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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00327
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 02-22-2013
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00338

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Friday, February 22, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 8 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Honey bees welcome; abandoned houses must be registered By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City commissioners on Wednesday unanimously approved an ordinance on second reading to permit honey bee keeping in the downtown district on city-owned properties. See HONEY BEES on page 5 After 66 years, a pioneer business changes directionDBS clears its decks By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Deer eld Builders Supply, a business xture in this city for 66 years, has exited the retail hardware business, closed the rebar manufacturing plant, and will no longer be a lumber yard. Instead, the family-run company will specialize in windows, cabinetry and specialty woods and maintain its export business in the Caribbean. A two-day auction last week cleared out the store at SE 2 Avenue and Hillsboro Blvd. Already gone was the large truck eet. Soon to be closed are DBS stores in Sarasota and Tampa. This is the rst year we were not in the Founders Days Parade, said company president Ed Dietrich. See BUILDERS on page 16By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach As this city undertakes major improvements on Martin Luther King [MLK] Boulevard to attract new development, the streets earliest inhabitants still remember earlier times. Alfonsa McIntosh remembers when MLK was named Rock Road; a name that came from the road literally being made out of rocks and dirt. My Residents remember origins of Martin Luther King Boulevard and its role in local history father used to bust those big old rocks to ll in pot holes, he said. Back then, McIntosh said MLK Boulevard was mostly surrounded by farms and labor camps, but one of the few surviving buildings from that era, the Ali Building, is where he used to get haircuts for 75 cents. See BLACK HISTORY on page 2 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach This time of year at St. Ambrose Church, Father Bryan Daltons joke is that the St. Ambrose Carnival thrives with its dedicated corps of party givers who just keep on givingpeople who stage the annual food fest, midway, rides and entertainment love it so much they will run off with the carnival. Indeed, the same crew of volunteers have been putting on the event for 19 years with such dedication that some take their annual vacations so they can devote a week or two to their volunteer duties. Our dearest friends and anyone See FAIR on page 29Meet me at The St. Ambrose FairFeb. 28 March 3Sarah Corbett sings solo for attendees at the Rock Road Restoration Groups Black History Month Program at the E. Pat Larkins Center on Feb. 17. [Staff photo]

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2 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Now, Rock Road is known by two names: MLK and Hammondville Road, a decision made by city commissioners in 1990 that was not without controversy. Commissioners chose Hammondville in honor of Hiram F. Hammon, a white pioneer who employed many African Americans on his farms in the area. Beverly Moody, a community activist who now serves as the director of outreach services for Congressman Alcee Hastings, said many in the African American community were upset with naming the street after Hammon because of the poor wages he paid his workers. She said residents packed city hall to demand the removal of Hammons name but commissioners decided to compromise and choose two names. Now, 20 years after the name change, commissioners are focused on the street itself. On Feb. 7, residents and city of cials broke ground on the MLK streetscape improvements. The $11 million project, which also includes Historic Downtown Pompano, is designed to improve sidewalks, lighting and landscaping and add entryway signs and new parking. Another groundbreaking ceremony is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 28 at 5 p.m. at the Ali Building, 353 MLK Blvd. Final plans for the buildings future are still being worked-out but the goal is to make it a cultural center. Horatio Danovich, engineer for the Community Development Agency, said the project has been budgeted to cost about $1.2 million and should be nished by the end of the year. Built in 1933, the Ali Building is named after Frank and Florence Ali, the husband and wife who originally owned it. Frank ran the barbershop and Florence ran a beauty salon out of the rst oor. They used the second oor as their home. Asked if shes happy with the citys plans for the Ali Building, Hazel Armbrister, president of the Rock Road Restoration Historical Group [RRHG], said she is waiting until the project is farther along before she makes up her mind. She said its important Black historyContinued from page 1 See BLACK HISTORY on page 3Hazel Armbrister, president of the Rock Road Restoration Historical Group, presents Alfonso McIntosh with a Pioneer award at the groups Black History Month Program on Feb. 17. McIntosh helped start Rock Road when it was just an informal group that met at the Mitchell Moore Center. [Staff photo]

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The Pelican 3 Friday, February 22, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com that the Ali Building become a museum for our history blacks, coloreds, negroes. Pompano would not have been Pompano without them. To honor some of those who helped Pompano to evolve, the RRRHG, residents and city of cials gathered at the E. Pat Larkins Center on Sunday for RRRHGs Black History Program. McIntosh was presented with the organizations Pioneer award. Armbrister described him as one of the organizations founding members and credited him with helping to establish RRRHG when it was just an unof cial group that met at the Mitchell Moore Community Center. Richard Macon was honored for his work as the owner of Freeman-Macon Funeral Home. Macon said he has amassed a stack of unpaid bills from people who couldnt afford a decent funeral for a loved one. But Macon said their ability to pay hasnt been his main concern. I saw a need in this community. [Some people] couldnt afford a decent burial. I decided I could [help them] and I just decided to keep doing it. The late John Franklin Lee was honored for opening the rst shoe repair shop and teaching many young men, including his grandson, Vincent Johnson, to shine shoes. Ocie Phillips was honored for opening the citys rst barbershop. Tom Baker, now deceased, was honored for being one of the rst landowners in Pompano. In particular, Armbrister said he owned vast tracts around Rock Road. His son-in-law, Julius Bristol Ellington, also deceased, was honored for his generosity and life of giving. Accepting the awards were the son of Julius Ellington, Charles Ellington, and Charles wife, Emma. In 2000, the Ellington family kept up Julius spirit of giving by donating land to the city for the E. Pat Larkins Center, land that previously housed the Ellington homestead where Charles Ellington was born and Emma Ellington gave birth to three of their sons. Emma Ellington said that its important to teach the African American residents of Pompano that their forefathers were hard-working, successful people who played an important role in helping to develop the city. Were going to rewrite our own history, she said. Black historyContinued from page 2

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4 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFExperience a free chair and hand massage, Aura reading, acupuncture analysis, and refreshments. Early birds --the rst 100 visitors--will receive a gift bag of products, coupons and information. And theres a raf e for a chance to win a couples basket of wonderful items and experiences. Take advantage of this opportunity to enjoy some of the bene ts of the variety of non-invasive healing methods that support mind, body and spirit offered every day at owner, Lisa Smiths Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Feel good services available in this unique Come to Lisas Healing Center Open House tomorrow, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.center include massage modalities, Reiki, LaHoChi, Cranial Sacral Therapy for adults and children, Edgar Cayce methods, Lymphatic Drainage, Aura readings, Animal Aura readings, Animal communication, Sound therapy, Crystal healing classes and groups, chiropractic care, Acupuncture, Life coaching, and guidance counseling. According to Lisa, her wellness center offers preventative and restorative lifelong health solutions to the whole client using the team approach. Described natural methods are chemically free and allow a client to assume responsibility for his or her own health. Programs are developed for each client according to the clients needs and desires. A few of the many modalities offered are:MassageI am a licensed massage therapist and Usui Reiki Master and a 2009 graduate of the Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork program offered through the Atlantic Technical Center of Broward College in Margate. Having worked as a massage therapist in the chiropractor, physical therapist and spa environments, I understand the need for an individual approach. So we mix and match as we work on a client. When we encounter tension and trigger points, we adjust our techniques to meet the need. We might use four different massages in one treatment. Lisa Smith, owner of Lisas Healing Center in Lighthouse Point, is about to begin a Reiki treatment during which the healing is passed from the Master to the student. [Staff photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]See HEALING CENTER on page 25

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The Pelican 5 Friday, February 22, 2013 The city recently retained the Urban Farming Institute to provide an urban farm park and offer educational courses at Jaco Pastorius Park. One of the classes will offer instruction on urban and rural beekeeping without the use of chemicals. Registration with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will be required in order to ensure that the proposed beekeeping activities are certi ed and properly maintained. Commissioner Jed Shank suggested the city next look at making the same accommodation for aquaculture.In other business: Commissioners unanimously approved on rst reading an ordinance to provide for inspection of abandoned property. With this ordinance, if a property is vacant or abandoned for 30 days or more, the mortgage holder must inspect the property to con rm it is abandoned and register with the city. The ordinance is intended to give the city more control over abandoned properties.Honey BeesContinued from page 1 In Oakland Park, commission meetings are held the rst and third Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Meetings are broadcast live on Comcast, Channel 78, and rebroadcast the following evening at 6:30 p.m. The public is welcome and encouraged to attend any commission meetings.SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.comArt 2-26 Art Classes with artist Valter de Morais Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 2 to 4 p.m. and 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Morais Art Gallery, 418 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Cost is $25 per session. 954-532-1534. 2-24 Riverwalk Sunday Arts from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Esplanade Park, 400 SW 2 St., Fort Lauderdale. 954-4682540.Auctions, Sales2-23 Pompano Beach GreenMarket from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. Held every Saturday. 954-292-8040. 2-23 & 24 Wilton Manors Green Market from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Held every Saturday and Sunday. 954-592-0381. 2-24 Deer eld Beach Green Market at 8 a.m. at The Cove, Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal, at the Cove. Held every Sunday. 561-2391536 or 561-299-8684.Books & Lectures2-27 Teen Literature Club from 6 to 7 p.m. at Northwest Branch Library, 1580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954-357-6599. 2-27 Jean Larkins Great Books program from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Percy White Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Runs on 3-13 also. 954-357-7680. See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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6 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XXI, Issue 8 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & LettersVOTE March 12 Quality of life begins at home. To insure it, VOTE on MARCH 12!Many voters are ignoring the upcoming municipal elections March 12, but we hope we can change their minds. Heres why: Along with the rest of the nation, Broward County has experienced a tremendous economic downturn. Getting out of it has been hard. Some cities are doing better than others. So we need jobs, lower taxes, facilities and cities that can produce a strong economic base. Now is the time to consider how your city is doing. It is your vote that determines who will make the decisions that impact your life. Think about this: Shall your city implement the red light cameras that photograph the tail of your car sneaking through a yellow light? Its either pay the ne or start a legal battle. Shall your city allow signage that turns a sophisticated business community into a replica of Coney Island? Overturning mistakes like that are expensive to the taxpayer. Shall your city control the colors you can use to paint your house? Shall your city demand police protection at local schools? Shall your city support cultural events? How about the parks in your city? Are they beautiful, well-kept and accessible? Do you and your children have access to sports and recreation? Are those people running your government smart enough to keep assessments and taxes low and public funds safe? Does your city have a suf cient reserve fund? Does your city have the resources to step in after a hurricane? The people you will elect on March 12 should always be working on these issues. They are your public servants. They essentially determine the quality of life for you and your family. Before you vote in this election, ask questions of the candidates, call them for position statements, ask them to speak to a gathering of your neighbors. When you cast your vote, do it as an informed citizen. This week The Pelican offers pro les of the candidates running in the cities that we cover. Only Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach and Oakland Park have commission elections in March. Voting absentee will cost you a little more than a buck. Voting at the polls will cost you about an half hour of your time. Whichever voting method you choose remember: Making sure you have the right to vote has already cost thousands of Americans their lives.Fisher seeks third term; says much work yet to be completedLamar FisherMayor Age 52VOTE March 12 Pompano BeachPlace of birth Pompano Beach Career Owner, Fisher Auction Company, Pompano Beach Education Palm Cove High School, A.A. degree Palm Beach State College Civic organizations Kiwanis, past distinguished governor, Elks Lodge Public service Pompano Beach planning and zoning board, chair of the Broward County Planning Council Mayor Lamar Fisher was elected mayor in 2007. He says he is seeking re-election to continue the work that we and this commission body have already put into motion. He comes to this election with a list of priorities based on scal responsibility, job growth and quality of life as he seeks a third term as city-wide mayor. He is proud that in 2013, the city collects the same level of taxes as it did ve years ago. The city has one of the lowest re assessments in the county. As for job growth, Fisher says that conversations are on-going with developers to invest in the Federal Highway corridor. To that end, city planners and of cials are undergoing studies of land-use and zoning to facilitate a mixeduse development. It would be a perfect t with the golf and water views along Federal Highway, he says. One coup already in the works is the proposed Whole Foods Market that will take over the now defunct K-Mart building north of Copans on Federal Highway. Whole Foods and Sports Authority will share the space. The opening of both stores is expected in 2014. Another Federal Highway project consisting of garden apartments is moving quickly says Fisher. Plans for a boutique hotel and marina have been approved for the old Tails Restaurant, 2635 N. Riverside Drive. It will have 120 rooms in a three to fourstory building.Baumwald impatient with citys progress, wants hotels, jobs Mayor Age 47 Place of birth St. Louis. 32 years in Pompano Beach Career Construction Education One year at Admiral Farragut Academy [1981-82] Public service Served three and one-half years on the community appearance committee Incarceration [1998] Possession of cocaine David Baumwald says he has serious problems with the amount of time it takes to get things done in the city. Citing the progress on the VOTE March 12 Pompano Beachproposed regional library/cultural center, he adds that after seven to eight years of planning, Id get red if I took this long to get things done. But he adds that the library itself should be put off for two years until times are better. This candidate is also anxious to see more action at the citys municipal pier. It should be done by now. [The city] has been very slow. The pier should be open with live entertainment. Baumwald strongly supports a hotel, something like a Days Inn at the beach, for families. He wants the beach to be affordable, family-oriented. He would like to see the city offer tax incentives to encourage business owners to build in Pompano Beach. We should give business owners breaks in areas like landscaping and negotiate to get the businesses here. He also Lamar FisherDavid Baumwald David Baumwald See FISHER on page 14 See BAUMWALD on page 14

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The Pelican 7 Friday, February 22, 2013 Burrie seeks re-election to keep city moving in right directionDistrict 2 Commissioner Age 68 Place of birth New York, 50 years in Pompano Beach Career Attorney Education St. Thomas University, Juris Doctor. Public service Coast Guard Auxiliary, Moose, American Legion, Chairman of Relay for Life, member Cresthaven Homeowners Association, and Highlands Civic Association and South Pompano Civic Association, Elks Lodge exalted ruler. Elected of ceSix years Pompano Beach Commissioner, Dist. 2. VOTE March 12 Pompano BeachCharlotte BurrieCharlotte Burrie Put the brakes on spending and subsidizing programs, Terwilliger VOTE March 12 Pompano BeachThomas Terwilliger Commissioner, District 2Age 67 Birthplace Mount Clements, MI. How long in Pompano Beach? 3 years Career Former Merchant Marine, investment manager. Education MBA nance Civic involvement Peace Corps volunteer [1960s], Broward County Election Voting technician, Governors Hurricane Task Force [2001-2003] Thomas Terwilliger, a resident of Leisureville says he offers the city an Thomas TerwilligerCharlotte Burrie seeks her fourth term as District 2 commissioner and says she wants to continue helping her district and the city to move in the right direction. One of her top priorities is the Neighborhood Stabilization Project [NSP], a program that funnels HUD money to repair, refurbish and sell blighted and foreclosed homes to new owners. Proceeds from the sales are recycled for other homes. Burrie says she is expecting more funds to be available for the Highlands only. In the Highlands, Burrie explains that beauti cation and traf c calming will begin to take place once the county completes the street paving. The city will fund the beauti cation and add welcome signs to the neighborhood. She would also like to see a community center for that neighborhood and has her untainted new view, adding that a little outside perspective never hurts. Terwilliger tops his priority of causes with the crime issues in The Highlands. Safety is the key here, he says. These residents are facing drug See Terwilliger on page 12 See BURRIE on page 12 Crime and illegal dumping concern Dist. 4 candidate PoitierVOTE March 12 Pompano BeachWoodrow Woody PoitierWoodrow Woody PoitierCommissioner, District 4Age 65 Birthplace Dade City, lived in Pompano Beach since 1956. Career Owner/manager L.C. Poitier Funeral Home; Pompano Beach retired lieutenant, paramedic/ re ghter [23 years] Education Moorehouse College; Miami Dade College School of Mortuary A.S. degree, 1970 Civic organizations NW Kiwanis; Tigers Roar Club; Mount Calvary Baptist Church Trustee; Pompano Beach Housing Authority past chair and EMS advisory board, past chair. Public of ce In third term as commissioner in Dist. 4. Woody Poitier has a laundry list of issues that he believes are important in District 4, one of which is the illegal dumping that goes on there. Pompano Beach offers twice a week bulk pick-up that has attracted people who prefer to dump lawn material, bulk carpeting and other items in this community instead of disposing of this waste material legally. He recalls when he was an eyewitness of an illegal dumping that prompted him to follow the culprit, call the police and witness the arrest. He agrees that a solution may lie in fewer bulk pick-up days. Criminals have stalked this district for many years with drug dealers, theft and break-ins. Poitier keeps his own police scanner on hand to track the numbers. He says that many crimes are avoidable if residents will lock their homes and cars. He also urges neighbors to look out after each other. Criminals like to brag about their deeds, he says, intimating that listening might be one way to locate criminals. Major work on Martin Luther King Boulevard, Poitier says, has boosted his ego. He refers to 731 MLK Boulevard where the CRA has broken ground to build a commercial mixed-used building and to the restoration of the districts historic building, the Ali Building, known as the rst black-owned business in Pompano. Poitier say she feels very good about the progress being made there. On Dixie Highway, the transit center is open. The bus station opened up the whole thing, Poitier says. There is talk of getting a Greyhound Bus at the center. The city also approved a senior center on Blanche Ely Boulevard at the St. Joseph Haitian Center. It is well-deserved and very needed for our seniors, Poitier added. Poitier is supportive of the work of the Community Redevelopment Agency. He likes the idea of a new cultural center but is uncertain about a hotel on the pier parking lot. Of his candidacy he says, Ive gotten the hang of the job. We are accomplishing things in the district. We are getting things done. This is one of the best city commissions in a long time.[Eds note: Invitations to be interviewed were extended to Dist. 4 candidates Ed Phillips and Joseph Wells who did not respond after several phone calls.]Poitiers campaign contributorsKaris Kristo, Jason McNair, Emerald Transportation, Peter Kiernon, MO BRAD, Jimmie and Regina Glenn, Jessie Walker, James Jones, Dr. Richard Porraro, J. Newell, Rev. Robert and Barbara Robinson, Bettye Larkins, Robbie Holloway, Keith & Associates, Council for Effective Government, Political Action Committee Dunlay, Miskel, Bacman & Blattner, Mr. Squeaky Car Wash, Johnston & Metevia, Royal Palm Business Center, Romena Nelson, Shirley Simmons, Ralph Adderly, Daisy Josey, Broward County Police Benevolent Association, Maurice Spates, Dwight and Cynthia Evans, Barbie Miller, Minnie Camp eld, Glenn Bostic, Rob MajorTotal contributions to date $6,770

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8 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Mayor Age 81 Birthplace Philadelphia. How long in Deer eld Beach 55 years. CareerTeacher of journalism and advanced English. Degree from West Chester University; masters work at Villanova. Education BS in secondary education, Community Association Management license and manager of Princeton Place. Civic involvement DB Historical Society, DB Womans Club, major donor to the Holocaust Memorial at Temple Beth Israel, chair of a city charter revision committee, former Important things remain to be accomplished, Noland saysVOTE March 12 Deer eld BeachPeggy Noland City making decisions that should belong to the voters, Robb saysVOTE March 12 Deer eld BeachJean Robbchair planning and zoning board. Other public of ceMayor 1980 1993. Ran unsuccessfully for mayor in 1997 and district 1 commission, 2004.Jean RobbMayorAge 61 Education Syracuse Barber School, NY CareerFormer beautician, hostess manager of Cove Restaurant, contractors expeditor. Civic involvement Board member, Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization, Board of Directors for League of Cities, American Legion Post 162, Disabled Veterans of America. Prior public service DB City Commission, 1992-97, 1997-2005. Peggy Noland Elected mayor in 2009. Peggy Noland is seeking a second term as mayor of Deer eld Beach because she loves her position, feels compassion for the city and has made the necessary sacri ces in the line of duty. Noland sees the most important issues facing the commission in the next few years to be development of Sullivan Park, infrastructure improvements to Cove Gardens and building the athletic elds at Tam O Shanter. In this next budget cycle she wants to give city employees the ve percent raise they have deferred for the last two years. Addressing an automatic pay raise the commission will receive in March, Noland said she has no strong feelings one way or another. It was approved by a previous commission of which she was a member so that commissioners would no longer be in a position to give themselves a raise. See NOLAND on page 13 See ROBB on page 20Commissioner, District 3 Age 64 Birthplace The Bronx. Has lived here 12 years. Career Assist. Director East Hampton, LI Chamber of Commerce. Sub teacher in Deer eld Beach. Education BA from Queens College Civic involvement CVE Relay for Life, former Deer eld Beach Housing Authority Commissioner, on board of CVE Master Management, former DB Planning and Zoning Board member. Other public of ce No, but ran Berner says her activism will bene t District 3VOTE March 12 Deer eld BeachCaryl Berner Caryl Berner for the same seat four years ago. Caryl Berner says because she has been involved with issues for the past nine years, she has already served her district. She attends most city commission meetings and other district meetings. If elected she will work to change the culture at city hall, she said, citing the employees ve percent pay cut because they did not have an advocate. Berner was responsible for getting city commission meetings on the cable TV system in Century Village, worked against the utility tax, feels there is a solution to the new beach sticker policy that excludes part time residents, and will hold quarterly District 3 meetings. Several years ago, she fought for a no-smoking area at the beach, and won. One of her rst issues was that a menorah be installed on public property along See BERNER on page 21Capobianco is strong in nance and communication skillsVOTE March 12 Deer eld BeachCommissioner, District 3 Age, 62 Birthplace Boston. How long in Deer eld Beach 10 years Career nancial services and business consulting Education Communications/ education degree from Bridgewater State Civic involvement Director of Oakridge V, headed master management for Century Village East, 2006-2009. Currently is president of the CVE Recreation Committee.Donna Capobianco Donna Capobianco Other public of cenone. Ran for seat four years ago. Donna Capobianco comes to the Dist. 3 city commission campaign with a strong background in business and nance. Following the death of the See CAPOBIANCO on page 15

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The Pelican 9 Friday, February 22, 2013 Commissioner, District 3 Age74 Birthplace Greenbelt, MD. Has lived here fulltime for four years. CareerManagement and ownership positions in retail food industry. Education High school degree, college courses. Civic involvement Commdr. Jewish War Veterans Post 265, Deer eld Beach Democratic Club, vice president of Temple Beth Israel. In Maryland, active in Democratic Rosenzweig says his is a moderate voice that will nd solutionsVOTE March 12 Deer eld BeachRichard RosenzweigParty and Civic Federation. Richard Rosenzweig said he is running because in high school he wrote an essay on the importance of the vote and thought about being in the Maryland legislature. Although he was never a candidate, he worked politics behind the scenes, and now with a new chance at public of ce does not want to sit on the sidelines. Additionally, he was encouraged to run by members of the DB Democrat Club and feels he will a more moderate voice than his opponents. He criticizes the prevailing lack of district meetings because the role of a Democracy is to have people involved. He is against any zoning change that would allow residences on the Hillsboro Pines Golf Course and says Master Management should evaluate purchasing the golf course and/or investigate other uses for the property such as the cemetery being developed on the old Tam OShanter Golf Course. A major question is if the Village can afford to buy the golf course now with another major project underway, replacement of the irrigation system. He would work to resolve the beach sticker parking problem and would hold a public hearing before making a decision. The current policy is discriminatory Richard Rosenzweig See ROSENZWEIG on page 11Commission Seat 1 Age 46 Place of birth East Orange, N.J. How long in Oakland Park: Since 1987. Career Administrator for Commercial Metal Building Services. Education Associate degree from Broward College. Civic and professional organizations Organizer and of cer of Royal Palm Isles Neighborhood Group. Volunteer for Citizens Observer Patrol. Volunteer at citys Youth Day and Oktoberfest. Sara Guevrekian says she didnt aspire to run for city commission. But recently she says shes been Guevrekian says its time to put her activism to workVOTE March 12 Oakland ParkSara Guevrekian so uncomfortable with city leadership that at some point a switch clicked, and she decided it was time to take what she has learned through her volunteer work and become part of the solution. She says she is frustrated at the complacency she sees on the dais. Guevrekian rst became involved in city matters in the fall of 2008 when she learned a Value Place Hotel, offering weekly rentals, was proposed at Northwest 38 Street and Powerline Road. She had a hard time getting her calls to commissioners returned or her emails acknowledged. She and her neighbors were fearful about the element the hotel would attract in an area where there already was a problem with vagrancy. That was the issue that drove her into community activism. I was fearful about my home and went into protection mode for my slice of the pie, she said. In the process, she got to know her neighbors in Royal Palm Isles and then grew protective of her neighborhood. I was like a mother hen in full protection mode. I didnt want to be invisible. Eventually, after neighbors rallied in protest, plans for the hotel were stymied. Guevrekian continued to regularly attend city commission meetings and to keep her neighbors informed through a community newsletter. She attended a 13-week Broward Sheriffs Of ce Citizens Academy and developed a relationship with BSO employees. She says shes very concerned about the crime index in the city. She says raising awareness is important and sharing information is valuable. BSO has divided the city into districts, but she says the western zone was never properly staffed. When the same people run for of ce year after year, Guevrekian says things tend to get done on autopilot. She says she would provide the voice of Jane Q. Citizen. In the past, when she rst became involved, she says the attitude was that citizens should get out of the way. She believes community participation is very important. Asked her views about the proposed Culinary Arts District in downtown Oakland Park, Guevrekian said, Its a very exciting step in the right direction. Hopefully, (the city) can get it off the ground, and it will eventually happen. She said shes pleased with what shes seen so far from the citys consultants, Redevelopment Management Associates, and disappointed it has taken so long for something to happen. She says a culinary school sounds appealing and so does the plan for urban farming. Guevrekian says the contrast in candidates is extremely stark in this election. She believes new, fresh energy would be a good thing. Addressing proposed charter amendments, she said she favors eliminating the numbered seats. Theres no reason to have them, and it confuses people and makes for contentious races. Without the numbered seats, she says, all the candidates would have to put their best foot forward. Another amendment calls for moving the city election from March to November. She favors that move, believing it will result in more voter participation. Guevrekins campaign supportersAnna Strien, Lorri Winner, Peter Buchanan, Robert Rutheford, Carl Fair, Rich Cusmano, Samantha Carney, Michael Miles, James Blaschik, Bonnie Tembeck, Eileen Cawey, Michael Bryan, Kris and Bill Ettinger, The Franciscans of Fort Lauderdale, Event Treats, Bonnie Dipacio, Leigh Zimmerman, David Zimmerman, Jackie Vickman, Jeff Helyer, John Fullerton, Donald Gauntner, Jennifer Wendt, Ismail Jama, Michael Carn, Linn Payne, John and Charlotte Morrissey, Rafael Cardona, Anna Leitner, Diego Passarella, James Kiselica, Robert Wertz, Rebecca Justin, Charles Grenier, Larry Arnett, David Nagle, Sela LLC, Diane Wendt, Diego Pascarella, Michael McDevitt, Kent Morgan.Total contributions to date $11,429 Commission Seat 1 Age: 53 Place of birth: Boynton Beach. How long in the city of Oakland Park: 28 years. Career: Owner, Arnst Motors in Pompano Beach. Education: Graduated from Northeast High School in 1977. Attended the University of Florida for one year. Prior public service: Commissioner, vice mayor and mayor for 16 years. Civic and professional organizations: None. Former commissioner Arnst critical of direction city is takingVOTE March 12 Oakland ParkSteve Arnst Steve Arnst wants to return to the Oakland Park City Commission because he doesnt like the direction the city is headed. The downtown area once envisioned as a mixed-use district with a combination of commercial and residential, has now changed to a proposed culinary arts district. Restaurants are a dime a dozen, and when you have restaurants, you have to have people. If theres no in ux of housing, we wont have the people to support the restaurants, he says. Restaurants pop up, and then theyre gone. He also criticizes the lack of a parking plan. Arnst says the city has bought a lot of land downtown with no plan for repaying county loans if suf cient redevelopment doesnt occur. The loans expire in ve years and could burden the city with a 20-year debt. Pretty new buildings were envisioned before, Arnst says. The former Sears building was supposed to be the hub of the residential area with Gibbys at the southern end. Instead, the Gibbys site is still empty, and a brewery and algae farm are in the Sears building (Oakland Park Station). Steve ArnstSee ARNST on page 18Sara Guevrekian

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10 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Walls concerned with staff cuts, community serviceVOTE March 12 Oakland ParkLayne Dallett WallsCommission Seat 5 Age 57 Place of birth Wilkensburg, Pa. Oakland Park resident 22 years. Career Self-employed at Aerko International, a custom aerosol manufacturer. Education Associate degree, Broward College. Prior public service Commissioner from 1993-1997 and 2001-2008 plus appointed for three months in 2010. General Employees Pension Board, Charter Review Board and School Advisory Board. Layne Dallett Walls wants to return to the Oakland Park City Layne Dallett Walls Commission Seat 5 Age 51 Place of birth and how long in city: Milwaukee, WI. Moved to Oakland Park in January 2000. Career Project manager for United Health Care for 27 years. Education -Associate degree in human services from Milwaukee Technical College. Civic and professional organizations Graduate, Local Government Academy. Member, Oakland Park Kiwanis Club, Oakland Park Garden Club, Oakland Park Volunteer Corps, Corals of Oakland Park Homeowners Association, former member, Oakland Park General Employees Pension Plan Board of Trustees.VOTE March 12 Oakland ParkTim LonerganCommunity appearance is a passion for candidate LonerganTim Lonergan Tim Lonergan is passionate about making Oakland Park a nicer place. A city is only as nice as its most struggling area. The nicer the city looks, the safer it looks, the more people will want to move here. That will result in a larger pool of taxes so everyone pays less, he says. Acting upon this concern, Lonergan noticed there were no trash cans at the citys bus stops, and got that recti ed. He was disappointed in how the citys thoroughfares looked, and he and a few others gathered up the snipe signs placed illegally in medians and rights of way. Now code enforcement has instituted robocalls to those offenders ordering them to remove their signs. His own yard is a certi ed Wildlife Habitat. The city has spent more than $30 million in efforts to x up Main Street, and the Oakland Park Main Street Association has done a great job trying to get businesses to move there, Lonergan said, but he is getting mixed feed back on the move to establish a Culinary District there. He says the city is buying up property, but no buildings are going up. He believes at times the city has stopped efforts made by Main Street to bring businesses to town. He nds the proposed urban farm a good concept. At the same time other areas of the city also need attention, he says. At a recent commission meeting, numerous business owners complained of vagrants sleeping outside their businesses in the Powerline and Prospect Road Commission because she doesnt see any strong leadership there now. She believes the best commissions have a mix of new and older more experienced members. Here, the most senior member could soon be a commissioner with just two and a half years experience. In that case, the institutional knowledge is gone, she says. Walls said residents came to her and urged her to run again. She quali ed by petition gathering the necessary 228 signatures. Crime is one major issue in her campaign. She says it seems to be ticking up. She wants to be sure an adequate number of deputies are on the job, and if more are needed, says the city may need to increase the contract. The city doesnt currently have a police chief, and that position should be lled, she says. And Walls says more re ghters are needed in the city-run Fire Rescue Department. Another of her concerns is customer service. She says the quality has decreased with cuts in personnel in many departments. She would like employees to have training in providing friendly customer service. The Parks & Leisure Services Department needs some attention she believes. It has no director and rates for some programs have increased dramatically. Residents need to participate in discussions of redevelopment, she says. In the downtown area along Dixie Highway, the city needs to encourage building owners to get together to assemble parcels for redevelopment. See WALLS on page 23 See LONERGAN on page 17Ruben JeanCommission Seat 1 Age 40 Place of birth Haiti Oakland Park resident 5 years, Education masters degree in education and counseling and a bachelors in re safety management from Madison University Career Owner of RJ Taxes Services and works as operation manager at D & S Protection Corporation in Miami. Before moving to Oakland Park, Ruben served as a member of the council of the Village of El Portal in Miami-Dade County from 2006 to 2008. Jean says he was inspired to run for the commission seat because of his daughter, a student at Oakland Park Elementary School. He has made improving communication, public involvement and input as his main campaign focus. I will put our city rst by working side by side with our residents and staff to meet the communitys needs. My door is always open and I welcome your opinions. Together, well solve problems and make Oakland Park a city of pride. I know we can build a better future and a stronger community. Jean favors keeping the citys elections in March. If its not broke dont x it. He also favors another status quo: keeping the separate city commission districts instead of Inspired by his daughters suggestion, Jean says he will put the city rstSee JEAN on page 13 Ruben Jean

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The Pelican 11 Friday, February 22, 2013 Vice Mayor Ganz sets Dist.4 meetingDeer eld Beach Vice Mayor Bill Ganz will hold a meeting for residents of Dist. 4 Monday, Feb. 25, 7 p.m. at Constitution Park, 2831 W. Hillsboro Blvd. All are invited. Dist.4 encompasses the neighborhoods west of Military Trail with the exception of Century Village and Crystal Lake. he said. As for the utility tax, he believes the city had to enact it in order to keep taxes down and still balance the budget. He calls it a trade off. If the new commission seated in March goes forward with an automatic pay raise approved four years ago, he would not take the additional salary, Rosenzweig said because, as a newcomer, I havent earned it. He believes the current commission has shown its ability to compromise and feels he would be another Rosenzweigs campaign contributorsDeer eld Beach Democratic Club, Bernard Parness, Florence Friedenthal, Mildred Rosenlerantz, Helen Vega, Eventco, Inc., Priscilla Mazula, Arlene Johnson, Martin Cohen, Daniel and Marian Ross, Anita Snyder, Ruth Bierman, Deborah Bierman, Louis Gordon, Martin Cohen, Construction Management Services, Beatrice Rosner, Sally Potter, Kathy Richards, Bernie Parness, Broward County Police Benevolent Association, Keith & Associates, Edward Gallon, Marian Vale, Dorothy Zinn, Peachtree Restaurant, Pamela Militello, Bogen Law Of ces, Ruden McCloskey, Broward County Professional Fire ghters, Randee Geller, Barry Mishkin, LSN Partners, Mike Hawn, Fabienne Adam, Christiane R. Carter, Martin Cohen, Dorothy Zinn. Total contributions to date $7,666 moderate voice able to reach reasonable solutions. Rosenzweig said Crystal Lake residents will have some issues when the athletic elds go in at Tam OShanter and he will address those. In another area outside the Village, The Meadows, Rosenzweig says traf c controls are needed for pedestrian safety. In Deer elds future, he sees redevelopment being the focus and said it will be necessary to have the infrastructure to go with that redevelopment.RosenzweigContinued from page

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12 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 eyes on a piece of property. Burrie agrees that the proposed cultural center at the new library is a good idea and that it will be cheaper to construct it as a second oor to the library, but adds, We dont need another multipurpose room we need acoustics, tiered seating, a stagewe need to do something classy. Burrie supports the way the citys CRA is moving under its co-directors, Kim Briesemeister and Chris Brown. I just we could move faster on the beach. But they are doing a great job, she says. As for a hotel on city land at the beach, Burrie is not for it and would prefer to see a parking garage built there. As for taxes, Burrie says the city enjoys one of the lowest rates in the county. The CRA projects bring property values up, and that helps keep taxes lower. Burrie campaign contributorsJoseph Lodato, James Hyde Dunay, Miskel, Blackman & Blattner, Jeffrey Torrey, Broward County Police Benevolent Association, James Newell, Council for Effective Government, Political Action Committee; Keith & Associates, Johnston & Metevia, Royal Palm Business Center, Edwin Wheeler, M. Ross Shulmister, Benita V.R. Schulmister, Meryl Shulmister, John E. Abdo, developer. Total contributions to date . $3,925 BurrieContinued from page 7dealing problems. We have a new sheriff, and we want him to show us some real good results here. If not, we should consider another alternative. This candidate also cites code problems as a major issue and has concerns with the city interfering in areas that would best be left to the property owner. Examples include allowing the homeowner to complete improvements for nonstructural activities. Many non-structural repairs should be allowed without a permit, he says. Beauti cation needs to be simpler. Terwilliger adds that the proposed cultural library next to city hall will be a moneyloser for taxpayers. And its not the only waste factor. He adds that people in his district, especially the Highlands and Cresthaven dont realize that their taxes subsidize the city golf course. Programs should break even, he says. Dont burden many for the pleasures of a few. He says he would work hard to improve communications between city hall and the residents so homeowners can know their rights. He plans to have a tough look at all city codes and the code enforcement department. Terwilliger also believes that the city is headed in the wrong direction by pushing for Pompano Beach to become a tourism destination. Money has been wasted on the beach. Pompano is a great place to live and have good times with the family. It should be a bedroom community, he says. [Residents of] Cresthaven and the Highlands dont go to the beach. People feel disenfranchised and shortchanged. He is adamantly against building a hotel on the shing pier land owned by the city.TerwilligarContinued from page 7Susan Foster Total contributions to date $617.75 Editors note: Thomas Terwilliger has donated $517.75 to his campaign. Terwilligar campaign contributors

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The Pelican 13 Friday, February 22, 2013 Send news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Noland entered politics during her 12 year effort to get an aquatic center in Deer eld Beach. The citys lack of a pool was the issue that got her involved, she says. She defends the commissions decision two years ago to institute a utility tax here saying it has allowed the city to lower property taxes by 15 percent. She has also been criticized for the matter in which the lease for the shing pier restaurant was awarded, but stands behind her decision that the bids had to be reviewed by the commission. The bidder chosen by staff did not adhere to the bid requirements he says making it necessary for the commission to choose another vendor. On another issue that has become controversial, limits on who can buy beach parking stickers, Noland says it was approved by the commission without giving much thought to seasonal residents. Now, she says, it can be readdressed. Among the accomplishments of her last four years, Noland counts re nancing municipal bonds that resulted in a 5 percent savings in the interest rate while the city was able to withdraw $7 million, money that will be used to repave street. She is also proud of the fact she has kept a proposed yover connecting the Sawgrass Expressway with SW 10 Street off the planning charts of the MPO. She believes part of her job is to appoint young people to city boards because they are the ones who will invest here in the future. Its their turn. She is con dent she is working with the best city commission we have had in years .we work well together, we discuss. I am proud of what we have accomplished.NolandContinued from page 8Nolands campaign contributorsJean Robb says she is running because she is unhappy with the direction being taken by the city and because the current commission is not listening to the people. She cites merging the re/rescue department with BSO and adopting the utility tax as two examples of issues that should have gone to the voters. The tax she said will discourage large businesses from locating here. I had more industrial development when I was mayor, Sun Sentinel and the Publix warehouse, than anyone since, she said. Robb led a petition drive to force the city to place the proposed utility tax on a making every commission seat at large voters will decide both those issues on March 12. He also sees crime as a major issue that needs to be tackled. Asked how he would address the problem, Jean said he would do more to encourage and organize neighborhood watch programs. I look forward to continue my services to our community and county and put my experience as a former council person, small business owner, father and husband to work for JeanContinued from page 10Jeans campaign contributorsTo date, this candidate has no reported contributions.VOTE March 12

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14 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 By attracting these businesses and others, including Marriot Hotel and the new Publix [Atlantic Boulevard], Fisher see strong promotion of environmentally-friendly projects, economic strength and job growth for the city. Fisher says he is overthrilled with the work of the citys CRA, its advisory committee and other business owners and residents. The Atlantic Boulevard corridor is now under construction with beauti cation, sidewalk expansion and buried powerlinelines. The Harbor Village Shopping Center is near completion of its revamped parking space, new faade additions and landscaping. The mayors stimulus package, a multi-faceted program of enhancement includes a walk-through permitting process that reduces the time developers and builders normally spend in paperwork required prior to starting their projects. Fisher says he spends a large bulk of his time meeting with people and developers to discuss possibilities for the citys corridors. Mayor Fisher rates this commission as the best. We work cohesively together; we share the vision in strategic plans to move our city forward. I want to continue to see the hard work and strategic plans of this commission come to fruition. I want the positive momentum to continue to make our city the best it can be. Its what I enjoy most: promoting our city as a great place to live and work and play, he says.FisherContinued from page 6 Chuck Sussman, Turnpike Motors, Nuturf, Jeffrey and Maxine Merlin, Carolyn Kennedy, Raul Jacome, Borzoo Yazdanfar, Mike Serbin, Joe Rind, Juan Buyos, Leonie Sanchez, Timothy Bueno, Jose and Pilar Ojea, Judith Bernal, Richy Pressure Cleaning, MAS Maintenance, Carlos Castaneda Carmen Maria, Bhayinay Investors, hotel investor; James Wolf and Sally Abrahamsen.Total contributions to date $5,850 believes the zoning and building codes need an overhaul. He questions the things the city spends money on such as the municipal golf course and the dog park. We need jobs here, more retail, gas stations, he said. The [Greg Norman] golf course renovations were a good idea, but the time for it was not right, Baumwald says. In Cresthaven, Baumwald says the streets there should get the same attention as other streets in the city. He suggests adding yellow lines to divide the streets would make them safer. And in reference to traf c, he says synchronizing traf c lights would smooth out traf c problems. Baumwald adds that despite his arrest and incarceration for cocaine possession in 1998, he has changed and since then has become a good citizen. He adds that he is an example of how people can turn their lives around. Baumwald campaign contributors BaumwaldContinued from page 6Fisher campaign contributors Council for Effective Government, Political Action Committee; Mr. Squeaky Car Wash, Kim Sherman Betsy Sherman, Royal Palm Business Center, PRH, developer; Fortune Construction Company Johnson & Metevia, Palm Aire Associates, developer, Rhonda Lovelace, Concorde Properties, developer, Joseph Weiselberg, developer; Scott Brenner, Louis Mohorn.Total contributions to date $9,550 Donna Capobianco 3-16 Book fair from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Margate Library, 5810 Park Drive. New and like new books, videos and CDs. 954-3577500.Business2-28 Wilton Manors Business Association networking luncheon from 12 to 1 p.m. at Rosies Bar & Grill, 2449 Wilton Drive. 954-567-1320. 3-6 Business With a Twist networking event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Seaside Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach Cost is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. RSVP at www. PompanoBeachChamber.com.SightingsContinued from page 5 3-6 LEAD$ lunch from 11:30 to 1 p.m. at Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. LEAD$ business group meets every rst and third Wednesday. 954-427-1050. 3-7 Breakfast N Deer eld from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. LEAD$ business group meets every rst and third Wednesday. 954-427-1050. 3-11 Wilton Manors Business Expo from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Hosted by the Wilton Manors Business Association. Free vendor space is available. Door prizes and refreshments. 954-257-8788. See SIGHTINGS on page 17SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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The Pelican 15 Friday, February 22, 2013 Villages longtime political leader Amadeo Trinchitella, Capobianco was elected to the board of master management, the organization that oversees maintenance operation there. Capobianco says that when she came to the volunteer position, the board was $12 million in debt and within a year she and a new team of directors had attained solvency.Capobiancos campaign contributorsBarry Lasser, Patrick Murphy & Associates, Marian Warmband, Eugenea Goldman, Judith Somerset, Delores Esposito, Melvin Nass, Keith Nichols, Minuteman Press, Thomas Winter, Andrea Bonasera, Paul Gennell, George Smalls, Robert Gravatt Total contributions to date $3,306Defeated in her commission attempt four years ago, Capobianco says she is running now because she feels she is well quali ed. I have a business background. Big budgets dont bother me, she said. Current commissioner Marty Popelsky, who is term limited, failed to hold district meetings during his tenure Capobiano said, and this lack of communication with Villagers will end if she is elected. People need input, she said. They also need to be listened to and I can listen. She said she is a believer in management skills. You create dif culties when you dont follow procedures and policy, she said. She also believes she is a good negotiator who strives to bring forth a win-win in any situation. Capobianco said issues that may need addressing are the Hillsboro Pines Golf Course and the citys revamp of its zoning code. She noted that one code is being rewritten to protect children when it should also protect the elderly. Another issue that needs a resolution, she said, is parking at the beach and the newlyadopted policy that prevents part time homeowners from purchasing them. Capobianco said the district has become more diverse with an in ux of Canadians and Latinos and she feels she can communicate their concerns. I will do the research and build consensus. I like team play, she said of her interest in serving as a commissioner. I will get things done. CapobiancoContinued from page

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16 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-7838700! A consistent donor to the community, Dietrich said some of this philanthropy will have to cease with the change in business direction. He did renew his Little League support this year. He is probably the last of the leagues initial donors. But DBSs unmatched contribution to keeping the Butler House sound will not continue he said. The concept of the old line lumber yard is ancient history, Dietrich said this week. We were the last one to sell nails, by the pound, out of a bin, but there are 25 big box stores within a radius of a few miles and there is a paint store on every corner. To survive now, you have to be a low cost, low margin operator. Located on ve acres bordered by Hillsboro Boulevard and the Florida East Coast Railroad, DBS was founded by Eds father, Ed, now 96 and living in North Carolina. His mother, Emily, was the citys historian for many years and a major force in obtaining National Historical Registry for the Butler House, Old Schoolhouse and Deer eld Beach Elementary School. Maintaining the familys structure in the business, Eds daughters Gretchen and Jessica now help manage the company. Another family member and manager, Brad Wanzenberg, has left the company to become a territory manager for Dixie Plywood. The company that once had an annual payroll of $4 million and 100 employees will be reduced to about a dozen people, Dietrich said. Now space is available for other small business owners. A surf board/paddle board maker already occupies a corner of the former lumber yard. In another corner the metal rebar building is for sale or available for occupancy. It is possible this evolution of DBS could create a smallbusiness emporium of leased space, Dietrich said. With 66 years of history, Dietrich can count hundreds of longtime customers among them the City of Deer eld Beach, the Boca Raton Resort and Caps Place restaurant. And while the emphasis at DBS now will be on the big ticket items used in remodeling cabinets, windows and doors customers will still be able to buy a $58 screen door, Dietrich said. We have a lot of doors and windows, top quality, at a good price. When he told his father the facts of his new business situation, he took it in stride Dietrich said. He understands the realities. BuildersContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, February 22, 2013Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@ yahoo. com or 954-783-8700! LonerganContinued from page 10areas. We have to nd solutions, Lonergan said, noting he doesnt have all the answers. have to nd solutions, Lonergan said, noting he doesnt have all the answers. At two shopping centers at Prospect Road and Andrews Avenue, the city owns the parking lots and sidewalks. The sidewalks have been in disrepair for years, and there are no lights in the parking lots. Some of the newly incorporated areas were promised lights and sidewalks. We need to deliver on those promises, Lonergan said. Lonergan says the commission has made good progress in the past couple years and has been listening to residents and their concerns. Now they need to focus more actively on the rest of the city. The upcoming city election includes several possible charter amendments, including one to move the city election from March to November. Lonergan said he is absolutely in favor of that move. He says the super voters will always vote and a November election brings out other voters ensuring a good turnout. He says the sitting commission has done a good job trimming the city budget but if he is elected, will do more research to be sure the money is going into the right efforts. Lonergan is not a huge supporter of the Wal-Mart proposed for the Kmart site. We already have to wait for three stoplights to get through that area. Traf c is already a Lonergans campaign contributors Thomas Benzi, Michael Miles, Sonja Sears, William Sears, Lorri Winner, Jerry Skidmore, Mitchell Stollberg, Timothy Hart, Janice Balkin, Harold Mann, Patricia Crowley, Sella LLC, Floyd Adams, Michael E. Carn, Dr. Jack Doren Total contributions to date $2,250

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18 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 A culinary district is very people intensive, and if theyre not busy on the weekdays, they wont make it, Arnst says. He doesnt believe the entire downtown should be a culinary arts district. He says the city needs to market itself so builders are interested in coming to Oakland Park. He would like to see Dixie Highway involved, as originally planned. Arnst maintains that one problem with the current commission is that none of the commissioners know what it is to run a business. He says the city has to be run like a business, and he would bring that skill to the dais. He says the city has spent a lot of money on their consultants, Redevelopment Management Associates, and theyre no further ahead than they were a year ago. In coming up with the idea for the culinary arts district, he says, RMA threw a dart on the wall, and that one stuck. Arnst says the city needs to get someone to beat the bushes, call on developers and get someone to assemble land and build. He says the cultural arts district is a hard sell. In the area of public safety, Arnst says the city needs a police chief. [A new chief has yet to be named since Chief John Bukata retired.] The city has had recent issues with burglaries in the North Andrews area and problems with vagrants on Powerline Road. Regarding break-ins, Arnst says residents need to get to know their neighbors so they know who belongs on their street. And they need to alert the Broward Sheriffs Ofce of anything suspicious. He takes down license plate numbers of anyone unknown on his street and suggests that others do the same. Some zoning issues will be coming up, including a variance for adult entertainment bars on Federal Highway. They were previously allowed to stay until 2014. Arnst said he wont be accepting campaign donations from anyone doing business in the city. He says voters can expect that he will do his home-Arnst Campiagn contributorsCrown Trophy, Roger Mann, Dennis Berrett Total contributions to date $1,000 work and treat everyone with respect. I try not to open my mouth and insert foot, he said. ArnstContinued from page 9VOTE March 12 Do it! Start your next good habit.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, February 22, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF Las Orquideas 5640 N. Federal Hwy. Fort Lauderdale 954-772-7272 Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. lasorquideashome.comI am lucky that I can share my culture with everyone who walks through our doors, says Las Orquideas owner Fernando Gill, a native of the Medelln region of Colombia. People just love Las Orquideas Restaurant brings the best of Colombian cuisine to Fort Lauderdale The Friday special Cazuela de Marisco features a bowl of creamy soup overowing with shrimp, clams, crab, white sh and oysters. The hearty Bandeja Montaera platter delivers tender skirt steak, pork skin strip, poached egg, arepa, fried plantains, avocado and savory beans. our authentic, home cooked fare and our attentive service. Everyone feels at home when they come here. At just about any time of day, this bustling eatery is lled with the sounds of lively music, friendly chatter and hungry patrons enjoying mouthwatering Colombian and Latin American specialties. Ive been coming here for many years. The people are so nice and the food is always fresh, says Brian Stormer, a Lauderdale-By-The-Sea resident who pops over the Commercial Boulevard Bridge several times a week to enjoy tasty Colombian gastronomy. My favorite dish is the grilled sh with soup, salad and beans. It is very healthy. But the Churrasco steak is perfect when you want to treat yourself to some red meat! Also, the prices are beyond reasonable for example, today I had the grilled sh with 3 side dishes for $10. And it is the same price for lunch or dinner. Fresh salads, homemade soups, grilled chicken, steak and sh are all integral components of a fairly extensive menu. We live close by and so come here a lot, I love the skirt steak, says area resident Ismael Perez. Sometimes we just stop in to pick up some empanadas and mango juice, adds his wife Raquel. And the eminently affordable daily specials are also a trademark of this welcoming culinary hotspot. Our seafood soup is incredible. It is a Friday specialty that I simply love! says friendly proprietor Fernando. Indeed, this creamy maritime stew is bursting at the seams with shrimp, clams, crab, white sh and oysters. The delightful ocean avors are topped only by the eye-See LAS ORQUIDEAS on page 31

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20 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Jean Robb says she is running because she is unhappy with the direction being taken by the city and because the current commission is not listening to the people. She cites merging the r 30e/rescue department with BSO and adopting the utility tax as two examples of issues that should have gone to the voters. The tax she said will discourage large businesses from locating here. I had more industrial development when I was mayor, Sun Sentinel and the Publix warehouse, than anyone since, she said. Robb led a petition drive to force the city to place the proposed utility tax on a ballot, but the effort failed due to misinformation on some of the petitions. Although the re merger with BSO happened two years ago, Robb still contends that is goes against the city charter which prohibits relinquishing city property without a vote. She argues that contract should have prevented retiring reghters from staying on with BSO enabling them to doubledip pension funds. Robb believes that city funds are spent on the wrong things. She questions the salaries of recreation administrators when fees to play Little League have risen to $120 per player. She would eliminate pensions and health insurance for the mayor and commissioners, and revisit the utility tax. She cites the commissions handling of the pier restaurant lease as an example of poor performance. As a former chair of a charter review committee, Robb said she would favor a new review of the document and urge that the recall process be simpli ed, moving city elections to November, and revoke the condition of term limits that allow a commissioner, after serving an eight-year term, to run for mayor. The city is moving in the wrong direction, Robb said. This is not our Deer eld Beach. Robbs campaign contributorsRobbContinued from page 8Doras Haircrafters, Ruth and Edwin Rider, Charles Brown, Guspav Realty, American Rock Restaurant, The Cove, Cove Management, Gerda Sturz, Angelo Pacheco, Fran Bruno, Russell Guardino, John Abdo, developer, Dr. Maureen OFlannagan, Fred Foreman, Jerry Novickas, Mason Smith, Data Management Associates, Stephen Welch, Joe Dotro, Janis Major, Angela Storr, Gimler Plumbing, Anthony Verderame, restaurateur, Francois Cherisien, Mari Mezidor, Alice Chattman, Ali Crisman, Sandra Jackson, Stacy Krevoy, Adam Krevoy, Margie Brinkmann, Horst Brinkman, Wayne Adams, Don Thomas, John Grassi, JSPC, Frederick Timbrell, Rachel Timbrell, Cheyenne Cox, Betty Buschm COOCVE Master Management, Bruce Rodgers, Sandra Pfendler, National Custom Homes, builder, Clark & Robb, John Grassi, John Connell, Robert Ranta, Geraldine Langlois, Brian Eichler, Cove Bagel, Fred Foreman, Olga Wit, Robert Zukas, Charles Passarelli, Ralph Levy, Elizabeth Tullo, Barry Russell, Arthur Ratte, Shirley Scimone, Ronald Laverne, Daniel Devine, Rosa Ebery, Allen Davis, Robert Lawlor, Herbert Buesser, Keith Bongard, Total contributions to date $18,840Citizens Police AcademyWilton Manors The Wilton Manors Police Department is offering an eight-week Citizens Police Academy on Thursdays. The goal is to improve the relationship between residents and their police department. Topics covered during the course include: K9 unit, detective bureau, special investigations, drug enforcement and code compliance. Participants will also be able to go on a ride along in a patrol car. Applicants must be at least 18. Non-residents may apply but preference will be given to residents or those who work or own a business in the city. Applications are available at the police station, 2020 Wilton Drive. Call 954-3902150.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, February 22, 2013 with symbols of Christmas. An issue within the Village that concerns her is the possible sale of the Hillsboro Pines Golf Club which could result in residential units being built there. The charge that Century Village residents do not pay their fair share of the ad valorem taxes is not accurate she said. Many do not claim homestead exemption and her building of 80 units pays more than the tax on 20 homes in a nearby neighborhood. Century Village residents also contribute heavily to re/rescue ambulance fees because of their high usage. She also brings up the situation now occurring in the Village where a state statute is being enforced that costs residents with Dish TV a $200 perunit permit fee. The Dish is favored by French Canadians who want their programming in French. She served almost two years on the Deer eld Beach Housing Authority but was removed by the commission after other board members complained about her behavior. She credits the current city commission with being more civil to one another than they have been in the past and rates the city a out of ve points for the way it is being run. I am the most diverse candidate, a Jewish woman. And its time a more estrogen on the commission, she said.BernerContinued from page 8Berners campaign contributorsNancy Giordano, Danielle Lobano, Ted and Judy Schneider Total contributions to date $250Business Seminar Series Deerfield Beach The Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce, is offering a Business Seminar Series.All classes will be held at ITT Technical Institute, 700 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Classes start at 5:30 p.m. Quickbooks for Starters and Startups is the first seminar and will be on Wednesday, Feb. 27. The second will be Legal & Tax Implications of Starting a Business in Florida. The third is Quickbooks for Intermediate Users on Wednesday, March 27. Call 954-427-1050.

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22 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Children & Family2-26 Jump rope program from 5:30 to 5:45 p.m. at Northwest Branch Library, 1580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach. Event runs until March 28. 954-357-6599. 2-26 Free Pirate adventures from 12 to 3 p.m. at Pompano Citi Centre, corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway. Music, games, treasure hunt, pirate bounce house, costume contest and arts and crafts. 954-943-4685. 2-27 Bookworms Storytime and Craft from 10 to 10:30 a.m. at Percy White Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954357-7680. 2-28 Story Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. at Northwest Branch Library, 1580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954357-6599.Clubs, Charity & Civic Organizations2-25 Retired Educators meeting at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca Raton Speaker is attorney Jeffrey Devore. He will talk about immigration and naturalization. Meeting is free. New members welcome. 954-2556360 or 561-483-5445. 2-27 Kiwanis Club of Oakland Park meets at 7:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Boulevard. 954-566-9957. 2-27 Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach meets at 12 p.m. at Sea Side Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd. Food served. 954-783-4999. 2-27 Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors meets at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave. 954560-7813. 2-28 Cocktails for a Cause from 7 to 10 p.m. at American Social, 721 E. Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Event bene ts Broward Childrens Center. Appetizers, cocktails, door prizes and giveaways. Cost is $20 in advance and $25 at the door.SightingsContinued from page 143-2 Anime Club meets from 2 to 3 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd.. 954-357-7595. 3-8 Pompano Quilter group meets from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-357-7595.Education & Self Development2-23 African & AfricanAmerican Stories with Sista Idya from 2 to 2:45 p.m. at Beach Branch Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd. Sista Idya will highlight the many aspects of Black History Month with storytelling lled with audience participation via call and response, creative movement and chanting. 954357-7830. 2-25 Hail to the Chiefs business networking mixer from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at Business Resource Center, 501 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. Learn from small business owners about how to run a business. 954-586-1111. 2-27 QuickBooks for Starters and Startups at 5:30 p.m. at ITT Technical Institute, 700 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Sign-in at 5 See SIGHTINGS on page 23

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The Pelican 23 Friday, February 22, 2013 Asked about the proposed Culinary Arts District, she says its something new and has to be given a little time. Its a neat idea, but it cant be all mom and pop businesses. She suggests, Lets have some arts in the area, too, not just restaurants. She said she hopes a proposed urban farm idea works, but she doesnt know how many residents would participate in a community garden. Other areas also need attention, such as Prospect Road where landscaping improvements were started but apparently didnt continue. Addressing a proposed charter amendment on moving the local election from March to November, Walls said the local election needs to stay its own little animal. In November voters wont be as attuned to local issues. Everyone talks about how expensive it is (for local elections.) Our little city pays $60,000. But it shouldnt be that expensive, she says. For example, municipalities are charged each time for use of election equipment. But we already own those machines as Broward County taxpayers. The current commission is doing an OK job, Walls says, but they cant seem to make a decision. They table a lot of things and bring them back up. If theyd read the backup, they could get a lot of their questions answered before the meeting gets started. Last year the commission raised the millage in order to Walls campaign contributorsRobert Lochrie, Brooke Tiballi, Lochrie & Chakas, Broward Tool, Mack Industries, William Laystrom, William Tobias, John Loparo, Jill Dallett, Dennis Buchta, Barbara Weiss, Mary Alvarez, Torey Alston, Harvey Ross, Mark Walls, William Sears, Katie Freeman, Sonja Sears, CMP Commercial Insurance, Keith Polikoff, Becker & Polikoff, SELA Property Management, Michael Dallett, Helen Dallett Total contributions to date $1,550 give staff raises. Walls is concerned they may have cut staff a little too much mentioning the clerks of ce and nance as being understaffed.WallsContinued from page 10p.m. 954-427-1050. 2-27 Property tax exemption ling assistance from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Appraisers will assist with homestead, senior and other property tax exemption applications as well as answer questions on property taxes. 954-357-5579. 2-28 Job Skills and Job Search Assistance from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library, 2800 N.W. 9 Court, Pompano Beach. 954-3577670. 2-28 Ask the Experts tax advice class from 4 to 6 p.m. at Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. Hosted by ACR Bookkeeping Service Plus and Burkersen Tax and Accounting Services, CPAs. 954-5861111. Events & Activities 2-24 Hazardous waste disposal event at Wilton Manors Municipal Complex, 2100 N. Dixie Hwy., from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. 954-765-4999. 2-27 Taste of the Beach from 6 to 9 p.m. at El Prado SightingsContinued from page 22 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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24 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Pet rescue bene tWilton Manors A fundraiser for Grateful Paws Dog & Cat Rescue will be held Wednesday, March 6 from 6 to 10 p.m. at Alibi, 2266 Wilton Drive. A cocktail reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Advance tickets are $20. The entertainment portion of the event, featuring Nikki Adams and Floridas Own Dame Edna, is at 9 p.m. There will also be a raffle and silent auction at 8 p.m. Email sdr@wolfcuff.com for tickets.Family Fun Day and Car ShowPompano Beach In honor of BSO Deputy Christopher Schaub, there will be a Family Fun Day and Car Show on Saturday, March 2 from 2 to 6 p.m. at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road, just east of Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Vendor space is available at 954-7864223.GreenMarket classesPompano Beach The Pompano Beach GreenMarket on Saturday, Feb. 23 will include special seminars and demonstrations related to gardening, aquaponics, permaculture, hydroponics, soil making and more. Attendees can also learn how to make smoothies, dehydrate fresh veggies and ferment foods into tasty treats. Classes start at 10 a.m. The GreenMarket runs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Call 954-2928040. Briefs SightingsContinued from page 23Park, 4500 El Mar Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Local restaurants serve food and beverages. Live entertainment and silent auction. Tickets are $30. 954-776-1000. 2-28 Groundbreaking ceremony at 5 p.m. at Pompano Beachs Ali Building, 353 Martin Luther King Boulevard. Ali Building will become an arts and cultural center. 954-786-5535. 3-2 Family Fun Day and Car Show in honor of BSO Deputy Christopher Schaub from 2 to 6 p.m. at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road, Pompano Beach. Vendor space available. 954-7864223. 3-3 Bingo at St. Henrys Catholic Church, 1500 S. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach. Doors open at 12 p.m. Bingo begins at 1 p.m. Regular games plus three-part jackpot game. Door prizes and refreshments. 954-785-2450. 2-2 Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Garden Clubs Annual Flower Show and Tea Vacation in South Florida from 1 to 4 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive on A1A, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Free admission but donations accepted. 954-941-8748. Health & Fitness 2-25 Spinal Stenosis A Healthy Spine Series from 4 to 5 p.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E Sample Rd, Deer eld Beach. 954-7597400. 2-28 Alzheimers Prevention Program with author Dr. Gary Small from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E Sample Rd, Deer eld Beach. 954759-7400. 2-28 Girls Night In health screenings for women from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Broward Health Medical Center, 1600 S Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954-759-7400. 2-26 Support group for family and friends of people with mental illness from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954-739-1888. 3-5 Support group for caregivers from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954776-8961. Music 2-26 Symphony of the Americas at 8:15 p.m. at Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are See SIGHTINGS on page 30Galt Food & Wine FestFort Lauderdale The inaugural Galt Ocean Wine Food & Wine Festival will be held Saturday, March 2 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Galt Ocean Mile Shoppes, 3351 Galt Ocean Dr. Attendees will hear live music as they sample over 40 fine artisan wines, craft beers and spirits and distinctive food pairings. There will also be live cooking demonstrations and wine pairing explanations. There will also be a retail bazaar and marketplace. Call 561-338-7594.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, February 22, 2013 CranioSacral Therapy (CST)A printed brochure describes CST as a light touch therapy that can create dramatic improvements in ones life. It releases tensions deep in the body to relieve pain and dysfunction. The end result is an improved whole-body health and performance. This therapy claims to help a full spectrum of pain, illness and dysfunction including migraines, neck and back pain, motor coordination impairments, infant and childhood disorders, brain and spinal cord injuries, chronic fatigue, Fibromyalgia, TMJ syndrome, scoliosis, central nervous system, learning disabilities, post traumatic disorders, orthopedic problems and more. Trained at the Upledger Institute in Palm Beach Gardens, Lisa says, We use a gentle touch starting with about the weight of a nickel, a practitioner evaluates the clients internal environment, and using light touch techniques releases any restrictions she nds. Its effective for all ages from newborns to elders and clients say one treatment leaves them feeling energetic and life changing. Some people are helped with one session. Others do regular follow ups until relief is experienced. This therapy is said to have bene ted mentally and physically challenged children. Newborns, treated shortly after birth get a lifetime bene t as the tiny body is gently aligned for optimum growthLymphatic DrainageA very mild massage promotes lymphatic ow and proper body function. Ideal for pre and post surgery, this massage is frequently requested by people getting cosmetic surgeries and mastectomies. Lisa describes Re exology as a massage of the feet or hands that opens up the energy channels to the body. Reiki is a system of enlightenment and the hands on healing is passed from master to student. Aura readings claim to help areas of personal and spiritual growth. Lisa concludes with We are not medical doctors. We are practicing and using proven healing techniques to help clients feel better for long term health. A plan is developed to bring a client to his or her optimal health.Healing Center staffGiovanna Perpignano is an acupuncture physician, researcher, licensed massage therapist, yoga instructor and womens health speaker who has been involved in healing techniques since 1973. She earned her National Acupuncture Certi cation in 1994 from the Community School of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Miami, Fl. Allene Graham is an animal communicator, channeler, licensed massage therapist, spiritual minister, guidance counselor, life coach, Reiki master, LaHoChi practioner and chair yoga instructor. She has over 30 years of experience as a senior veterinary technician working with domestic an exotic animals. Lesley Vanvurst is a licensed massage therapist and Reiki practitioner. She gravitates to the elds of medical and sports massage and her goal is to teach clients how to move in a health way to prevent injury and chronic pain. She creates customized treatment for each client. Heres what a few clients have to say Alice Smith, Fort Lauderdale, says, We were lucky enough to nd Lisa. Shes amazing at nding just the right therapeutic massage technique to bring relief to aching musclesespecially if you have medical issues. My husband and I couldnt be happier. Lorraine S. Pompano Beach, says, I spent the winter in Pompano Beach and was fortunate to nd Lisa Smith who came to my apartment weekly. I was so impressed by how much she was helping me, that I booked appointments for my husband who was equally pleased. Lisa does whatever it takes to help the body heal and make you feel better. I highly recommend Lisa to those who understands the importance of therapeutic massage for wellness, as well as for speci c problems. Jenny Spencer says, Lisa explains what shes doing and why. She went that extra mile to pay attention to my special needs as a stroke survivor. She did what no other massage therapist has done for me in the past three yearsrelaxed my spastic arm so that it lay straight out to the side. She also found a knot just below my knee that allowed my foot, which turned inward to become straight. Shes better than the best. Call 954-782-6564 for an appointment. Open Mon. to Fri. from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sat. 10 to 3 p.m. Visit the web site for information on the center and the staff at lisashealingcenter.comHealing CenterContinued from page 4

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26 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days. References Available. 954-482-5494. 2-22 CAREGIVER COMPANION 20+ Years Experience. References. Total Patient Care For Elderly. Light Housekeeping Healthy Cook. Kosher/Gourmet. Mature European Lady. Available To Travel & Cruise. 561-4341411. 2-22 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 3-8 CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 3-8 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs Carpentry Plumbing Roo ng Masonry Windows Painting Decking Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 Emergency Calls. 3-8 MARCELAS CLEANING Residential Cleaning. Affordable Service You Can Trust! Experienced & GREAT References. 954-376-0524. 3-1 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill, Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954-818-9538. 2-22 GIGIS CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable Honest. More Info. 954-2102248 Or 954-295-7033. 3-8 ROYAL FINE FLOORING Laminates Wood Floors Engineered Floors. Carpets Direct From The Mills. Do NOT Buy Before You Call Us! 954-401-7535. Woman Owned. 3-8 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. STAMP COLLECTIONSWANTED ACCUMULATIONS & COLLECTIONS Of Stamps. House Calls Made. Call John 954-467-7128 Or 954-6142562. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITYBOCA RATON On Federal Hwy. HAIR SALON! Barber & Beauty. Owner Retiring. 6 Stations 2 Private Rooms. Rent Only $1,590 Month Or $35,000. Serious Inquires Only!! 954-415-4937. 2-22 COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 2-15 MISCOLD OMEGA & JAEGER & LECOULTRE Watches & Clocks Every Kind & Condition WANTED!!. Call Dirk 407-668-2916. 2-22 OLD NAUTICAL STUFF WANTED BY Collector. Sextants, Officers Watches, Captain Clocks, Compasses, Etc. Marine/Submarine. Dirk 407-668-2916. 2-22 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 3-8 THRIFT STORECLF THRIFT STORE 801 SE 10 St. Deer eld. Monday & Wednesday 10am-3pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-4pm. 20% Off Friday & Saturday ONLY. 954-428-8980. 2-22 GARAGE SALESLEISUREVILLE ANNUAL COMMUNITY SALE! Friday March 1st & Saturday March 2nd 2013. 8am-3pm. Off Copans Between Dixie & I-95. Something For Everyone!!!!! 2-22LOST AND FOUNDMISSING FROM 2501 NE 10 Avenue Pompano Beach. White Female Huskey/Chow Since 12-31-12. REWARD!! 954-941-9541. 2-22 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL Off NE 14th Street Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water, Electric. Up To 33. $325 Month. Call 954-7814994. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38 x13New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges. No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 3-1CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954-8125192. 3-1 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Private Room & Bath. Private Entrance. All Utilities Included. Furnished/Unfurnished. 1.5 Miles To The Beach. $150 Week. 954-786-9188. 2-22

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The Pelican 27 Friday, February 22, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 3/2 1 Car Garage. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease. Utilities Not Included. Available March 1st. 954-6498867. 2-22 SEASONAL RENTALDEERFIELD BEACH E OF A1A Due To Cancellation Furnished Efficiency Apt. Available. Pool Laundry Yard Parking. Walk To Beach & Pier. $450 Week/$1,600 Month. 954-428-8262. 2-22 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19 REAL ESTATE FOR SALEPOMPANO BEST BUYS!!!! LOW FEES!!!!!! RIVERGATE T/H Rarely Available. 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath/1CG ICW View $475K. 3228 TOWNHOMES/CAMELOT 2/2 T/H, One Floor Only! Totally Renovated, Approx. 1/2 Block To Ocean $280K. SEA HAVEN #321 B Remodeled. 2/2 Adjacent To Marina $155K. GARDEN AIRE VILLAGE S. #415, 2/2 Approx. 1 Mile To Sea! $110K. Contact PJ Carswell, Atlantic Prop. Int. Inc. 954-242-4260. pj@atlanticprop.com. 2-22 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-8 POMPANO AEGEAN OCEANFRONT Large South Side 2/2 + Den Or 3rd Bedroom On Sand. Great Oceanview! Tiled & Remodeled. Hurricane Proof Building. 24 Hr. Security. Garage Park 2 Cars. New Exercise Room. Hot Tub, BBQ, Heated Pool. Widest Beach In Area. Price Reduced To $359,000. Dynasty R.E. 954295-2356. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH INTRACOASTAL VIEW! 2/2.5 Remodeled + Built-in Of ce. Tiled Thru-out. Garage. Security, Pets OK. $525,000. MLS # A1744626. Owner 954353-0024. 2-22 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month. 954-6291324. 3-1 FORT LAUDERDALE YEARLY RENTAL Coral Ridge Country Club Estates. 2/2 On Intracoastal. 1550 Sq Ft. Magni cent View 2 Parking Spaces. Unfurnished. No Pets. $1,600 Per Month. Dockage Available For Rent. 954-4925086 Or 954-873-7201. 3-1 POMPANO ADULT CONDO 55+. Nicely Furnished 1/1. Yearly Lease $800 Month. Call 954-943-5531. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH MARINE COLONY 2/2. Close To Beach. Direct Ocean AccessDock Space Available. Pretty Canal View. Screened Balcony. Small Pets OK! Large Walk-in Closets. Near Public Golf Course. Tennis Courts. Shopping Mall. Available April 1st $1,200 Per Month. 954-6953493. 2-22 APTS FOR RENTBEACH AREA APT As Low As $475 A Week In Season! (3225 NE 6th St.) 95 Yards To Beach; Bright Airy Apt With Cable, Wireless, Parking, Patio, Charming Furnishings And More. Pet Friendly. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com. 3-15 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH ATLANTIC FEDERAL. Ef ciency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 2-22 LUXURY OCEAN-VIEW APT: $1475 A MONTH IN SEASON! (Ocean Blvd & NE 6th St.) European Style Kitchen, Ultra-Quiet, EcoFriendly, Central Air, Tropical Pool, Ocean Views, Dedicated Parking, Coin Laundry, Premium Cable TV, WI-FI And More. Pets OK. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com. 3-15 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 APT. All New! Screened Florida Room. Ceramic Granite. Upscale Residential Neighborhood. $1,000 Month. 609-638-1291. 2-22 LIGHTHOUSE POINT MARINA AREA. Very Attractive Large 2/2. Rent Dock At Marina & Walk Home. $1,700 Month Unfurnished. Agent 954-614-8428. 2-22 PRIMO OCEAN BOULEVARD APT For As Low As $68 A Night In Season! (601 N. Ocean Blvd) Great Area, Great Apt. Great Rates. 95 Yards To Beach. Special Weekly & Monthly Rates Too. Cats & Small Dogs Welcome With Pet Fee. Contact Debbie 561-541-0308. Debbie@paxpr operties.com. 3-15 POMP ANO BEACH EFFICIENCY (NO KITCHEN) $600 Per Month. More Information 609-6381291. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-22 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. 3-8 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 2-22

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28 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSDont miss this months seminar at RJ Boyle Studio, 5040 N. Federal Hwy., on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at 7 p.m. Ee will have a few of the best local yellowfin tuna fishermen revealing secrets on how to catch this elusive fish. Mark and Kathy Hamilton Yellow n tuna seminar on Feb. 27from the boat Nauti Girl and Captain Triston Hunt from Timeless and Scored One have spent tons of time over the last few years chasing yellowfin. They have learned all of the little nuances that turn these fish on. Every year, I am approached by a number of people that struggle to catch tuna. Tuna can be extremely finicky and at times you must be totally dialed-in order to catch them. The seminar will start at 7 p.m. but youre going to want to get there at 6:15 p.m. to eat, drink, and meet the crews. The event will be catered by Lauderdale-ByThe-Seas Blue Moon Fish Co. We only have room for 85 people so you must call to reserve your spot. This event will sell out quickly! The cost is $25. Call us at RJ Boyle Studio 954-420-5001Broward in between a big sail sh weekAs for the fishing this weekend, sailfish have been numerous off Miami and Palm Beach. Sails have been caught here and there, right out front. Lots of nice dolphin were also caught this week, all inside 300 feet of water. The kingfish bite has finally been good throughout the week. If the weather cooperates, you will be pleasantly surprised with how good the fishing is going to be. Get Tight! In Deer eld BeachWalgreens, 1005 S. Federal Hwy. Walgreens, 1325 N. Military Trail Peking Tokyo, S.E. 10th Street Shopping Center Josephs Italian Pastries, 788 S. Federal Hwy. Hot Tomatoe, 626 S. Federal Hwy. Marlees Diner, 699 S. Federal Hwy. One Price Dry Cleaners, 273 S. Federal Hwy.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, February 22, 2013 FairContinued from page 1else that loves us, knows they have to do this, said Gail Kammerer, chairperson from the beginning when she had kids at St. Ambrose School. Some have been at the same work station for the 19 years. Many of the 750 volunteers see people at carnival they dont see all year. When its over, she, said, We have carnival withdrawal. This massive fundraiser will be held Feb. 28 through March 3 on the school grounds at 380 S. Federal Highway. Hildebrand Rides, Inc. will again supply the thrills, on Saturday at 7 p.m. Father Dalton will be arrested and fair goers will pay to either get him out of jail, or keep him in, a new Tiki bar will open opposite the food court, raf es worth $1,500 and $2,500 will be held, and the music begins Thursday at 6 p.m and goes to Sunday at 9 p.m. Kammerers goal is to raise $100,000. She almost made it last year. That money is 10 percent of the schools budget said Music Minister Bob Colasanti who is also general manager of the parish. Some of the money raised is being designated for a large pavilion to be used for school activities and the carnivals food court. With a projected cost of $600,000, that promise is still several years away, Colasanti said. Fran Bannon, sales and catering manager at the Bridge Hotel, has been chair of the food court since the carnival was conceived. At the time, her children were very young and enrolled in St. Ambrose School but she has stayed with the job ever since. Why? I have to support the school. My children were afforded an incredible education. They [the school staff] were my partners in raising my children to be wonderful people, she said. Bannon normally takes a two-week vacation to oversee preparation of all the food that is served at the carnival. There are no vendors here. Menu items are cooked in the school kitchen or on grills and griddles at the food stations. We have willing weekend warriors and teams of the same people on the food line every year, she said. Without the support of St. Ambrose parishioners, the carnival could not be accomplished. They donate all manner of things necessary to bring off the event from catsup to cooking equipment, to knives and forks. Our school is very small, Bannon said. Parishioners support the carnival whether they have kids in the school, or not. We could not do it without them. What more keeps Bannon heading up this vital component of the carnival? Well, Father Dalton, she said.Hes our rock star an amazing human being. This is a special year for all the parishioners at St. Ambrose. It marks the half century of the church and school. Father Dalton has been there 44 of those years. A 50th anniversary album is being assembled with photos of all the parish members. The big event will be a dinner dance this spring.Things to know about St. Ambrose Carnival Carnival wristbands are $15 on Thursday [with coupon], $20 on Friday, $30 on Saturday and $25 on Sunday. Buy one by Feb. 27, and a $20 band is good for any day. Entertainment Thursday 6 to 10 p.m., Friday5:30 to 11 p.m., Saturday, 1 to 11 p.m., Sunday, 1 to 9 p.m. For details, search St. Ambrose Carnival. Also online is a wish list of items to be donated, a complete list of the carnival rides, and the names of the carnivals major

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30 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 between $25 and $85. 954522-5334. 2-27 Tony Bennett at 8 p.m. at Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are between $76 and $151. 954-522-5334. 3-1 Nat King Cole Generation Hope Generations Concert at 7 p.m. at Keith C. & Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center at Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets are between $75 and $350. 561237-9000. 3-2 ABBACADABRA Music of ABBA at 7:30 p.m. at Keith C. & Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center at Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets are between $45 and $65. 561-237-9000. 3-2 The Capitol Steps at 2 p.m. at Coral Springs Center for the Arts, 2855 Coral Springs Drive. Tickets are $35 and $45. 954-344-5999. 3-3 In the Spotlight featuring Pianist Jose Menor at 4 p.m. at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Call 561982-8887. Politics & Government 2-28 Greater Pompano Beach Democratic Club meets at 7 p.m. at E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-867-8629 or 954971-1062. 2-28 Pompano Beach Republican Club meets at 7 p.m. at Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Items for Americas Moms for Soldiers will be collected. Refreshments served. 954-786-7536. 3-4 Log Cabin Republic Club meets at 7 p.m. at 603 Kensington Place, Wilton Manors. 954-566-4165.SightingsContinued from page 24

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The Pelican 31 Friday, February 22, 2013 popping portion size. This hearty dish is a real treat for seafood lovers. For those with serious appetites, the Bandeja Montaera is another noteworthy signature dish. It features a large cut of melt-in-yourmouth seasoned grilled skirt steak topped with an egg and served with a cornmeal arepa, a bowl of soul-warming beans and a bedazzling strip of fried pork skin akin to the most decadent slab of bacon imaginable. This is a typical Colombian dish that was speci cally designed by the mountain people to provide them the energy they would need to work throughout the day. On the poultry front, our grilled chicken with passion fruit sauce is truly delicious, says Fernando. It has a won-Los OrquideasContinued from page 19derfully exotic and tropical taste to it. With regards to fresh sh, people come from all over especially for our Mojarra Frita [whole fried Red Snapper], insists the gregarious restaurateur. The sh is aky and tender with a wonderfully crispy exterior. Indeed, customers seem to enter Las Orquiedas with a purpose, as if already knowing exactly what specialty they are eager to devour. This quaint establishment prides itself on making everything fresh in-house, including the special Colombian spicy sauce which patrons should slather liberally over just about every dish. For an authentic culinary voyage to Colombia, Las Orquideas is truly one of the best options in Broward. And to slake ones thirst, a bevy of juices, Colombian beers and international wines are offered at wallet-friendly prices. This cozy, unpretentious restaurant serves complete South American breakfast dishes that all come with cheese and chocolate. Fresh breads and baked goods are also available. For lunch or dinner, most large entres are priced around $10. Daily meal specials are offered for $7.60. Beers start at $3 and bottles of wine at $17. There is ample free parking and all major credit cards are accepted. This is also a great place to take the kids as they can get a nice plate of grilled chicken or steak with fries and rice for $6! Dont forget to try some of the decadent desserts such passion fruit mousse, vanilla an or 3 leches cake. Enjoy! The Mojarra Frita or whole fried Red Snapper is a customer favorite.

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Friday, February 22, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 8 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Honey bees welcome; abandoned houses must be registered By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – City commissioners on Wednesday unanimously approved an ordinance on second reading to permit honey bee keeping in the downtown district on city-owned properties. See HONEY BEES on page 5 After 66 years, a pioneer business changes directionDBS clears its decks By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Deer eld Builders Supply, a business xture in this city for 66 years, has exited the retail hardware business, closed the rebar manufacturing plant, and will no longer be a lumber yard. Instead, the family-run company will specialize in windows, cabinetry and specialty woods and maintain its export business in the Caribbean. A two-day auction last week cleared out the store at SE 2 Avenue and Hillsboro Blvd. Already gone was the large truck eet. Soon to be closed are DBS stores in Sarasota and Tampa. “This is the rst year we were not in the Founders’ Days Parade,” said company president Ed Dietrich. See BUILDERS on page 16By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – As this city undertakes major improvements on Martin Luther King [MLK] Boulevard to attract new development, the street’s earliest inhabitants still remember earlier times. Alfonsa McIntosh remembers when MLK was named Rock Road; a name that came from the road literally being made out of rocks and dirt. “My Residents remember origins of Martin Luther King Boulevard and its role in local history father used to bust those big old rocks to ll in pot holes,” he said. Back then, McIntosh said MLK Boulevard was mostly surrounded by farms and labor camps, but one of the few surviving buildings from that era, the Ali Building, is where he used to get haircuts for 75 cents. See BLACK HISTORY on page 2 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach –This time of year at St. Ambrose Church, Father Bryan Dalton’s joke is that the St. Ambrose Carnival thrives with its dedicated corps of party givers who just keep on givingpeople who stage the annual food fest, midway, rides and entertainment love it so much they will “run off with the carnival.” Indeed, the same crew of volunteers have been putting on the event for 19 years with such dedication that some take their annual vacations so they can devote a week or two to their volunteer duties. “Our dearest friends and anyone See FAIR on page 29 Meet me at The St. Ambrose FairFeb. 28 March 3 Sarah Corbett sings solo for attendees at the Rock Road Restoration Group’s Black History Month Program at the E. Pat Larkins Center on Feb. 17. [Staff photo]

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2 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Now, Rock Road is known by two names: MLK and Hammondville Road, a decision made by city commissioners in 1990 that was not without controversy. Commissioners chose Hammondville in honor of Hiram F. Hammon, a white pioneer who employed many African Americans on his farms in the area. Beverly Moody, a community activist who now serves as the director of outreach services for Congressman Alcee Hastings, said many in the African American community were upset with naming the street after Hammon because of the poor wages he paid his workers. She said residents packed city hall to demand the removal of Hammon’s name but commissioners decided to compromise and choose two names. Now, 20 years after the name change, commissioners are focused on the street itself. On Feb. 7, residents and city of cials broke ground on the MLK streetscape improvements. The $11 million project, which also includes Historic Downtown Pompano, is designed to improve sidewalks, lighting and landscaping and add entryway signs and new parking. Another groundbreaking ceremony is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 28 at 5 p.m. at the Ali Building, 353 MLK Blvd. Final plans for the building’s future are still being worked-out but the goal is to make it a cultural center. Horatio Danovich, engineer for the Community Development Agency, said the project has been budgeted to cost about $1.2 million and should be nished by the end of the year. Built in 1933, the Ali Building is named after Frank and Florence Ali, the husband and wife who originally owned it. Frank ran the barbershop and Florence ran a beauty salon out of the rst oor. They used the second oor as their home. Asked if she’s happy with the city’s plans for the Ali Building, Hazel Armbrister, president of the Rock Road Restoration Historical Group [RRHG], said she is waiting until the project is farther along before she makes up her mind. She said it’s important Black historyContinued from page 1 See BLACK HISTORY on page 3Hazel Armbrister, president of the Rock Road Restoration Historical Group, presents Alfonso McIntosh with a Pioneer award at the group’s Black History Month Program on Feb. 17. McIntosh helped start Rock Road when it was just an informal group that met at the Mitchell Moore Center. [Staff photo]

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The Pelican 3 Friday, February 22, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com that the Ali Building “become a museum for our history – blacks, coloreds, negroes. Pompano would not have been Pompano without them.” To honor some of those who helped Pompano to evolve, the RRRHG, residents and city of cials gathered at the E. Pat Larkins Center on Sunday for RRRHG’s Black History Program. McIntosh was presented with the organization’s Pioneer award. Armbrister described him as one of the organization’s founding members and credited him with helping to establish RRRHG when it was just an unof cial group that met at the Mitchell Moore Community Center. Richard Macon was honored for his work as the owner of Freeman-Macon Funeral Home. Macon said he has amassed a stack of unpaid bills from people who couldn’t afford a decent funeral for a loved one. But Macon said their ability to pay hasn’t been his main concern. “I saw a need in this community. [Some people] couldn’t afford a decent burial. I decided I could [help them] and I just decided to keep doing it.” The late John Franklin Lee was honored for opening the rst shoe repair shop and teaching many young men, including his grandson, Vincent Johnson, to shine shoes. Ocie Phillips was honored for opening the city’s rst barbershop. Tom Baker, now deceased, was honored for being one of the rst landowners in Pompano. In particular, Armbrister said he owned vast tracts around Rock Road. His son-in-law, Julius Bristol Ellington, also deceased, was honored for his generosity and “life of giving.” Accepting the awards were the son of Julius Ellington, Charles Ellington, and Charles’ wife, Emma. In 2000, the Ellington family kept up Julius’ spirit of giving by donating land to the city for the E. Pat Larkins Center, land that previously housed the Ellington homestead where Charles Ellington was born and Emma Ellington gave birth to three of their sons. Emma Ellington said that it’s important to teach the African American residents of Pompano that their forefathers were hard-working, successful people who played an important role in helping to develop the city. “We’re going to rewrite our own history,” she said. Black historyContinued from page 2

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4 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFExperience a free chair and hand massage, Aura reading, acupuncture analysis, and refreshments. Early birds --the rst 100 visitors--will receive a gift bag of products, coupons and information. And there’s a raf e for a chance to win a couple’s basket of wonderful items and experiences. Take advantage of this opportunity to enjoy some of the bene ts of the variety of non-invasive healing methods that support mind, body and spirit offered every day at owner, Lisa Smith’s Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Feel good services available in this unique Come to Lisa’s Healing Center Open House tomorrow, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.center include massage modalities, Reiki, LaHoChi, Cranial Sacral Therapy for adults and children, Edgar Cayce methods, Lymphatic Drainage, Aura readings, Animal Aura readings, Animal communication, Sound therapy, Crystal healing classes and groups, chiropractic care, Acupuncture, Life coaching, and guidance counseling. According to Lisa, her wellness center offers preventative and restorative lifelong health solutions to the ‘whole client’ using the team approach. Described natural methods are chemically free and allow a client to assume responsibility for his or her own health. Programs are developed for each client according to the client’s needs and desires. A few of the many modalities offered are:Massage“I am a licensed massage therapist and Usui Reiki Master and a 2009 graduate of the Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork program offered through the Atlantic Technical Center of Broward College in Margate. Having worked as a massage therapist in the chiropractor, physical therapist and spa environments, I understand the need for an individual approach. So we mix and match as we work on a client. When we encounter tension and trigger points, we adjust our techniques to meet the need. We might use four different massages in one treatment. Lisa Smith, owner of Lisa’s Healing Center in Lighthouse Point, is about to begin a Reiki treatment during which the healing is passed from the Master to the student. [Staff photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]See HEALING CENTER on page 25

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The Pelican 5 Friday, February 22, 2013 The city recently retained the Urban Farming Institute to provide an urban farm park and offer educational courses at Jaco Pastorius Park. One of the classes will offer instruction on urban and rural beekeeping without the use of chemicals. Registration with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will be required in order to ensure that the proposed beekeeping activities are certi ed and properly maintained. Commissioner Jed Shank suggested the city next look at making the same accommodation for aquaculture.In other business: Commissioners unanimously approved on rst reading an ordinance to provide for inspection of abandoned property. With this ordinance, if a property is vacant or abandoned for 30 days or more, the mortgage holder must inspect the property to con rm it is abandoned and register with the city. The ordinance is intended to give the city more control over abandoned properties.Honey BeesContinued from page 1 In Oakland Park, commission meetings are held the rst and third Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Meetings are broadcast live on Comcast, Channel 78, and rebroadcast the following evening at 6:30 p.m. The public is welcome and encouraged to attend any commission meetings.SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.comArt 2-26 – Art Classes with artist Valter de Morais Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 2 to 4 p.m. and 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Morais Art Gallery, 418 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Cost is $25 per session. 954-532-1534. 2-24 – Riverwalk Sunday Arts from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Esplanade Park, 400 SW 2 St., Fort Lauderdale. 954-4682540.Auctions, Sales2-23 – Pompano Beach GreenMarket from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. Held every Saturday. 954-292-8040. 2-23 & 24 – Wilton Manors Green Market from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Held every Saturday and Sunday. 954-592-0381. 2-24 – Deer eld Beach Green Market at 8 a.m. at The Cove, Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal, at the Cove. Held every Sunday. 561-2391536 or 561-299-8684.Books & Lectures2-27 – Teen Literature Club from 6 to 7 p.m. at Northwest Branch Library, 1580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954-357-6599. 2-27 – Jean Larkin’s Great Books program from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Percy White Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Runs on 3-13 also. 954-357-7680. See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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6 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XXI, Issue 8 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & LettersVOTE March 12 Quality of life begins at home. To insure it, VOTE on MARCH 12!Many voters are ignoring the upcoming municipal elections March 12, but we hope we can change their minds. Here’s why: Along with the rest of the nation, Broward County has experienced a tremendous economic downturn. Getting out of it has been hard. Some cities are doing better than others. So we need jobs, lower taxes, facilities and cities that can produce a strong economic base. Now is the time to consider how your city is doing. It is your vote that determines who will make the decisions that impact your life. Think about this: Shall your city implement the red light cameras that photograph the tail of your car sneaking through a yellow light? It’s either pay the ne or start a legal battle. Shall your city allow signage that turns a sophisticated business community into a replica of Coney Island? Overturning mistakes like that are expensive to the taxpayer. Shall your city control the colors you can use to paint your house? Shall your city demand police protection at local schools? Shall your city support cultural events? How about the parks in your city? Are they beautiful, well-kept and accessible? Do you and your children have access to sports and recreation? Are those people running your government smart enough to keep assessments and taxes low and public funds safe? Does your city have a suf cient reserve fund? Does your city have the resources to step in after a hurricane? The people you will elect on March 12 should always be working on these issues. They are your public servants. They essentially determine the quality of life for you and your family. Before you vote in this election, ask questions of the candidates, call them for position statements, ask them to speak to a gathering of your neighbors. When you cast your vote, do it as an informed citizen. This week The Pelican offers pro les of the candidates running in the cities that we cover. Only Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach and Oakland Park have commission elections in March. Voting absentee will cost you a little more than a buck. Voting at the polls will cost you about an half hour of your time. Whichever voting method you choose remember: Making sure you have the right to vote has already cost thousands of Americans their lives.Fisher seeks third term; says much work yet to be completedLamar FisherMayor Age – 52VOTE March 12 Pompano BeachPlace of birth Pompano Beach Career – Owner, Fisher Auction Company, Pompano Beach Education Palm Cove High School, A.A. degree Palm Beach State College Civic organizations – Kiwanis, past distinguished governor, Elks Lodge Public service – Pompano Beach planning and zoning board, chair of the Broward County Planning Council Mayor Lamar Fisher was elected mayor in 2007. He says he is seeking re-election to continue the work that “we and this commission body have already put into motion.” He comes to this election with a list of priorities based on scal responsibility, job growth and quality of life as he seeks a third term as city-wide mayor. He is proud that in 2013, the city collects the same “level of taxes” as it did ve years ago. The city has one of the lowest re assessments in the county. As for job growth, Fisher says that conversations are on-going with developers to invest in the Federal Highway corridor. To that end, city planners and of cials are undergoing studies of land-use and zoning to facilitate a mixeduse development. “It would be a perfect t with the golf and water views along Federal Highway,” he says. One coup already in the works is the proposed Whole Foods Market that will take over the now defunct K-Mart building north of Copans on Federal Highway. Whole Foods and Sports Authority will share the space. The opening of both stores is expected in 2014. Another Federal Highway project consisting of garden apartments is “moving quickly” says Fisher. Plans for a boutique hotel and marina have been approved for the old Tails Restaurant, 2635 N. Riverside Drive. It will have 120 rooms in a three to fourstory building.Baumwald impatient with city’s progress, wants hotels, jobs Mayor Age 47 Place of birth St. Louis. 32 years in Pompano Beach Career – Construction Education – One year at Admiral Farragut Academy [1981-82] Public service – Served three and one-half years on the community appearance committee Incarceration [1998] Possession of cocaine David Baumwald says he has “serious problems” with the amount of time it takes to get things done in the city. Citing the progress on the VOTE March 12 Pompano Beachproposed regional library/cultural center, he adds that after seven to eight years of planning, “I’d get red if I took this long to get things done.” But he adds that the library itself should be put off for two years until times are better. This candidate is also anxious to see more action at the city’s municipal pier. “It should be done by now. [The city] has been very slow. The pier should be open with live entertainment.” Baumwald strongly supports a hotel, something like a Day’s Inn at the beach, for families. He wants the beach to be affordable, family-oriented. He would like to see the city offer tax incentives to encourage business owners to build in Pompano Beach. “We should give business owners breaks in areas like landscaping and negotiate to get the businesses here.” He also Lamar FisherDavid Baumwald David Baumwald See FISHER on page 14 See BAUMWALD on page 14

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The Pelican 7 Friday, February 22, 2013 Burrie seeks re-election to keep city moving in right directionDistrict 2 Commissioner Age 68 Place of birth New York, 50 years in Pompano Beach Career – Attorney Education – St. Thomas University, Juris Doctor. Public service – Coast Guard Auxiliary, Moose, American Legion, Chairman of Relay for Life, member Cresthaven Homeowners Association, and Highlands Civic Association and South Pompano Civic Association, Elks Lodge exalted ruler. Elected of ce Six years Pompano Beach Commissioner, Dist. 2. VOTE March 12 Pompano BeachCharlotte BurrieCharlotte Burrie Put the brakes on spending and subsidizing programs, Terwilliger VOTE March 12 Pompano BeachThomas Terwilliger Commissioner, District 2Age – 67 Birthplace – Mount Clements, MI. How long in Pompano Beach? – 3 years Career – Former Merchant Marine, investment manager. Education – MBA nance Civic involvement – Peace Corps volunteer [1960s], Broward County Election Voting technician, Governor’s Hurricane Task Force [2001-2003] Thomas Terwilliger, a resident of Leisureville says he offers the city an Thomas TerwilligerCharlotte Burrie seeks her fourth term as District 2 commissioner and says she wants to continue helping her district and the city to move in the right direction. One of her top priorities is the Neighborhood Stabilization Project [NSP], a program that funnels HUD money to repair, refurbish and sell blighted and foreclosed homes to new owners. Proceeds from the sales are recycled for other homes. Burrie says she is expecting more funds to be available for the Highlands only. In the Highlands, Burrie explains that beauti cation and traf c calming will begin to take place once the county completes the street paving. “The city will fund the beauti cation and add welcome signs to the neighborhood.” She would also like to see a community center for that neighborhood and has her “untainted new view,” adding that a little “outside perspective never hurts.” Terwilliger tops his priority of causes with the crime issues in The Highlands. “Safety is the key here,” he says. “These residents are facing drug See Terwilliger on page 12 See BURRIE on page 12 Crime and illegal dumping concern Dist. 4 candidate PoitierVOTE March 12 Pompano BeachWoodrow “Woody” PoitierWoodrow “Woody” PoitierCommissioner, District 4Age 65 Birthplace – Dade City, lived in Pompano Beach since 1956. Career – Owner/manager L.C. Poitier Funeral Home; Pompano Beach retired lieutenant, paramedic/ re ghter [23 years] Education – Moorehouse College; Miami Dade College School of Mortuary A.S. degree, 1970 Civic organizations – NW Kiwanis; Tiger’s Roar Club; Mount Calvary Baptist Church Trustee; Pompano Beach Housing Authority past chair and EMS advisory board, past chair. Public of ce – In third term as commissioner in Dist. 4. Woody Poitier has a laundry list of issues that he believes are important in District 4, one of which is the illegal dumping that goes on there. Pompano Beach offers twice a week bulk pick-up that has attracted people who prefer to dump lawn material, bulk carpeting and other items in this community instead of disposing of this waste material legally. He recalls when he was an eyewitness of an illegal dumping that prompted him to follow the culprit, call the police and witness the arrest. He agrees that a solution may lie in fewer bulk pick-up days. Criminals have stalked this district for many years with drug dealers, theft and break-ins. Poitier keeps his own police scanner on hand to track the numbers. He says that many crimes are avoidable if residents will lock their homes and cars. He also urges neighbors to look out after each other. “Criminals like to brag about their deeds,” he says, intimating that listening might be one way to locate criminals. Major work on Martin Luther King Boulevard, Poitier says, has “boosted his ego.” He refers to 731 MLK Boulevard where the CRA has broken ground to build a commercial mixed-used building and to the restoration of the district’s historic building, the Ali Building, known as the rst black-owned business in Pompano. Poitier say she feels “very good” about the progress being made there. On Dixie Highway, the transit center is open. “The bus station opened up the whole thing,” Poitier says. There is talk of getting a Greyhound Bus at the center. The city also approved a senior center on Blanche Ely Boulevard at the St. Joseph Haitian Center. “It is well-deserved and very needed for our seniors,” Poitier added. Poitier is supportive of the work of the Community Redevelopment Agency. He likes the idea of a new cultural center but is uncertain about a hotel on the pier parking lot. Of his candidacy he says, “I’ve gotten the hang of the job. We are accomplishing things in the district. We are getting things done. This is one of the best city commissions in a long time.”[Ed’s note: Invitations to be interviewed were extended to Dist. 4 candidates Ed Phillips and Joseph Wells who did not respond after several phone calls.]Poitier’s campaign contributorsKaris Kristo, Jason McNair, Emerald Transportation, Peter Kiernon, MO BRAD, Jimmie and Regina Glenn, Jessie Walker, James Jones, Dr. Richard Porraro, J. Newell, Rev. Robert and Barbara Robinson, Bettye Larkins, Robbie Holloway, Keith & Associates, Council for Effective Government, Political Action Committee Dunlay, Miskel, Bacman & Blattner, Mr. Squeaky Car Wash, Johnston & Metevia, Royal Palm Business Center, Romena Nelson, Shirley Simmons, Ralph Adderly, Daisy Josey, Broward County Police Benevolent Association, Maurice Spates, Dwight and Cynthia Evans, Barbie Miller, Minnie Camp eld, Glenn Bostic, Rob MajorTotal contributions to date $6,770

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8 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Mayor Age 81 Birthplace Philadelphia. How long in Deer eld Beach – 55 years. Career Teacher of journalism and advanced English. Degree from West Chester University; master’s work at Villanova. Education – BS in secondary education, Community Association Management license and manager of Princeton Place. Civic involvement DB Historical Society, DB Woman’s Club, major donor to the Holocaust Memorial at Temple Beth Israel, chair of a city charter revision committee, former Important things remain to be accomplished, Noland saysVOTE March 12 Deer eld BeachPeggy Noland City making decisions that should belong to the voters, Robb saysVOTE March 12 Deer eld BeachJean Robbchair planning and zoning board. Other public of ce Mayor 1980 – 1993. Ran unsuccessfully for mayor in 1997 and district 1 commission, 2004.Jean RobbMayorAge 61 Education – Syracuse Barber School, NY Career Former beautician, hostess manager of Cove Restaurant, contractor’s expeditor. Civic involvement – Board member, Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization, Board of Directors for League of Cities, American Legion Post 162, Disabled Veterans of America. Prior public service DB City Commission, 1992-97, 1997-2005. Peggy Noland Elected mayor in 2009. Peggy Noland is seeking a second term as mayor of Deer eld Beach because she “loves” her position, feels ”compassion” for the city and has made the necessary “sacri ces” in the line of duty. Noland sees the most important issues facing the commission in the next few years to be development of Sullivan Park, infrastructure improvements to Cove Gardens and building the athletic elds at Tam ‘O Shanter. In this next budget cycle she wants to give city employees the ve percent raise they have deferred for the last two years. Addressing an automatic pay raise the commission will receive in March, Noland said she has no strong feelings one way or another. It was approved by a previous commission of which she was a member so that commissioners would no longer be in a position to give themselves a raise. See NOLAND on page 13 See ROBB on page 20Commissioner, District 3 Age 64 Birthplace – The Bronx. Has lived here 12 years. Career Assist. Director East Hampton, LI Chamber of Commerce. Sub teacher in Deer eld Beach. Education – BA from Queen’s College Civic involvement – CVE Relay for Life, former Deer eld Beach Housing Authority Commissioner, on board of CVE Master Management, former DB Planning and Zoning Board member. Other public of ce No, but ran Berner says her activism will bene t District 3VOTE March 12 Deer eld BeachCaryl Berner Caryl Berner for the same seat four years ago. Caryl Berner says because she has been involved with issues for the past nine years, she has already served her district. She attends most city commission meetings and other district meetings. If elected she will work to “change the culture” at city hall, she said, citing the employee’s ve percent pay cut because “they did not have an advocate.” Berner was responsible for getting city commission meetings on the cable TV system in Century Village, worked against the utility tax, feels there is a solution to the new beach sticker policy that excludes part time residents, and will hold quarterly District 3 meetings. Several years ago, she fought for a no-smoking area at the beach, and won. One of her rst issues was that a menorah be installed on public property along See BERNER on page 21Capobianco is strong in nance and communication skillsVOTE March 12 Deer eld BeachCommissioner, District 3 Age 62 Birthplace – Boston. How long in Deer eld Beach – 10 years Career nancial services and business consulting Education – Communications/ education degree from Bridgewater State Civic involvement Director of Oakridge V, headed master management for Century Village East, 2006-2009. Currently is president of the CVE Recreation Committee.Donna Capobianco Donna Capobianco Other public of ce none. Ran for seat four years ago. Donna Capobianco comes to the Dist. 3 city commission campaign with a strong background in business and nance. Following the death of the See CAPOBIANCO on page 15

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The Pelican 9 Friday, February 22, 2013 Commissioner, District 3 Age 74 Birthplace – Greenbelt, MD. Has lived here fulltime for four years. Career Management and ownership positions in retail food industry. Education – High school degree, college courses. Civic involvement – Commdr. Jewish War Veterans Post 265, Deer eld Beach Democratic Club, vice president of Temple Beth Israel. In Maryland, active in Democratic Rosenzweig says his is a moderate voice that will nd solutionsVOTE March 12 Deer eld BeachRichard RosenzweigParty and Civic Federation. Richard Rosenzweig said he is running because in high school he wrote an essay on the importance of the vote and thought about being in the Maryland legislature. Although he was never a candidate, he worked politics behind the scenes, and now with a new chance at public of ce does not want to “sit on the sidelines.” Additionally, he was encouraged to run by members of the DB Democrat Club and feels he will a more moderate voice than his opponents. He criticizes the prevailing lack of district meetings because the “role of a Democracy is to have people involved.” He is against any zoning change that would allow residences on the Hillsboro Pines Golf Course and says Master Management should evaluate purchasing the golf course and/or investigate other uses for the property such as the cemetery being developed on the old Tam O’Shanter Golf Course. A major question is if the Village can afford to buy the golf course now with another major project underway, replacement of the irrigation system. He would work to resolve the beach sticker parking problem and would hold a public hearing before making a decision. The current policy is discriminatory Richard Rosenzweig See ROSENZWEIG on page 11Commission Seat 1 Age 46 Place of birth East Orange, N.J. How long in Oakland Park: Since 1987. Career Administrator for Commercial Metal Building Services. Education Associate degree from Broward College. Civic and professional organizations Organizer and of cer of Royal Palm Isles Neighborhood Group. Volunteer for Citizens Observer Patrol. Volunteer at city’s Youth Day and Oktoberfest. Sara Guevrekian says she didn’t aspire to run for city commission. But recently she says she’s been Guevrekian says it’s time to put her activism to workVOTE March 12 Oakland ParkSara Guevrekian “so uncomfortable with city leadership that at some point a switch clicked,” and she decided it was time to take what she has learned through her volunteer work and become part of the solution. She says she is frustrated at the complacency she sees on the dais. Guevrekian rst became involved in city matters in the fall of 2008 when she learned a Value Place Hotel, offering weekly rentals, was proposed at Northwest 38 Street and Powerline Road. She had a hard time getting her calls to commissioners returned or her emails acknowledged. She and her neighbors were fearful about the element the hotel would attract in an area where there already was a problem with vagrancy. That was the issue that drove her into community activism. “I was fearful about my home and went into protection mode for my slice of the pie,” she said. In the process, she got to know her neighbors in Royal Palm Isles and then grew protective of her neighborhood. “I was like a mother hen in full protection mode. I didn’t want to be invisible.” Eventually, after neighbors rallied in protest, plans for the hotel were stymied. Guevrekian continued to regularly attend city commission meetings and to keep her neighbors informed through a community newsletter. She attended a 13-week Broward Sheriff’s Of ce Citizens Academy and developed a relationship with BSO employees. She says she’s very concerned about the crime index in the city. She says raising awareness is important and sharing information is valuable. BSO has divided the city into districts, but she says the western zone was never properly staffed. When the same people run for of ce year after year, Guevrekian says things tend to get done on autopilot. She says she would provide the voice of Jane Q. Citizen. In the past, when she rst became involved, she says the attitude was that citizens should get out of the way. She believes community participation is very important. Asked her views about the proposed Culinary Arts District in downtown Oakland Park, Guevrekian said, “It’s a very exciting step in the right direction. Hopefully, (the city) can get it off the ground, and it will eventually happen.” She said she’s pleased with what she’s seen so far from the city’s consultants, Redevelopment Management Associates, and disappointed it has taken so long for something to happen. She says a culinary school sounds appealing and so does the plan for urban farming. Guevrekian says the contrast in candidates is “extremely stark” in this election. She believes “new, fresh energy would be a good thing.” Addressing proposed charter amendments, she said she favors eliminating the numbered seats. “There’s no reason to have them, and it confuses people and makes for contentious races. Without the numbered seats, she says, all the candidates would have to put their best foot forward. Another amendment calls for moving the city election from March to November. She favors that move, believing it will result in more voter participation. Guevrekin’s campaign supportersAnna Strien, Lorri Winner, Peter Buchanan, Robert Rutheford, Carl Fair, Rich Cusmano, Samantha Carney, Michael Miles, James Blaschik, Bonnie Tembeck, Eileen Cawey, Michael Bryan, Kris and Bill Ettinger, The Franciscans of Fort Lauderdale, Event Treats, Bonnie Dipacio, Leigh Zimmerman, David Zimmerman, Jackie Vickman, Jeff Helyer, John Fullerton, Donald Gauntner, Jennifer Wendt, Ismail Jama, Michael Carn, Linn Payne, John and Charlotte Morrissey, Rafael Cardona, Anna Leitner, Diego Passarella, James Kiselica, Robert Wertz, Rebecca Justin, Charles Grenier, Larry Arnett, David Nagle, Sela LLC, Diane Wendt, Diego Pascarella, Michael McDevitt, Kent Morgan.Total contributions to date $11,429 Commission Seat 1 Age: 53 Place of birth: Boynton Beach. How long in the city of Oakland Park: 28 years. Career: Owner, Arnst Motors in Pompano Beach. Education: Graduated from Northeast High School in 1977. Attended the University of Florida for one year. Prior public service: Commissioner, vice mayor and mayor for 16 years. Civic and professional organizations: None. Former commissioner Arnst critical of direction city is takingVOTE March 12 Oakland ParkSteve Arnst Steve Arnst wants to return to the Oakland Park City Commission because he doesn’t like the direction the city is headed. The downtown area once envisioned as a mixed-use district with a combination of commercial and residential, has now changed to a proposed culinary arts district. “Restaurants are a dime a dozen, and when you have restaurants, you have to have people. If there’s no in ux of housing, we won’t have the people to support the restaurants,” he says. “Restaurants pop up, and then they’re gone.” He also criticizes the lack of a parking plan. Arnst says the city has bought a lot of land downtown with no plan for repaying county loans if suf cient redevelopment doesn’t occur. The loans expire in ve years and could burden the city with a 20-year debt. Pretty new buildings were envisioned before, Arnst says. The former Sears building was supposed to be the hub of the residential area with Gibby’s at the southern end. Instead, the Gibby’s site is still empty, and a brewery and algae farm are in the Sears building (Oakland Park Station). Steve ArnstSee ARNST on page 18Sara Guevrekian

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10 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Walls concerned with staff cuts, community serviceVOTE March 12 Oakland ParkLayne Dallett WallsCommission Seat 5 Age 57 Place of birth Wilkensburg, Pa. Oakland Park resident 22 years. Career Self-employed at Aerko International, a custom aerosol manufacturer. Education Associate degree, Broward College. Prior public service Commissioner from 1993-1997 and 2001-2008 plus appointed for three months in 2010. General Employees Pension Board, Charter Review Board and School Advisory Board. Layne Dallett Walls wants to return to the Oakland Park City Layne Dallett Walls Commission Seat 5 Age 51 Place of birth and how long in city: Milwaukee, WI. Moved to Oakland Park in January 2000. Career Project manager for United Health Care for 27 years. Education -Associate degree in human services from Milwaukee Technical College. Civic and professional organizations Graduate, Local Government Academy. Member, Oakland Park Kiwanis Club, Oakland Park Garden Club, Oakland Park Volunteer Corps, Corals of Oakland Park Homeowners Association, former member, Oakland Park General Employees Pension Plan Board of Trustees.VOTE March 12 Oakland ParkTim LonerganCommunity appearance is a passion for candidate LonerganTim Lonergan Tim Lonergan is passionate about making Oakland Park a nicer place. “A city is only as nice as its most struggling area. The nicer the city looks, the safer it looks, the more people will want to move here. That will result in a larger pool of taxes so everyone pays less,” he says. Acting upon this concern, Lonergan noticed there were no trash cans at the city’s bus stops, and got that recti ed. He was disappointed in how the city’s thoroughfares looked, and he and a few others gathered up the snipe signs placed illegally in medians and rights of way. Now code enforcement has instituted robocalls to those offenders ordering them to remove their signs. His own yard is a certi ed Wildlife Habitat. The city has spent more than $30 million in efforts to x up Main Street, and the Oakland Park Main Street Association has done a great job trying to get businesses to move there, Lonergan said, but he is getting mixed feed back on the move to establish a Culinary District there. He says the city is buying up property, but no buildings are going up. He believes at times the city has stopped efforts made by Main Street to bring businesses to town. He nds the proposed urban farm a good concept. At the same time other areas of the city also need attention, he says. At a recent commission meeting, numerous business owners complained of vagrants sleeping outside their businesses in the Powerline and Prospect Road Commission because she doesn’t see any strong leadership there now. She believes the best commissions have a mix of new and older more experienced members. Here, the most senior member could soon be a commissioner with just two and a half years experience. In that case, “the institutional knowledge is gone,” she says. Walls said residents came to her and urged her to run again. She quali ed by petition gathering the necessary 228 signatures. Crime is one major issue in her campaign. She says it seems to be ticking up. She wants to be sure an adequate number of deputies are on the job, and if more are needed, says the city may need to increase the contract. The city doesn’t currently have a police chief, and that position should be lled, she says. And Walls says more re ghters are needed in the city-run Fire Rescue Department. Another of her concerns is customer service. She says the quality has decreased with cuts in personnel in many departments. She would like employees to have training in providing friendly customer service. The Parks & Leisure Services Department needs some attention she believes. It has no director and rates for some programs have increased dramatically. Residents need to participate in discussions of redevelopment, she says. In the downtown area along Dixie Highway, the city needs to encourage building owners to get together to assemble parcels for redevelopment. See WALLS on page 23 See LONERGAN on page 17Ruben JeanCommission Seat 1 Age 40 Place of birth Haiti Oakland Park resident 5 years, Education masters degree in education and counseling and a bachelors in re safety management from Madison University Career Owner of RJ Taxes Services and works as operation manager at D & S Protection Corporation in Miami. Before moving to Oakland Park, Ruben served as a member of the council of the Village of El Portal in Miami-Dade County from 2006 to 2008. Jean says he was inspired to run for the commission seat because of his daughter, a student at Oakland Park Elementary School. He has made improving communication, public involvement and input as his main campaign focus. “I will put our city rst by working side by side with our residents and staff to meet the community’s needs. My door is always open and I welcome your opinions. Together, we’ll solve problems and make Oakland Park a city of pride. I know we can build a better future and a stronger community.” Jean favors keeping the city’s elections in March. “If it’s not broke don’t x it.” He also favors another status quo: keeping the separate city commission districts instead of Inspired by his daughter’s suggestion, Jean says he will put the city rstSee JEAN on page 13 Ruben Jean

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The Pelican 11 Friday, February 22, 2013 Vice Mayor Ganz sets Dist.4 meetingDeer eld Beach – Vice Mayor Bill Ganz will hold a meeting for residents of Dist. 4 Monday, Feb. 25, 7 p.m. at Constitution Park, 2831 W. Hillsboro Blvd. All are invited. Dist.4 encompasses the neighborhoods west of Military Trail with the exception of Century Village and Crystal Lake. he said. As for the utility tax, he believes the city had to enact it in order to keep taxes down and still balance the budget. He calls it a “trade off.” If the new commission seated in March goes forward with an automatic pay raise approved four years ago, he would not take the additional salary, Rosenzweig said because, as a newcomer, “I haven’t earned it.” He believes the current commission has shown its ability to compromise and feels he would be another Rosenzweig’s campaign contributorsDeer eld Beach Democratic Club, Bernard Parness, Florence Friedenthal, Mildred Rosenlerantz, Helen Vega, Eventco, Inc., Priscilla Mazula, Arlene Johnson, Martin Cohen, Daniel and Marian Ross, Anita Snyder, Ruth Bierman, Deborah Bierman, Louis Gordon, Martin Cohen, Construction Management Services, Beatrice Rosner, Sally Potter, Kathy Richards, Bernie Parness, Broward County Police Benevolent Association, Keith & Associates, Edward Gallon, Marian Vale, Dorothy Zinn, Peachtree Restaurant, Pamela Militello, Bogen Law Of ces, Ruden McCloskey, Broward County Professional Fire ghters, Randee Geller, Barry Mishkin, LSN Partners, Mike Hawn, Fabienne Adam, Christiane R. Carter, Martin Cohen, Dorothy Zinn. Total contributions to date $7,666 “moderate voice” able to reach “reasonable solutions.” Rosenzweig said Crystal Lake residents will have some issues when the athletic elds go in at Tam O’Shanter and he will address those. In another area outside the Village, The Meadows, Rosenzweig says traf c controls are needed for pedestrian safety. In Deer eld’s future, he sees redevelopment being the focus and said it will be necessary to have the infrastructure to go with that redevelopment.RosenzweigContinued from page

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12 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 eyes on a piece of property. Burrie agrees that the proposed cultural center at the new library is a good idea and that it will be cheaper to construct it as a second oor to the library, but adds, “We don’t need another multipurpose room… we need acoustics, tiered seating, a stage…we need to do something classy.” Burrie supports the way the city’s CRA is moving under its co-directors, Kim Briesemeister and Chris Brown. “I just we could move faster on the beach. But they are doing a great job,” she says. As for a hotel on city land at the beach, Burrie is not for it and would prefer to see a parking garage built there. As for taxes, Burrie says the city enjoys one of the lowest rates in the county. “The CRA projects bring property values up, and that helps keep taxes lower.” Burrie campaign contributorsJoseph Lodato, James Hyde Dunay, Miskel, Blackman & Blattner, Jeffrey Torrey, Broward County Police Benevolent Association, James Newell, Council for Effective Government, Political Action Committee; Keith & Associates, Johnston & Metevia, Royal Palm Business Center, Edwin Wheeler, M. Ross Shulmister, Benita V.R. Schulmister, Meryl Shulmister, John E. Abdo, developer. Total contributions to date . $3,925 BurrieContinued from page 7dealing problems. We have a new sheriff, and we want him to show us some real good results here. If not, we should consider another alternative.” This candidate also cites code problems as a major issue and has concerns with the city interfering in areas that would best be left to the property owner. Examples include allowing the homeowner to complete improvements for nonstructural activities. “Many non-structural repairs should be allowed without a permit,” he says. “Beauti cation needs to be simpler.” Terwilliger adds that the proposed cultural library next to city hall will be a moneyloser for taxpayers. And it’s not the only waste factor. He adds that people in his district, especially the Highlands and Cresthaven don’t realize that their taxes subsidize the city golf course. “Programs should break even,” he says. “Don’t burden many for the pleasures of a few.” He says he would work hard to improve communications between city hall and the residents so homeowners can know their rights. He plans to have a tough look at all city codes and the code enforcement department. Terwilliger also believes that the city is headed in the wrong direction by pushing for Pompano Beach to become a tourism destination. “Money has been wasted on the beach. Pompano is a great place to live and have good times with the family. It should be a bedroom community,” he says. “[Residents of] Cresthaven and the Highlands don’t go to the beach. People feel disenfranchised and shortchanged.” He is adamantly against building a hotel on the shing pier land owned by the city.TerwilligarContinued from page 7Susan Foster Total contributions to date $617.75 Editor’s note: Thomas Terwilliger has donated $517.75 to his campaign. Terwilligar campaign contributors

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The Pelican 13 Friday, February 22, 2013 Send news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Noland entered politics during her 12 year effort to get an aquatic center in Deer eld Beach. The city’s lack of a pool was the issue that got her involved, she says. She defends the commission’s decision two years ago to institute a utility tax here saying it has allowed the city to lower property taxes by 15 percent. She has also been criticized for the matter in which the lease for the shing pier restaurant was awarded, but stands behind her decision that the bids had to be reviewed by the commission. The bidder chosen by staff did not adhere to the bid requirements he says making it necessary for the commission to choose another vendor. On another issue that has become controversial, limits on who can buy beach parking stickers, Noland says it was approved by the commission without giving much thought to seasonal residents. Now, she says, it can be readdressed. Among the accomplishments of her last four years, Noland counts re nancing municipal bonds that resulted in a 5 percent savings in the interest rate while the city was able to withdraw $7 million, money that will be used to repave street. She is also proud of the fact she has kept a proposed yover connecting the Sawgrass Expressway with SW 10 Street off the planning charts of the MPO. She believes part of her job is to appoint young people to city boards because “they are the ones who will invest here in the future. It’s their turn.” She is con dent she is working with “the best city commission we have had in years .we work well together, we discuss. I am proud of what we have accomplished.”NolandContinued from page 8Noland’s campaign contributorsJean Robb says she is running because she is unhappy with the direction being taken by the city and because the current commission is not listening to the people. She cites merging the re/rescue department with BSO and adopting the utility tax as two examples of issues that should have gone to the voters. The tax she said will discourage large businesses from locating here. “I had more industrial development when I was mayor, Sun Sentinel and the Publix warehouse, than anyone since,” she said. Robb led a petition drive to force the city to place the proposed utility tax on a making every commission seat at large – voters will decide both those issues on March 12. He also sees crime as a major issue that needs to be tackled. Asked how he would address the problem, Jean said he would do more to encourage and organize neighborhood watch programs. “I look forward to continue my services to our community and county and put my experience as a former council person, small business owner, father and husband to work for JeanContinued from page 10Jean’s campaign contributorsTo date, this candidate has no reported contributions.VOTE March 12

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14 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 By attracting these businesses and others, including Marriot Hotel and the new Publix [Atlantic Boulevard], Fisher see strong promotion of “environmentally-friendly projects, economic strength and job growth” for the city. Fisher says he is “overthrilled” with the work of the city’s CRA, its advisory committee and other business owners and residents. The Atlantic Boulevard corridor is now under construction with beauti cation, sidewalk expansion and buried powerlinelines. The Harbor Village Shopping Center is near completion of its revamped parking space, new faade additions and landscaping. The mayor’s stimulus package, a multi-faceted program of enhancement includes a “walk-through” permitting process that reduces the time developers and builders normally spend in paperwork required prior to starting their projects. Fisher says he spends a large bulk of his time meeting with people and developers to discuss possibilities for the city’s corridors. Mayor Fisher rates this commission as the best. “We work cohesively together; we share the vision in strategic plans to move our city forward.” “I want to continue to see the hard work and strategic plans of this commission come to fruition. I want the positive momentum to continue to make our city the best it can be. It’s what I enjoy most: promoting our city as a great place to live and work and play,” he says.FisherContinued from page 6 Chuck Sussman, Turnpike Motors, Nuturf, Jeffrey and Maxine Merlin, Carolyn Kennedy, Raul Jacome, Borzoo Yazdanfar, Mike Serbin, Joe Rind, Juan Buyos, Leonie Sanchez, Timothy Bueno, Jose and Pilar Ojea, Judith Bernal, Richy Pressure Cleaning, MAS Maintenance, Carlos Castaneda Carmen Maria, Bhayinay Investors, hotel investor; James Wolf and Sally Abrahamsen.Total contributions to date $5,850 believes the zoning and building codes need an overhaul. He questions the things the city spends money on such as the municipal golf course and the dog park. “We need jobs here, more retail, gas stations,” he said. The [Greg Norman] golf course renovations were a good idea, but the time for it was not right, Baumwald says. In Cresthaven, Baumwald says the streets there should get the same attention as other streets in the city. He suggests adding “yellow lines” to divide the streets would make them safer. And in reference to traf c, he says synchronizing traf c lights would smooth out traf c problems. Baumwald adds that despite his arrest and incarceration for “cocaine possession” in 1998, he has changed and since then has become a good citizen. He adds that he is an example of how people can turn their lives around. Baumwald campaign contributors BaumwaldContinued from page 6Fisher campaign contributors Council for Effective Government, Political Action Committee; Mr. Squeaky Car Wash, Kim Sherman Betsy Sherman, Royal Palm Business Center, PRH, developer; Fortune Construction Company Johnson & Metevia, Palm Aire Associates, developer, Rhonda Lovelace, Concorde Properties, developer, Joseph Weiselberg, developer; Scott Brenner, Louis Mohorn.Total contributions to date $9,550 Donna Capobianco 3-16 – Book fair from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m at Margate Library, 5810 Park Drive. New and “like new” books, videos and CDs. 954-3577500.Business2-28 – Wilton Manors Business Association networking luncheon from 12 to 1 p.m. at Rosie’s Bar & Grill, 2449 Wilton Drive. 954-567-1320. 3-6 – Business With a Twist networking event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Seaside Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach Cost is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. RSVP at www. PompanoBeachChamber.com.SightingsContinued from page 5 3-6 – LEAD$ lunch from 11:30 to 1 p.m. at Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. LEAD$ business group meets every rst and third Wednesday. 954-427-1050. 3-7 – Breakfast N’ Deer eld from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. LEAD$ business group meets every rst and third Wednesday. 954-427-1050. 3-11 – Wilton Manors Business Expo from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Hosted by the Wilton Manors Business Association. Free vendor space is available. Door prizes and refreshments. 954-257-8788. See SIGHTINGS on page 17SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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The Pelican 15 Friday, February 22, 2013 Village’s longtime political leader Amadeo Trinchitella, Capobianco was elected to the board of master management, the organization that oversees maintenance operation there. Capobianco says that when she came to the volunteer position, the board was $12 million in debt and within a year she and a new team of directors had attained solvency.Capobianco’s campaign contributorsBarry Lasser, Patrick Murphy & Associates, Marian Warmband, Eugenea Goldman, Judith Somerset, Delores Esposito, Melvin Nass, Keith Nichols, Minuteman Press, Thomas Winter, Andrea Bonasera, Paul Gennell, George Smalls, Robert Gravatt Total contributions to date $3,306Defeated in her commission attempt four years ago, Capobianco says she is running now because she feels she is well quali ed. “I have a business background. Big budgets don’t bother me,” she said. Current commissioner Marty Popelsky, who is term limited, failed to hold district meetings during his tenure Capobiano said, and this lack of communication with Villagers will end if she is elected. “People need input,” she said. “They also need to be listened to and I can listen.” She said she is a believer in management skills. “You create dif culties when you don’t follow procedures and policy,” she said. She also believes she is a good negotiator who strives to bring forth a “win-win” in any situation. Capobianco said issues that may need addressing are the Hillsboro Pines Golf Course and the city’s revamp of its zoning code. She noted that one code is being rewritten to protect children when it should also protect the elderly. Another issue that needs a resolution, she said, is parking at the beach and the newlyadopted policy that prevents part time homeowners from purchasing them. Capobianco said the district has become more diverse with an in ux of Canadians and Latinos and she feels she can communicate their concerns. “I will do the research and build consensus. I like team play,” she said of her interest in serving as a commissioner. “I will get things done.” CapobiancoContinued from page

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16 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-7838700! A consistent donor to the community, Dietrich said some of this philanthropy will have to cease with the change in business direction. He did renew his Little League support this year. He is probably the last of the league’s initial donors. But DBS’s unmatched contribution to keeping the Butler House sound will not continue he said. “The concept of the old line lumber yard is ancient history,” Dietrich said this week. “We were the last one to sell nails, by the pound, out of a bin, but there are 25 big box stores within a radius of a few miles and there is a paint store on every corner. To survive now, you have to be a low cost, low margin operator.” Located on ve acres bordered by Hillsboro Boulevard and the Florida East Coast Railroad, DBS was founded by Ed’s father, Ed, now 96 and living in North Carolina. His mother, Emily, was the city’s historian for many years and a major force in obtaining National Historical Registry for the Butler House, Old Schoolhouse and Deer eld Beach Elementary School. Maintaining the family’s structure in the business, Ed’s daughters Gretchen and Jessica now help manage the company. Another family member and manager, Brad Wanzenberg, has left the company to become a territory manager for Dixie Plywood. The company that once had an annual payroll of $4 million and 100 employees will be reduced to about a dozen people, Dietrich said. Now space is available for other small business owners. A surf board/paddle board maker already occupies a corner of the former lumber yard. In another corner the metal rebar building is for sale or available for occupancy. It is possible this evolution of DBS could create a smallbusiness emporium of leased space, Dietrich said. With 66 years of history, Dietrich can count hundreds of longtime customers among them the City of Deer eld Beach, the Boca Raton Resort and Cap’s Place restaurant. And while the emphasis at DBS now will be on the big ticket items used in remodeling cabinets, windows and doors customers will still be able to buy a $58 screen door, Dietrich said. “We have a lot of doors and windows, top quality, at a good price.” When he told his father the facts of his new business situation, he took it in stride Dietrich said. “He understands the realities.” BuildersContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, February 22, 2013Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@ yahoo. com or 954-783-8700! LonerganContinued from page 10areas. “We have to nd solutions,” Lonergan said, noting he doesn’t have all the answers. have to nd solutions,” Lonergan said, noting he doesn’t have all the answers. At two shopping centers at Prospect Road and Andrews Avenue, the city owns the parking lots and sidewalks. The sidewalks have been in disrepair for years, and there are no lights in the parking lots. “Some of the newly incorporated areas were promised lights and sidewalks. We need to deliver on those promises,” Lonergan said. Lonergan says the commission has made good progress in the past couple years and has been listening to residents and their concerns. Now they need to focus more actively on the rest of the city. The upcoming city election includes several possible charter amendments, including one to move the city election from March to November. Lonergan said he is “absolutely” in favor of that move. He says the super voters will always vote and a November election brings out other voters ensuring a good turnout. He says the sitting commission has done a good job trimming the city budget but if he is elected, will do more research to be sure the money is going into the right efforts. Lonergan is not a huge supporter of the Wal-Mart proposed for the Kmart site. “We already have to wait for three stoplights to get through that area. Traf c is already a Lonergan’s campaign contributors Thomas Benzi, Michael Miles, Sonja Sears, William Sears, Lorri Winner, Jerry Skidmore, Mitchell Stollberg, Timothy Hart, Janice Balkin, Harold Mann, Patricia Crowley, Sella LLC, Floyd Adams, Michael E. Carn, Dr. Jack Doren Total contributions to date $2,250

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18 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 “A culinary district is very people intensive, and if they’re not busy on the weekdays, they won’t make it,” Arnst says. He doesn’t believe the entire downtown should be a culinary arts district. He says the city needs to market itself so builders are interested in coming to Oakland Park. He would like to see Dixie Highway involved, as originally planned. Arnst maintains that one problem with the current commission is that none of the commissioners know what it is to run a business. He says the city has to be run like a business, and he would bring that skill to the dais. He says the city has spent a lot of money on their consultants, Redevelopment Management Associates, “and they’re no further ahead than they were a year ago.” In coming up with the idea for the culinary arts district, he says, “RMA threw a dart on the wall, and that one stuck.” Arnst says the city needs to get someone to beat the bushes, call on developers and get someone to assemble land and build. He says the cultural arts district is a hard sell. In the area of public safety, Arnst says the city needs a police chief. [A new chief has yet to be named since Chief John Bukata retired.] The city has had recent issues with burglaries in the North Andrews area and problems with vagrants on Powerline Road. Regarding break-ins, Arnst says residents need to get to know their neighbors so they know who belongs on their street. And they need to alert the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce of anything suspicious. He takes down license plate numbers of anyone unknown on his street and suggests that others do the same. Some zoning issues will be coming up, including a variance for adult entertainment bars on Federal Highway. They were previously allowed to stay until 2014. Arnst said he won’t be accepting campaign donations from anyone doing business in the city. He says voters can expect that he will do his home-Arnst Campiagn contributorsCrown Trophy, Roger Mann, Dennis Berrett Total contributions to date $1,000 work and treat everyone with respect. “I try not to open my mouth and insert foot,” he said. ArnstContinued from page 9VOTE March 12 Do it! Start your next good habit.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, February 22, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF Las Orquideas 5640 N. Federal Hwy. Fort Lauderdale 954-772-7272 Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. lasorquideashome.com“I am lucky that I can share my culture with everyone who walks through our doors,” says Las Orquideas owner Fernando Gill, a native of the Medelln region of Colombia. “People just love Las Orquideas Restaurant brings the best of Colombian cuisine to Fort Lauderdale The Friday special Cazuela de Marisco features a bowl of creamy soup over owing with shrimp, clams, crab, white sh and oysters. The hearty “Bandeja Montaera” platter delivers tender skirt steak, pork skin strip, poached egg, arepa, fried plantains, avocado and savory beans. our authentic, home cooked fare and our attentive service. Everyone feels at home when they come here.” At just about any time of day, this bustling eatery is lled with the sounds of lively music, friendly chatter and hungry patrons enjoying mouthwatering Colombian and Latin American specialties. “I’ve been coming here for many years. The people are so nice and the food is always fresh,” says Brian Stormer, a Lauderdale-By-The-Sea resident who pops over the Commercial Boulevard Bridge several times a week to enjoy tasty Colombian gastronomy. “My favorite dish is the grilled sh with soup, salad and beans. It is very healthy. But the Churrasco steak is perfect when you want to treat yourself to some red meat! Also, the prices are beyond reasonable – for example, today I had the grilled sh with 3 side dishes for $10. And it is the same price for lunch or dinner.” Fresh salads, homemade soups, grilled chicken, steak and sh are all integral components of a fairly extensive menu. “We live close by and so come here a lot, I love the skirt steak,” says area resident Ismael Perez. “Sometimes we just stop in to pick up some empanadas and mango juice,” adds his wife Raquel. And the eminently affordable daily specials are also a trademark of this welcoming culinary hotspot. “Our seafood soup is incredible. It is a Friday specialty that I simply love!” says friendly proprietor Fernando. Indeed, this creamy maritime stew is bursting at the seams with shrimp, clams, crab, white sh and oysters. The delightful ocean avors are topped only by the eye-See LAS ORQUIDEAS on page 31

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20 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Jean Robb says she is running because she is unhappy with the direction being taken by the city and because the current commission is not listening to the people. She cites merging the r 30e/rescue department with BSO and adopting the utility tax as two examples of issues that should have gone to the voters. The tax she said will discourage large businesses from locating here. “I had more industrial development when I was mayor, Sun Sentinel and the Publix warehouse, than anyone since,” she said. Robb led a petition drive to force the city to place the proposed utility tax on a ballot, but the effort failed due to misinformation on some of the petitions. Although the re merger with BSO happened two years ago, Robb still contends that is goes against the city charter which prohibits relinquishing city property without a vote. She argues that contract should have prevented retiring re ghters from staying on with BSO enabling them to doubledip pension funds. Robb believes that city funds are spent on the wrong things. She questions the salaries of recreation administrators when fees to play Little League have risen to $120 per player. She would eliminate pensions and health insurance for the mayor and commissioners, and revisit the utility tax. She cites the commission’s handling of the pier restaurant lease as an example of poor performance. As a former chair of a charter review committee, Robb said she would favor a new review of the document and urge that the recall process be simpli ed, moving city elections to November, and revoke the condition of term limits that allow a commissioner, after serving an eight-year term, to run for mayor. “The city is moving in the wrong direction,” Robb said. “This is not our Deer eld Beach.” Robb’s campaign contributorsRobbContinued from page 8Dora’s Haircrafters, Ruth and Edwin Rider, Charles Brown, Guspav Realty, American Rock Restaurant, The Cove, Cove Management, Gerda Sturz, Angelo Pacheco, Fran Bruno, Russell Guardino, John Abdo, developer, Dr. Maureen O’Flannagan, Fred Foreman, Jerry Novickas, Mason Smith, Data Management Associates, Stephen Welch, Joe Dotro, Janis Major, Angela Storr, Gimler Plumbing, Anthony Verderame, restaurateur, Francois Cherisien, Mari Mezidor, Alice Chattman, Ali Crisman, Sandra Jackson, Stacy Krevoy, Adam Krevoy, Margie Brinkmann, Horst Brinkman, Wayne Adams, Don Thomas, John Grassi, JSPC, Frederick Timbrell, Rachel Timbrell, Cheyenne Cox, Betty Buschm COOCVE Master Management, Bruce Rodgers, Sandra Pfendler, National Custom Homes, builder, Clark & Robb, John Grassi, John Connell, Robert Ranta, Geraldine Langlois, Brian Eichler, Cove Bagel, Fred Foreman, Olga Wit, Robert Zukas, Charles Passarelli, Ralph Levy, Elizabeth Tullo, Barry Russell, Arthur Ratte, Shirley Scimone, Ronald Laverne, Daniel Devine, Rosa Ebery, Allen Davis, Robert Lawlor, Herbert Buesser, Keith Bongard, Total contributions to date $18,840Citizens Police AcademyWilton Manors – The Wilton Manors Police Department is offering an eight-week Citizens Police Academy on Thursdays. The goal is to improve the relationship between residents and their police department. Topics covered during the course include: K9 unit, detective bureau, special investigations, drug enforcement and code compliance. Participants will also be able to go on a ride along in a patrol car. Applicants must be at least 18. Non-residents may apply but preference will be given to residents or those who work or own a business in the city. Applications are available at the police station, 2020 Wilton Drive. Call 954-3902150.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, February 22, 2013 with symbols of Christmas. An issue within the Village that concerns her is the possible sale of the Hillsboro Pines Golf Club which could result in residential units being built there. The charge that Century Village residents do not pay their fair share of the ad valorem taxes is not accurate she said. Many do not claim homestead exemption and her building of 80 units pays more than the tax on 20 homes in a nearby neighborhood. Century Village residents also contribute heavily to re/rescue ambulance fees because of their high usage. She also brings up the situation now occurring in the Village where a state statute is being enforced that costs residents with Dish TV a $200 perunit permit fee. The Dish is favored by French Canadians who want their programming in French. She served almost two years on the Deer eld Beach Housing Authority but was removed by the commission after other board members complained about her behavior. She credits the current city commission with being more civil to one another than they have been in the past and rates the city a “3” out of ve points for the way it is being run. “I am the most diverse candidate, a Jewish woman. And it’s time a more estrogen on the commission,” she said.BernerContinued from page 8Berner’s campaign contributorsNancy Giordano, Danielle Lobano, Ted and Judy Schneider Total contributions to date $250Business Seminar Series Deerfield Beach – The Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce, is offering a Business Seminar Series.All classes will be held at ITT Technical Institute, 700 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Classes start at 5:30 p.m. “Quickbooks for Starters and Startups” is the first seminar and will be on Wednesday, Feb. 27. The second will be “Legal & Tax Implications of Starting a Business in Florida. The third is “Quickbooks for Intermediate Users” on Wednesday, March 27. Call 954-427-1050.

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22 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Children & Family2-26 – Jump rope program from 5:30 to 5:45 p.m. at Northwest Branch Library, 1580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach. Event runs until March 28. 954-357-6599. 2-26 – Free Pirate adventures from 12 to 3 p.m. at Pompano Citi Centre, corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway. Music, games, treasure hunt, pirate bounce house, costume contest and arts and crafts. 954-943-4685. 2-27 – Bookworms Storytime and Craft from 10 to 10:30 a.m. at Percy White Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954357-7680. 2-28 – Story Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. at Northwest Branch Library, 1580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954357-6599.Clubs, Charity & Civic Organizations2-25 – Retired Educators meeting at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca Raton Speaker is attorney Jeffrey Devore. He will talk about immigration and naturalization. Meeting is free. New members welcome. 954-2556360 or 561-483-5445. 2-27 – Kiwanis Club of Oakland Park meets at 7:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Boulevard. 954-566-9957. 2-27 – Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach meets at 12 p.m. at Sea Side Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd. Food served. 954-783-4999. 2-27 – Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors meets at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave. 954560-7813. 2-28 – Cocktails for a Cause from 7 to 10 p.m. at American Social, 721 E. Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Event bene ts Broward Children’s Center. Appetizers, cocktails, door prizes and giveaways. Cost is $20 in advance and $25 at the door.SightingsContinued from page 143-2 – Anime Club meets from 2 to 3 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd.. 954-357-7595. 3-8 – Pompano Quilter group meets from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-357-7595.Education & Self Development2-23 – African & AfricanAmerican Stories with Sista Idya from 2 to 2:45 p.m. at Beach Branch Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd. Sista Idya will highlight the many aspects of Black History Month with storytelling lled with audience participation via call and response, creative movement and chanting. 954357-7830. 2-25 – Hail to the Chiefs business networking mixer from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at Business Resource Center, 501 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. Learn from small business owners about how to run a business. 954-586-1111. 2-27 – QuickBooks for Starters and Startups at 5:30 p.m. at ITT Technical Institute, 700 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Sign-in at 5 See SIGHTINGS on page 23

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The Pelican 23 Friday, February 22, 2013 Asked about the proposed Culinary Arts District, she says it’s something new and has to be given a little time. “It’s a neat idea, but it can’t be all mom and pop businesses.” She suggests, “Let’s have some arts in the area, too, not just restaurants.” She said she hopes a proposed urban farm idea works, but she doesn’t know how many residents would participate in a community garden. Other areas also need attention, such as Prospect Road where landscaping improvements were started but apparently didn’t continue. Addressing a proposed charter amendment on moving the local election from March to November, Walls said the local election “needs to stay its own little animal. In November voters won’t be as attuned to local issues.” “Everyone talks about how expensive it is (for local elections.) Our little city pays $60,000. But it shouldn’t be that expensive,” she says. For example, municipalities are charged each time for use of election equipment. “But we already own those machines as Broward County taxpayers.” The current commission is doing an OK job, Walls says, “but they can’t seem to make a decision. They table a lot of things and bring them back up. If they’d read the backup, they could get a lot of their questions answered before the meeting gets started.” Last year the commission raised the millage in order to Walls campaign contributorsRobert Lochrie, Brooke Tiballi, Lochrie & Chakas, Broward Tool, Mack Industries, William Laystrom, William Tobias, John Loparo, Jill Dallett, Dennis Buchta, Barbara Weiss, Mary Alvarez, Torey Alston, Harvey Ross, Mark Walls, William Sears, Katie Freeman, Sonja Sears, CMP Commercial Insurance, Keith Polikoff, Becker & Polikoff, SELA Property Management, Michael Dallett, Helen Dallett Total contributions to date $1,550 give staff raises. Walls is concerned they may have cut staff a little too much mentioning the clerk’s of ce and nance as being understaffed.WallsContinued from page 10p.m. 954-427-1050. 2-27 – Property tax exemption ling assistance from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Appraisers will assist with homestead, senior and other property tax exemption applications as well as answer questions on property taxes. 954-357-5579. 2-28 – Job Skills and Job Search Assistance from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library, 2800 N.W. 9 Court, Pompano Beach. 954-3577670. 2-28 – Ask the Experts tax advice class from 4 to 6 p.m. at Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. Hosted by ACR Bookkeeping Service Plus and Burkersen Tax and Accounting Services, CPAs. 954-5861111. Events & Activities 2-24 – Hazardous waste disposal event at Wilton Manors Municipal Complex, 2100 N. Dixie Hwy., from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. 954-765-4999. 2-27 – Taste of the Beach from 6 to 9 p.m. at El Prado SightingsContinued from page 22 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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24 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Pet rescue bene tWilton Manors – A fundraiser for Grateful Paws Dog & Cat Rescue will be held Wednesday, March 6 from 6 to 10 p.m. at Alibi, 2266 Wilton Drive. A cocktail reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Advance tickets are $20. The entertainment portion of the event, featuring Nikki Adams and “Florida’s Own Dame Edna,” is at 9 p.m. There will also be a raffle and silent auction at 8 p.m. Email sdr@wolfcuff.com for tickets.Family Fun Day and Car ShowPompano Beach – In honor of BSO Deputy Christopher Schaub, there will be a Family Fun Day and Car Show on Saturday, March 2 from 2 to 6 p.m. at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road, just east of Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Vendor space is available at 954-7864223.GreenMarket classesPompano Beach – The Pompano Beach GreenMarket on Saturday, Feb. 23 will include special seminars and demonstrations related to gardening, aquaponics, permaculture, hydroponics, soil making and more. Attendees can also learn how to make smoothies, dehydrate fresh veggies and ferment foods into tasty treats. Classes start at 10 a.m. The GreenMarket runs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Call 954-2928040. Briefs SightingsContinued from page 23Park, 4500 El Mar Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Local restaurants serve food and beverages. Live entertainment and silent auction. Tickets are $30. 954-776-1000. 2-28 – Groundbreaking ceremony at 5 p.m. at Pompano Beach’s Ali Building, 353 Martin Luther King Boulevard. Ali Building will become an arts and cultural center. 954-786-5535. 3-2 – Family Fun Day and Car Show in honor of BSO Deputy Christopher Schaub from 2 to 6 p.m. at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road, Pompano Beach. Vendor space available. 954-7864223. 3-3 – Bingo at St. Henry’s Catholic Church 1500 S. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach. Doors open at 12 p.m. Bingo begins at 1 p.m. Regular games plus three-part jackpot game. Door prizes and refreshments. 954-785-2450. 2-2 – Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Garden Club’s Annual Flower Show and Tea “Vacation in South Florida” from 1 to 4 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive on A1A, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Free admission but donations accepted. 954-941-8748. Health & Fitness 2-25 – Spinal Stenosis A Healthy Spine Series from 4 to 5 p.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E Sample Rd, Deer eld Beach. 954-7597400. 2-28 – Alzheimer’s Prevention Program with author Dr. Gary Small from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E Sample Rd, Deer eld Beach. 954759-7400. 2-28 – Girls Night In health screenings for women from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Broward Health Medical Center, 1600 S Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954-759-7400. 2-26 – Support group for family and friends of people with mental illness from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954-739-1888. 3-5 – Support group for caregivers from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954776-8961. Music 2-26 – Symphony of the Americas at 8:15 p.m. at Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are See SIGHTINGS on page 30Galt Food & Wine FestFort Lauderdale – The inaugural Galt Ocean Wine Food & Wine Festival will be held Saturday, March 2 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Galt Ocean Mile Shoppes, 3351 Galt Ocean Dr. Attendees will hear live music as they sample over 40 fine artisan wines, craft beers and spirits and distinctive food pairings. There will also be live cooking demonstrations and wine pairing explanations. There will also be a retail bazaar and marketplace. Call 561-338-7594.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, February 22, 2013 CranioSacral Therapy (CST)A printed brochure describes CST as a light touch therapy that can create dramatic improvements in one’s life. It releases tensions deep in the body to relieve pain and dysfunction. The end result is an improved whole-body health and performance. This therapy claims to help a full spectrum of pain, illness and dysfunction including migraines, neck and back pain, motor coordination impairments, infant and childhood disorders, brain and spinal cord injuries, chronic fatigue, Fibromyalgia, TMJ syndrome, scoliosis, central nervous system, learning disabilities, post traumatic disorders, orthopedic problems and more. Trained at the Upledger Institute in Palm Beach Gardens, Lisa says, “We use a gentle touch starting with about the weight of a nickel, a practitioner evaluates the client’s internal environment, and using light touch techniques releases any restrictions she nds. It’s effective for all ages from newborns to elders and clients say one treatment leaves them feeling energetic and life changing. Some people are helped with one session. Others do regular follow ups until relief is experienced.” This therapy is said to have bene ted mentally and physically challenged children. Newborns, treated shortly after birth get a lifetime bene t as the tiny body is gently aligned for optimum growthLymphatic DrainageA very mild massage promotes lymphatic ow and proper body function. Ideal for pre and post surgery, this massage is frequently requested by people getting cosmetic surgeries and mastectomies. Lisa describes Re exology as a massage of the feet or hands that opens up the energy channels to the body. Reiki is a system of enlightenment and the hands on healing is passed from master to student. Aura readings claim to help areas of personal and spiritual growth. Lisa concludes with “We are not medical doctors. We are practicing and using proven healing techniques to help clients feel better for long term health. A plan is developed to bring a client to his or her optimal health.”Healing Center staffGiovanna Perpignano is an acupuncture physician, researcher, licensed massage therapist, yoga instructor and women’s health speaker who has been involved in healing techniques since 1973. She earned her National Acupuncture Certi cation in 1994 from the Community School of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Miami, Fl. Allene Graham is an animal communicator, channeler, licensed massage therapist, spiritual minister, guidance counselor, life coach, Reiki master, LaHoChi practioner and chair yoga instructor. She has over 30 years of experience as a senior veterinary technician working with domestic an exotic animals. Lesley Vanvurst is a licensed massage therapist and Reiki practitioner. She gravitates to the elds of medical and sports massage and her goal is to teach clients how to move in a health way to prevent injury and chronic pain. She creates customized treatment for each client. Here’s what a few clients have to say Alice Smith, Fort Lauderdale, says, “We were lucky enough to nd Lisa. She’s amazing at nding just the right therapeutic massage technique to bring relief to aching muscles—especially if you have medical issues. My husband and I couldn’t be happier.” Lorraine S. Pompano Beach, says, “I spent the winter in Pompano Beach and was fortunate to nd Lisa Smith who came to my apartment weekly. I was so impressed by how much she was helping me, that I booked appointments for my husband who was equally pleased. Lisa does whatever it takes to help the body heal and make you feel better. I highly recommend Lisa to those who understands the importance of therapeutic massage for wellness, as well as for speci c problems.” Jenny Spencer says, “ Lisa explains what she’s doing and why. She went that extra mile to pay attention to my special needs as a stroke survivor. She did what no other massage therapist has done for me in the past three years—relaxed my spastic arm so that it lay straight out to the side. She also found a knot just below my knee that allowed my foot, which turned inward to become straight. She’s better than the best.” Call 954-782-6564 for an appointment. Open Mon. to Fri. from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sat. 10 to 3 p.m. Visit the web site for information on the center and the staff at lisashealingcenter.comHealing CenterContinued from page 4

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26 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days. References Available. 954-482-5494. 2-22 CAREGIVER COMPANION 20+ Years Experience. References. Total Patient Care For Elderly. Light Housekeeping – Healthy Cook. Kosher/Gourmet. Mature European Lady. Available To Travel & Cruise. 561-4341411. 2-22 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 3-8 CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 3-8 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs – Carpentry – Plumbing – Roo ng – Masonry – Windows – Painting – Decking – Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 – Emergency Calls. 3-8 MARCELA’S CLEANING – Residential Cleaning. Affordable Service You Can Trust! Experienced & GREAT References. 954-376-0524. 3-1 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill, Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954-818-9538. 2-22 GIGI’S CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable – Honest. More Info. 954-2102248 Or 954-295-7033. 3-8 ROYAL FINE FLOORING – Laminates – Wood Floors – Engineered Floors. Carpets Direct From The Mills. Do NOT Buy Before You Call Us! 954-401-7535. Woman Owned. 3-8 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. STAMP COLLECTIONSWANTED – ACCUMULATIONS & COLLECTIONS Of Stamps. House Calls Made. Call John 954-467-7128 Or 954-6142562. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITYBOCA RATON – On Federal Hwy. HAIR SALON! Barber & Beauty. Owner Retiring. 6 Stations – 2 Private Rooms. Rent Only $1,590 Month Or $35,000. Serious Inquires Only!! 954-415-4937. 2-22 COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 2-15 MISCOLD OMEGA & JAEGER & LECOULTRE Watches & Clocks – Every Kind & Condition WANTED!!. Call Dirk 407-668-2916. 2-22 OLD NAUTICAL STUFF WANTED BY Collector. Sextants, Officers Watches, Captain Clocks, Compasses, Etc. Marine/Submarine. Dirk 407-668-2916. 2-22 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 3-8 THRIFT STORECLF THRIFT STORE – 801 SE 10 St. Deer eld. Monday & Wednesday 10am-3pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-4pm. 20% Off Friday & Saturday ONLY. 954-428-8980. 2-22 GARAGE SALESLEISUREVILLE ANNUAL COMMUNITY SALE! Friday March 1st & Saturday March 2nd 2013. 8am-3pm. Off Copans Between Dixie & I-95. Something For Everyone!!!!! 2-22LOST AND FOUNDMISSING FROM 2501 NE 10 Avenue Pompano Beach. White Female Huskey/Chow Since 12-31-12. REWARD!! 954-941-9541. 2-22 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL Off NE 14th Street Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water, Electric. Up To 33’. $325 Month. Call 954-7814994. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH –Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38 x13’New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges. No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 3-1CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 – Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954-8125192. 3-1 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Private Room & Bath. Private Entrance. All Utilities Included. Furnished/Unfurnished. 1.5 Miles To The Beach. $150 Week. 954-786-9188. 2-22

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The Pelican 27 Friday, February 22, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – LEISUREVILLE 3/2 – 1 Car Garage. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease. Utilities Not Included. Available March 1st. 954-6498867. 2-22 SEASONAL RENTALDEERFIELD BEACH E OF A1A – Due To Cancellation Furnished Efficiency Apt. Available. Pool – Laundry – Yard – Parking. Walk To Beach & Pier. $450 Week/$1,600 Month. 954-428-8262. 2-22 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19 REAL ESTATE FOR SALEPOMPANO BEST BUYS!!!! LOW FEES!!!!!! RIVERGATE – T/H Rarely Available. 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath/1CG – ICW View $475K. 3228 TOWNHOMES/CAMELOT – 2/2 T/H, One Floor Only! Totally Renovated, Approx. 1/2 Block To Ocean $280K. SEA HAVEN #321 B – Remodeled. 2/2 – Adjacent To Marina $155K. GARDEN AIRE VILLAGE S. #415, 2/2 Approx. 1 Mile To Sea! $110K. Contact PJ Carswell, Atlantic Prop. Int. Inc. – 954-242-4260. pj@atlanticprop.com 2-22 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-8 POMPANO AEGEAN OCEANFRONT Large South Side 2/2 + Den Or 3rd Bedroom On Sand. Great Oceanview! Tiled & Remodeled. Hurricane Proof Building. 24 Hr. Security. Garage Park – 2 Cars. New Exercise Room. Hot Tub, BBQ, Heated Pool. Widest Beach In Area. Price Reduced To $359,000. Dynasty R.E. 954295-2356. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH – INTRACOASTAL VIEW! 2/2.5 Remodeled + Built-in Of ce. Tiled Thru-out. Garage. Security, Pets OK. $525,000. MLS # A1744626. Owner 954353-0024. 2-22 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony – Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month. 954-6291324. 3-1 FORT LAUDERDALE – YEARLY RENTAL Coral Ridge Country Club Estates. 2/2 On Intracoastal. 1550 Sq Ft. Magni cent View – 2 Parking Spaces. Unfurnished. No Pets. $1,600 Per Month. Dockage Available For Rent. 954-4925086 Or 954-873-7201. 3-1 POMPANO ADULT CONDO 55+. Nicely Furnished 1/1. Yearly Lease $800 Month. Call 954-943-5531. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH – MARINE COLONY 2/2. Close To Beach. Direct Ocean AccessDock Space Available. Pretty Canal View. Screened Balcony. Small Pets OK! Large Walk-in Closets. Near Public Golf Course. Tennis Courts. Shopping Mall. Available April 1st $1,200 Per Month. 954-6953493. 2-22 APTS FOR RENTBEACH AREA APT As Low As $475 A Week In Season! (3225 NE 6th St.) 95 Yards To Beach; Bright Airy Apt With Cable, Wireless, Parking, Patio, Charming Furnishings And More. Pet Friendly. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com 3-15 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH ATLANTIC – FEDERAL. Ef ciency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 2-22 LUXURY OCEAN-VIEW APT: $1475 A MONTH IN SEASON! (Ocean Blvd & NE 6th St.) European Style Kitchen, Ultra-Quiet, EcoFriendly, Central Air, Tropical Pool, Ocean Views, Dedicated Parking, Coin Laundry, Premium Cable TV, WI-FI And More. Pets OK. 561-5410308; Debbie@pax-properties. com 3-15 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 APT. All New! Screened Florida Room. Ceramic – Granite. Upscale Residential Neighborhood. $1,000 Month. 609-638-1291. 2-22 LIGHTHOUSE POINT – MARINA AREA. Very Attractive Large 2/2. Rent Dock At Marina & Walk Home. $1,700 Month Unfurnished. Agent 954-614-8428. 2-22 PRIMO OCEAN BOULEVARD APT For As Low As $68 A Night In Season! (601 N. Ocean Blvd) Great Area, Great Apt. Great Rates. 95 Yards To Beach. Special Weekly & Monthly Rates Too. Cats & Small Dogs Welcome With Pet Fee. Contact Debbie 561-541-0308. Debbie@paxproperties.com 3-15 POMPANO BEACH EFFICIENCY – (NO KITCHEN) $600 Per Month. More Information 609-6381291. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-22 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. 3-8 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 2-22

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28 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSDon’t miss this month’s seminar at RJ Boyle Studio, 5040 N. Federal Hwy., on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at 7 p.m. Ee will have a few of the best local yellowfin tuna fishermen revealing secrets on how to catch this elusive fish. Mark and Kathy Hamilton Yellow n tuna seminar on Feb. 27from the boat Nauti Girl and Captain Triston Hunt from Timeless and Scored One have spent tons of time over the last few years chasing yellowfin. They have learned all of the little nuances that turn these fish on. Every year, I am approached by a number of people that struggle to catch tuna. Tuna can be extremely finicky and at times you must be totally dialed-in order to catch them. The seminar will start at 7 p.m. but you’re going to want to get there at 6:15 p.m. to eat, drink, and meet the crews. The event will be catered by Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea’s Blue Moon Fish Co. We only have room for 85 people so you must call to reserve your spot. This event will sell out quickly! The cost is $25. Call us at RJ Boyle Studio 954-420-5001Broward in between a big sail sh weekAs for the fishing this weekend, sailfish have been numerous off Miami and Palm Beach. Sails have been caught here and there, right out front. Lots of nice dolphin were also caught this week, all inside 300 feet of water. The kingfish bite has finally been good throughout the week. If the weather cooperates, you will be pleasantly surprised with how good the fishing is going to be. Get Tight! In Deer eld BeachWalgreens, 1005 S. Federal Hwy. Walgreens, 1325 N. Military Trail Peking Tokyo, S.E. 10th Street Shopping Center Josephs Italian Pastries, 788 S. Federal Hwy. Hot Tomatoe, 626 S. Federal Hwy. Marlee’s Diner, 699 S. Federal Hwy. One Price Dry Cleaners, 273 S. Federal Hwy.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, February 22, 2013 FairContinued from page 1else that loves us, knows they have to do this,” said Gail Kammerer, chairperson from the beginning when she had kids at St. Ambrose School. “Some have been at the same work station for the 19 years.” Many of the 750 volunteers see people at carnival they don’t see all year. When it’s over, she, said, ”We have carnival withdrawal.” This massive fundraiser will be held Feb. 28 through March 3 on the school grounds at 380 S. Federal Highway. Hildebrand Rides, Inc. will again supply the thrills, on Saturday at 7 p.m. Father Dalton will be arrested and fair goers will pay to either get him out of jail, or keep him in, a new Tiki bar will open opposite the food court, raf es worth $1,500 and $2,500 will be held, and the music begins Thursday at 6 p.m and goes to Sunday at 9 p.m. Kammerer’s goal is to raise $100,000. She almost made it last year. That money is 10 percent of the school’s budget said Music Minister Bob Colasanti who is also general manager of the parish. Some of the money raised is being designated for a large pavilion to be used for school activities and the carnival’s food court. With a projected cost of $600,000, that promise is still several years away, Colasanti said. Fran Bannon, sales and catering manager at the Bridge Hotel, has been chair of the food court since the carnival was conceived. At the time, her children were very young and enrolled in St. Ambrose School but she has stayed with the job ever since. Why? “I have to support the school. My children were afforded an incredible education. They [the school staff] were my partners in raising my children to be wonderful people,” she said. Bannon normally takes a two-week vacation to oversee preparation of all the food that is served at the carnival. There are no vendors here. Menu items are cooked in the school kitchen or on grills and griddles at the food stations. “We have willing weekend warriors and teams of the same people on the food line every year,” she said. Without the support of St. Ambrose parishioners, the carnival could not be accomplished. They donate all manner of things necessary to bring off the event from catsup to cooking equipment, to knives and forks. “Our school is very small,” Bannon said. “Parishioners support the carnival whether they have kids in the school, or not. We could not do it without them.” What more keeps Bannon heading up this vital component of the carnival? “Well, Father Dalton,” she said.”He’s our rock star… an amazing human being.” This is a special year for all the parishioners at St. Ambrose. It marks the half century of the church and school. Father Dalton has been there 44 of those years. A 50th anniversary album is being assembled with photos of all the parish members. The big event will be a dinner dance this spring.Things to know about St. Ambrose Carnival• Carnival wristbands are $15 on Thursday [with coupon], $20 on Friday, $30 on Saturday and $25 on Sunday. • Buy one by Feb. 27, and a $20 band is good for any day. • Entertainment Thursday – 6 to 10 p.m., Friday5:30 to 11 p.m., Saturday, 1 to 11 p.m., Sunday, 1 to 9 p.m. • For details, search St. Ambrose Carnival. Also online is a wish list of items to be donated, a complete list of the carnival rides, and the names of the carnivals major

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30 The Pelican Friday, February 22, 2013 between $25 and $85. 954522-5334. 2-27 – Tony Bennett at 8 p.m. at Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are between $76 and $151. 954-522-5334. 3-1 – Nat King Cole Generation Hope Generations Concert at 7 p.m. at Keith C. & Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center at Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets are between $75 and $350. 561237-9000. 3-2 – ABBACADABRA – Music of ABBA at 7:30 p.m. at Keith C. & Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center at Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets are between $45 and $65. 561-237-9000. 3 -2 – The Capitol Step s at 2 p.m. at Coral Springs Center for the Arts, 2855 Coral Springs Drive. Tickets are $35 and $45. 954-344-5999. 3-3 – “In the Spotlight” featuring Pianist Jose Menor at 4 p.m. at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Call 561982-8887. Politics & Government 2-28 – Greater Pompano Beach Democratic Club meets at 7 p.m. at E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-867-8629 or 954971-1062. 2-28 – Pompano Beach Republican Club meets at 7 p.m. at Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Items for America’s Moms for Soldiers will be collected. Refreshments served. 954-786-7536. 3-4 – Log Cabin Republic Club meets at 7 p.m. at 603 Kensington Place, Wilton Manors. 954-566-4165.SightingsContinued from page 24

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The Pelican 31 Friday, February 22, 2013 popping portion size. This hearty dish is a real treat for seafood lovers. For those with serious appetites, the Bandeja Montaera is another noteworthy signature dish. It features a large cut of melt-in-yourmouth seasoned grilled skirt steak topped with an egg and served with a cornmeal arepa, a bowl of soul-warming beans and a bedazzling strip of fried pork skin akin to the most decadent slab of bacon imaginable. “This is a typical Colombian dish that was speci cally designed by the mountain people to provide them the energy they would need to work throughout the day.” On the poultry front, “our grilled chicken with passion fruit sauce is truly delicious,” says Fernando. “It has a won-Los OrquideasContinued from page 19derfully exotic and tropical taste to it.” With regards to fresh sh, “people come from all over especially for our Mojarra Frita [whole fried Red Snapper],” insists the gregarious restaurateur. “The sh is aky and tender with a wonderfully crispy exterior.” Indeed, customers seem to enter Las Orquiedas with a purpose, as if already knowing exactly what specialty they are eager to devour. This quaint establishment prides itself on making everything fresh in-house, including the special Colombian spicy sauce which patrons should slather liberally over just about every dish. For an authentic culinary voyage to Colombia, Las Orquideas is truly one of the best options in Broward. And to slake one’s thirst, a bevy of juices, Colombian beers and international wines are offered at wallet-friendly prices. This cozy, unpretentious restaurant serves complete South American breakfast dishes that all come with cheese and chocolate. Fresh breads and baked goods are also available. For lunch or dinner, most large entres are priced around $10. Daily meal specials are offered for $7.60. Beers start at $3 and bottles of wine at $17. There is ample free parking and all major credit cards are accepted. This is also a great place to take the kids as they can get a nice plate of grilled chicken or steak with fries and rice for $6! Don’t forget to try some of the decadent desserts such passion fruit mousse, vanilla an or 3 leches cake. Enjoy! The “Mojarra Frita” or whole fried Red Snapper is a customer favorite.

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