with a live author of a play about a child who died in the gas chamber at Auschwitz concentration camp. Gauthier, who co-hosted the event, says, As I was reviewing information for Emils event, I visited the books website www.hanassuitcase.ca. On the website they list the Restricted Rights of Jews in Czechoslovakia and in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia 1939 1941. One of the restrictions listed (1941) was that Jews are banned from public libraries. That really hit home for me. The squirming, twisting and poking, typical of this age group, stopped the moment Sher began to speak. About one hundred people in attendance were mesmerized as Sher told the story about a young Japanese educator, Fumiko Ishioka who wanted Japanese school children to learn about the Holocaust. After years of intense research, she tracked down a suitcase belonging to Hana Brady, and used it to involve Japanese boys and girls in the story of just one of a million and half children who were murdered in Hitlers Auschwitz camp. Hanas story became a book written by Karen Levine. Sher, in his introduction to his play, gives thanks to Karen Levine for the book, George Brady, Hanas surviving brother, Fumiko Ishioka and Allen McInnis for tilling the soil so a play could ourish. Not a sound was heard as Sher told the sad story of Hana along with the uplifting part about nding her brother, Brady, who survived. Brady shared memories of Hanas brief life and terrible ending. The children began to wave their hands hoping to ask questions. One poignant question was Does it make you sad to talk about it? Yes it does, Sher responds, but we do this so that your generation will learn the lessons of the Holocaust and make sure that such a tragedy will never happen again. Why didnt the Nazis murder Hanas brother George? Sher replied. George was lucky. He had plumbing skills. He was good with machines and the Germans used him in the work camps. He has to live Author of the play, Hanas Suitcase on Stage wowed school children at Lighthouse Point Library March 7 Lecturer and playwrite Emil Sher posed with his mother, Olga {center} and school children who came to hear about Hanas Suitcase on March 7 at the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point Library. [Photos courtesy of Christy Keyes]See HANA on page 24 Meet the Easter BunnyPompano Beach The Easter Bunny will make an appearance on Saturday, March 23 from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Community Park, 820 NE 8 Ave. Along with photo opportunities with the Easter Bunny, there will also be free games, face painting, Easter egg hunts, arts and crafts and more. Call 954-786-4111.Nan Rich speaks at Democratic Club meetingPompano Beach Democrat Nan Rich, former state senator, will speak at the Palm Aire/Cypress Bend Democratic Club on Monday, April 1 at 7 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave. Rich is a candidate for the 2014 gubernatorial race against Republican Governor Rick Scott. Refreshments served. Call Ashley Protheroe at 786-877-1644 or Jeannie Wilson at 954-973-6081.so be free games, face painting, Easter egg hunts, arts and crafts and more. Call 954-786-4111.Small business loansPompano Beach Those looking for a small business loan can attend the Microenterprise Business Loan Fund Program meeting on Thursday, March 21 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 MLK Blvd. The City of Pompano Beach provides loans to residents who live in the Northwest CRA district or have their business located there. The program entails weekly training workshops and business consultations. Call 954-5861111.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 15, 2013 Pompano Beach Broward Sheriffs Of ce detectives have released surveillance video from a cell phone store robbery in Pompano Beach. Just after 3:30 p.m. on Feb. 1, a black male wearing a hooded sweatshirt and blue jeans bolted into the Metro PCS store at 317 E. Copans Rd. He ran right up to the counter and said give me all the [expletive] money. The clerk laughed at the scruffy-faced subject, who then pulled out a silver handgun, pointed it at the clerk and reiterated his demand. The clerk handed over cash and the gunman bolted out of the store all in a matter of 18 seconds. The robber is believed to be in his 20s, around 5-foot-6 and 120 pounds. Anyone with information should call BSO Det. Steven Hoover at 954-321-4270 or Broward Crime Stoppers, anonymously, at 954-493-TIPS-8477 or online at www. BrowardCrimeStoppers.org. A cash reward of up to $1,000 to tipsters who call Crime Stoppers leading to an arrest.Robber walks in, walks out with cash in 18 seconds 3-15 Body Awareness at Empire Stage, 1140 N. Flagler Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Productions Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 5 p.m. until April 4. Tickets $20. www.islandcitystage.org or 954-678-1496. 3-19 & 21 Rossetti Fine Art Life Drawing Classes at Pearl Arts and Crafts, 1033 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park, on Tuesdays from 6 to 9 p.m. and Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Cost is $125 for four sessions. 954247-9580. 3-21 Ernestine Maat Ray will discuss Colors and Textures of our African Legacy from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Dr., Lauderdale-By-TheSea. 954-785-7408.Auctions & Sales3-16 Grannys Attic from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Bargains on various items. 954-7864111. 3-16 Tropical Plant Fair from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Equality Park, 2040 N. Dixie Hwy., Wilton Manors. Vendor space available. 954-2572317. 3-23 Womens Club of Coconut Creek hosts a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at North Recreation Complex, 4455 Sol Press Blvd., Coconut Creek. Fundraiser to support scholarships for Coconut Creek residents and charitable programs. 954-326-7480.Auditions & Theatre3-15 Jerrys Girls at The Stage Door Theatre, 8036 W. Sample Road, Coral Springs. Play performed now through March 24 on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $38. Group rates available. 954-344-7765. 3-20 My Son The SightingsContinued from page 4 See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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12 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 needs and problems. While campaigning, he noted that Green Road presents severe traf c problems for residents of Crystal Lake and that a planned athletic complex in a neighborhood of elderly people could present some problems. Within Century Village, acquiring the Hillsboro Pines Golf Course if the master homeowners association can afford to, is a priority. In no case would he favor changing the current recreational zoning, Rosenzweig said. Although it was a nonpartisan election, Rosenzweig drew much of his support from the Deer eld Beach Democratic Club. They threw me under the bus, he joked, But they worked hard to get me elected. Donna Capobianco, who lost her second run for the seat told her backers, I am happy knowing we did great against the CVE political machine. What a run. You were behind me all the way and what a joy that has been. I believe things happen for a reason. We pick up, move forward and face the next challenge life puts in our path . Now I can do what I had planned. Enjoy more tennis. Caryl Berner, the third person in the race would not comment on her position but did say, I am glad Jean Robb will be sitting on the dais. Hollywood The South East Police Motorcycle Rodeo to Bene t C.O.P.S. [Concerns of Police Survivors] will take place on Saturday, April 27, 2013 at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, 1 Seminole Way, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Approximately 150 riders will compete from over 20 agencies throughout Florida and the East Coast, all with the goal of raising money for C.O.P.S. There will also be food, sponsor and trade booths, a Kids Zone and a multitude Rodeo to bene t C.O.P.S.of family activities. Raf e prizes will also be available, including a 2013 HarleyDavidson X883 Iron Edition Sportster motorcycle with a ramp free motorcycle trailer. Raf e tickets can be purchased during the rodeo for $1 per ticket or 25 for $20. Call 954-288-7201 to become a sponsor.Deer eld electionsContinued from page 7

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 15, 2013 Send news to mdpelican@yahoo.com Thief sought for stealing electronics from vesselsLighthouse Point The police here are seeking help from the community in locating a thief or thieves who are boarding and stealing electronic equipment from docked vessels.. Over the past few weeks, several boats have been robbed during the overnight hours. Police believe that individuals are walking the seawalls and boarding vessels where electronic equipment is displayed. Police are following several leads provided by surveillance cameras from some of the theft locations. Meanwhile the police are asking the community to be alert and immediately report any suspicious activity to 954-9428080. They further ask boaters to secure their vessels, increase illumination and secure fences that lead to docks.

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14 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Send your events for publication to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Pompano Beach The Mens Club of St. Colemans Parish will hold its Fish Fry on Friday, March 22 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at St. Colemans Parish Hall, 1200 S. Federal Hwy. Tickets are $8 and include choice of entre: two pieces of tilapia, two crab cakes or shrimp. Choice of side: clam chowder, Caesar salad, macaroni and cheese or French fries. A dinner roll comes with each meal. Desserts and refreshments sold separately. Proceeds bene t sports programs and other initiatives at St. Colemans. Call 954270-2501.Mens Club Fish Fry Waiter A Jewish Tragedy at The Stage Door Theatre, 8036 W. Sample Road, Coral Springs. Play performed March 20 through April 14 on Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. and Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. Tickets are $38. Group rates available. 954-344-7765.Books & Lectures3-15 & 16 Book sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Dixon Hall, 2200 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. 954-946SightingsContinued from page See SIGHTINGS on page 15Power BreakfastLauderdale-By-TheSea The spring Power Breakfast is set for Friday, March 22 from 7:30 to 8:45 a.m. at Blue Moon Fish Co., 4405 W. Tradewinds Ave. The guest speaker will be Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Mayor Roseann Minnet who will provide an update and answer questions about the upcoming beauti cation project on Commercial Boulevard. Gourmet breakfast served. Cost is $20. 954-2679888. Mens Club Comedy ShowPompano Beach The Saint Coleman Mens Club will hold its annual Comedy Show on Friday, April 26 at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. This years comedians are Paul Nardizzi and Dennis Regan. The shows will be held at Galuppis Restaurant, 1103 N. Federal Hwy. Tickets for the early show are $20 and tables of eight are $150. Tickets for the late show are $25 and tables of eight are $175. The late show has sold out every year so get tickets early. Priority seating is given to those who purchase tables. You can buy tickets and see the seating chart at the Mens Club website, www.stcmc.org or call Steve Feeley at 954-235-9119 or Jim Hoy 954-495-1296.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 15, 2013 6398. 3-16 Book fair from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Margate Library, 5810 Park Drive. New and like new books, videos and CDs. 954-3577500. 3-23 & 24 Book sale from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Northwest Regional Library, 3151 University Drive, Coral Springs. 954-357-7990.Business3-21 Greater Pompano Beach Chamber membership breakfast from 7:45 to 9 a.m. at Auto Tech & Body, 429 N. Dixie Hwy., Pompano Beach. RSVP at www. PompanoBeachChamber.com. 3-25 Networking Monday Mixer from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at CRA Business Resource Center, 501 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach, 954586-1111. 3-28 Wilton Manors Business Association meets for lunch networking from 12 to 1 p.m. at Lotus Chinese Kitchen, 1434 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Visit wiltonmanors businessassociation.com. Children & Family 3-16 Pony rides at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. Rides held every third Saturday. 954786-4507. 3-16 56th Annual Youth Day at 10 a.m. at Wimberly Field Athletic Complex, 3900 NE 3 Ave., Oakland Park. Sponsors wanted. 954-630-4500. 3-23 Easter Bunny from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Community Park, 820 NE 8 Ave. Free games, face painting egg hunts, arts and crafts and more. 954-786-4111. 3-29 Madagascar 3 plays at sundown at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. Event is free. 954-360-4507. 3-30 Easter Bunny visits Pompano Citi Centre, corner of Federal Highway and Copans Road, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Photos, food, arts and crafts, egg hunt and other kids activities. 954943-4683. Clubs & Charity3-15 Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Meets every Friday. 954-786-3274. 3-19 Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Club meets every Tuesday. 954972-7178. 3-19 Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets at 12:15 SightingsContinued from page 14 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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16 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 harm in it. [Changes] will give us an opportunity to be unique, a model, Fisher said. At the meeting, animal activists urged the commission to adopt TNR, a trap, neuter, vaccinate and release policy favored by many. Advocates say it is about half the cost of trapping, holding and then euthanizing if the cat is not adopted. In fact, during this moratorium they publically urged organizations that practice TNR to go into the citys cat colonies in the hopes of reducing their numbers. Aycock, however, cautioned that TNR has merit only in controlled situations. The feral cats can be trapped only once and a rabies vaccination lasts only three years. The colonies become infested with illnesses and the cats are almost impossible to catch and treat, he said. This is about ethics. Animals in the wild suffer like you cant imagine. We have bred cats to need care. When we cut them lose, how do we protect them? Only two percent of roaming cats are neutered, Aycock said. TNR does not work. If it did I would give it my good graces. Aycock is the author of the citys present ordinance which makes it illegal to abandon a cat and to feed feral cats. We have a sound ordinance, he said. We talk to the feeders and often can convince them they are not doing a good thing . We are always about protecting the animals. The ordinance does allow feeders to obtain permits but requires the cats to be contained and to be sterilized and vaccinated. Cats in the wild face all sorts of dangers, among them being poisoned or shot by people living near them. You cant force someone to live next to a colony, Aycock said. A University of Florida study of TNR also does not advocate it as a method of controlling the feral cat population. Those studies show that it is impossible to catch all the cats and neuter them and when they are returned to the wild, they attract other cats which proceed to produce litters. The colonies grow in numbers rather than decrease. The report speaks of the dangers the cats present to other wildlife and of the inhumane and cruel life the cats themselves endure. Two years is their normal life span. King says cat feeders see themselves as saving the abandoned and feral cats but are not recognizing studies that show the animals live meager lives, shortened by disease, people who poison or shoot them, dog attacks, or being hit by cars. Unfortunately, Animal Control is being portrayed as being against the cats . .nothing could be further from the truth. Janice Grif n is one resident who wants to keep the ordinance intact.I do not want the city to make it any easier to have these colonies. As an animal lover myself, I cant see perpetuating that kind of life for an animal. Any policy that encourages colonies is not good. No animal lover would want this. a program she calls quite successful. Candace West, a trapper from Tamarac, urged commissioners at a February meeting to consider TNR as an option. She and others present said to the commission, give us time to develop a program. Faced with the publics growing awareness of TNR, Aycock said, I have asked for alternatives. If they can produce variations [on the ordinance] that give me the ability to satisfy the citizens, I would entertain that. CatsContinued from page 1Pompano Beach High School Booster Club hosts its 7th Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, May 4 at the Pompano Beach Municipal Golf Course, 1101 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and tee off is 8:30 with a shotgun start. Lunch, raf es, live and silent auctions will follow at Galuppis Restaurant. Proceeds bene t athletic scholarships and team sports. For more info email PBHSBooster1@yahoo.com. Fees are as follow: Individual Golfer $100; Tee Sponsor $150; Silver Sponsor $500; Gold Sponsor $750; Platinum Sponsor $1000. Grif n said the cats presents issues in neighborhoods where they use homeowners yards as a potty. That is not a good situation for anyone, she said. But animal activists dont agree. The national organization, Best Friends Animal Society, has introduced two bills in the Florida Legislature making it legal to feed feral/free roaming cats if they have been sterilized and vaccinated which is indicated by clipping an ear. Protection is also given for the care givers. Carol Ebert, executive director of the Florida Humane Society, a no-kill shelter, said she favors TNR. But she points out that spring is the breeding season and all the unsprayed ferals will be pregnant. Her shelter is at capacity now 100 cats and cannot accept any more. The Society does adopt out kittens at the PetSmart stores in Coral Springs and Boca Raton, Boosters need boost for PBHS

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 15, 2013 Angelos Station House & Tapas Bar Cove Shopping Center 1544 SE 3 Court Deer eld Beach 954-227-5961 Open Daily 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Hip and stylish, Deer eld Beachs Angelos Station House serves up top-notch Italian fare in friendly ambianceBy Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFProprietor Silvio Trentalange and his wife Marianne are truly seasoned restaurateurs. Having owned and operated 19 eateries in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Acapulco, Mexico, this gregarious couple brings over 50 years of experience to their latest venture Angelos StaA whimsical Chefs creation: tender chicken breast with asparagus, Fontina cheese and homemade gravy. original recipe. A great feature of the recently opened Angelos Station House is the tapas menu. These smaller portions are designed to be shared amongst friends over a glass a wine and spirited conversation. Some of the highlights See ANGELOS on page 19tion House. We had actually moved to Florida to retire but after talking with Executive Chef Angelo Morinelli, we decided to open a new restaurant here in Deer eld Beach, says Silvio with slight bewilderment. As you can tell, it is named after him. And with good reason, Chef Angelo has been in the business for 40 years and has cultivated a culinary savoirfaire that is truly unparalleled. I ran my own restaurant continuously in Mineola, NY for 30 years. Then I decided to come to Florida where I owned Tanzy in Mizner Park. Now, I am excited about this newest project, says the friendly Chef who was born in Naples, Italy. My style of cooking is very contemporary but I always respect the essence and ingredients of the

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Pompano ArtHall in full swing as artists honor Black History Month Pompano Beach Every month, ArtHall combines art and networking at this citys CRA Business Center, 50 NE 1 St. But Februarys event featured a focus on Black History Month. Ras David Williams and LaVaughn Wright filled the CRA Business Center with African and African American-themed art work, including Williams painting of President Barack Obama. And guitarist Eugene Grey entertained those who attended the event. [Photos by Michael dOliveira]Hail to the Chief Ras David Williams [Above] and his painting of President Obama. [Top Right] LaVaughn Wright with three of his paintings. [Right] Eugene Grey entertains attendees with his guitar.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 15, 2013 include the grilled sirloin tips with caramelized onions, the mini crab cakes, the tuna AngelosContinued from page 17carpaccio, the fried calamari, the PEI mussels in white wine sauce and the delightful hot or cold seafood antipasti dishes. Our tapas bar is always packed. People just love it! says General Manager David Green eld, an industry veteran specializing in highend steakhouses. We also offer $5 glasses of wine all day long and a great Happy Hour from 4 to 7 pm when all drinks are half-price. Healthy salads, veggies and soups along with a long list of mouthwatering appetizers such grilled octopus, Portobello mushrooms stuffed with spinach & mozzarella, eggplant Napolitano and Silvios favorite Clams Casino make a great start to an enjoyable gastronomic voyage to Italy. Of course, there are plenty of enticing pasta dishes including porcini mushroom Papardelle, Tagliatelle Bolognese and Linguini Vongole. The Fiocchi Quattro Formaggi is outstanding, says Marianne. It features pillow shaped pasta stuffed with four cheeses and roasted pear. Meat lovers can enjoy avorful grilled NY strip steak, tender let mignon and even braised lamb shank. A few choice chicken dishes also make an appearance. Our veal chop and sh plates are specialties of the house, says Angelo who is clearly passionate about his food. And our 2 lbs. lobster dishes are outstanding. Indeed, lobster a cionados can indulge in a variety of preparations such as the classic steamed or grilled with butter but also the Oreganato version with garlic, breadcrumbs and herbs or the Fra Diavolo with spicy marinara over linguini. Shell sh lovers can order the lobster Arianchata which includes mussels, clams, scallops, calamari and shrimp in a spicy white wine sauce over linguini. We buy our seafood daily in smaller quantities. This way, customers can be assured that it is always extremely fresh, adds the affable Angelo. And all our sauces are made fresh in house so that everything we serve is truly of the highest quality. This elegant trattoria prides itself of providing superlative customer service, an evocative Mediterranean atmosphere and delectable fare whilst maintaining a price point that is accessible to all. There is a great private party room that can accommodate up to 35 guests. It is ideal for birthday parties, business functions, or any other special event that requires good food in a pleasant setting. Most tapas dishes are priced between $6-$8, appetizers between $6-$13 while main courses range from $14 to $25. Get there before 6 pm and enjoy the Early Dinner that includes soup or salad, entre and dessert for $16.95. There is also an eye-popping wine list with excellent vintages starting at $24. Of course, full bar service is equally offered. On the dessert front, Angelos Station House delivers all the required classics such as tiramisu, zabaglione with fresh fruit, cannoli, tartufo and chocolate lava cake. For a novel taste sensation, patrons should give the olive oil gelato a try. Buon appetito! Silvio and Marianne Trentalange show off a few of Angelos Station House specialties. The Linguini Pescatore is a customer favorite. It comes loaded with fresh mussels, clams, scallops, calamari and shrimp in a zesty tomato sauce over al dente pasta.

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFOnce again this year, the great white tent on El Mar Drive signaled the coming of Lauderdale-by-the-Seas much anticipated annual culinary event. Despite inclement weather, hundreds of area residents and visitors attended the classic gastronomic soire known as Taste of the Beach. Presented by the LBTS Chamber of Commerce, the celebrated Taste of the Beach lived up to expectations by featuring over 30 area restaurants, live entertainment and additional vendors all displaying the very best of their respective specialties. The maelstrom of aromatic scents, lively music and good cheer created the perfect atmosphere to enjoy the wide variety of delectable dishes served up by several local eateries. Everyone seems to be having a good time said event organizer Guy Contrada as he walked the floor making sure guests and restaurateurs were enjoying the experience. From tender meats to grilled seafood, fresh oysters to lobster bisque, sultry salads to decadent desserts, there was a wealth of tasty temptations for every palate. In addition, several wine and spirits purveyors were also present to showcase their particular brands of tonic. Ambrosial vintages, flavored vodkas and frosty beers were great complements to the toothsome fare on hand. We also had many fantastic gift baskets and prizes for the silent auction, added Chamber President Mark Great food and lively ambiance make Lauderdale-By-The-Seas Taste of the Beach a resounding success The ladies from Chart House restaurant [above] show off their avorful seared tuna nachos. [Photo by Malcolm McClintock] Lenore and her chef from the Lenore Nolan-Ryan Cooking School serve up tasty Asian noodles and homemade brownies. [Photo by Sunny Eckhardt]See TASTE on page 21

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The Pelican 21 Friday, March 15, 2013 Kerry McNarara Silver. One of the most rewarding evenings of the year, Taste of the Beach is a memorable occasion that should always be marked on ones calendar. Simply drop by the Chamber Welcome Center to plan next years visit! TasteContinued from page 20 [Above] Event organizer Guy Contrada, Aruba Beach Caf, and High Noon proprietor Paul Novak enjoy the festivities. The folks from Azteca Fresh Grill [Right] showcase tempting Mexican specialties. [Photos by Sunny Eckhardt] Lonergan said he faced kind of an uphill battle, since my opponent had previous experience. Overall, the people want fresh ideas and new energy. I offer that. Im so proud to be able to serve all the residents of Oakland Park. Asked what issues he wants to tackle soon, he said he is concerned with home break-ins going on throughout the city. I want to focus on crime and work with Chief (Al) Hubrig from BSO and make sure were on track to reduce crime statistics throughout the city. Its important that residents feel safe in Oakland Park. Its a great city, and we have the potential to become even better. Voters approved all six proposed charter amendments. One calls for moving the municipal election from March to November. Another eliminates numbered, individual seats. Instead, candidates would run as a group with the top two or three winning election. Guevrekian said she is eager to see how the move to November elections will affect future elections. Im certain there will be an increase in turnout, and thats a good thing for the city. Lonergan said he was happy to see all the amendments pass. With the move of the election to November, the money spent on March elections can be used in better places, he said. Oakland Park electionsContinued from page 3

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Highwaymen showSaturday, April 6th, the Oakland Park Historical Society will be holding its 3rd Annual Highwaymen Show, featuring R.L. Lewis and fellow Highwayman Hall of Fame Artists and their work. The show will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Jaco Pastorius Community Center in Oakland Park, located at 4000 N. Dixie Highway. Strawberry FestivalWilton Manors New Presbyterian Church will host its Strawberry Festival on Saturday, March 16 at 4 p.m. at its Rejoice School, 512 NE 26 St. There will be strawberries, homemade pound cake and whipped cream to enjoy. There will also be a silent auction in the churchs newly renovated courtyard. Suggested donation is $5. Proceeds will benefit students at Rejoice. Call 954-946-4380. See SIGHTINGS on page 23 SightingsContinued from page 15p.m. at 2801 Country Blvd. 866-976-8279 3-19 Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale/Cypress Creek meets at 12 p.m. at Westin Cypress Creek Hotel, 400 Corporate Drive. Club meets every Tuesday. 954492-8254. 3-20 Kiwanis Club of Oakland Park meets Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd. 954-5669957. 3-20 Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave. 954-5607813. 3-21 Kiwanis Club of Deer eld Beach meets on Thursdays at 12 p.m. at DoubleTree Hilton, 100 Fairway Drive. 754-333-0565. 3-21 Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets on Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 North Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. 3-23 Kiwanis Club of Deer eld Beach West meets second and fourth Saturday at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St. 954-54-732-9883.Education & Self Development3-18 Toastmasters Toast of Goldcoast meets at 7 p.m. at Dennys, 3151 Powerline Road, Oakland Park. 954-718-0543. 3-19 Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Deer eld Beach City Hall, 150 NE 2 Ave., Deer eld Beach. 954-357-5579.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 15, 2013 SightingsContinued from page 22 See SIGHTINGS on page 25Small business loansPompano Beach Those looking for a small business loan can attend the Microenterprise Business Loan Fund Program meeting on Thursday, March 21 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 MLK Blvd. The City of Pompano Beach provides loans to residents who live in the Northwest CRA district or have their business located there. The program entails weekly training workshops and business consultations. Call 954-5861111. 3-19 Prearranging your Cremation or Funeral Services workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Asia Buffett 240 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach. Free lunch. RSVP at 954-7819661. 3-21 Prearranging your Cremation or Funeral Services workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Bobby Rubinos, 2501 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Free lunch. RSVP at 954-781-9661. 3-27 Property tax exemption ling assistance workshop at 11:30 a.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W Atlantic Blvd. 954357-5579.Events & Activities3-15 & 16 12th Biennial Quilt Show from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 1 St., Fort Lauderdale. 3-16 Grand opening of Peaceful Ridge Rescue 3004 Peaceful Ridge Drive, Davie, takes place at 11 a.m. Peaceful Ridge is dedicated to caring for abused and abandoned horses. www. PeacefulRidgeRescue.com or 954-240-6080. 3-16 Kayak rentals from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Richardson Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Rates are $16 per hour for a single kayak [$40 for 4 hours] and $24 per hour [$58 for 4 hours] for a double kayak. 954-7810073 or 954-854-1014. 3-16 Photographer Jerry Saxon presents a slide program centering on the natural beauty of South Florida parks, speci cally Quiet Waters Park, from 2 to 3 p.m. at Deer eld Beach Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd. Light refreshments served. 954-3577680. 3-17 Classic Car Show from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Diamond Strike Lanes, 2200 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Music, food, raf e and door prizes. 954-941-0968. 3-20 Spaghetti Dinner from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Music provided by DJ TJ. Dinner includes spaghetti, meatballs, salad, dessert and drink. Tickets are $8 per person and $15 per couple. Bring your own wine. 954-390-2120. 3-31 Easter sunrise services held by Community Church at 7 a.m. at the pavilion at the east end of Commercial Boulevard in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea There will also be a 10 a.m. service at the church, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea. 954-776-5530. 3-31Easter sunrise services held by Fort Lauderdale Business and Professional Womens Club on the beach across from Bahia Mar, 801 Seabreeze Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. 954-566-4165. 4-9 GFWC Womans Club of Deer eld Beach instillation luncheon at 12 p.m. at Wyndham Hotel Resort, 4011 N. Ocean Blvd., Deereld Beach. Cost is $30. Public welcome. 954-421-4700.

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad with the knowledge of the horrible deaths of his mother, father and sister. George now lives in Montreal with his wife and children of his own but he never forgets the horror of his childhood. Once he learned of Fumikos years of research and Hanas suitcase, he visited her in Japan and talked to her Small Wings group. He was so moved by the experience that he joined Fumiko in lecturing about the Holocaust around the world so that no one will forget his family and the six million Jews who died because they were Jewish. Then Emils face breaks into a smile as he says, We have a Holocaust survivor in the audiencemy mother, Olga Sher. Come up, Mother and help me answer these questions. Everyone clapped as a tiny woman, the size of a fth grader, stepped up to the podium beside her son. He held out an armband with a Jewish star on it, saying This was Mothers armband which she had to wear at all time during Hitlers purge of Jews. A young voice called out to Olga, Did you hate the Germans? With a sweet smile, Olga answered. No. Many good people helped us. Theres a list of those good people too. These people did not want to be part of Hitlers madness. Different families hid me in their attics for four years. When I was lucky to come out alive, I saw a school acquaintance holding a baby and I realized that life had been happening while I struggled to survive from 1941 to 1944. You have to forgive. In Warsaw there is a monument documenting the Holocaust. As I stood reading the words, I saw a German prisoner sweeping the streets. He was very thin and looked to be a sad soul. I felt pity, not anger. You must be able to forgive. I have had a good life since that terrible time. In Canada, I married a loving husband and we had two wonderful sons. I am now a snowbird from Montreal. When I am here, I get to volunteer in this wonderful library. Olga Shers nal words to the group were As Doreen can tell you, when Hitler gained control in Germany, one of the rst rights he took from us was forbidding Jews the use of libraries. Perhaps that is why I love volunteering in this library and welcoming all who come to use it. Parents and children lined up to buy Shers book, Hanas Suitcase on Stage. He signed copies of the book and one of his daughters acted as cashier. The audience left, emotionally drained, to digest this reminder of the 6,000,000 people who died because they were Jews. The last page of the book, and Shers play end with this poem written by Japanese children. Hana Brady, thirteen years old was the owner of this suitcase. Fifty ve years ago, May 18, 1942, two days after Hanas eleventh birthday, she was taken to Terezin in Czechoslovakia. October 23, 1944, crowded in a freight train, she was sent to Auschwitz. She was taken to the gas chamber right after. People were allowed to take only one suitcase with them. I wonder what Hana put in her suitcase. Hana would have been sixty nine years old today, but her life stopped when she was thirteen. I wonder what kind of a girl she was. The few drawings she made at Terezinthese are the only things she left for us. What do these drawings tell us? Happy memories of her family? Dreams and hopes for the future? Why was she killed? There was one reason. She was born Jewish. Name: Hana Brady. Date of Birth: May 16, 1931. Orphan. We, Small Wings, will tell every child in Japan what happened to Hana. We, Small Wings, will never forget what happened to one and a half million Jewish children. We children can make a difference in building peace in the worldso that the Holocaust will never happen again. By Small Wings, December 2000,Tokyo, Japan Translated from Japanese by Fumiko Ishioka HanaContinued from page 10 Seder nightsTwo Seders will take place in honor of Passover next week. The meals are open to families with an emphasis on children.First Seder Night Monday, March 25 at 7:30 p.m. Second Seder Night Tuesday, March 26 at 7:30 p.m. Seders will take place at 4431 NE 27 Ave., Lighthouse Point. Call Rabbi Tzvi Dechter at 347-410-1106 or visit www. JewishLHP.com.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 15, 2013 work and they always have my taxes in order. I can reach someone in their of ce at all times, and that is reassuring to me. I recommend their services to everybody who wants reliable accounting services. George Spain Jr., owner of G.Cutz, LLC, Pompano, writes John and his team have helped me in more ways than I can count. Anytime I have an accounting or tax related question, John is always there giving me guidance. Being local is important to me as is face to face contact. Randall Stevens, Pompano, credits Pinnacle for digging him out of a messy situation. I can never thank John enough for straightening out my situation with the IRS so that I could move forward and get on the right track. I highly recommend them PinnacleContinued from page 8 the visitors back. Brown questioned whether the survey should be done before the downtown is revamped. Koch said now is the best time, since so many more people are here. We want to know what brought them here, and what will make their experience better. That answer wont change based on improvements youre making. Malcolm McClintock, executive director of the LBTS Chamber of Commerce, and Mark Silver, chamber president, urged approval. Commissioners agreed by a vote of 4-0 to hire Ambit to develop the marketing plan. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser, who had favored deferral of the plan, was not at the meeting. SurveyContinued from page 9 whether you have issues with the IRS or are just looking for consistent, great tax and accounting services. Pleased to pass on these testimonials, John concludes with Were very innovative in using technology, which means we cut the time involved in preparation and pass the savings on to the client. Open Mon. to Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The April 15 deadline is fast approaching. Call 954933-2893 for a free consultation. SightingsContinued from page 23 See SIGHTINGS on page 28Health & Safety3-16 Health Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at MEC Ministries, 115 NE 3 St., Pompano Beach. HIV/AIDS and cholesterol testing, bounce houses and more. 954785-9546. 3-16 Health Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at MEC Ministries Pompano, 115 NE 3 St. HIV/AIDS tests, cholesterol tests and more. 954-7859546. 3-16 Chiropractic intern Kevin Kustarz will talk about chiropractic medicine and Gods healing potential at 12:30 p.m. at Hedglon Chiropractic Center, 1313 E. Sample Rd., Pompano Beach. RSVP at 954-946-1799. 3-16 U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary About Boating Safely class from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Spanish River Park,

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-783-8700 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 3-29 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO. Looking For Good People! Good Opportunity For Right Individual. Qualifications: Good Driving Record Physically Fit Professional. No Drugs! Average Tech Earns $600 $1,200 A Week. Wayne 954-868-5560. 3-15 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTMALE CNA/HHA/ COMPANION Broward Former EMT/Certified/ Lt. Massage. Compassionate References. Ron 954-2322832. 3-15 COMPANION/ELDERLY Housekeeper Or Nanny. Looking For A Job! Excellent References. Full/Part Time. Available Weekends! White American. 954-245-2434. 322 CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AIDE Will Care For The Elderly! Honest And Reliable. 20 Years Experience. Please Call 954-486-7630. 3-15 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-5 CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 4-5 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs Carpentry Plumbing Roo ng Masonry Windows Painting Decking Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 Emergency Calls. 4-5 CARPET CLEANING!!! 2 ROOMS $59.00 ACTUAL PRICE!!!! NO GIMMICKS!!!!! CALL 954-784-8199 FOR INFORMATION. 3-22 BLADE RUNNERS Yard Maintenance. FREE ESTIMATE!! Grass Cutting Trimming Hedges & Shrubs. Mulching. Lic/Ins. Starting At $25 Per Cut. Eddie 954-4941303. 3-29 M.M. CARPET INSTALLATION REPAIRS AND RESTRETCH. CALL 954-675-3810. 3-15 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill, Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954-818-9538. 3-22 GIGIS CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable Honest. More Info. 954-2957033 Or 954-210-2248. 4-5 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 315 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CSTAMP COLLECTIONSWANTED ACCUMULATIONS & COLLECTIONS Of Stamps. House Calls Made. Call John 954-467-7128 Or 954-6142562. 3-15 HOMEOWNERS INSURANCEBETTER RATES! BETTER SERVICE! Call KATIE For A FREE Quote! 954-784-9029. www.myersinsures.com. 3-29 COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 3-22 GARAGE SALESPOMPANO NEW AND OLD SALE!!!! Parliament House 405 N Ocean Blvd. Saturday March 16 9am 2pm. Books Toys Dcor Household Items!! Clothes Crafts MUCH MORE. 3-15 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 4-5 COCKT AIL TABLE 50Lx30W Partial Leather Top Walnut Mahogany Solid Wood Beautiful Carved Legs 2 Drawers. $200. Hillsboro Beach A1A. 954-360-7092. 3-15 THRIFT STORECLF THRIFT STORE 801 SE 10 St. Deer eld. Monday & Wednesday 10am-3pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-4pm. 20% Off Friday & Saturday ONLY. 954-428-8980. 3-15 DOCKS FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT Up To 40. $10 Per Foot. New Dock Electric & Water Available! Wide Canal! Close To INLET. No Live-Aboards!! No Fixed Bridges. Cell 412-491-3937. 3-15 POMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL Off NE 14 St. Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water, Electric. Up To 33 $325 Month. 954-7814994. 3-15 CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954812-5192.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 15, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-783-8700 1994 CHEVY CAVALIER 4 Cyl. Low Miles. Economical! Sporty! Ice A/C. CD Tint. New Battery & Tires. $1700 OBO. 954-632-0476. 3-15 OPEN HOUSESPOMPANO 1500 N OCEAN BLVD. UNIT 801. Sunday 14pm. Completely Renovated 2/2. Small Pet OK! Washer/ Dryer In Unit. Oceanfront Bldg. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. 954-803-4174. 3-15 HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 2/1 HOME! Just REDUCED! $79,000. 55+ Community! 2 Clubhouses! FREE GOLF. Low Maintenance. Robert Elkins Charles Rutenberg R.E. 954-782-8968. 3-22 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 3/2 1 Car Garage. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease. Utilities Not Included. Available NOW!!!!!!. 954-6498867. 3-15 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19REAL ESTATE FOR SALEPOMPANO BEST BUYS!!!! LOW FEES!!!!!! 3228 T/H / VILLA 2/2 One Floor Only! Totally Renovated, Approx. 1/2 Block To Ocean $279,999 MAKE OFFER.. RIVERGATE TH Rarely Available. 3 Bedrm. 2.5 Bath/1 CG ICW View $475K. SEA HAVEN #321 B Remodeled. 2/2 Adjacent To Marina $155K. GARDEN AIRE VILLAGE S. #415, 2/2 Approx. 1 Mile To Sea! $110K. Contact PJ Carswell, Atlantic Prop. Int. Inc. 954-242-4260. pj@atlanticprop.com. 3-15 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-29CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month. 954-6291324. 3-29 POMPANO BEACH MARINE COLONY 2/2. Close To Beach. Direct Ocean AccessDock Space Available. Pretty Canal View. Screened Balcony. Small Pet OK! Large Walk-in Closets. Near Public Golf Course. Tennis Courts. Shopping Mall. Non-Smoking. Available April 1st $1,200 Per Month. 954-695-3493. 3-15 APTS FOR RENTBEACH AREA APT As Low As $475 A Week In Season! (3225 NE 6th St.) 95 Yards To Beach; Bright Airy Apt With Cable, Wireless, Parking, Patio, Charming Furnishings And More. Pet Friendly. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com. 3-15 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 3-22 LUXURY OCEAN-VIEW APT: $1475 A MONTH IN SEASON! (Ocean Blvd & NE 6th St.) European Style Kitchen, Ultra-Quiet, EcoFriendly, Central Air, Tropical Pool, Ocean Views, Dedicated Parking, Coin Laundry, Premium Cable TV, WI-FI And More. Pets OK. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com. 3-15 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 APT. All New! Screened Florida Room. Ceramic Granite. Upscale Residential Neighborhood. $975 Month. 609-638-1291. 3-15 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO 1 Bedroom & Ef ciency With Kitchen. Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Yearly Seasonal. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 4-5 PRIMO OCEAN BOULEVARD APT For As Low As $68 A Night In Season! (601 N. Ocean Blvd) Great Area, Great Apt. Great Rates. 95 Yards To Beach. Special Weekly & Monthly Rates Too. Cats & Small Dogs Welcome With Pet Fee. Contact Debbie 561-541-0308. Debbie@paxpr operties.com. 3-15 POMP ANO BEACH NE 1/1 $725 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 3/1 New $1250. SW 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 3-22 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 4-19 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. LIGHTHOUSE POINT UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent In A Psychologists Of ce For A SOLO PROFESSIONAL. $950/Month. Located In The GATEWAY CENTRE 2040 East Sample Rd. Windowed Unfurnished Of ce! 14 x 12.5. Call 954-942-3344. 4-5 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723.

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28 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. SightingsContinued from page 25By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point RJ Boyle, of RJ Boyle Studios, says theres plenty of fish to choose from this weekend, including a chance for anglers Bad weathers departure brings good to go back out and catch a swordfish. We finally have a chance to go out sword fishing, due to the weather backing off. And I know at least 15 to 20 boats will be headed out Saturday and Sunday, he said. The weather should be great both ways. And thats not all. Tons of dolphin have been caught at 200 ft. Theres also been some nice kingfish around. But if you dont have the ability to go out that far, said Boyle, try some inshore fishing. And if all else fails, you might want to try wahoo fishing. They feed as the full Moons approaching, he added. If you do go out for wahoo, Boyle recommends trolling at high speeds. Last week was good for wahoo. For those who need a few tips about catching a swordfish, Boyle will be teaching a class at the International Game Fish Association, 300 Gulf Stream Way, Dania Beach, on Saturday, April 9 from 7 to 10 p.m. Call 954-420-5001. 3939 N. Ocean Blvd., Boca Raton. Cost is $35. Bring lunch. RSVP at 561-3913600. 3-16 Reiki II class from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Lisas Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Cost is $100. RSVP at 954-782-6564. 3-18 & 27 Protecting Your Family on the Worst Day of Their Life seminar at 2 p.m. at Panera Bread, 5975 N., Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. RSVP at 954781-9661. 3-20 Protecting your Family if you pass more than 75 miles from your Residence workshop at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. at Starbucks, 1015 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. RSVP at 954-781-9661. 3-23 Meditation class from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Lisas Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Learn the art of meditation. Cost is $50. RSVP at 954-782-6564.Music 3-16 St. Patricks and St. Josephs Festival at 6:30 p.m. at Assumption Catholic Church, 2001 S. Ocean Blvd., Lauderdale By-The-Sea. Irish and Italian food, music by Marcel Rasa. 50/50 raf es. Tickets are $25. 954-9417647. 3-17 Organist Samuel Metzger performs at 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach High School, 600 NE 13 Ave. Sponsored by New Presbyterian Church. Admission is free. Donations are accepted. 954-946-4380.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, March 15, 2013 Martin Lenkowsky PELICAN WRITER When it comes to newly hatched sea turtles, Richard Whitecloud wants Broward County residents seeing things in a different light, but the tiny mammals should see only a minimum of light. Whitecloud is founder of Its turtle season and once again STOP will rescue hatchlings from man-made dangersSTOP, Sea Turtle Oversight Protection, an organization of volunteers dedicated to making Broward Countys miles of shoreline safe for the newly hatched animals to make it back to the beckoning surf from their nests buried in the sand. Members of the organization addressed a meeting of the Broward County Sierra Club Thursday evening at Fern Forest Nature Center in Coconut Creek. Its their goal to limit the amount of artificial lighting so prevalent along our areas beaches. Ann Wiley, a STOP volunteer on Fort Lauderdale beach, explained how sea turtles instincts are to follow the natural ambient light caused by the moon and stars reflecting off the waters surface. Conversely, their instinct is to avoid the darkness of dunes and vegetation away from the waters edge. Because of the prevalence of man-made light emanating from hotels, condos, businesses, and traffic signals along A1A, many hatchlings are attracted to these artificial light sources rather than the water and head in the wrong direction. Sadly, many of them are killed, usually run over by cars. Wiley wants to see turtle safe lighting surrounding area beaches. The solution is simple, she said. Keep the lighting long, low and shielded. By long, she is referring to long wave-length light which is a more subdued form of lighting. Examples of this type of lighting might be either red or amber. Their organizations goal gets straight to the point: To STOP sea turtle disorientation in Broward County. STOP has been working closely with the county, various municipalities, and business owners to make beach area lighting safer for hatchlings. The organizations actions do not stop there. Throughout sea turtle nesting STOP volunteer Ann Wiley discusses sea turtles with Sierra Club member E.C. Burleson Jr. at Fern Forest Nature Center. [Staff photo] See TURTLES on page 31

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30 The Pelican Friday, March 15, 2013 make the changes. Mayor Gary Resnick was absent because he was attending a National League of Cities conference in Washington, D.C. Commissioners also approved an ordinance that would give code greater power to cite boat owners who leave unsightly vessels on their yard or use their homes to do commercial boat repair for an extended period of time. If youre going to make money, go rent a warehouse, said Commissioner Scott Newton. But while they want the city to look better, commissioners also asked Blocker to make sure the new code of ordinances wasnt unnecessarily harsh on residents or didnt have the opposite effect of making the city look less appealing. I just dont want people to be chopping away at a limb over the sidewalk, said Green. Vice Mayor Julie Carson asked Blocker if code compliance was too focused on penalizing people and risked pushing them out of the city. No maam, I dont, responded Blocker, who added that code compliance has reached out to churches and other organizations to try and get them to help residents rectify their violations. Carson added that she wants to make it exciting for residents to help their neighbors with code problems, possibly even providing grants to spur organizations that help. Spring Fling to close part of Wilton Drive Wilton Manors The Rainbow Business Coalition [RBC] has found its third major event and they want to close the southern end of Wilton Drive from the bridge to Northeast 21 Court during the festivities. Spring Fling, an event that includes food trucks, childrens activities and entertainment, is scheduled for May 4 from 12 to 8 p.m. Last year, RBC organized Stonewall in June and Wicked Wilton in October. The city has set aside ve Wilton Drive closings this year and will have one left after Spring Fling; the fourth was the city-run Hearts on the Drive in February. Organized by RBC and Pride United Broward, Spring Fling would be centered at Richardson Park and include the southern end of Wilton Drive. Greg Hardy, president of RBC, and Jeff Shincarick, vice president of RBC, said they want it to be something for the whole community. Its not a gay event, its not a straight event, said Hardy to commissioners. Eventually, they hope it will morph into a food, wine and arts and crafts event. Commissioner Scott Newton gave RBC credit for doing something on the south end of the street. It seems like [the businesses there are] always being pushed off. City staff and event organizers are still working on the details of the street closure and Northeast 20 Street may be kept open during the event. Hardy and Shincarick said since Wicked Wilton focused more on the north end of Wilton Drive they wanted to make sure the south end got some attention as well. The two estimate between 5,000 and 6,000 people will attend. Its a nice draw in the spring, said Hardy.Tools for codesContinued from page 5 The Pelican 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 31 Friday, March 15, 2013 season, as many as 150 volunteers monitor sea turtle nests throughout the county. They spend countless nights on the beach documenting the number of turtles hatching from their nests. Hatchlings taking natures designed route toward the east are left alone. Those disoriented by artificial lighting are recovered in buckets and sent on a proper seafaring journey. Sea turtle nesting season in South Florida begins in March when the leatherbacks arrive. Loggerheads arrive in May, and green sea turtles get here in the middle of June. All told, it means many months of sleepless nights on the beach for STOP volunteers. When female sea turtles first arrive on the beach, they dig a hole in the sand, lay their many eggs and head back toward the water. They first cover the nest with sand to hide it from predators before they depart. For the most part, STOP has had great cooperation from beachfront cities, businesses, and residents. Wiley points to the willingness of the Ritz Carlton resort on Fort Lauderdale in particular in its efforts to make its property turtle friendly in terms of lighting. Whitecloud sees STOP as a conduit between animals and people. Hes proud of the fact most individuals are supportive of their goals. We see many municipalities that didnt have beach lighting ordinances now have them, he said, adding since sea turtles are classified as an endangered species many state and federal laws were already in place protecting these beautiful creatures from harm. Sea turtles have been on the planet for hundreds of millions of years. Prior to the arrival of human beings, their only threat was predatory animals. Whitecloud says not all people are as friendly toward helping other species. Some people are totally disgruntled about having to help because of the human superiority aspect, he said. In other words, he explained some folks feel its not our problem to worry about other species. Whitecloud describes the volunteers as individuals who take time out from their own TurtlesContinued from page 29busy life schedules to protect these animals from harm by spending many nighttime hours at the beach. Out of approximately 54,000 sea turtle hatchlings recorded last season, more than 20,000 became disoriented and started heading in the wrong direction before being rescued from probable harm. The sea turtle nesting season in Florida runs from March through October. Here are a few simple things to help protect them: Remember, it is against the law to touch or disturb nesting sea turtles, hatchlings, or their nests. Sea turtles are protected by both the Federal Endangered Species Act and the Florida Marine Protection Act. Report injured or dead sea turtles, by calling 1-888-404FWCC (3922) or *FWC from your cell phone. If you must be on the beach at night, limit your walking and do not use flashlights or flash photography. That can abort the nesting process, or other sea turtles nearby may be discouraged from nesting if there are lights on the beach. Turn off outside patio lights and shield indoor lights from shining directly onto the beach by closing the drapes at night. Check the laws in your city to be in compliance.. For more about Sea Turtle Watching Tips by SEEturtles.org Maternity room etiquette for sea turtles .

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