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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00327
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 02-15-2013
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00337

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Friday, February 15, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 7 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Pompano Beach The Cypress Civic Association of Pompano VOTE March 12 Candidates to debate, Feb. 20Beach will meet on Wednesday, Feb. 20, at 7:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6th Street, Pompano Beach. This is an opportunity to Meet the Candidates for the upcoming mayoral election. All interested residents are invited to attend. Fire system delaying use of Deer eld Island Park boat dock By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach A 170-foot dock at Deer eld Island Park has been ready for boaters since November but remains closed under orders from the county re marshal. Broward County Parks and Recreation Director Dan West said the issue is a re suppression system not included on the original plans. The system could cost as much as $200,000, about half See DOCK on page 16 Mixed-use project fails, city sets cap for hotelBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Developer Robert Jolley walked away from Tuesdays commission meeting with new hope that he and his hotel partners could build a hotel on the citys public parking lot at Hagen Park.See HOTEL on page 15 Pompano candidates forumPompano Beach Candidates for the mayor and city commission seats will attend Meet the Candidates Night on Monday, March 4 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 MLK Blvd. A panel made up of members of the events sponsors, The Greater Pompano Beach Democratic Club, NAILS and Small Biz CEDC, will ask questions of each candidate. Audience members will also have an opportunity to meet and greet those running for of ce. Call 954-353-6396 for more information. US 1 focal point gets a redo, but it needs major workBy Judy WilsonSTAFF WRITERDeer eld Beach The citys signature waterfall got a sprucing up this week. Maintenance crews did major work at the southwest corner of US 1 and Hillsboro Boulevard, installing a sprinkler system, clearing massive amounts of dead palm fronds and noxious exotic plants, installing lights, adding red rock borders and laying sod. The clean up involved replacing 40-year old irrigation pipes, a situation city crews discovered once they began digging, and replacing a sidewalk. Its a focal point and we are trying to clean it up, said Bob Harbin, parks and recreation department superintendent. It was a major task. See REDO on page 4 Voters asked to decide dates and process of electionsBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Along with ve commission candidates, voters in this city will be asked to decide on six referenda questions in the March 12 election. The citys Charter Review Board approved the rst four questions unanimously but the last two, moving municipal elections from March to November and eliminating numbered seats, have fostered disagreement. On moving elections from March to November, one side says holding them in November will save the city tens of thousands of dollars and increase turnout. The other side says moving the date would mean city See ELECTIONS on page 14 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Robin Jackson says the city made her street [Northwest 7 Terrace] much more pedestrian friendly, and shes looking forward to the Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] doing the same for Martin Luther King [MLK] Boulevard.Holdouts still persist in MLK streetscape improvementsIt brings value to the neighborhood, it really does, said Jackson, who added that she can now let her granddaughter rider her skateboard around the neighborhood without worrying about her going into the street. On Feb. 7, the city held its of cial groundbreaking ceremony for the Northwest [NW] CRA MLK Busy shovels mark improvements on MLK Boulevard in Pompano Beach. In on the fun are CRA co-director Kim Briesemeister, County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Pompano Commissioner Rex Hardin, Vice Mayor George Brummer, CRA co-director Chris Brown, Mayor Lamar Fisher, Commissioners Charlotte Burrie and Woody Poitier.See MLK on page 29

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2 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Art 2-15 Island City Artwalk from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Businesses host local artists and many serve food and refreshments. Hearts on the Drive also takes place at the same time. Visit www. islandcityartwalk.com. 2-19 Life drawing classes every Tuesday from 6 to 9 p.m. at Rossetti Fine Art Gallery, 132 SW 15 St., Pompano Beach. Fee is $125 for four sessions. 954-9070629. 2-20 Our Art-By-TheSea presents Batik on Rice Paper with Watercolors from 7 to 9 p.m. a LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Community Church, 4433 Bougainvilla Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Tammy Seymour will demonstrate the process of creating rice paper batiks. 954-594-0444 or 954-7857408. 2-20 ArtHalls Black History Month event from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. Music, art, networking and refreshments. 954-586-1111. 2-21 Life drawing classes every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Rossetti Fine Art Gallery, 132 SW 15 St., Pompano Beach. Fee is $125 for four sessions. 954-907-0629.Auctions, Sales2-16 Pompano Beach GreenMarket from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. Held every Saturday. 954-292-8040. 2-16 & 17 Wilton Manors Green Market from Otto McCullough, Youth of the Year from Thomas D. Stephanis Boys and Girls Clubs, accepts the proclamation from Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher. [Staff photo]Youth of the Year 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Held every Saturday and Sunday. 954592-0381. 2-17 Deer eld Beach Green Market at 8 a.m. at The Cove, Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal. Held every Sunday. 561-239-1536 or 561-299-8684.Books & Lectures2-20 Authors Reception featuring Mae Silver at 6 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-357-7595. 2-20 Too Hot to Hide: Remarkable Women of Fort Lauderdale at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. Mae Silver will discuss her latest book detailing womens history in Fort See SIGHTINGS on page 11

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The Pelican 3 Friday, February 15, 2013 Childrens Piano Competition draws tri-county contendersBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach About 130 young pianists will arrive early morning at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, Feb. 23, with their music in hand. For 18 years, the city has offered young children entrance into the competition which has since become the largest piano competition in the state. Organized by the Broward County Music Teachers Association, students adhere to repertoire standards established by the association. The juried event is judged by piano professors chosen from statewide schools and universities. Matthew Reichenberger won the 2012 Advanced II level with his performance of Chopins Ballade in A-Flat Major. This year Reichenberger returns to open the evening recital with Chopins Barcarolle. He will also remain to watch his brother, Jonathan, who won the 2012 Advanced I level, compete for the top prize. Both Reichenberger pianists are students of Maria Gomez, who calls the Pompano Beach competition good and democratic. It really helps the kids reach for higher musical goals. Democratic because beginner students are invited to compete. Bob Luptak, owner of Steinway Piano Gallery in Boca Raton, has been a part of the musical event for seven years and is the benefactor of the $500 Young Steinway Virtuoso award which encourages students to attend summer camps or programs to enhance their studies. This year, cellist Cellist, Iris van Eck will emcee the event. van Eck is the founder of Chameleon Chamber Music series at the Leiser Opera Center in Fort Lauderdale. She was assistant principal cellist in the Florida Philharmonic for 18 years, principal cellist for the Florida Grand Opera where she remained for about eight years. She appears as soloist with various orchestras in the United States and Europe. Sponsored by the City of Pompano Beach and local business owners, the event takes place on Feb. 23 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic center, 1801 NE 6 St. The winners recital is at 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Competition begins at 8 a.m. Visitors are welcome to view the judging. Call 954-7864111.

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4 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 The city has budgeted $5,000 this year to maintain the area which is also highlighted by a wading pool and small deer statue. Because of its location, it could be considered the citys of cial entrance but it is not an impressive one. In recent years the growth behind the coral rock waterfall has resembled a jungle and the grass around it was parched. Litter dotted the area which is now enhancde by two large power boxes, a sign reminding residents of papershredding events and a bus stop. This weeks work is the best we can do with what we have, Harbin said. It needs a major facelift. Ruth Blacketer who headed the citys now defunct Beauti cation Committee, remembers former City Manager Larry Deetjen wanted a better image there and her committee members worked to bring an idea forward. She said that at the time JM Family was going to pay for the improvement. Deetjen said that at the time there was interest from the private sector in the corner. Today a re station would never be located on a busy intersection where response times are critical. The concept was to leverage private investment to upgrade public land. Another plan for the corner was drawn only a few years ago Blacketer said, but no work was ever done. Again her committee did major research to bring ideas to the city. In their research they found their committee underfunded when compared to other cities. Boca Raton for example had $100,000 for beauti cation projects and this was back in the 90s. she said.IWS wins plea for promotional wall graphicsDeer eld BeachIsland Water Sports, described by Mayor Peggy Noland as an iconic business on the beach, got permission to have advertising placards on their building at the A1A S curve. The six wall panels will have a limitation: no logos of the companies who place them there to promote sur ng as a way of life will be allowed. Store owner Linsey Cottrell appeared before the city commission Tuesday to ask that a variance received in 2009 allowing the wall panels with only images be amended to also allow a message and a logo. Cottrell argued that the panels organically advocate a nautical lifestyle and bring an authenticity to our business. Founded here 40 years ago by Cottrells parents, Island Water Sports sponsors the citys surf camp and supports a number of youth events and school charities. According to Cottrell, without the words or logos, companies would not be willing to erect the panels. Putting similar art in the display areas which would cost her business about $18,000 a year she said. Noland said, Ive always been a supporter of your company. The sings are not offensive. Commissioner Joe Miller, who represents the beach, suggested a compromise: eliminate the logo but allow the wording which espouses a sur ng life. Vice Mayor Bill Ganz favored sticking with the limitation established by the Community Appearance Board. The code allows a sign up to 100 square feet. You have a graphic display of 267 feet. Your signs are more like billboards. I dont see how we can allow [the request]. Millers motion to accept the panels with words, but not logos, was approved by the commission 4-1. Home repair funds available for moderate income residentsDeer eld Beach The city has $300,000 in federal and state money for residential home repair and will begin accepting applications Tuesday, Feb. 19. Home repairs must contribute to the health and safety of occupants or address code violations. Applications will be taken until the funds run out. To be eligible, incomes must fall within certain levels, ranging from $38,150 for a one-person residence to $49,050 for a family of three to $71,950 for a family of eight. Call 954-431-7866.Holiday pool hoursDeer eld Beach The aquatic center, 501 SE 6 Ave., will have reduced hours Monday, Feb. 18, Presidents Day. City of ces will be closed all day, but the pool will be open 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.RedoContinued from page 1 VOTE March 12 Who votes? Registered voters in Pompano Beach, Oakland Park and Deer eld Beach will vote for local commissioners and referenda. See page 6.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, February 15, 2013 Florida Water and Land Conservation Amendment topic of DemocratsTerry LaPlante, Legacy Campaign South Florida eld organizer, will discuss an amendment for voters to pass on the November 2014 ballot. The meeting is set for Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. LaPlante will discuss the Florida Water and Land Conservation Amendment that Floridas Water and Land Legacy proposes to put on the November 2014 ballot. The Amendment dedicates LaPlante funding for water and land conservation, management, and restoration by amending the state constitution. The Amendment sets aside one-third of Floridas existing documentary stamp tax revenues (paid when real estate is sold) and guarantees that these funds can be used only for conservation purposes, such as acquiring conservation and recreation lands, managing existing lands, protecting lands that are critical for water supply and restoring degraded natural systems. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call Joanne Goodwin, 954-783-8232. The Pelican is now for sale [5 each] at Publix locations in Lighthouse Point and on Atlantic Boulevard in Pompano Beach. All proceeds from these purchases and additional donations bene t local Publix charities. We thank you for reading The Pelican By Judy Wilson PELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach It took some time, but an $1 million county parks grant has of cially been accepted by the city for a community center in the Tedder/Highlands/ Tallman Pines neighborhood. The two-acre parcel was annexed into the city years ago, but the county continued to maintain the small shelter and playground known as West Pompano Beach Highlands Park. $1 million will buy community centerNow, a 24,000 square-foot recreational building will be built on the site at Northeast 44 Street and 5 Avenue. Parks and Recreation Superintendent Bob Harbin hopes to have a proposal by next week from an architect that will enable him to establish a timeline, and costs, for the project. When preliminary drawings are complete, Harbin said he will hold a community meeting to get residents views. Broward County Mayor Kristin Jacobs has been trying to funnel funds for West Highlands Park since before she was elected to the commission. At the time, around 1996, she chaired a committee of unincorporated neighborhoods and set her sights on the Highlands. Plans were drawn with a community center too big for the site and From leftCity Commissioner Ben Preston, County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, City Commissioner Joe Miller, Deereld Mayor Peggy Noland, County Mayor Kristin Jacobs, Deer eld Vice Mayor Bill Ganz.See CHECK on page 29

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6 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XXI, Issue 7 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & LettersNothing trivial about ashes on the go says local priestBy The Rev. Mark Andrew Jones, BSGCOMMENTARYI was prominently featured on the front page of the Sun Sentinel and the Pelican Newspaper last year for offering Ashes-to-Go at a local Tri-Rail Station in the early morning hours of Ash Wednesday, 2012. This year I was joined by seven lay ministers of St. Nicholas Episcopal Church in the offering of Ashes-to-Go on both the north and south bound platforms of the train station. The growing movement of offering Ashes-to-Go is not without criticism, however. My Ash Wednesday sermon directly responds to criticism heard around the country, explaining at one point that: Only God understands our hearts; so we must never be quick to judge others, and certainly not those, who have the moral courage to step out of the crowd and accept public prayer and the sign of the Cross. This church Gods House will not be a place of judgment. No, this church, the assembled Body of Christ at St. Nicholas, is dedicated to being an Easter people of prayer and worship, to being people of the Resurrection who offer Gods gracious and loving forgiveness as hope for all people, excluding none not even those who at this point in their faith journey give little thought to God. Last year, on Ash Wednesday, our senior warden and I were at the local TriRail Station, offering Ashes-to-Go. We were surprised by the media coverage; but more importantly we were deeply moved by our spiritual encounters with harried and hurried commuters, who took the time to turn aside, to pause, re ect, and pray, and to receive ashes in the form of a cross on their foreheads, while hearing words that can penetrate ones soul: Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return. This week, between 6 and 9 a.m., I was again at the Tri-Rail Station, this time accompanied by seven parishioners serving as Lay Ministers, enabling us to offer Ashes-to-Go on the North as well as on the South-bound platforms. And, once again, we were deeply moved. In some quarters, Ashes-to-Go is a controversial practice. Some priests (mostly from outside this diocese) suggest in effect that the growing movement to offer Ashes-to-Go trivializes what should otherwise be a profound experience. Others argue that the Sacraments and sacramental rites, such as the imposition of ashes, should primarily be for the church and in the church. And virtually all who are opposed to Ashes-to-Go charge that it is a theologically shallow exercise of cheap grace. Now this is a discussion worth having. It is certainly true that living in a culture where perception is often treated as reality, we need to be on guard against the temptation to bolster ours or someone elses image in order to create a potentially misleading good impression. But this is as true for us here inside a church on Ash Wednesday, as it is for those who stopped on the train platform this morning for Ashes-toGo. Todays Gospel challenges all of us to exam our motives; because even doing good can degenerate into mere religious or social posturing. The imposition of ashes is a visible and public act of piety. This morning, after returning from the train station, each and every Lay Minister joyously reported experiencing what it means to be blessed and to be a blessing for others. Ashes-to-Go is just a small part of the Churchs invitation to a Holy Lent. Its just a small invitation; but, with that said, the Church needs to meet people where theyre at. Receiving ashes with the words that You are dust and to dust you shall return is a sobering message. This realization alone is the rst step toward examining our relationships with loved ones, with neighbors and colleagues, with the created world around us, and with God. What we do today, what we begin with the receipt of ashes and those haunting words, our re ections on our own mortality, and the meaningfulness or meaninglessness of our lives, as well as our witness of bearing a cross on our forehead that prompts others to engage in similar re ections, all of this, will help us over the course of the next 40 days of Lent and beyond into the Eastertide to be open to accept the grace of God of which St. Paul speaks today. Ashes-to-Go will not fully prepare people for Easter; nor will this full liturgy in which we are now taking part. It all comes, and only comes, by living authentically and honestly before God and our neighbors. This Church invites everyone to come here for that purpose. We invite people to pray and worship with and among us without insisting that people be anything other than who they are and where they are in their faith journey. Lets rst be honest and authentic. Doing so, we believe, will naturally lead to the assessment of ones relationships with those we love, with neighbors and colleagues, and with God. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church is located at 1111 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach. Call 954-942-5887 for more information. Send comments to this article: siren2415@gmail.com. Please include a daytime telephone number if your comments are sent for publication. ahs, publisherWe favor keeping local elections VOTE March 12 on the March calendarIn Oakland Park, Tim Lonergan faces Layne Walls for Seat 5. Sara Guevrekian, Ruben Jean and Steven Arnst are seeking Seat 1. In addition to electing commissioners, Oakland Park voters will be asked several questions regarding its city charter. One question voters will face is whether or not the local elections should move from March to November. We think voters should weigh the savings of moving local elections to November against some other factors. This year the March 12 election will cost taxpayers about $67,000. Are those savings worth it? In November, the ballots are long with many referenda, state questions, county, state and congressional elections, and every four years there will be presidential elections. Voters should remember that the people they elect locally have the most immediate and continuing impact on their lives. These contenders for local of ce are often lost in the long ballots. Local leaders determine taxes; they can change and add laws, and they can donate tax dollars to charities and spend funds on myriad projects. Local leaders should be carefully studied, questioned and researched. Allowing a weak or unethical person to take the helm could end up costing much more than an election. Careless votes by elected of cials can encumber a city for years or bring on lawsuits that are inordinately costly to the taxpayer. We believe local elections are worth the cost. Oakland Park has shaved the cost of its local elections challenging some of the supervisor of elections practices All cities should do the same.In other cities In Pompano Beach, all registered voters will choose the city mayor. Mayor Lamar Fisher is seeking his third term. Fisher faces David Baumwald. In District 4, Commissioner Woody Poitier faces two challengers: Joseph Wells and Ed Phillips. In District 2, Commissioner Charlotte Burrie will face Thomas Terwilliger. In Deer eld Beach, Mayor Peggy Noland faces former mayor, Jean Robb. In District 3, the candidates are Donna Capobianco, Caryl Berner and Richard Rosenzweig. Next week, The Pelican will publish candidate pro les. Who votes?

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The Pelican 7 Friday, February 15, 2013 In Lighthouse PointOfferdahls, 2400 N. Federal Hwy. Lighthouse Point Marina, 2831 Marina Circle Red Fox Diner, 3640 N. Federal Hwy. Lighthouse Point Police Dept., 3701 NE 22nd Ave. Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St. Bone sh Macs, 2002 E. Sample Rd.Letters Beach re station a slow buildTo the Editor; I moved to Pompano Beach Sept. 2011 and noticed work beginning on the new re station #11 between N. Riverside Drive and A1A. I have biked by it two or three times and have watched it progress. It appears it may be done in a few more months? I nd it interesting to note that the 102-story Empire State Building was built in 409 days: 3/17/1930 to 5/1/1931 and the two-story re house is at approximately 518 days and counting! Wonder what kind of contract this it? Cost plus? Michael C. Jaros Pompano BeachBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Allround athlete and community service volunteer Jordon Murphy took second place in the National Silver Gloves Championships in Independence, MO. earlier this month. The 13-year old Murphy boxes in the 75-pound weight division and went into the tournament as the Florida and regional champion, winning in Tampa and Washington, D.C. Taking on eight boxers from around the country, Murphy defeated two opponents before falling to Malik Nelson of New Jersey. He is the Number Two-ranked boxer in the 12 to 13-year-old division. A resident of Deer eld Beach, Murphy attends Lions Creek Middle School where he is on the track team and maintains a 3.4 grade point average. He also wrestles for the Police Athletic League [PAL] team and plays Little League baseball. It was at the PAL gymnasium here ve years ago that Murphys boxing talents were discovered. Coached by Steve Collazo he began winning tournaments Deer elds Murphy second best U.S. boxer in his class almost immediately. He has completed 500 hours of community service volunteering at local events. BSO Deputy Butch Santy, who heads the PAL program and escorts Murphy to his tournaments said, Jordon has been in the program since he was eight years old. It has been a pleasure to watch him grow as a person and as a boxer. One constant about Jordon is his desire to win and his willingness to put in the hard work to be one of the best boxers, pound-for-pound, in the country. Murphy will be recognized at next months commission meeting.

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8 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 BriefsBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFMike Petrakis, owner of Hellenic Foreign Car Repairs, has been located at 41 SW 5 Ct. in Pompano Beach since 1974. He and his associate mechanic, Jim Erkul, work their magic on two brands, Mercedes and BMW cars. Petrakis says, Im a Greek, and Jim was born in Turkey. Where but in a melting pot like America, would you nd a Greek and a Turk working well together? Mercedes Benz automobile was rst marketed in 1901 and is one of the best known and established vehicle brands in the world. BMW (Bayerische Motoren Werke) or Bavarian Motorworks is headquartered in Munich, Bovaria, Germany. In June 2012, BMW was listed as the #1 most reputable company in the world by Forbes.com. Petrakis says, All of my life I have been involved with cars and mechanics. The cars have undergone many changes in the 40 years that I have been working on them. Safety has improved 100 percent. High-end cars, such as the two brands we service, have air bags in the front, on the sides and on top. Sensors in the cars dictate which air bags will activate if a collision occurs. The passengers in these cars are so much safer with these air bags which are triggered as needed immediately at the collision site. The stability control on slippery roads keeps these cars from losing traction. These amazing improvements as well as other conveniences were made possible when computers were installed. He continues. We provide top service and repair specializing in the workings of these two brands. We do continuing education on the technology of the newer models so that we can diagnose and repair any problems that occur. Hellenic offers A/C, tune up, factory maintenance, computer diagnosis, and front end work, and the owner claims that he and Jim are kept busy all the time. I chose to focus my business on these two cars because thats where I had the most experience. I came from Greece in 1970. I worked in New York for one year and then came to Florida. I worked for the Mercedes dealership in Pompano Beach and in several independent shops while I learned the English language and the ways of America. Asked which of the two cars he prefers, he says, Theyre very much on a par. I drive a Mercedes for its comfort and reliability. When I take a long trip I prefer a Mercedes. If Im going to be driving in traf c, I drive a BMW because of its high performance and precision of driving. It responds quickly to the drivers demand. Mike says his customers prefer him over car dealers for two reasons. They speak directly to me when describing a problem, and Im the one who will x it. And second, our prices are about 30 percent less than the dealers for obvious reasons. We accept any extended warranty and are equipped to do exactly what the dealer would do. We like to have our customers make appointments so that we can give them our full time and attention. Although it is not part of his normal business, Mike will accommodate a customer who wants to sell or buy a car if he, Mike, knows the cars history and value. He claims that these two cars are becoming more and more popular with customers because of their advanced technology. He says, In the last 10 years we have seen more cars with over 100,000 miles and even 200,000 miles than ever before. This is best explained by the fact that they continue to perform better for longer because of the cars construction and technology. Average ownership now is ve or six years. It used to be two or three years. The cars cost less to maintain so drivers are keeping them longer. Ive been doing my work for over 50 years. I still enjoy it and nd it Hellenic Foreign Car Repairs services Mercedes and BMW cars exclusively See HELLENIC on page 11MIke Petrakis, owner of Hellenic Foreign Car Repairs, says while he prefers the Mercedes for longer trips, the BMW is his choice for city traf c. [Staff photo]Legislative town hallFort Lauderdale Voters will have a chance to talk to members of the state legislature at a town hallstyle event on Monday, Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW 5 Ave. Guests include Senator Chris Smith [D-Fort Lauderdale], Senate Democratic Leader, Senator Jack Latvala [R-Clearwater], chair of the Senate Ethics and Elections Committee, and Mary Ellen Klas, Tallahassee bureau chief for The Miami Herald. WLRN Radios Senior Anchor/Reporter and host of The Florida Roundup, Phil Latzman, will moderate. To reserve a seat, visit www. WLRN.org.Learn about Remarkable WomenPompano Beach Mae Silver, author of Too Hot to Hide: Remarkable Women of Fort Lauderdale will discuss her book on Wednesday, Feb. 20 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. The book details womens history in Fort Lauderdale. Her book also shows how white, black, and Seminole women often worked together to solve community issues. In the Feb. 8 issue of The Pelican it was incorrectly written that the event takes place at the Beach Branch Library. The Pelican regrets the error. Call 954357-7830.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, February 15, 2013 Jasmin Shirley, newly appointed chair of the Af rmative Action Committee of the Broward Democratic Party, will speak at the Democratic Womens Club Feb. 20 at 7:30 p.m.at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Shirley is vice president of Community Health Services of the North Broward Hospital District d/b/a Broward Health. She oversees the day-to-day operations of Community Health Services division which is inclusive of fourteen primary care centers, three school-based health centers, a home health and hospice agency, an infusion company, urgent care centers, physician practices and related operations. Shirley was featured in the Women in Medicine, published in Florida Medical Business (September 2006), and received an award in 2006, from the Top Ten Women in Medicine, State of Florida. She served as the chairperson for the 2006 and 2007 March of Dimes WalkAmerica which raised $1.1M and $1.2M respectively; and was recognized in 2005 as a March of Dimes Women of Distinction. Shirley received her masters of science in public health with an emphasis on epidemiology and administration from the University of Miami. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954942-8711Shirley Chair of af rmative action will speak at Democratic clubBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Mark Pollack says four hours of unlimited bowling and shoe rental for $15 is de nitely a deal The Dude abides. Pollack has taken his love of The Big Lebowski the 1998 Cohen Bothers lm about ctional unemployed slacker and avid bowler/pot smoker Jeffrey The Dude Lebowski, played by Jeff Bridges, and translated it to the Over the Line! bowling event; Sunday, Feb. 17 from 8 p.m. to Midnight at Diamond Strike Lanes, 2200 N. Federal Hwy. For years, Pollack and his friends have been endlessly quoting the lm. All we do is walk around quoting that movie. The events title comes directly from a scene where Passion for Big Lebowski drives Over the line! bowling eventone character steps Over the line! during a league bowling game, much to disapproval of Walter, a Vietnam Veteran and The Dudes constantly screwing-up companion. This is not Nam, this is bowling. There are rules, Walter informs the offender. Pollack says its that kind of campiness and whackedout dialogue that makes it such a great lm. Even the most mundane or regular dialogue is humorous because of the placement. Its just random things being said at random times. And its The Dudes love of bowling displayed in one scene where he listens to a tape of bowling alley noises under a poster of President Richard Nixon bowling that makes it the perfect theme for a bowling event. How can you bowl without [quoting] that movie? And like The Dude, Pollacks big into Strikes and gutters . Said Pollack, [Im] passionate about bowling. Its the only sport I really like. To encourage as much embracement of the Lebowski theme, Pollack will be awarding prizes to those who are best dressed as The Dude or any of the other characters in the movie. There will also be a vinyl record and CD swap and live music courtesy of three bands: The Shakers, who play a mix of rock & roll and punk; The Mobile Homies, a combination of rock & roll, punk and country and Los Bastardos Magni cos, a combination of punk and country. Over the line! repeats third Sundays Visit www. blindspotpresents.com for more information.

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10 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFMeet Nancy Crockett, a smiling pleasant lady, who spends her life in a wheelchair, but does not indulge in a pity party. I have such tremendous upper body muscles, I could arm wrestle a football player, she quips, adding, These muscles come from pushing myself around. Ive been knitting since I was six years old. At that early age my hands were turning in. Cerebral Palsy (CP) had begun to rear its ugly head. My great aunt Bert gured out that if I learned to knit, my hands would eventually turn back out and it worked. Ive been knitting and crocheting ever since. At this point, Nancy removed a big bag hanging on the handle of her chair to show some of her work. She held up a simple scarf being made by beginning students and then displayed some of her own beautifully crafted sweaters, berets, slippers and crochet edged towels. I cant produce enough of the Volunteer Nancy Crockett teaches knitting and crocheting every week at the Lighthouse Point Library slippers, she says. Every time I think Im ready to put them on ETAY, the website for hand made items, some one seems to want to buy them. They are triple strand knit with rug backing on the soles to keep feet from sliding. Asked how she prices her products, Mary says she checks retail stores that carry upscale hand knits. I charge much less than they do and so far Ive had no complaints. Christy Keyes, library director, considers Nancy a yarn artist. She says, Nancy does such exquisite work. She is very gentle in her instruction and she really enjoys watching her students grow and succeed. Recently one of her students completed knitting her rst scarf and she paraded around the library showing it off. We all got a [Top] Nancy Crockett, dedicated volunteer, teaches crocheting and knitting weekly at the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point Library. [Photos courtesy of Christy Keyes.]See CROCKETT on page 13Black History at ArtHallPompano Beach ArtHalls celebration of Black History month offers the community a cultural collection of paintings at its artist reception on Wednesday, Feb. 20 from 5:30 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. Ras David Williams and LaVaughn Wright present their art and music will be provided by guitarist and composer Eugene Grey. Adimu Men of Excellence will also perform. ArtHall is the third Wednesday of every month. Call 954-586-1111.Salad Luncheon and Chinese AuctionLighthouse Point The Garden Club of Lighthouse Point hosts its annual Salad Luncheon and Chinese Auction at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 21 at 11 a.m. at St. Pauls Education Hall, 2700 NE 36 St. Cost is $10 for non-members and includes lunch, dessert and coffee. There will be raf es, a silent auction and garden boutique plants for sale. There will also be programs: Waterwise Gardening, and Salads from Your Own Backyard. Reservations are required by Feb. 19. Call Inger Jones at 954-942-9310.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, February 15, 2013 Republicans Have HeartThe February meeting of The Pompano Beach Republican Club is Thurs, Feb 28, 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. The Club will be collecting items for Americas Moms for Soldiers. These items are needed: beef jerky, Slim Jims, wet wipes/baby wipes, Chapstick, granola bars, snack size Chex mix, chips, Doritos, nuts, powdered drink mix, Q-tips, gum, disposable razors, foot powder. For a complete list of items, visit www.americasmomsforsoldiers. com. Dena Espenschied, Field Representative for American Majority Florida is the guest speaker. American Majority is a nonpro t, nonpartisan grassroots organization that trains thousands of activists and candidates each year to be the catalysts for change in their local communities. Dena will discuss pension reform on the local level, including successful results seen in San Diego and San Jose, California in 2012. Call 954-786-7536. Refreshments will be served. challenging. Married with one daughter, Mikes hobby is working in the shop when its closed. Thats when I tackle the most dif cult jobs that require concentration. My philosophy is Where theres dif culty, there is opportunity for success. No car leaves our shop until it is right. We are proud of our name and our work. Brett Snyder, Miami, says hes been bringing his Mercedes to Mike for 10 years. Mike takes time to solve complex problems and he knows these cars inside and out. He takes pride in his work and he makes me feel like a member of his family. I have a 1979 Mercedes 6.9 and a 2004 Mercedes CL 5S. I love them both. Jerilyn Caesar, Pompano, is on her fourth Mercedes and says, Mike has checked out every one of my cars before I bought them. Hes the best. Hes a master mechanic as well as being honest and fair in his charges. Ive been a proud customer for years. Meta Berk, owner of Mercedes Showroom in Pompano Beach, says, Were a business that has used Mikes services for about 30 years. We sell used Mercedes and BMWs, but before we offer them, we have Mike check them out and x anything that needs xing. His knowledge of and workmanship on these German cars is the best. When he says theyre ready, they are ready. Call 954-941-3737. Visit the web site at hellenicauto. com or e-mail: mike@ hellenicauto.com. HellenicContinued from page 8 Lauderdale from 6 to 8 p.m. Her book also shows how white, black, and Seminole women often worked together to solve community issues. 954-357-7830. 2-21 Local author Deborah Sharp will speak at 11:30 a.m. at Delray Beach Golf Club, 2200 Highland Ave. Cost is $25. Lunch included. 561-865-9756.Business2-21 Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce membership breakfast from 7:45 to 9 a.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $10 online, $15 at the door for members and $15 for nonmembers who RSVP and $20 non-members at the door. Call 954-9412940. 2-28 Wilton Manors Business Association networking luncheon from 12 to 1 p.m. at Rosies Bar & Grill, 2449 Wilton Drive. 954-567-1320. 3-6 Business With a Twist networking event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the SightingsContinued from page 2Democratic Club meetingPompano Beach The monthly Palm Aire/Cypress Bend Democratic Club meeting will be held Monday, March 4 at 7 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave. The special guest speaker will be Jacob G. Horowitz, attorney with the law rm of Goren, Cherof, Doody & Ezrol. Horowitz concentrates primarily on local government matters, serving as the assistant city attorney for Pembroke Pines, Tamarac, North Lauderdale and other municipalities. Political Obstacles for City Government is the topic of the night. Light refreshments will be served. Call Ashley Protheroe at 786-8771644 or Jeannie at 954-973-6081.VOTE March 12 Who votes? Registered voters in Pompano Beach, Oakland Park and Deer eld Beach will vote for local commissioners and referenda. See page 6.See SIGHTINGS on page 18

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12 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Rocky Road Historical Group to meet Feb. 17Pompano Beach The Rocky Road Historical Group will hold its annual Black History Month program on Sunday, Feb. 17 from 3 to 7 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Boulevard. Alfonsa McIntosh, Freemans Funeral Home, O.C. Phillips Barber Shop, John Lees Shoe Shop, McMillion Barbeque, Sunshine Health Center and Shamrock Service Station will be honored with the Frank & Florena Ali Entrepreneurs Award. A table of eight costs $250. Individual tickets are on sale for $35. Call 954-943-6511.SPECIAL TO THE PELICANDie Zauber te. Mozarts last operatic masterpiece is an allegorical representation of the struggle between good and evil. Through the visionary stage direction of Jeffrey Marc Buchman, this timeless tale comes alive in the imagination of a 1950s teenage boy who reads a book of The Magic Flute at bedtime and, as he dreams, is transported into the story, becoming its protagonist, prince Tamino. Two different worlds the boys reality and a wondrous fantasy land meld through costumes and scenery as the prince is charged by the Queen of the Night with the rescue of her daughter, the lovely Pamina, from the hands of Sarastro. Die Zauber te, The Magic Flute opens in Fort Lauderdale Feb. 21If you go The Magic Flute by MozartFort Lauderdale Broward Center for the Performing Arts / Au-Rene Theater Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 23 at 8 p.m. Tickets may be purchased by phone at 800-741-1010 or online at www.FGO. org. As his quest alongside the bird catcher Papageno nears its end, Tamino comes to know who the real villain is in this story. The Queen of the Night, a role that requires a soprano to sing several Fs above high C, is one of the most iconic characters in opera, will be undertaken by soprano Jeanette Vecchione, a virtuosa of the coloratura category. After debuting the role with the Vienna State Opera, her Queen of the Night at the Thtre des Champs-Elyses in December 2011 not only commanded standing ovations each night, but turned her into a YouTube sensation, generating thousands of online views. The Juilliard School graduate has been described as a rising star ... [with] easy high notes, which she used awlessly, by the Chilean newspaper El Mercurio. Cuban-American soprano Lisette Oropesa makes her FGO and role debut as Pamina. A graduate of the Mets Lindemann Young Artist Development Program, Oropesa has performed with the Met numerous times and is scheduled to return there next season as Gilda in a new production of Rigoletto. Florida Grand Opera has selected her as this seasons Walter and Ida Olson Artist, awarded to an outstanding American artist each year. Our hero, Tamino, is sung by Andrew Bidlack, a former See MAGIC FLUTE on page 25

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The Pelican 13 Friday, February 15, 2013 kick out of her. Nancy has been teaching for two hours every Wednesday from 12 to 2 p.m. for the past two years. I have between two to eight ladies every week, she says. Some are regulars and others come back to learn a certain new technique. Just last week a lady came in to nd out how to attach two sides using knitting needles. Another woman wanted to learn how to cast on which is a rst step. Some return over and over until they are ready to do more sophisticated creations on their own. Librarian Rosemary Wilson says, Nancy is a wonderful addition to our volunteer team. She gives all the time in the world to her students and they love her for it. Some have even come in with half nished projects they started long ago, and she helps them complete them. Were so glad we have her. Nancy enjoys being a volunteer teacher although she has taught professionally and may do it again some day. Whats important to me, she says, is seeing the students enjoy learning. I get great satisfaction. Theres camaraderie here and friendships are formed. Everyone is welcome. I have never had a male student, but men do knit and they are welcome. Keeping hands busy is a great stress reliever. The repetitive motion is very soothing and kind of makes your mind go blank and your troubles slip away. One of her students, Bess Antonelli, says, I was so lucky to nd Nancy who is very patient with those of us who have a hard time mastering knitting. I want to make a blanket for each of my two new great grandchildren who are expected in May. I hope my crocheted blankets will be ready before they are. Although she is now retired, Nancy had a 20-year successful banking career and says, I was a teller until my CP made it impossible for me to stand or walk. When I became a wheelchair person at 42, the bank made me a customer service rep. When working became too dif cult, I stopped and worked part time as a tax preparer to supplement my income. She sighs and says, Recently I lost my mother who was my best friend. I am really challenging my limited physical ability to close up either her house or mine. This is also a very emotional time because my mother was my biggest cheer leader. She made me think I could be independent and I am. She was a much loved, Eucharistic Minister at St. Gabriel, and a dedicated volunteer. She taught me to give back wherever I could. I moved to Florida from Massachusetts after earning a B.S. degree from Worcester State College as a quali ed French and English teacher. I could never get a job teaching because of my CP. Though life has dealt this woman some tough cards to play, she continues to keep teaching and learning. Thank you Nancy Crockett for sharing your skills with the community.CrockettContinued from page 10 Patriotic concertPompano Beach The New Presbyterian Church 100 Voice Concert Choir and The Kings Brass, directed by Dr. John L. Wilson, present A Patriotic Spectacular concert on Sunday, Feb. 17 at 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach High School, 600 NE 13 Ave. The concert will also feature the Pompano Beach High School ROTC Color Guard in a salute to liberty. A pre-concert in the courtyard at 1 p.m. will feature the New Presbyterian Brass Quintet. The concert is free but an offering is suggested. 954-448-5083.

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14 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Record Rack sells classic formats in new locationBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFcandidates would get lost in the mix of state, county and national elections. City government is a unique level of government, said former mayor Layne Walls, who is running for Seat 5 against Tim Lonergan. She voted against moving the elections when she was a member of the Charter Review Board. Shes also worried that future elections will become partisan st ghts. If they move [to November] theres no way that [political] parties wont get involved. Local elections of municipal of cials is a nonpartisan vote in Florida. Candidates who identify their political parties in advertisements or public announcements could be charged with ethics violations. Bill Sears, Charter Review Board member, voted for the move. Sears said past turnout has been pathetic and the cost is too much, especially in this day and age. According to the city clerks of ce, the city has budgeted $67,000 to pay for the election but the exact gure wont be known until after the votes have been cast. In the 2011 city election, 3,865 of the citys 22,715 registered voters cast ballots. In the November 2012 general election, 25,408 voters were registered and 16,084 went to the polls. Our numbers are so small that if we can add even a thousand people, thats huge, said Joanne Darling, Charter Review Board member. She also thinks the money saved could be put to better use. Id love an extra police of cer. Thats a lot of money to me. Voters will also be asked if they want to have citywide elections for all candidates. Such a move would mean that candidates would not seek election for a speci c seat, rather, the top votegetters would be elected as commissioners. Those in favor say that since the seats arent tied to a geographical boundary there is no need to have them. If the referendum passes the top vote getters in the next election will be elected. Presently winners are elected based on the top vote getter for each seat. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said some people are confused by the current system. She said the citywide process will be easier to understand, and voters can choose their favorite candidates overall. Sears prefers numbered seats because it eliminates the need for unchallenged candidates to mount campaigns. By keeping the seats, Sears said, a candidate will only have one or two opponents to raise money against. But by opening it up, every candidate will have to raise more money to run against everyone else. The other four referenda will ask voters to decide on: lling the position of vice mayor if a vacancy occurs, the elimination of ineffective language, making the city manager approve public improvement contracts under the rules of the citys procurement code and requiring commissioners with a voting con ict to disclose that con ict. Visit, www.oaklandpark org for a sample of the Oakland Park ballot.ElectionsContinued from page 1Pompano Beach Vinyls reign as the dominant music format ended long ago but Record Rack has always been a place for vinyl lovers to get their favorite sounds. But vinyl isnt near as dead as it might seem, says Record Rack owner Ritchie Siegrist. In fact, its making a bit of a comeback. When we went from vinyl to CDs it was a drastic change. We sacri ced quality for availability. Now, the appreciation is coming back, said Siegrist from his new location at 2205 E. Atlantic Blvd. Previously located at the Harbor Village Shops, Siegrist opened Record Rack 11 years ago and moved into his new location last month. He compares his new setup, long rows of albums, to the way old school record stores used to be organized. And the new location has exposed him to new customers. I like the fact that Im right up on the highway.See RECORD on page 15

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The Pelican 15 Friday, February 15, 2013 Send your events for publication to mdpelican@yahoo.com Jolley, whose past projects include Island City Lofts on Wilton Drive and a townhouse development on Dixie Highway just south of the city, said he intends to enter into negotiations with the city at some point in the near future. Jolley declined to provide the name of the hotel group. Leigh Ann Henderson, assistant city manager, said the city could enter into negotiations with Jolley without sending out another Request For Proposal [RFP]. Jolleys optimism rose when commissioners unanimously rejected a residential development proposal by IBI Group, an international architecture and engineering rm with of ces in Pompano Beach. Mayor Gary Resnick said the commission appreciates that IBI had $18 million in nancing and was serious about building but its proposal was not close enough to what we want. What commissioners really want is a hotel. Maybe we need to go back to the drawing board, said Commissioner Ted Galatis, referring to the RFP the city advertised last year. Only IBI submitted a bid. IBIs representatives said they looked into a hotel proposal but found that it wasnt nancially feasible. I dont think youre ever going to get a hotel. You have to do what the market supports, said Patrea St. John, IBIs vice president and member of the citys planning and zoning board. IBIs $4.5 million mixeduse development was planned to include between 120 and 280 residential units, 13,000 sq. ft. of retail and restaurant space, a rooftop pool and garden, 1.2-acre plaza and between 300 and 620 parking spaces; including a possible four-story parking garage. Its an opportunity to extend the Wilton Manors brand as a place to live, work and play, said Kevin Greiner, senior planner at IBI. Commissioner Scott Newton worried that developers would be unable to provide enough parking during construction, parking that businesses near Hagen Park depend on. The proposal was also rejected by the special committee formed to review it. Members of the committee said the project wasnt good enough to justify building it on a piece of public property. Sal Torre, president of the Westside Association of Wilton Manors, said he would like to see the city build its own parking structure. But resident Paul Kuta likes things just the way they are and says a development on the parking lot will destroy the space used for the city yard sales, green market and other community gatherings. Cities all over South Florida are trying to cobble open land together to create town centers for a variety of community events. We already have one in Wilton Manors. Yet our city commission seems determined to destroy it by repeatedly authorizing RFPs for high-rise, mixeduse private development on publically-owned land adjacent to our city hall and stealing a portion of Hagen Park, said Kuta.HotelContinued from page 1 Along with vinyl, Siegrist sells CDs, cassettes, DVDs, eight-track cartridges and new and used turntables. He also refurbishes old turntables and will help customers set up their new turntables. One thing you probably wont nd at Record Rack though is an appreciation for the digital age of music. The worst [format] is MP3. I almost feel sorry for the new kids [who have never heard music on vinyl]. But now, he says, a lot of those kids have discovered vinyls quality and theyre coming into his store to get it. At rst the kids were getting into their parents collections. Now theyre just going for the quality, he said. Visit www.therecordrack. net or call 954-783-5004. RecordContinued from page 14

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16 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 of what the dock cost to build. When the project began back in 2011, funded by the Broward Boating Improvement Program and the Florida Inland Navigational District, plans were approved by the Deer eld Beach Fire Department. When the city contracted its re/rescue service to the county, a new set of requirements were imposed on the project, namely a pumping system that will protect not only the dock, but a house on the island and some outbuildings. The county has hired a consultant to draw up a revised plan and the cost being estimated is between $100,000 and $200,000. The additional expense will be paid by the county, West said. West is resigned to adding the system, acknowledging that it will be safer for the wildlife of cer that lives there, but adding it probably wont be effective on the dock since only re ghters can operate it and they have to be transported to the island by boat.By the time they got there it would probably be too late, he observed this week. Dan Yaffe, chair of the countys Marine Advisory Committee, has less patience with the situation. The dock is concrete and aluminum, he pointed out.There is no fuel pump, no overnight stays. It is intended for people to tie up small boats for a few hours, enjoy the island and move on. The dock is a boaters only access to the wildlife and mangrove preserve. Located in the Intracoastal Waterway at the Hillsboro Canal across from Sullivan Park, the 53-acre sanctuary has nature trails, an observation platform, boardwalk, playground and picnic areas. The county does run a boat over on weekends between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. and offers educational expeditions October through May. Yaffe said if the re system must be installed it could be another year before boaters can enjoy the natural terrain. One obstacle encountered during construction was a coral outcropping that had to be removed, but which has given boaters more navigable water he said. Yaffe points out funds for the Broward Boating Improvement Program come from vessel registration fees, not from ad valorem taxes. My agency has satis ed the terms of the contract, he added, inferring it is now up to the county to compete the job. West said he would like nothing better. We are trying to get this project done. It is such neat island. The best he can hope for, he said this week, is that the new re marshal BSO Capt. Bill Boss will concede that the original plans are okay. Boss could not be reached for comment by press time. He was not re marshal when the re suppression upgrade was added to the dock project.DockContinued from page 1Property tax exemption ling assistanceDeer eld Beach The Broward County Property Appraisers Of ce will be available to answer questions about property tax exemption on Tuesday, Feb. 19 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Deer eld Beach City Hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. Another session will be held Wednesday, Feb. 20 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Appraisers will assist with homestead, senior and other property tax exemption applications as well as answer questions on property taxes. Portability applications will also be accepted. Documents required to le a homestead exemption include: a current Florida drivers license, Florida identi cation card, current voter registration card or declaration of domicile. Non-US citizens must also provide proof of permanent residency. Visit www.bcpa. net or call 954-357-5579.VOTE March 12 Who votes? Registered voters in Pompano Beach, Oakland Park and Deer eld Beach will vote for local commissioners and referenda. See page 6.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, February 15, 2013Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@ yahoo. com or 954-783-8700!

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18 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-7838700! SPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach After a 2.5 million dollar restoration and site development effort, the historic SampleMcDougald House opened to the public last year and immediately proved to be a popular site for heritage education as well as civic and social events. The Sample-McDougald House Preservation Societys fifth annual Breakfast for the Big House will, once again, be a most unique and exciting benefit. The event is hosted by John Knox Village, and the proceeds raised help to support the care and maintenance of the historic structure as well as provide for on-going programming at the site.Breakfast at the Big House March 1, celebrity wait staff to serve patrons for tipsThe Breakfast for the Big House benefit will be held on Friday, March 1 at 7:30 a.m., and will take place at the John Knox Village dining room, located at 651 SW 6 St. What makes this event unusual and fun are the Table Waiters & Waiter Teams some of Pompano Beach and Broward Countys finest civic and political leaders who work for tips. This year celebrity waiters include Pompano Beach City Commissioners Rex Hardin and Barry Dockswell, Broward County Mayor Kristin Jacobs, as well as other community leaders. There is no admission charge; however our Waiters do work for tips. You decide what you want to tip. Guests are asked to purchase their tip money in advance in order to save time waiting in line. By prepaying for your tips, your name tag and tip money will be waiting for you at the door. A significant feature of the Breakfast is the presentation of the annual Champion of the Big House Award and the Presidents Award. These awards are in recognition of an individual, business or non-profit organization that has provided significant contribution toward the success of the preservation of the historic Sample-McDougald House. Call 954-783-3400, or 954292-8040 for information. Seaside Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach Cost is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. RSVP at www.PompanoBeachChamber.com.Children & Family2-22 & 23 Broadway for Kids and Grown Ups at 7 p.m. at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $15. RSVP at 561-447-8829. 2-26 Free Pirate adventures from 12 to 3 p.m. at Pompano Citi Centre, corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway. Music, games, treasure hunt, pirate bounce house, costume contest and arts and crafts. 954-943-4685Clubs, Charity & Civic Organizations2-21 Wilton Manors Historical Society meets at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 954-566-9019. 2-25 Retired Educators meeting at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca Raton. Speaker is attorney Jeffrey Devore. He will talk about immigration and naturalization. New members welcome. 954-255-6360 or 561-483-5445. 2-28 Cocktails for a Cause from 7 to 10 p.m. at American Social, 721 E. Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Event bene ts Broward Childrens Center. Appetizers, cocktails, door prizes and giveaways. Cost is $20 in advance and $25 at the door. SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 20

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The Pelican 19 Friday, February 15, 2013 Whats that toilet doing here?! How would you like to wake up in the morning to nd a pretty purple toilet sitting in your front yard, or how about you neighbors?! Donate $20 and you can have this toilet placed in a yard near you. The lucky toilet recipient has the option of having it removed for a donation of $10 or $20 to send it to someone else. Dont miss out on this great fundraiser that is sure to bring lots of laughs. Call 954-4217040 to join the Lighthouse Point teamMore Relay eventsFeb. 28 Relay For Life Give Back Night at Tijuana Flats, 278 S. Federal Hwy., Deer eld will be held Feb. 28 from 5 p.m. to closing. 15 percent of all sales will go to March 10 Shimmy for a CauseMiddle Eastern & Fusion Dance Show. This is a bene t event to raise money to ght cancer featuring a multitude of dancers from South Florida and beyond. It will be held on at 6 p.m., at ARTSERVE, 1350 Sunrise Blvd, Fort Lauderdale. Entrance fee is $25, a portion which will be donated to Relay for Life of Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point and Hillsboro Beach American Cancer Society. There will be door prizes and chance drawings with lots of prizes. Call 954-421-7040 to join the Lighthouse Point team.This week, Hazel Armbrister was honored for her years of work in preserving Black history in Pompano Beach. Through years of activism, Armbrister, a retired teacher, also convinced the city to save an historic building on Martin Luther King Boulevard. The Ali Building, built in 1933, was home to the citys rst Black-owned business, a hair salon and a barber shop. Pictured are Commissioner Woody Poitier, Hazel Armbrister and Mayor Lamar Fisher. Wilton Manors business expoWilton Manors The Wilton Manors Business Association Business Expo will be held Monday, March 11 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park Community Center, 2020 Wilton Drive. Free vendor space is available. Door prizes and refreshments will be available. To become a vendor, call 954-257-8788.

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20 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Education & Self Development2-23 African & African-American Stories with Sista Idya from 2 to 2:45 p.m. at Beach Branch Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd. Sista Idya will highlight the many aspects of Black History Month with storytelling lled with audience participation via call and response, creative movement and chanting. 954357-7830.Events & Activities2-15 Studio 54 party at 7 p.m. at Copy This, 2157 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Memorabilia, interviews and stories from Sal Defalco, former bartender at Studio 54. 954-563-7181. 2-16 Gold Coast Derby Grrls take on the Bradentucky Bombers at 6 p.m. at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Visit www.ticketmaster. com for tickets. 2-27 Taste of the Beach from 6 to 9 p.m. at El Prado Park, 4500 El Mar Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Local restaurants serve food and beverages. Live entertainment and silent auction. Tickets are $30. 954-776-1000. 3-3 Bingo at St. Henrys Catholic Church, 1500 S. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach. Doors open at 12 p.m. Bingo begins at 1 p.m. Regular games plus three-part jackpot game. Door prizes and refreshments. 954-785-2450.Health & Fitness2-16 Reiki class from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Lisas Healing Center. 4301 N. Federal Hwy. Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Cost is $100. RSVP at 954-782-6564. 2-19 Gambling Recreation or Risk? from 10 to 11 a.m. at NE Focal Point Senior Center, 227 NW 2 Street, Deer eld Beach. 954480-4446. 2-19 Seniors, Dating & Sex with Dr. Kate GeMeiner from 12 to 1 p.m. at NE Focal Point Senior Center, 227 NW 2 Street, Deer eld Beach. 954-480-4446. 2-20 Alzheimers Caregiver Support Group meets from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at NE Focal Point, 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. Group meets every Wednesday. 954-4804449. SightingsContinued from page 18 See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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The Pelican 21 Friday, February 15, 2013 Music 2-15 Delray String Quartet performs at 7:30 p.m. at All Saints Episcopal Church, 333 Tarpon Drive, Fort Lauderdale, and on Feb. 17 at The Colony Hotel, 525 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach. Tickets are $35. 561213-4138. 2-17 Passionate Piano Featuring Pianist Catherine Lan at 4 p.m. at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $20 for members and $25 for non-members. 561-998-7784. 2-17 New Presbyterian Church 100 Voice Concert Choir and The Kings Brass present A Patriotic Spectacular at 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach High School, 600 NE 13 Ave. An offering is suggested. 954-448-5083. 2-21 Mostly Mozart at 7:30 p.n. at Lynn Universitys Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Hear letters from Mozarts life and performances of his works, including Fantasy in D minor performed by Roberta Rust. 561-2379000.Politics & Government2-28 Greater Pompano Beach Democratic Club meets at 7 p.m. at E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-867-8629 or 954971-1062. 2-28 Pompano Beach Republican Club meets at 7 p.m. at Emma Lou Olsen Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Items for Americas Moms for Soldiers will be collected. Refreshments served. 954-786-7536. 3-4 Palm Aire/Cypress Bend Democratic Club meets at 7 p.m. at Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Refreshments served. 786-877-1644 or 954-973-6081.Theatre & Film2-16 Kiss Me Kate at 8 p.m. at Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Dinner at 6 p.m. Tickets for dinner and show are $30 and $20 for just the show. Feb. 17 show is at 2 p.m. 954786-4590. Upcoming2-24 Hazardous waste disposal event at Wilton Manors Municipal Complex, 2100 N. Dixie Hwy., from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. 954-765-4999. 3-9 American Association of University Women Pompano Beach Branch Annual Scholarship Fundraiser SightingsContinued from page 20 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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22 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 at 11:30 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St. Featured will be Author Deborah Sharp who will present her soon to be published Mace Bauer Mystery: Mama Gets Trashed. Event includes a silent auction and lunch. Cost is $38. 954-524-2938. 3-16 Tropical Plant Fair from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Pride Center, 2040 Dixie Hwy., Wilton Manors. Free admission. Email rrplottery@ aol.com for vendor space. 3-23 Womens Club of Coconut Creek hosts a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at North Recreation Complex, 4455 Sol Press Blvd., Coconut Creek. Fundraiser to support scholarships for Coconut Creek residents and charitable programs. 954-326-7480.SightingsContinued from page 21

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24 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Pompano Rotarians bring traditional golf tournament back as fund-raiserBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Simona Niculescu recently stood before a room of Rotarians to announce the person who agreed to open the meeting with a prayer. I asked, she said. And he said Yes. Thats what Rotarians do. Since the mid-fifties, members of the Rotary Club of Pompano Beach have been saying Yes. They say Yes to children through Kids in Distress, The Boys and Girls Club, Horses and the Handicapped and Woodhouse. They say Yes to hungry persons through Broward Outreach, Feeding South Florida and the Co-operative Feeding Project. They say Yes to education through four-year scholarships for local high school students. They say Yes to persons caught up in bad times through the Salvation Army, Rebuilding Together and Lifenet4Families. They say Yes to Autism Speaks. In the last three years, this local club has delivered $165,000 to the local community. Its not a club of zillionaires who simply write checks; its a club of working men and women with families who share a love for the community in which they live and work. This month, Rotarians are resurrecting their annual Golf Classic April 20 with an 8 a.m. scramble, and they need sponsors, volunteers, raffle prizes and golfers. Toby Smith, club secretary says, Its going to be fantastic. We are playing the new Greg Norman course. Were giving away a $10,000 Easy-Go, four-seater, street legal electric vehicle. Its a great way for local golfers to take a look at us and our club and join us supporting these charities. Major sponsors, $750, receive a four-team play of 18-holes which includes cart, lunch, recognition at the awards lunch, gift bags, range balls and more. A sponsorship sign for Longest Drive or Closest to the Pin is $200. Foursomes are $400 or $100 per player. Rotary is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. All donations are tax-deductible. To help, play or get more information, call Co-chair Gene Pridemore at 954-8680323. The Rotary Club of Pompano Beach meets at Galuppis Restaurant, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach at noon of Fridays.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, February 15, 2013 In Pompano BeachWinn Dixie, 277 S. Powerline Road Walgreens, 1101 E. Atlantic Blvd. Walgreens, 960 S. Pompano Pkwy Walgreens, 3573 N. Federal Hwy. Walgreens, 2401 W. Atlantic Blvd. UPS Store 49 N. Federal Hwy. Iberia Bank 990 N. Federal Hwy. costing $1.8 million. When residents rejected it saying they would prefer a basketball court and water feature, the plans were shelved. Meanwhile the county CheckContinued from page 5 Tuesday night, Jacobs and County Commissioner Chip LaMarca came to the commission meeting with a gigantic $1 million check for photo op purposes. Jacobs said, It is exciting to have this dream realized. And Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland said, It is nice to see our Broward County tax dollars coming back.Magic FluteContinued from page 12FGO Young Artist and recent San Francisco Opera Adler Fellow. He last joined FGO for the 2010-2011 production of Don Giovanni, where he brought a smooth tenor voice to the role of Don Octavio, according to South Florida Classical Review. Former FGO Young Artist Jonathan G. Michie, a South Florida favorite, returns home in the comedic part of Papageno. Praised for vocal mastery and theatrical panache by the San Francisco Chronicle, Michie joined FGO last season in to sing in Romo et Juliette as Mercutio. In the role of Sarastro is Jordan Bisch, described by the Dallas Morning News as a beautifully chocolaty yet wellfocused bass. Buchman joins forces again with conductor Andrew Bisantz, following a smash-hit with FGOs most recent Rigoletto. This production of Die Zauber te was built by New York City Opera in 1988. Miami performances of Die Zauber te are sponsored, in part, by Funding Arts Network, and Fort Lauderdale performances are sponsored, in part, by Funding Arts Broward. maintained the green area at a cost of $50,000 a year. Jacobs spokesperson Marcia Monserrat said the county has been working with the city for ve years to transfer the park parcel. The city took control of it January 31 and will now maintain it and in the future staff the community center. The park will likely be renamed, Harbin said.

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26 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 MASTER GARDNER A1A N.E. BROWARD Wednesday Or Saturday Every Other Week. Must Have Own Tools!! NO LAWN! $150/Day. 954-7817356. 2-15 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days. References Available. 954-482-5494. 2-15 HOME HEALTH AIDE Private Certified. Day Or Nights. Providing Loving & Professional Care. Honest & Reliable. Affordable Rates. References Available. 954-6787754. 2-15 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 3-8 CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 3-8 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs Carpentry Plumbing Roo ng Masonry Windows Painting Decking Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 Emergency Calls. 3-8 MARCELAS CLEANING Residential Cleaning. Affordable Service You Can Trust! Experienced & GREAT References. 954-376-0524. 3-1 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill, Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954-818-9538. 2-22 URIELS PAINTING INTERIOR OR EXTERIOR. Over 10 Years Experience. Affordable Rates. FREE Estimates!! 754-235-4606. All Credit Cards Accepted. 2-15 GIGIS CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable Honest. More Info. 954-2102248 Or 954-295-7033. 3-8 ROYAL FINE FLOORING Laminates Wood Floors Engineered Floors. Carpets Direct From The Mills. Do NOT Buy Before You Call Us! 954-401-7535. Woman Owned. 3-8 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YRS. EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable Love To Clean Windows! Refrigerators, Ovens. No Problem. FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. 215 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 215 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CSTAMP COLLECTIONSWANTED ACCUMULATIONS & COLLECTIONS Of Stamps. House Calls Made. Call John 954-467-7128 Or 954-6142562. 2-15 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITYBOCA RATON On Federal Hwy. HAIR SALON! Barber & Beauty. Owner Retiring. 6 Stations 2 Private Rooms. Rent Only $1,590 Month Or $35,000. Serious Inquires Only!! 954-415-4937. 2-22 COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 2-15 MISCOLD OMEGA & JAEGER & LECOULTRE Watches & Clocks Every Kind & Condition WANTED!!. Call Dirk 407-668-2916. 2-22 OLD NAUTICAL STUFF WANTED BY Collector. Sextants, Officers Watches, Captain Clocks, Compasses, Etc. Marine/Submarine. Dirk 407-668-2916. 2-22 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 3-8 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL Off NE 14th Street Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water, Electric. Up To 33. $325 Month. Call 954781-4994. CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954812-5192. CEMETERY PLOTSSTAR OF DAVID North Lauderdale Garden Of Israel, Family Estate Section. 2 Side By Side Roadside Burial Plots Including 2 Vaults. Must Sell Make Offer. Syd 905-776-1265 Or sydneyn@xplornet.com. ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Private Room & Bath. Private Entrance. All Utilities Included. Furnished/Unfurnished. 1.5 Miles To The Beach. $150 Week. 954-786-9188.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, February 15, 2013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,200 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 3/2 1 Car Garage. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease. Utilities Not Included. Available March 1st. 954-6498867. 2-15 REAL ESTATE FOR SALEPOMPANO PROPERTIES FOR SALE RIVERGATE T/ H Rarely Available. 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath/1-CG ICW View $475K. 3228 TOWNHOMES/ CAMELOT 2/2 T/H, One Floor Only! Totally Renovated, Approx. 1/2 Block To Ocean $280K. SEA HAVEN #321 B Remodeled. 2/2 Adjacent To Marina $155K. GARDEN AIRE VILLAGE S. #415, 2/2 Approx. 1 Mile To Sea! $110K. Contact PJ Carswell, Atlantic Prop. Int. Inc. 954-242-4260. pj@atlanticprop.com. 2-15 SEASONAL RENTALDEERFIELD BEACH E OF A1A Due To Cancellation Furnished Efficiency Apt. Available. Pool Laundry Yard Parking. Walk To Beach & Pier. $450 Week/$1,600 Month. 954-428-8262. 2-15 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE DEERFIELD. Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny With Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furn. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $48,000. 561-3729837. 2-15 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-8 POMPANO AEGEAN OCEANFRONT Large South Side 2/2 + Den Or 3rd Bedroom On Sand. Great Oceanview! Tiled & Remodeled. Hurricane Proof Building. 24 Hr. Security. Garage Park 2 Cars. New Exercise Room. Hot Tub, BBQ, Heated Pool. Widest Beach In Area. Price Reduced To $359,000. Dynasty R.E. 954295-2356. 2-15 POMPANO BEACH INTRACOASTAL VIEW! 2/2.5 Remodeled + Built-in Of ce. Tiled Thru-out. Garage. Security, Pets OK. $525,000. MLS # A1744626. Owner 954353-0024. 2-15 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month. 954-6291324. 3-1 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH UNFURNISHED EFFICIENCIES From $600 $650 Month. Pool Coin Laundry Full Kitchen. Call 954-907-2258. 2-15 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH ATLANTIC FEDERAL. Ef ciency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 2-15 LIGHTHOUSE POINT MARINA AREA. Very Attractive Large 2/2. Rent Dock At Marina & Walk Home. $1,700 Month Unfurnished. Agent 954-614-8428. 2-15 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-22 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. 3-8 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 2-22

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28 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point Earlier in the week, my cousin Fred Gushue and I decided to charter a boat for the afternoon with a few boys from the Calvary High School baseball team. We went down to the Hillsboro Inlet shing eet and met up with a long time customer and friend, Capt. Tom Oberender. who is running a boat named Texas Wireline. We had heard through the grapevine that the grey tile sh were biting so we decided to give it a shot. Grey tile sh make for excellent eating and would be perfect for dinner as long as we could catch them. Tom had a spot picked out about a mile south of the inlet so we loaded up the crew and headed offshore. I still get butter ies in my stomach every time I leave RJ Boyle goes bottom shing, catches tiles galore RJ Boyle and Benji Rosenblum, Joey Gushue and Max Rosenblum from Calvary High School with the days catch.the inlet. I have had so many great catches out of Hillsboro Inlet and this would be no different. We set up in 400 feet of water with two rods rigged with ve hooks and a fourpound lead at the bottom. For bait we used cut squid on each hook. We freespooled the line until it hit the bottom and before we were able to lock the reel up the rods began to bounce. We left the rig down for a second and then began to reel. The rods bent over and we all smiled as we brought the sh to the boat. Tiles! Tom had put us on to the mother lode as he has done time and time again with charters from all over the world. What was surprising about this catch was the size of the sh. Grey tile sh on average off our coast range from one to three pounds. The tiles we caught on this trip were all between two and ve pounds. We caught sh non-stop for a few hours and decided to go in early as we knew we had a lot of lleting to do. The mate on the boat used to work as a chef so he made short work of all of the sh. As I pulled out of the parking lot I glanced at the lighthouse and thanked God for another productive trip. The captains and mates working out of Hillsboro Inlet are some of the best in the world. They give 100 percent and produce great catches year round. If you have never chartered a boat you should give it a try its totally worth it. If you have any questions about techniques and tackle for tile sh give us a call at the shop, 954-420-5001, and we can get you dialed in. Til next time.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, February 15, 2013 BOCA RATON SYMPHONIA Side by Side with musicians from Florida Atlantic University and the Youth Orchestra of Palm Beach County Conductor Kyle Prescott, D.M.A. Presented by the City of Boca Raton Monday, February 18, at 7 p.m. Mizner Park Amphitheater For more information: 1 866 Music 01 (1 866 687 4201) www.bocasymphonia.org A CONCERT FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY PLEASE JOIN US! Musicians from Florida Atlantic University* and theYouth Orchestra of Palm Beach County will sit with Boca Raton Symphonia musicians to present an inter generational performance of music, education and entertainment for the community. The program will fea ture traditional favorites including: Gershwin's American in Paris Suite; Bizet's Carmen; Horner's Somewhere Out There from An American Tail; Brahms' Hungarian Dance No. 5 and Strauss' Radetzky March Op. 228. MEET THE ORCHESTRA Come early and take part in our program starting at 6:15 p.m. Have fun touching and seeing the instruments up close and talking to the musicians. This special program is free to the public, rain or shine and will take place under the "big tent." Blankets and chairs are welcome, and chairs are also available to rent for $5. *The Boca Raton Symphonia is Ensemble in Residence at Florida Atlantic University streetscape improvements. Plans for the $11 million project include 60 new parking spaces, landscape, lighting and sidewalk improvements and entryway signs for MLK and Historic Downtown Pompano. About $7 million of that money is supposed to be spent on MLK with the rest going to Downtown. Work will start this month on replacing a water main under MLK Boulevard. Once that is complete, at either the end of May or beginning of June, work can begin on the surface improvements. The whole project is estimated to take about a year to complete. The water main is being replaced to ensure that capacity is suf cient enough to handle new development. Of cials hope that the streetscape improvements, the renovation of the Ali Building, 357 Hammondville Road, the 731 MLK Boulevard retail building and the new bus terminal at the corner of Dixie Highway and MLK will help revitalize the area and attract new development. Making property values go up. Thats what its all about, said Carlton Moore, liaison to the Northwest Community Redevelopment Agency [NW CRA] Advisory Committee. But not everyone has signed-off on the project. According to Horatio Danovich, CRA engineer, seven [out of a total of 80 property owners along MLK] didnt give the city permission to make sidewalk improvements in front of their property. Their property values will increase because of it, said Danovich. Moore said CRA of cials hope making the groundbreaking will help win over the last holdouts. He compared the process to dating. Sometimes, he said, it takes more than one night out to impress someone and forge a meaningful relationship. If the city cant get permission from these last few property owners it will be forced to build around their properties. But, said Danovich, if the owners change their mind after funding is spent they will probably either have to pay for their own improvements or leave things the way they are now. Whitney Rawls, NW CRA Advisory Board member, said the planned improvements have been a long time coming. The community is in dire need of removing blight. But, he added, the challenge now is to make sure the improvements dont increase property values to the point where current residents get priced out of our own community. MLKContinued from page 1 costing $1.8 million. When residents rejected it saying they would prefer a basketball court and water feature, the plans were shelved. Meanwhile the county maintained the green area at a cost of $50,000 a year. Jacobs spokesperson Marcia Monserrat said the county has been working with the city for ve years to transfer the park parcel. The city took control of it January 31 and will now maintain it and in the future staff the community center. The park will likely be renamed, Harbin said. Tuesday night, Jacobs and County Commissioner Chip LaMarca came to the commission meeting with a gigantic $1 million check for photo op purposes. Jacobs said, It is exciting to have this dream realized. And Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland said, It is nice to see our Broward County tax dollars coming back.CheckContinued from page 5

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30 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 A new sign at Mr. Squeaky Car Wash, 499 W. Atlantic Blvd., has grabbed the attention of residents and nearby business owners. Bright and colorful, the Mr. Squeaky face caught the eye of Hamid Borjian, who said, A street sign is the best way to attract customers to your local business. It is a throwback to a time when street signs for a business were unique and memorable. The new sign at Mr. Squeaky is the new landmark in Pompano Beach. It is amazing. Mr. Squeaky Car Wash owner Richard Sasso, said the time and effort to display the latest Mr. Squeaky sign was well worth it. It took about two years of total effort to get the sign finally built. The first step was to meet with the City of Pompano Beach zoning department to ensure the sign met with their code. The zoning and development installed the sign in January, both long-time and new customers give us a thumbs up, he added. It appears the hard work and expense has paid off for Mr. Squeaky Car Wash. We just had our best month Mr. Squeakys iconic sign attracts customers, compliments from communityever at Mr. Squeaky. We have steadily grown each month since we first opened seven years ago. We have even been voted as 1 of the Top 50 Car Washes in the USA by Modern Car Care Magazine. services departments at the city reviewed the drawings for the proposed sign on multiple occasions. Each time it was reviewed, the city advised that the sign did in fact meet all of the citys code requirements. I am very grateful to the many departments and staff members who reviewed the proposed sign and ultimately granted their support for it being built, said Sasso. On a typical day since we Richard Sasso, owner of Mr. Squeaky, recently debuted his new sign on West Atlantic Boulevard. [Photo courtesy of Mr. Squeaky]

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32 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013



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Friday, February 15, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 7 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Pompano Beach The Cypress Civic Association of Pompano VOTE March 12 Candidates to debate, Feb. 20Beach will meet on Wednesday, Feb. 20, at 7:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6th Street, Pompano Beach. This is an opportunity to “Meet the Candidates” for the upcoming mayoral election. All interested residents are invited to attend. Fire system delaying use of Deer eld Island Park boat dock By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – A 170-foot dock at Deer eld Island Park has been ready for boaters since November but remains closed under orders from the county re marshal. Broward County Parks and Recreation Director Dan West said the issue is a re suppression system not included on the original plans. The system could cost as much as $200,000, about half See DOCK on page 16 Mixed-use project fails, city sets cap for hotelBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Developer Robert Jolley walked away from Tuesday’s commission meeting with new hope that he and his hotel partners could build a hotel on the city’s public parking lot at Hagen Park.See HOTEL on page 15 Pompano candidates forumPompano Beach – Candidates for the mayor and city commission seats will attend “Meet the Candidates Night” on Monday, March 4 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 MLK Blvd. A panel made up of members of the event’s sponsors, The Greater Pompano Beach Democratic Club, NAILS and Small Biz CEDC, will ask questions of each candidate. Audience members will also have an opportunity to meet and greet those running for of ce. Call 954-353-6396 for more information. US 1 “focal point” gets a redo, but it needs major workBy Judy WilsonSTAFF WRITERDeer eld Beach The city’s signature waterfall got a sprucing up this week. Maintenance crews did major work at the southwest corner of US 1 and Hillsboro Boulevard, installing a sprinkler system, clearing massive amounts of dead palm fronds and noxious exotic plants, installing lights, adding red rock borders and laying sod. The clean up involved replacing 40-year old irrigation pipes, a situation city crews discovered once they began digging, and replacing a sidewalk. “It’s a focal point and we are trying to clean it up,” said Bob Harbin, parks and recreation department superintendent. “It was a major task.” See REDO on page 4 Voters asked to decide dates and process of electionsBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – Along with ve commission candidates, voters in this city will be asked to decide on six referenda questions in the March 12 election. The city’s Charter Review Board approved the rst four questions unanimously but the last two, moving municipal elections from March to November and eliminating numbered seats, have fostered disagreement. On moving elections from March to November, one side says holding them in November will save the city tens of thousands of dollars and increase turnout. The other side says moving the date would mean city See ELECTIONS on page 14 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Robin Jackson says the city made her street [Northwest 7 Terrace] much more pedestrian friendly, and she’s looking forward to the Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] doing the same for Martin Luther King [MLK] Boulevard.Holdouts still persist in MLK streetscape improvements“It brings value to the neighborhood, it really does,” said Jackson, who added that she can now let her granddaughter rider her skateboard around the neighborhood without worrying about her going into the street. On Feb. 7, the city held its of cial groundbreaking ceremony for the Northwest [NW] CRA MLK Busy shovels mark improvements on MLK Boulevard in Pompano Beach. In on the fun are CRA co-director Kim Briesemeister, County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Pompano Commissioner Rex Hardin, Vice Mayor George Brummer, CRA co-director Chris Brown, Mayor Lamar Fisher, Commissioners Charlotte Burrie and Woody Poitier.See MLK on page 29

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2 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Art 2-15 – Island City Artwalk from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Businesses host local artists and many serve food and refreshments. Hearts on the Drive also takes place at the same time. Visit www. islandcityartwalk.com. 2-19 – Life drawing classes every Tuesday from 6 to 9 p.m. at Rossetti Fine Art Gallery, 132 SW 15 St., Pompano Beach. Fee is $125 for four sessions. 954-9070629. 2-20 – Our Art-By-TheSea presents Batik on Rice Paper with Watercolors from 7 to 9 p.m. a LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Community Church, 4433 Bougainvilla Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Tammy Seymour will demonstrate the process of creating rice paper batiks. 954-594-0444 or 954-7857408. 2-20 – ArtHall’s Black History Month event from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. Music, art, networking and refreshments. 954-586-1111. 2-21 – Life drawing classes every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Rossetti Fine Art Gallery, 132 SW 15 St., Pompano Beach. Fee is $125 for four sessions. 954-907-0629.Auctions, Sales2-16 – Pompano Beach GreenMarket from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. Held every Saturday. 954-292-8040. 2-16 & 17 – Wilton Manors Green Market from Otto McCullough, Youth of the Year from Thomas D. Stephanis Boys and Girls Clubs, accepts the proclamation from Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher. [Staff photo]Youth of the Year 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Held every Saturday and Sunday. 954592-0381. 2-17 – Deer eld Beach Green Market at 8 a.m. at The Cove, Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal. Held every Sunday. 561-239-1536 or 561-299-8684.Books & Lectures2-20 – Author’s Reception featuring Mae Silver at 6 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-357-7595. 2-20 – Too Hot to Hide: Remarkable Women of Fort Lauderdale at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. Mae Silver will discuss her latest book detailing women’s history in Fort See SIGHTINGS on page 11

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The Pelican 3 Friday, February 15, 2013 Children’s Piano Competition draws tri-county contendersBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach About 130 young pianists will arrive early morning at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, Feb. 23, with their music in hand. For 18 years, the city has offered young children entrance into the competition which has since become the largest piano competition in the state. Organized by the Broward County Music Teachers Association, students adhere to repertoire standards established by the association. The juried event is judged by piano professors chosen from statewide schools and universities. Matthew Reichenberger won the 2012 Advanced II level with his performance of Chopin’s Ballade in A-Flat Major. This year Reichenberger returns to open the evening recital with Chopin’s Barcarolle. He will also remain to watch his brother, Jonathan, who won the 2012 Advanced I level, compete for the top prize. Both Reichenberger pianists are students of Maria Gomez, who calls the Pompano Beach competition “good and democratic. It really helps the kids reach for higher musical goals.” Democratic because beginner students are invited to compete. Bob Luptak, owner of Steinway Piano Gallery in Boca Raton, has been a part of the musical event for seven years and is the benefactor of the $500 “Young Steinway Virtuoso” award which encourages students to attend summer camps or programs to enhance their studies. This year, cellist Cellist, Iris van Eck will emcee the event. van Eck is the founder of Chameleon Chamber Music series at the Leiser Opera Center in Fort Lauderdale. She was assistant principal cellist in the Florida Philharmonic for 18 years, principal cellist for the Florida Grand Opera where she remained for about eight years. She appears as soloist with various orchestras in the United States and Europe. Sponsored by the City of Pompano Beach and local business owners, the event takes place on Feb. 23 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic center, 1801 NE 6 St. The winners’ recital is at 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Competition begins at 8 a.m. Visitors are welcome to view the judging. Call 954-7864111.

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4 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 The city has budgeted $5,000 this year to maintain the area which is also highlighted by a wading pool and small deer statue. Because of its location, it could be considered the city’s of cial entrance but it is not an impressive one. In recent years the growth behind the coral rock waterfall has resembled a jungle and the grass around it was parched. Litter dotted the area which is now enhancde by two large power boxes, a sign reminding residents of papershredding events and a bus stop. This week’s work is the “best we can do with what we have,” Harbin said. “It needs a major facelift.” Ruth Blacketer who headed the city’s now defunct Beauti cation Committee, remembers former City Manager Larry Deetjen wanted a better image there and her committee members worked to bring an idea forward. She said that at the time JM Family was going to pay for the improvement. Deetjen said that at the time there was interest from the private sector in the corner. “Today a re station would never be located on a busy intersection where response times are critical. The concept was to leverage private investment to upgrade public land.” Another plan for the corner was drawn only a few years ago Blacketer said, but no work was ever done. Again her committee did major research to bring ideas to the city. In their research they found their committee underfunded when compared to other cities. Boca Raton for example had $100,000 for beauti cation projects and “this was back in the 90s.” she said.IWS wins plea for promotional wall graphicsDeer eld Beach Island Water Sports, described by Mayor Peggy Noland as “an iconic business on the beach,” got permission to have advertising placards on their building at the A1A “S” curve. The six wall panels will have a limitation: no logos of the companies who place them there to promote sur ng as a way of life will be allowed. Store owner Linsey Cottrell appeared before the city commission Tuesday to ask that a variance received in 2009 allowing the wall panels with only images be amended to also allow a message and a logo. Cottrell argued that the panels “organically advocate a nautical lifestyle and bring an authenticity to our business.” Founded here 40 years ago by Cottrell’s parents, Island Water Sports sponsors the city’s surf camp and supports a number of youth events and school charities. According to Cottrell, without the words or logos, companies would not be willing to erect the panels. Putting similar art in the display areas which would cost her business about $18,000 a year she said. Noland said, “I’ve always been a supporter of your company. The sings are not offensive.” Commissioner Joe Miller, who represents the beach, suggested a compromise: eliminate the logo but allow the wording which espouses a sur ng life. Vice Mayor Bill Ganz favored sticking with the limitation established by the Community Appearance Board. “The code allows a sign up to 100 square feet. You have a graphic display of 267 feet. Your signs are more like billboards. I don’t see how we can allow [the request].” Miller’s motion to accept the panels with words, but not logos, was approved by the commission 4-1. Home repair funds available for moderate income residentsDeer eld Beach – The city has $300,000 in federal and state money for residential home repair and will begin accepting applications Tuesday, Feb. 19. Home repairs must contribute to the health and safety of occupants or address code violations. Applications will be taken until the funds run out. To be eligible, incomes must fall within certain levels, ranging from $38,150 for a one-person residence to $49,050 for a family of three to $71,950 for a family of eight. Call 954-431-7866.Holiday pool hoursDeer eld Beach – The aquatic center, 501 SE 6 Ave., will have reduced hours Monday, Feb. 18, President’s Day. City of ces will be closed all day, but the pool will be open 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.RedoContinued from page 1 VOTE March 12 Who votes? Registered voters in Pompano Beach, Oakland Park and Deer eld Beach will vote for local commissioners and referenda. See page 6.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, February 15, 2013 Florida Water and Land Conservation Amendment topic of DemocratsTerry LaPlante, Legacy Campaign South Florida eld organizer, will discuss an amendment for voters to pass on the November 2014 ballot. The meeting is set for Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. LaPlante will discuss the Florida Water and Land Conservation Amendment that Florida’s Water and Land Legacy proposes to put on the November 2014 ballot. The Amendment dedicates LaPlante funding for water and land conservation, management, and restoration by amending the state constitution. The Amendment sets aside one-third of Florida’s existing documentary stamp tax revenues (paid when real estate is sold) and guarantees that these funds can be used only for conservation purposes, such as acquiring conservation and recreation lands, managing existing lands, protecting lands that are critical for water supply and restoring degraded natural systems. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call Joanne Goodwin, 954-783-8232. The Pelican is now for sale [5¢ each] at Publix locations in Lighthouse Point and on Atlantic Boulevard in Pompano Beach. All proceeds from these purchases and additional donations bene t local Publix charities. We thank you for reading The Pelican By Judy Wilson PELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – It took some time, but an $1 million county parks grant has of cially been accepted by the city for a community center in the Tedder/Highlands/ Tallman Pines neighborhood. The two-acre parcel was annexed into the city years ago, but the county continued to maintain the small shelter and playground known as West Pompano Beach Highlands Park. $1 million will buy community centerNow, a 24,000 square-foot recreational building will be built on the site at Northeast 44 Street and 5 Avenue. Parks and Recreation Superintendent Bob Harbin hopes to have a proposal by next week from an architect that will enable him to establish a timeline, and costs, for the project. When preliminary drawings are complete, Harbin said he will hold a community meeting to get residents’ views. Broward County Mayor Kristin Jacobs has been trying to funnel funds for West Highlands Park since before she was elected to the commission. At the time, around 1996, she chaired a committee of unincorporated neighborhoods and set her sights on the Highlands. Plans were drawn with a community center too big for the site and From leftCity Commissioner Ben Preston, County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, City Commissioner Joe Miller, Deer eld Mayor Peggy Noland, County Mayor Kristin Jacobs, Deer eld Vice Mayor Bill Ganz.See CHECK on page 29

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6 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2013. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XXI, Issue 7 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & LettersNothing trivial about ashes on the go says local priestBy The Rev. Mark Andrew Jones, BSGCOMMENTARYI was prominently featured on the front page of the Sun Sentinel and the Pelican Newspaper last year for offering “Ashes-to-Go” at a local Tri-Rail Station in the early morning hours of Ash Wednesday, 2012. This year I was joined by seven lay ministers of St. Nicholas Episcopal Church in the offering of Ashes-to-Go on both the north and south bound platforms of the train station. The growing movement of offering Ashes-to-Go is not without criticism, however. My Ash Wednesday sermon directly responds to criticism heard around the country, explaining – at one point – that: “Only God understands our hearts; so we must never be quick to judge others, and certainly not those, who … have the moral courage to step out of the crowd and accept public prayer and the sign of the Cross. This church – God’s House – will not be a place of judgment. No, this church, the assembled Body of Christ at St. Nicholas, is dedicated to being an Easter people of prayer and worship, to being people of the Resurrection who offer God’s gracious and loving forgiveness as hope for all people, excluding none – not even those who at this point in their faith journey give little thought to God. Last year, on Ash Wednesday, our senior warden and I were at the local TriRail Station, offering Ashes-to-Go. We were surprised by the media coverage; but – more importantly – we were deeply moved by our spiritual encounters with harried and hurried commuters, who took the time to turn aside, to pause, re ect, and pray, and to receive ashes in the form of a cross on their foreheads, while hearing words that can penetrate one’s soul: ‘Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.’” This week, between 6 and 9 a.m., I was again at the Tri-Rail Station, this time accompanied by seven parishioners serving as Lay Ministers, enabling us to offer Ashes-to-Go on the North as well as on the South-bound platforms. And, once again, we were deeply moved.” In some quarters, Ashes-to-Go is a controversial practice. Some priests (mostly from outside this diocese) suggest – in effect – that the growing movement to offer Ashes-to-Go trivializes what should otherwise be a profound experience. Others argue that the Sacraments and sacramental rites, such as the imposition of ashes, should primarily be for the church and in the church. And virtually all who are opposed to Ashes-to-Go charge that it is a theologically shallow exercise of cheap grace. Now this is a discussion worth having. It is certainly true that living in a culture where “perception” is often treated as reality, we need to be on guard against the temptation to bolster ours or someone else’s image in order to create a potentially misleading good impression. But this is as true for us here inside a church on Ash Wednesday, as it is for those who stopped on the train platform this morning for Ashes-toGo. Today’s Gospel challenges all of us to exam our motives; because even “doing good” can degenerate into mere religious or social posturing. The imposition of ashes is a visible and public act of piety. This morning, after returning from the train station, each and every Lay Minister joyously reported experiencing what it means to be blessed and to be a blessing for others. Ashes-to-Go is just a small part of the Church’s invitation to a Holy Lent. It’s just a small invitation; but, with that said, the Church needs to meet people where they’re at. Receiving ashes with the words that “You are dust and to dust you shall return” is a sobering message. This realization alone is the rst step toward examining our relationships with loved ones, with neighbors and colleagues, with the created world around us, and with God. What we do today, what we begin with the receipt of ashes and those haunting words, our re ections on our own mortality, and the meaningfulness or meaninglessness of our lives, as well as our witness of bearing a cross on our forehead that prompts others to engage in similar re ections, all of this, will help us over the course of the next 40 days of Lent and beyond into the Eastertide to be open to accept the grace of God of which St. Paul speaks today. Ashes-to-Go will not fully prepare people for Easter; nor will this full liturgy in which we are now taking part. It all comes, and only comes, by living authentically and honestly before God and our neighbors. This Church invites everyone to come here for that purpose. We invite people to pray and worship with and among us without insisting that people be anything other than who they are and where they are in their faith journey. Let’s rst be honest and authentic. Doing so, we believe, will naturally lead to the assessment of one’s relationships with those we love, with neighbors and colleagues, and with God. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church is located at 1111 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach. Call 954-942-5887 for more information. Send comments to this article: siren2415@gmail.com. Please include a daytime telephone number if your comments are sent for publication. ahs, publisherWe favor keeping local elections VOTE March 12 on the March calendarIn Oakland Park, Tim Lonergan faces Layne Walls for Seat 5. Sara Guevrekian, Ruben Jean and Steven Arnst are seeking Seat 1. In addition to electing commissioners, Oakland Park voters will be asked several questions regarding its city charter. One question voters will face is whether or not the local elections should move from March to November. We think voters should weigh the savings of moving local elections to November against some other factors. This year the March 12 election will cost taxpayers about $67,000. Are those savings worth it? In November, the ballots are long with many referenda, state questions, county, state and congressional elections, and every four years there will be presidential elections. Voters should remember that the people they elect locally have the most immediate and continuing impact on their lives. These contenders for local of ce are often lost in the long ballots. Local leaders determine taxes; they can change and add laws, and they can donate tax dollars to charities and spend funds on myriad projects. Local leaders should be carefully studied, questioned and researched. Allowing a weak or unethical person to take the helm could end up costing much more than an election. Careless votes by elected of cials can encumber a city for years or bring on lawsuits that are inordinately costly to the taxpayer. We believe local elections are worth the cost. Oakland Park has shaved the cost of its local elections challenging some of the supervisor of elections’ practices All cities should do the same.In other cities In Pompano Beach, all registered voters will choose the city mayor. Mayor Lamar Fisher is seeking his third term. Fisher faces David Baumwald. In District 4, Commissioner Woody Poitier faces two challengers: Joseph Wells and Ed Phillips. In District 2, Commissioner Charlotte Burrie will face Thomas Terwilliger. In Deer eld Beach, Mayor Peggy Noland faces former mayor, Jean Robb. In District 3, the candidates are Donna Capobianco, Caryl Berner and Richard Rosenzweig. Next week, The Pelican will publish candidate pro les. Who votes?

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The Pelican 7 Friday, February 15, 2013 In Lighthouse PointOfferdahl’s, 2400 N. Federal Hwy. Lighthouse Point Marina, 2831 Marina Circle Red Fox Diner, 3640 N. Federal Hwy. Lighthouse Point Police Dept., 3701 NE 22nd Ave. Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St. Bone sh Mac’s, 2002 E. Sample Rd.Letters Beach re station a slow buildTo the Editor; I moved to Pompano Beach Sept. 2011 and noticed work beginning on the new re station #11 between N. Riverside Drive and A1A. I have biked by it two or three times and have watched it progress. It “appears” it may be done in a few more months? I nd it interesting to note that the 102-story Empire State Building was built in 409 days: 3/17/1930 to 5/1/1931 and the two-story re house is at approximately 518 days and counting! Wonder what kind of contract this it? Cost plus? Michael C. Jaros Pompano BeachBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Allround athlete and community service volunteer Jordon Murphy took second place in the National Silver Gloves Championships in Independence, MO. earlier this month. The 13-year old Murphy boxes in the 75-pound weight division and went into the tournament as the Florida and regional champion, winning in Tampa and Washington, D.C. Taking on eight boxers from around the country, Murphy defeated two opponents before falling to Malik Nelson of New Jersey. He is the Number Two-ranked boxer in the 12 to 13-year-old division. A resident of Deer eld Beach, Murphy attends Lions Creek Middle School where he is on the track team and maintains a 3.4 grade point average. He also wrestles for the Police Athletic League [PAL] team and plays Little League baseball. It was at the PAL gymnasium here ve years ago that Murphy’s boxing talents were discovered. Coached by Steve Collazo he began winning tournaments Deer eld’s Murphy second best U.S. boxer in his class almost immediately. He has completed 500 hours of community service volunteering at local events. BSO Deputy Butch Santy, who heads the PAL program and escorts Murphy to his tournaments said, “Jordon has been in the program since he was eight years old. It has been a pleasure to watch him grow as a person and as a boxer. One constant about Jordon is his desire to win and his willingness to put in the hard work to be one of the best boxers, pound-for-pound, in the country.” Murphy will be recognized at next month’s commission meeting.

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8 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 BriefsBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFMike Petrakis, owner of Hellenic Foreign Car Repairs, has been located at 41 SW 5 Ct. in Pompano Beach since 1974. He and his associate mechanic, Jim Erkul, work their magic on two brands, Mercedes and BMW cars. Petrakis says, “I’m a Greek, and Jim was born in Turkey. Where but in a melting pot like America, would you nd a Greek and a Turk working well together?” Mercedes Benz automobile was rst marketed in 1901 and is one of the best known and established vehicle brands in the world. BMW (Bayerische Motoren Werke) or Bavarian Motorworks is headquartered in Munich, Bovaria, Germany. In June 2012, BMW was listed as the #1 most reputable company in the world by Forbes.com. Petrakis says, “All of my life I have been involved with cars and mechanics. The cars have undergone many changes in the 40 years that I have been working on them. Safety has improved 100 percent. High-end cars, such as the two brands we service, have air bags in the front, on the sides and on top. Sensors in the cars dictate which air bags will activate if a collision occurs. The passengers in these cars are so much safer with these air bags which are triggered as needed immediately at the collision site. The stability control on slippery roads keeps these cars from losing traction. These amazing improvements as well as other conveniences were made possible when computers were installed.” He continues. “We provide top service and repair specializing in the workings of these two brands. We do continuing education on the technology of the newer models so that we can diagnose and repair any problems that occur.” Hellenic offers A/C, tune up, factory maintenance, computer diagnosis, and front end work, and the owner claims that he and Jim are kept busy all the time. “I chose to focus my business on these two cars because that’s where I had the most experience. I came from Greece in 1970. I worked in New York for one year and then came to Florida. I worked for the Mercedes dealership in Pompano Beach and in several independent shops while I learned the English language and the ways of America.” Asked which of the two cars he prefers, he says, “They’re very much on a par. I drive a Mercedes for its comfort and reliability. When I take a long trip I prefer a Mercedes. If I’m going to be driving in traf c, I drive a BMW because of its high performance and precision of driving. It responds quickly to the driver’s demand.” Mike says his customers prefer him over car dealers for two reasons. “They speak directly to me when describing a problem, and I’m the one who will x it. And second, our prices are about 30 percent less than the dealers for obvious reasons. We accept any extended warranty and are equipped to do exactly what the dealer would do. We like to have our customers make appointments so that we can give them our full time and attention.” Although it is not part of his normal business, Mike will accommodate a customer who wants to sell or buy a car if he, Mike, knows the car’s history and value. He claims that these two cars are becoming more and more popular with customers because of their advanced technology.” He says, “In the last 10 years we have seen more cars with over 100,000 miles and even 200,000 miles than ever before. This is best explained by the fact that they continue to perform better for longer because of the car’s construction and technology. Average ownership now is ve or six years. It used to be two or three years. The cars cost less to maintain so drivers are keeping them longer. I’ve been doing my work for over 50 years. I still enjoy it and nd it Hellenic Foreign Car Repairs services Mercedes and BMW cars exclusively See HELLENIC on page 11MIke Petrakis, owner of Hellenic Foreign Car Repairs, says while he prefers the Mercedes for longer trips, the BMW is his choice for city traf c. [Staff photo]Legislative town hallFort Lauderdale – Voters will have a chance to talk to members of the state legislature at a town hallstyle event on Monday, Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW 5 Ave. Guests include Senator Chris Smith [D-Fort Lauderdale], Senate Democratic Leader, Senator Jack Latvala [R-Clearwater], chair of the Senate Ethics and Elections Committee, and Mary Ellen Klas, Tallahassee bureau chief for The Miami Herald. WLRN Radio’s Senior Anchor/Reporter and host of The Florida Roundup, Phil Latzman, will moderate. To reserve a seat, visit www. WLRN.org.Learn about Remarkable WomenPompano Beach – Mae Silver, author of “Too Hot to Hide: Remarkable Women of Fort Lauderdale” will discuss her book on Wednesday, Feb. 20 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. The book details women’s history in Fort Lauderdale. Her book also shows how white, black, and Seminole women often worked together to solve community issues. In the Feb. 8 issue of The Pelican it was incorrectly written that the event takes place at the Beach Branch Library. The Pelican regrets the error. Call 954357-7830.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, February 15, 2013 Jasmin Shirley, newly appointed chair of the Af rmative Action Committee of the Broward Democratic Party, will speak at the Democratic Women’s Club Feb. 20 at 7:30 p.m.at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Shirley is vice president of Community Health Services of the North Broward Hospital District d/b/a Broward Health. She oversees the day-to-day operations of Community Health Services division which is inclusive of fourteen primary care centers, three school-based health centers, a home health and hospice agency, an infusion company, urgent care centers, physician practices and related operations. Shirley was featured in the “2006 Women in Medicine,” published in Florida Medical Business (September 2006), and received an award in 2006, from the “Top Ten Women in Medicine, State of Florida. She served as the chairperson for the 2006 and 2007 March of Dimes WalkAmerica which raised $1.1M and $1.2M respectively; and was recognized in 2005 as a March of Dimes Women of Distinction. Shirley received her masters of science in public health with an emphasis on epidemiology and administration from the University of Miami. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954942-8711Shirley Chair of af rmative action will speak at Democratic clubBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Mark Pollack says four hours of unlimited bowling and shoe rental for $15 is de nitely a deal “The Dude abides.” Pollack has taken his love of The Big Lebowski the 1998 Cohen Bothers lm about ctional unemployed slacker and avid bowler/pot smoker Jeffrey “The Dude” Lebowski, played by Jeff Bridges, and translated it to the “Over the Line!” bowling event; Sunday, Feb. 17 from 8 p.m. to Midnight at Diamond Strike Lanes, 2200 N. Federal Hwy. For years, Pollack and his friends have been endlessly quoting the lm. “All we do is walk around quoting that movie.” The event’s title comes directly from a scene where Passion for “Big Lebowski” drives “Over the line!” bowling eventone character steps “Over the line!” during a league bowling game, much to disapproval of Walter, a Vietnam Veteran and “The Dude’s” constantly screwing-up companion. “This is not ‘Nam, this is bowling. There are rules,” Walter informs the offender. Pollack says it’s that kind of campiness and “whackedout dialogue” that makes it such a great lm. “Even the most mundane or regular dialogue is humorous because of the placement. It’s just random things being said at random times.” And it’s “The Dude’s” love of bowling – displayed in one scene where he listens to a tape of bowling alley noises under a poster of President Richard Nixon bowling – that makes it the perfect theme for a bowling event. “How can you bowl without [quoting] that movie?” And like “The Dude,” Pollack’s big into “Strikes and gutters .” Said Pollack, “[I’m] passionate about bowling. It’s the only sport I really like.” To encourage as much embracement of the Lebowski theme, Pollack will be awarding prizes to those who are “best dressed” as “The Dude” or any of the other characters in the movie. There will also be a vinyl record and CD swap and live music courtesy of three bands: The Shakers, who play a mix of rock & roll and punk; The Mobile Homies, a combination of rock & roll, punk and country and Los Bastardos Magni cos, a combination of punk and country. “Over the line!” repeats third Sundays Visit www. blindspotpresents.com for more information.

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10 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFMeet Nancy Crockett, a smiling pleasant lady, who spends her life in a wheelchair, but does not indulge in a pity party. “I have such tremendous upper body muscles, I could arm wrestle a football player,” she quips, adding, “These muscles come from pushing myself around.” “I’ve been knitting since I was six years old. At that early age my hands were turning in. Cerebral Palsy (CP) had begun to rear its ugly head. My great aunt Bert gured out that if I learned to knit, my hands would eventually turn back out and it worked. I’ve been knitting and crocheting ever since.” At this point, Nancy removed a big bag hanging on the handle of her chair to show some of her work. She held up a simple scarf being made by beginning students and then displayed some of her own beautifully crafted sweaters, berets, slippers and crochet edged towels. “I can’t produce enough of the Volunteer Nancy Crockett teaches knitting and crocheting every week at the Lighthouse Point Library slippers,” she says. “Every time I think I’m ready to put them on ETAY, the website for hand made items, some one seems to want to buy them. They are triple strand knit with rug backing on the soles to keep feet from sliding.” Asked how she prices her products, Mary says she checks retail stores that carry upscale hand knits. “I charge much less than they do and so far I’ve had no complaints.” Christy Keyes, library director, considers Nancy a yarn artist. She says, “Nancy does such exquisite work. She is very gentle in her instruction and she really enjoys watching her students grow and succeed. Recently one of her students completed knitting her rst scarf and she paraded around the library showing it off. We all got a [Top] Nancy Crockett, dedicated volunteer, teaches crocheting and knitting weekly at the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point Library. [Photos courtesy of Christy Keyes.]See CROCKETT on page 13Black History at ArtHallPompano Beach – ArtHall’s celebration of Black History month offers the community a cultural collection of paintings at its artist reception on Wednesday, Feb. 20 from 5:30 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. Ras David Williams and LaVaughn Wright present their art and music will be provided by guitarist and composer Eugene Grey. Adimu Men of Excellence will also perform. ArtHall is the third Wednesday of every month. Call 954-586-1111.Salad Luncheon and Chinese AuctionLighthouse Point – The Garden Club of Lighthouse Point hosts its annual Salad Luncheon and Chinese Auction at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 21 at 11 a.m. at St. Paul’s Education Hall, 2700 NE 36 St. Cost is $10 for non-members and includes lunch, dessert and coffee. There will be raf es, a silent auction and garden boutique plants for sale. There will also be programs: “Waterwise Gardening,” and “Salads from Your Own Backyard.” Reservations are required by Feb. 19. Call Inger Jones at 954-942-9310.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, February 15, 2013 Republicans Have HeartThe February meeting of The Pompano Beach Republican Club is Thurs, Feb 28, 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. The Club will be collecting items for America’s Moms for Soldiers. These items are needed: beef jerky, Slim Jim’s, wet wipes/baby wipes, Chapstick, granola bars, snack size Chex mix, chips, Doritos, nuts, powdered drink mix, Q-tips, gum, disposable razors, foot powder. For a complete list of items, visit www.americasmomsforsoldiers. com. Dena Espenschied, Field Representative for American Majority Florida is the guest speaker. American Majority is a nonpro t, nonpartisan grassroots organization that trains thousands of activists and candidates each year to be the catalysts for change in their local communities. Dena will discuss pension reform on the local level, including successful results seen in San Diego and San Jose, California in 2012. Call 954-786-7536. Refreshments will be served. challenging.” Married with one daughter, Mike’s hobby is working in the shop when it’s closed. “That’s when I tackle the most dif cult jobs that require concentration. My philosophy is “Where there’s dif culty, there is opportunity for success.” No car leaves our shop until it is right. We are proud of our name and our work.” Brett Snyder, Miami, says he’s been bringing his Mercedes to Mike for 10 years. “Mike takes time to solve complex problems and he knows these cars inside and out. He takes pride in his work and he makes me feel like a member of his family. I have a 1979 Mercedes 6.9 and a 2004 Mercedes CL 5S. I love them both. Jerilyn Caesar, Pompano, is on her fourth Mercedes and says, “Mike has checked out every one of my cars before I bought them. He’s the best. He’s a master mechanic as well as being honest and fair in his charges. I’ve been a proud customer for years.” Meta Berk, owner of Mercedes Showroom in Pompano Beach, says, “We’re a business that has used Mike’s services for about 30 years. We sell used Mercedes and BMWs, but before we offer them, we have Mike check them out and x anything that needs xing. His knowledge of and workmanship on these German cars is the best. When he says they’re ready, they are ready.” Call 954-941-3737. Visit the web site at hellenicauto. com or e-mail: mike@ hellenicauto.com. HellenicContinued from page 8 Lauderdale from 6 to 8 p.m. Her book also shows how white, black, and Seminole women often worked together to solve community issues. 954-357-7830. 2-21 Local author Deborah Sharp will speak at 11:30 a.m. at Delray Beach Golf Club, 2200 Highland Ave. Cost is $25. Lunch included. 561-865-9756.Business2-21 – Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce membership breakfast from 7:45 to 9 a.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $10 online, $15 at the door for members and $15 for nonmembers who RSVP and $20 non-members at the door. Call 954-9412940. 2-28 – Wilton Manors Business Association networking luncheon from 12 to 1 p.m. at Rosie’s Bar & Grill, 2449 Wilton Drive. 954-567-1320. 3-6 – Business With a Twist networking event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the SightingsContinued from page 2Democratic Club meetingPompano Beach – The monthly Palm Aire/Cypress Bend Democratic Club meeting will be held Monday, March 4 at 7 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave. The special guest speaker will be Jacob G. Horowitz, attorney with the law rm of Goren, Cherof, Doody & Ezrol. Horowitz concentrates primarily on local government matters, serving as the assistant city attorney for Pembroke Pines, Tamarac, North Lauderdale and other municipalities. “Political Obstacles for City Government” is the topic of the night. Light refreshments will be served. Call Ashley Protheroe at 786-8771644 or Jeannie at 954-973-6081.VOTE March 12 Who votes? Registered voters in Pompano Beach, Oakland Park and Deer eld Beach will vote for local commissioners and referenda. See page 6.See SIGHTINGS on page 18

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12 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Rocky Road Historical Group to meet Feb. 17Pompano Beach – The Rocky Road Historical Group will hold its annual Black History Month program on Sunday, Feb. 17 from 3 to 7 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Boulevard. Alfonsa McIntosh, Freemans Funeral Home, O.C. Phillips Barber Shop, John Lees Shoe Shop, McMillion Barbeque, Sunshine Health Center and Shamrock Service Station will be honored with the Frank & Florena Ali Entrepreneurs Award. A table of eight costs $250. Individual tickets are on sale for $35. Call 954-943-6511.SPECIAL TO THE PELICANDie Zauber te. Mozart’s last operatic masterpiece is an allegorical representation of the struggle between good and evil. Through the visionary stage direction of Jeffrey Marc Buchman, this timeless tale comes alive in the imagination of a 1950s teenage boy who reads a book of The Magic Flute at bedtime and, as he dreams, is transported into the story, becoming its protagonist, prince Tamino. Two different worlds – the boy’s reality and a wondrous fantasy land – meld through costumes and scenery as the prince is charged by the Queen of the Night with the rescue of her daughter, the lovely Pamina, from the hands of Sarastro. Die Zauber te, The Magic Flute opens in Fort Lauderdale Feb. 21If you go The Magic Flute by MozartFort Lauderdale Broward Center for the Performing Arts / Au-Rene Theater Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 23 at 8 p.m. Tickets may be purchased by phone at 800-741-1010 or online at www.FGO. org. As his quest alongside the bird catcher Papageno nears its end, Tamino comes to know who the real villain is in this story. The Queen of the Night, a role that requires a soprano to sing several F’s above high C, is one of the most iconic characters in opera, will be undertaken by soprano Jeanette Vecchione, a virtuosa of the coloratura category. After debuting the role with the Vienna State Opera, her Queen of the Night at the Thtre des Champs-Elyses in December 2011 not only commanded standing ovations each night, but turned her into a YouTube sensation, generating thousands of online views. The Juilliard School graduate has been described as “a rising star ... [with] easy high notes, which she used awlessly,” by the Chilean newspaper El Mercurio. Cuban-American soprano Lisette Oropesa makes her FGO and role debut as Pamina. A graduate of the Met’s Lindemann Young Artist Development Program, Oropesa has performed with the Met numerous times and is scheduled to return there next season as Gilda in a new production of Rigoletto. Florida Grand Opera has selected her as this season’s Walter and Ida Olson Artist, awarded to an outstanding American artist each year. Our hero, Tamino, is sung by Andrew Bidlack, a former See MAGIC FLUTE on page 25

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The Pelican 13 Friday, February 15, 2013 kick out of her.” Nancy has been teaching for two hours every Wednesday from 12 to 2 p.m. for the past two years. “I have between two to eight ladies every week,” she says. “Some are regulars and others come back to learn a certain new technique. Just last week a lady came in to nd out how to attach two sides using knitting needles. Another woman wanted to learn how to cast on which is a rst step. Some return over and over until they are ready to do more sophisticated creations on their own.” Librarian Rosemary Wilson says, “Nancy is a wonderful addition to our volunteer team. She gives all the time in the world to her students and they love her for it. Some have even come in with half nished projects they started long ago, and she helps them complete them. We’re so glad we have her.” Nancy enjoys being a volunteer teacher although she has taught professionally and may do it again some day. “What’s important to me,” she says, “is seeing the students enjoy learning. I get great satisfaction. There’s camaraderie here and friendships are formed. Everyone is welcome. I have never had a male student, but men do knit and they are welcome. Keeping hands busy is a great stress reliever. The repetitive motion is very soothing and kind of makes your mind go blank and your troubles slip away.” One of her students, Bess Antonelli, says, “I was so lucky to nd Nancy who is very patient with those of us who have a hard time mastering knitting. I want to make a blanket for each of my two new great grandchildren who are expected in May. I hope my crocheted blankets will be ready before they are.” Although she is now retired, Nancy had a 20-year successful banking career and says, “I was a teller until my CP made it impossible for me to stand or walk. When I became a wheelchair person at 42, the bank made me a customer service rep. When working became too dif cult, I stopped and worked part time as a tax preparer to supplement my income.” She sighs and says, “Recently I lost my mother who was my best friend. I am really challenging my limited physical ability to close up either her house or mine. This is also a very emotional time because my mother was my biggest cheer leader. She made me think I could be independent and I am. She was a much loved, Eucharistic Minister at St. Gabriel, and a dedicated volunteer. She taught me to give back wherever I could.” “I moved to Florida from Massachusetts after earning a B.S. degree from Worcester State College as a quali ed French and English teacher. I could never get a job teaching because of my CP.” Though life has dealt this woman some tough cards to play, she continues to keep teaching and learning. Thank you Nancy Crockett for sharing your skills with the community.CrockettContinued from page 10 Patriotic concertPompano Beach – The New Presbyterian Church 100 Voice Concert Choir and The King’s Brass, directed by Dr. John L. Wilson, present A Patriotic Spectacular concert on Sunday, Feb. 17 at 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach High School, 600 NE 13 Ave. The concert will also feature the Pompano Beach High School ROTC Color Guard in a salute to liberty. A pre-concert in the courtyard at 1 p.m. will feature the New Presbyterian Brass Quintet. The concert is free but an offering is suggested. 954-448-5083.

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14 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Record Rack sells classic formats in new locationBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFcandidates would get lost in the mix of state, county and national elections. “City government is a unique level of government,” said former mayor Layne Walls, who is running for Seat 5 against Tim Lonergan. She voted against moving the elections when she was a member of the Charter Review Board. She’s also worried that future elections will become partisan st ghts. “If they move [to November] there’s no way that [political] parties won’t get involved.” Local elections of municipal of cials is a nonpartisan vote in Florida. Candidates who identify their political parties in advertisements or public announcements could be charged with ethics violations. Bill Sears, Charter Review Board member, voted for the move. Sears said past turnout has been “pathetic” and the cost is too much, “especially in this day and age.” According to the city clerk’s of ce, the city has budgeted $67,000 to pay for the election but the exact gure won’t be known until after the votes have been cast. In the 2011 city election, 3,865 of the city’s 22,715 registered voters cast ballots. In the November 2012 general election, 25,408 voters were registered and 16,084 went to the polls. “Our numbers are so small that if we can add even a thousand people, that’s huge,” said Joanne Darling, Charter Review Board member. She also thinks the money saved could be put to better use. “I’d love an extra police of cer. That’s a lot of money to me.” Voters will also be asked if they want to have citywide elections for all candidates. Such a move would mean that candidates would not seek election for a speci c seat, rather, the top votegetters would be elected as commissioners. Those in favor say that since the seats aren’t tied to a geographical boundary there is no need to have them. If the referendum passes the top vote getters in the next election will be elected. Presently winners are elected based on the top vote getter for each seat. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said some people are confused by the current system. She said the citywide process will be easier to understand, and voters can choose their favorite candidates overall. Sears prefers numbered seats because it eliminates the need for unchallenged candidates to mount campaigns. By keeping the seats, Sears said, a candidate will only have one or two opponents to raise money against. But by opening it up, every candidate will have to raise more money to run against everyone else. The other four referenda will ask voters to decide on: lling the position of vice mayor if a vacancy occurs, the elimination of ineffective language, making the city manager approve public improvement contracts under the rules of the city’s procurement code and requiring commissioners with a voting con ict to disclose that con ict. Visit, www.oaklandpark org for a sample of the Oakland Park ballot.ElectionsContinued from page 1Pompano Beach – Vinyl’s reign as the dominant music format ended long ago but Record Rack has always been a place for vinyl lovers to get their favorite sounds. But vinyl isn’t near as dead as it might seem, says Record Rack owner Ritchie Siegrist. In fact, it’s making a bit of a comeback. “When we went from vinyl to CDs it was a drastic change. We sacri ced quality for availability. Now, the appreciation is coming back,” said Siegrist from his new location at 2205 E. Atlantic Blvd. Previously located at the Harbor Village Shops, Siegrist opened Record Rack 11 years ago and moved into his new location last month. He compares his new setup, long rows of albums, to the way old school record stores used to be organized. And the new location has exposed him to new customers. “I like the fact that I’m right up on the highway.”See RECORD on page 15

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The Pelican 15 Friday, February 15, 2013 Send your events for publication to mdpelican@yahoo.com Jolley, whose past projects include Island City Lofts on Wilton Drive and a townhouse development on Dixie Highway just south of the city, said he intends to enter into negotiations with the city at some point in the near future. Jolley declined to provide the name of the hotel group. Leigh Ann Henderson, assistant city manager, said the city could enter into negotiations with Jolley without sending out another Request For Proposal [RFP]. Jolley’s optimism rose when commissioners unanimously rejected a residential development proposal by IBI Group, an international architecture and engineering rm with of ces in Pompano Beach. Mayor Gary Resnick said the commission appreciates that IBI had $18 million in nancing and was serious about building but its proposal was “not close enough to what we want.” What commissioners really want is a hotel. “Maybe we need to go back to the drawing board,” said Commissioner Ted Galatis, referring to the RFP the city advertised last year. Only IBI submitted a bid. IBI’s representatives said they looked into a hotel proposal but found that it wasn’t nancially feasible. “I don’t think you’re ever going to get a hotel. You have to do what the market supports,” said Patrea St. John, IBI’s vice president and member of the city’s planning and zoning board. IBI’s $4.5 million mixeduse development was planned to include between 120 and 280 residential units, 13,000 sq. ft. of retail and restaurant space, a rooftop pool and garden, 1.2-acre plaza and between 300 and 620 parking spaces; including a possible four-story parking garage. “It’s an opportunity to extend the Wilton Manors brand as a place to live, work and play,” said Kevin Greiner, senior planner at IBI. Commissioner Scott Newton worried that developers would be unable to provide enough parking during construction, parking that businesses near Hagen Park depend on. The proposal was also rejected by the special committee formed to review it. Members of the committee said the project wasn’t good enough to justify building it on a piece of public property. Sal Torre, president of the Westside Association of Wilton Manors, said he would like to see the city build it’s own parking structure. But resident Paul Kuta likes things just the way they are and says a development on the parking lot will destroy the space used for the city yard sales, green market and other community gatherings. “Cities all over South Florida are trying to cobble open land together to create town centers for a variety of community events. We already have one in Wilton Manors. Yet our city commission seems determined to destroy it by repeatedly authorizing RFPs for high-rise, mixeduse private development on publically-owned land adjacent to our city hall and stealing a portion of Hagen Park,” said Kuta.HotelContinued from page 1 Along with vinyl, Siegrist sells CDs, cassettes, DVDs, eight-track cartridges and new and used turntables. He also refurbishes old turntables and will help customers set up their new turntables. One thing you probably won’t nd at Record Rack though is an appreciation for the digital age of music. “The worst [format] is MP3. I almost feel sorry for the new kids [who have never heard music on vinyl].” But now, he says, a lot of those kids have discovered vinyl’s quality and they’re coming into his store to get it. “At rst the kids were getting into their parents collections. Now they’re just going for the quality,” he said. Visit www.therecordrack. net or call 954-783-5004. RecordContinued from page 14

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16 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 of what the dock cost to build. When the project began back in 2011, funded by the Broward Boating Improvement Program and the Florida Inland Navigational District, plans were approved by the Deer eld Beach Fire Department. When the city contracted its re/rescue service to the county, a new set of requirements were imposed on the project, namely a pumping system that will protect not only the dock, but a house on the island and some outbuildings. The county has hired a consultant to draw up a revised plan and the cost being estimated is between $100,000 and $200,000. The additional expense will be paid by the county, West said. West is resigned to adding the system, acknowledging that it will be safer for the wildlife of cer that lives there, but adding it probably won’t be effective on the dock since only re ghters can operate it and they have to be transported to the island by boat.”By the time they got there it would probably be too late,” he observed this week. Dan Yaffe, chair of the county’s Marine Advisory Committee, has less patience with the situation. “The dock is concrete and aluminum,” he pointed out.”There is no fuel pump, no overnight stays. It is intended for people to tie up small boats for a few hours, enjoy the island and move on.” The dock is a boater’s only access to the wildlife and mangrove preserve. Located in the Intracoastal Waterway at the Hillsboro Canal across from Sullivan Park, the 53-acre sanctuary has nature trails, an observation platform, boardwalk, playground and picnic areas. The county does run a boat over on weekends between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. and offers educational expeditions October through May. Yaffe said if the re system must be installed it could be another year before boaters can enjoy the natural terrain. One obstacle encountered during construction was a coral outcropping that had to be removed, but which has given boaters more navigable water he said. Yaffe points out funds for the Broward Boating Improvement Program come from vessel registration fees, not from ad valorem taxes. “My agency has satis ed the terms of the contract,” he added, inferring it is now up to the county to compete the job. West said he would like nothing better. “We are trying to get this project done. It is such neat island.” The best he can hope for, he said this week, is that the new re marshal BSO Capt. Bill Boss will “concede” that the original plans are okay. Boss could not be reached for comment by press time. He was not re marshal when the re suppression upgrade was added to the dock project.DockContinued from page 1Property tax exemption ling assistanceDeer eld Beach – The Broward County Property Appraiser’s Of ce will be available to answer questions about property tax exemption on Tuesday, Feb. 19 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Deer eld Beach City Hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. Another session will be held Wednesday, Feb. 20 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Appraisers will assist with homestead, senior and other property tax exemption applications as well as answer questions on property taxes. Portability applications will also be accepted. Documents required to le a homestead exemption include: a current Florida driver’s license, Florida identi cation card, current voter registration card or declaration of domicile. Non-US citizens must also provide proof of permanent residency. Visit www.bcpa. net or call 954-357-5579.VOTE March 12 Who votes? Registered voters in Pompano Beach, Oakland Park and Deer eld Beach will vote for local commissioners and referenda. See page 6.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, February 15, 2013Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@ yahoo. com or 954-783-8700!

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18 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-7838700! SPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach After a 2.5 million dollar restoration and site development effort, the historic SampleMcDougald House opened to the public last year and immediately proved to be a popular site for heritage education as well as civic and social events. The Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society’s fifth annual Breakfast for the “Big” House will, once again, be a most unique and exciting benefit. The event is hosted by John Knox Village, and the proceeds raised help to support the care and maintenance of the historic structure as well as provide for on-going programming at the site.Breakfast at the “Big” House March 1, celebrity wait staff to serve patrons for tipsThe Breakfast for the “Big” House benefit will be held on Friday, March 1 at 7:30 a.m., and will take place at the John Knox Village dining room, located at 651 SW 6 St. What makes this event unusual and fun are the Table Waiters & Waiter Teams some of Pompano Beach and Broward County’s finest civic and political leaders who work for “tips.” This year celebrity waiters include Pompano Beach City Commissioners Rex Hardin and Barry Dockswell, Broward County Mayor Kristin Jacobs, as well as other community leaders. There is no admission charge; however our Waiters do work for “tips.” You decide what you want to tip. Guests are asked to purchase their “tip” money in advance in order to save time waiting in line. By prepaying for your “tips,” your name tag and “tip” money will be waiting for you at the door. A significant feature of the Breakfast is the presentation of the annual “Champion of the “Big” House Award” and the “President’s Award.” These awards are in recognition of an individual, business or non-profit organization that has provided significant contribution toward the success of the preservation of the historic Sample-McDougald House. Call 954-783-3400, or 954292-8040 for information. Seaside Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach Cost is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. RSVP at www.PompanoBeachChamber.com.Children & Family2-22 & 23 – Broadway for Kids and Grown Ups at 7 p.m. at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $15. RSVP at 561-447-8829. 2-26 – Free Pirate adventures from 12 to 3 p.m. at Pompano Citi Centre, corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway. Music, games, treasure hunt, pirate bounce house, costume contest and arts and crafts. 954-943-4685Clubs, Charity & Civic Organizations2-21 – Wilton Manors Historical Society meets at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 954-566-9019. 2-25 – Retired Educators meeting at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca Raton. Speaker is attorney Jeffrey Devore. He will talk about immigration and naturalization. New members welcome. 954-255-6360 or 561-483-5445. 2-28 – Cocktails for a Cause from 7 to 10 p.m. at American Social, 721 E. Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Event bene ts Broward Children’s Center. Appetizers, cocktails, door prizes and giveaways. Cost is $20 in advance and $25 at the door. SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 20

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The Pelican 19 Friday, February 15, 2013 What’s that toilet doing here?! How would you like to wake up in the morning to nd a pretty purple toilet sitting in your front yard, or how about you neighbors?! Donate $20 and you can have this toilet placed in a yard near you. The lucky toilet recipient has the option of having it removed for a donation of $10 or $20 to send it to someone else. Don’t miss out on this great fundraiser that is sure to bring lots of laughs. Call 954-4217040 to join the Lighthouse Point teamMore Relay eventsFeb. 28 “Relay For Life Give Back Night” at Tijuana Flats, 278 S. Federal Hwy., Deer eld will be held Feb. 28 from 5 p.m. to closing. 15 percent of all sales will go to March 10 Shimmy for a CauseMiddle Eastern & Fusion Dance Show.” This is a bene t event to raise money to ght cancer featuring a multitude of dancers from South Florida and beyond. It will be held on at 6 p.m., at ARTSERVE, 1350 Sunrise Blvd, Fort Lauderdale. Entrance fee is $25, a portion which will be donated to Relay for Life of Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point and Hillsboro Beach American Cancer Society. There will be door prizes and chance drawings with lots of prizes. Call 954-421-7040 to join the Lighthouse Point team.This week, Hazel Armbrister was honored for her years of work in preserving Black history in Pompano Beach. Through years of activism, Armbrister, a retired teacher, also convinced the city to save an historic building on Martin Luther King Boulevard. The Ali Building, built in 1933, was home to the city’s rst Black-owned business, a hair salon and a barber shop. Pictured are Commissioner Woody Poitier, Hazel Armbrister and Mayor Lamar Fisher. Wilton Manors business expoWilton Manors – The Wilton Manors Business Association Business Expo will be held Monday, March 11 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park Community Center, 2020 Wilton Drive. Free vendor space is available. Door prizes and refreshments will be available. To become a vendor, call 954-257-8788.

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20 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Education & Self Development2-23 – African & African-American Stories with Sista Idya from 2 to 2:45 p.m. at Beach Branch Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd. Sista Idya will highlight the many aspects of Black History Month with storytelling lled with audience participation via call and response, creative movement and chanting. 954357-7830.Events & Activities2-15 – Studio 54 party at 7 p.m. at Copy This, 2157 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Memorabilia, interviews and stories from Sal Defalco, former bartender at Studio 54. 954-563-7181. 2-16 – Gold Coast Derby Grrls take on the Bradentucky Bombers at 6 p.m. at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Visit www.ticketmaster. com for tickets. 2-27 – Taste of the Beach from 6 to 9 p.m. at El Prado Park, 4500 El Mar Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Local restaurants serve food and beverages. Live entertainment and silent auction. Tickets are $30. 954-776-1000. 3-3 – Bingo at St. Henry’s Catholic Church, 1500 S. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach. Doors open at 12 p.m. Bingo begins at 1 p.m. Regular games plus three-part jackpot game. Door prizes and refreshments. 954-785-2450.Health & Fitness2-16 – Reiki class from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Lisa’s Healing Center. 4301 N. Federal Hwy. Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Cost is $100. RSVP at 954-782-6564. 2-19 – Gambling Recreation or Risk? from 10 to 11 a.m. at NE Focal Point Senior Center, 227 NW 2 Street, Deer eld Beach. 954480-4446. 2-19 – Seniors, Dating & Sex with Dr. Kate GeMeiner from 12 to 1 p.m. at NE Focal Point Senior Center, 227 NW 2 Street, Deer eld Beach. 954-480-4446. 2-20 – Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group meets from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at NE Focal Point, 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. Group meets every Wednesday. 954-4804449. SightingsContinued from page 18 See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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The Pelican 21 Friday, February 15, 2013 Music 2-15 – Delray String Quartet performs at 7:30 p.m. at All Saints Episcopal Church, 333 Tarpon Drive, Fort Lauderdale, and on Feb. 17 at The Colony Hotel, 525 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach. Tickets are $35. 561213-4138. 2-17 – Passionate Piano Featuring Pianist Catherine Lan at 4 p.m. at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $20 for members and $25 for non-members. 561-998-7784. 2-17 – New Presbyterian Church 100 Voice Concert Choir and The King’s Brass present “A Patriotic Spectacular” at 2 p.m. at Pompano Beach High School, 600 NE 13 Ave. An offering is suggested. 954-448-5083. 2-21 – Mostly Mozart at 7:30 p.n. at Lynn University’s Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Hear letters from Mozart’s life and performances of his works, including Fantasy in D minor performed by Roberta Rust. 561-2379000.Politics & Government2-28 – Greater Pompano Beach Democratic Club meets at 7 p.m. at E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-867-8629 or 954971-1062. 2-28 – Pompano Beach Republican Club meets at 7 p.m. at Emma Lou Olsen Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Items for America’s Moms for Soldiers will be collected. Refreshments served. 954-786-7536. 3-4 – Palm Aire/Cypress Bend Democratic Club meets at 7 p.m. at Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Refreshments served. 786-877-1644 or 954-973-6081.Theatre & Film2-16 – Kiss Me Kate at 8 p.m. at Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Dinner at 6 p.m. Tickets for dinner and show are $30 and $20 for just the show. Feb. 17 show is at 2 p.m. 954786-4590. Upcoming2-24 – Hazardous waste disposal event at Wilton Manors Municipal Complex, 2100 N. Dixie Hwy., from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. 954-765-4999. 3-9 – American Association of University Women Pompano Beach Branch Annual Scholarship Fundraiser SightingsContinued from page 20 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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22 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 at 11:30 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St. Featured will be Author Deborah Sharp who will present her soon to be published Mace Bauer Mystery: Mama Gets Trashed. Event includes a silent auction and lunch. Cost is $38. 954-524-2938. 3-16 – Tropical Plant Fair from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Pride Center, 2040 Dixie Hwy., Wilton Manors. Free admission. Email rrplottery@ aol.com for vendor space. 3-23 – Women’s Club of Coconut Creek hosts a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at North Recreation Complex, 4455 Sol Press Blvd., Coconut Creek. Fundraiser to support scholarships for Coconut Creek residents and charitable programs. 954-326-7480.SightingsContinued from page 21

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The Pelican 23 Friday, February 15, 2013 Classi eds • CLASSIFIEDS • Classi eds • CLASSIFIEDS Classi eds • CLASSIFIEDS • Classi eds • CLASSIFIEDS

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24 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Pompano Rotarians bring traditional golf tournament back as fund-raiserBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Simona Niculescu recently stood before a room of Rotarians to announce the person who agreed to open the meeting with a prayer. “I asked,” she said. “And he said ‘Yes.’ That’s what Rotarians do.” Since the mid-fifties, members of the Rotary Club of Pompano Beach have been saying ‘Yes.’ They say ‘Yes’ to children through Kids in Distress, The Boys and Girls Club, Horses and the Handicapped and Woodhouse. They say ‘Yes” to hungry persons through Broward Outreach, Feeding South Florida and the Co-operative Feeding Project. They say ‘Yes’ to education through four-year scholarships for local high school students. They say ‘Yes’ to persons caught up in bad times through the Salvation Army, Rebuilding Together and Lifenet4Families. They say ‘Yes’ to Autism Speaks. In the last three years, this local club has delivered $165,000 to the local community. It’s not a club of zillionaires who simply write checks; it’s a club of working men and women with families who share a love for the community in which they live and work. This month, Rotarians are resurrecting their annual Golf Classic April 20 with an 8 a.m. scramble, and they need sponsors, volunteers, raffle prizes and golfers. Toby Smith, club secretary says, “It’s going to be fantastic. We are playing the new Greg Norman course. We’re giving away a $10,000 Easy-Go, four-seater, street legal electric vehicle. It’s a great way for local golfers to take a look at us and our club and join us supporting these charities.” Major sponsors, $750, receive a four-team play of 18-holes which includes cart, lunch, recognition at the awards lunch, gift bags, range balls and more. A sponsorship sign for “Longest Drive” or “Closest to the Pin” is $200. Foursomes are $400 or $100 per player. Rotary is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. All donations are tax-deductible. To help, play or get more information, call Co-chair Gene Pridemore at 954-8680323. The Rotary Club of Pompano Beach meets at Galuppi’s Restaurant, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach at noon of Fridays.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, February 15, 2013 In Pompano BeachWinn Dixie, 277 S. Powerline Road Walgreens, 1101 E. Atlantic Blvd. Walgreens, 960 S. Pompano Pkwy Walgreens, 3573 N. Federal Hwy. Walgreens, 2401 W. Atlantic Blvd. UPS Store 49 N. Federal Hwy. Iberia Bank 990 N. Federal Hwy. costing $1.8 million. When residents rejected it saying they would prefer a basketball court and water feature, the plans were shelved. Meanwhile the county CheckContinued from page 5 Tuesday night, Jacobs and County Commissioner Chip LaMarca came to the commission meeting with a gigantic $1 million check for photo op purposes. Jacobs said, “It is exciting to have this dream realized.” And Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland said, “It is nice to see our Broward County tax dollars coming back.”Magic FluteContinued from page 12FGO Young Artist and recent San Francisco Opera Adler Fellow. He last joined FGO for the 2010-2011 production of Don Giovanni, where he brought a “smooth tenor voice” to the role of Don Octavio, according to South Florida Classical Review. Former FGO Young Artist Jonathan G. Michie, a South Florida favorite, returns home in the comedic part of Papageno. Praised for “vocal mastery and theatrical panache” by the San Francisco Chronicle, Michie joined FGO last season in to sing in Romo et Juliette as Mercutio. In the role of Sarastro is Jordan Bisch, described by the Dallas Morning News as a “beautifully chocolaty yet wellfocused bass.” Buchman joins forces again with conductor Andrew Bisantz, following a smash-hit with FGO’s most recent Rigoletto. This production of Die Zauber te was built by New York City Opera in 1988. Miami performances of Die Zauber te are sponsored, in part, by Funding Arts Network, and Fort Lauderdale performances are sponsored, in part, by Funding Arts Broward. maintained the green area at a cost of $50,000 a year. Jacobs’ spokesperson Marcia Monserrat said the county has been working with the city for ve years to transfer the park parcel. The city took control of it January 31 and will now maintain it and in the future staff the community center. The park will likely be renamed, Harbin said.

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26 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 MASTER GARDNER – A1A N.E. BROWARD Wednesday Or Saturday Every Other Week. Must Have Own Tools!! NO LAWN! $150/Day. 954-7817356. 2-15 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days. References Available. 954-482-5494. 2-15 HOME HEALTH AIDE – Private Certified. Day Or Nights. Providing Loving & Professional Care. Honest & Reliable. Affordable Rates. References Available. 954-6787754. 2-15 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 3-8 CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-401-7535. (Woman Owned). 3-8 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs – Carpentry – Plumbing – Roo ng – Masonry – Windows – Painting – Decking – Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 – Emergency Calls. 3-8 MARCELA’S CLEANING – Residential Cleaning. Affordable Service You Can Trust! Experienced & GREAT References. 954-376-0524. 3-1 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill, Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954-818-9538. 2-22 URIEL’S PAINTING – INTERIOR OR EXTERIOR. Over 10 Years Experience. Affordable Rates. FREE Estimates!! 754-235-4606. All Credit Cards Accepted. 2-15 GIGI’S CLEANING SERVICE!! Family Run Cleaning Service. Dependable – Honest. More Info. 954-2102248 Or 954-295-7033. 3-8 ROYAL FINE FLOORING – Laminates – Wood Floors – Engineered Floors. Carpets Direct From The Mills. Do NOT Buy Before You Call Us! 954-401-7535. Woman Owned. 3-8 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YRS. EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – Love To Clean Windows! Refrigerators, Ovens. No Problem. FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. 215 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 215 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CSTAMP COLLECTIONSWANTED – ACCUMULATIONS & COLLECTIONS Of Stamps. House Calls Made. Call John 954-467-7128 Or 954-6142562. 2-15 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITYBOCA RATON – On Federal Hwy. HAIR SALON! Barber & Beauty. Owner Retiring. 6 Stations – 2 Private Rooms. Rent Only $1,590 Month Or $35,000. Serious Inquires Only!! 954-415-4937. 2-22 COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 2-15 MISCOLD OMEGA & JAEGER & LECOULTRE Watches & Clocks – Every Kind & Condition WANTED!!. Call Dirk 407-668-2916. 2-22 OLD NAUTICAL STUFF WANTED BY Collector. Sextants, Officers Watches, Captain Clocks, Compasses, Etc. Marine/Submarine. Dirk 407-668-2916. 2-22 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 3-8 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL Off NE 14th Street Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water, Electric. Up To 33’. $325 Month. Call 954781-4994. CARS FOR SALE1995 CLASSIC MERCURY COUGAR XR7 – Low Mileage!! Well Maintained / Service Records. Call 954812-5192. CEMETERY PLOTSSTAR OF DAVID – North Lauderdale – Garden Of Israel, Family Estate Section. 2 Side By Side Roadside Burial Plots Including 2 Vaults. Must Sell Make Offer. Syd 905-776-1265 Or sydneyn@xplornet.com ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Private Room & Bath. Private Entrance. All Utilities Included. Furnished/Unfurnished. 1.5 Miles To The Beach. $150 Week. 954-786-9188.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, February 15, 2013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,200 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH – LEISUREVILLE 3/2 – 1 Car Garage. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease. Utilities Not Included. Available March 1st. 954-6498867. 2-15 REAL ESTATE FOR SALEPOMPANO PROPERTIES FOR SALE – RIVERGATE – T/ H Rarely Available. 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath/1-CG – ICW View $475K. 3228 TOWNHOMES/ CAMELOT – 2/2 T/H, One Floor Only! Totally Renovated, Approx. 1/2 Block To Ocean $280K. SEA HAVEN #321 B – Remodeled. 2/2 – Adjacent To Marina $155K. GARDEN AIRE VILLAGE S. #415, 2/2 Approx. 1 Mile To Sea! $110K. Contact PJ Carswell, Atlantic Prop. Int. Inc. – 954-242-4260. pj@atlanticprop.com 2-15 SEASONAL RENTALDEERFIELD BEACH E OF A1A – Due To Cancellation Furnished Efficiency Apt. Available. Pool – Laundry – Yard – Parking. Walk To Beach & Pier. $450 Week/$1,600 Month. 954-428-8262. 2-15 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE – DEERFIELD. Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny With Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furn. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $48,000. 561-3729837. 2-15 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-8 POMPANO AEGEAN OCEANFRONT Large South Side 2/2 + Den Or 3rd Bedroom On Sand. Great Oceanview! Tiled & Remodeled. Hurricane Proof Building. 24 Hr. Security. Garage Park – 2 Cars. New Exercise Room. Hot Tub, BBQ, Heated Pool. Widest Beach In Area. Price Reduced To $359,000. Dynasty R.E. 954295-2356. 2-15 POMPANO BEACH – INTRACOASTAL VIEW! 2/2.5 Remodeled + Built-in Of ce. Tiled Thru-out. Garage. Security, Pets OK. $525,000. MLS # A1744626. Owner 954353-0024. 2-15 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – 2 BLOCKS BEACH!! 2/2 Apt. All Upgraded. Screened Balcony – Covered Parking. Security! Heated Pool. Exercise Room. $1,300 Month. 954-6291324. 3-1 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH UNFURNISHED EFFICIENCIES From $600 $650 Month. Pool – Coin Laundry – Full Kitchen. Call 954-907-2258. 2-15 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH ATLANTIC – FEDERAL. Ef ciency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 2-15 LIGHTHOUSE POINT – MARINA AREA. Very Attractive Large 2/2. Rent Dock At Marina & Walk Home. $1,700 Month Unfurnished. Agent 954-614-8428. 2-15 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-22 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Private Bathroom. $500 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-6541331 Or 561-998-5681. 3-8 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,200 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 2-22

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28 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point – Earlier in the week, my cousin Fred Gushue and I decided to charter a boat for the afternoon with a few boys from the Calvary High School baseball team. We went down to the Hillsboro Inlet shing eet and met up with a long time customer and friend, Capt. Tom Oberender. who is running a boat named “Texas Wireline.” We had heard through the grapevine that the grey tile sh were biting so we decided to give it a shot. Grey tile sh make for excellent eating and would be perfect for dinner as long as we could catch them. Tom had a spot picked out about a mile south of the inlet so we loaded up the crew and headed offshore. I still get butter ies in my stomach every time I leave RJ Boyle goes bottom shing, catches tiles galore RJ Boyle and Benji Rosenblum, Joey Gushue and Max Rosenblum from Calvary High School with the day’s catch.the inlet. I have had so many great catches out of Hillsboro Inlet and this would be no different. We set up in 400 feet of water with two rods rigged with ve hooks and a fourpound lead at the bottom. For bait we used cut squid on each hook. We freespooled the line until it hit the bottom and before we were able to lock the reel up the rods began to bounce. We left the rig down for a second and then began to reel. The rods bent over and we all smiled as we brought the sh to the boat. Tiles! Tom had put us on to the mother lode as he has done time and time again with charters from all over the world. What was surprising about this catch was the size of the sh. Grey tile sh on average off our coast range from one to three pounds. The tiles we caught on this trip were all between two and ve pounds. We caught sh non-stop for a few hours and decided to go in early as we knew we had a lot of lleting to do. The mate on the boat used to work as a chef so he made short work of all of the sh. As I pulled out of the parking lot I glanced at the lighthouse and thanked God for another productive trip. The captains and mates working out of Hillsboro Inlet are some of the best in the world. They give 100 percent and produce great catches year round. If you have never chartered a boat you should give it a try its totally worth it. If you have any questions about techniques and tackle for tile sh give us a call at the shop, 954-420-5001, and we can get you dialed in. ‘Til next time.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, February 15, 2013 BOCA RATON SYMPHONIA Side by Side with musicians from Florida Atlantic University and the Youth Orchestra of Palm Beach County Conductor Kyle Prescott, D.M.A. Presented by the City of Boca Raton Monday, February 18, at 7 p.m. Mizner Park Amphitheater For more information: 1 866 Music 01 (1 866 687 4201) www.bocasymphonia.org A CONCERT FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY PLEASE JOIN US! Musicians from Florida Atlantic University* and theYouth Orchestra of Palm Beach County will sit with Boca Raton Symphonia musicians to present an inter generational performance of music, education and entertainment for the community. The program will fea ture traditional favorites including: Gershwin's American in Paris Suite; Bizet's Carmen; Horner's Somewhere Out There from An American Tail; Brahms' Hungarian Dance No. 5 and Strauss' Radetzky March Op. 228. MEET THE ORCHESTRA Come early and take part in our program starting at 6:15 p.m. Have fun touching and seeing the instruments up close and talking to the musicians. This special program is free to the public, rain or shine and will take place under the "big tent." Blankets and chairs are welcome, and chairs are also available to rent for $5. *The Boca Raton Symphonia is Ensemble in Residence at Florida Atlantic University streetscape improvements. Plans for the $11 million project include 60 new parking spaces, landscape, lighting and sidewalk improvements and entryway signs for MLK and Historic Downtown Pompano. About $7 million of that money is supposed to be spent on MLK with the rest going to Downtown. Work will start this month on replacing a water main under MLK Boulevard. Once that is complete, at either the end of May or beginning of June, work can begin on the surface improvements. The whole project is estimated to take about a year to complete. The water main is being replaced to ensure that capacity is suf cient enough to handle new development. Of cials hope that the streetscape improvements, the renovation of the Ali Building, 357 Hammondville Road, the 731 MLK Boulevard retail building and the new bus terminal at the corner of Dixie Highway and MLK will help revitalize the area and attract new development. “Making property values go up. That’s what it’s all about,” said Carlton Moore, liaison to the Northwest Community Redevelopment Agency [NW CRA] Advisory Committee. But not everyone has signed-off on the project. According to Horatio Danovich, CRA engineer, seven [out of a total of 80 property owners along MLK] didn’t give the city permission to make sidewalk improvements in front of their property. “Their property values will increase because of it,” said Danovich. Moore said CRA of cials hope making the groundbreaking will help win over the last holdouts. He compared the process to dating. Sometimes, he said, it takes more than one night out to impress someone and forge a meaningful relationship. If the city can’t get permission from these last few property owners it will be forced to build around their properties. But, said Danovich, if the owners change their mind after funding is spent they will probably either have to pay for their own improvements or leave things the way they are now. Whitney Rawls, NW CRA Advisory Board member, said the planned improvements “have been a long time coming. The community is in dire need of removing blight.” But, he added, the challenge now is to make sure the improvements don’t increase property values to the point where current residents “get priced out of our own community.” MLKContinued from page 1 costing $1.8 million. When residents rejected it saying they would prefer a basketball court and water feature, the plans were shelved. Meanwhile the county maintained the green area at a cost of $50,000 a year. Jacobs’ spokesperson Marcia Monserrat said the county has been working with the city for ve years to transfer the park parcel. The city took control of it January 31 and will now maintain it and in the future staff the community center. The park will likely be renamed, Harbin said. Tuesday night, Jacobs and County Commissioner Chip LaMarca came to the commission meeting with a gigantic $1 million check for photo op purposes. Jacobs said, “It is exciting to have this dream realized.” And Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland said, “It is nice to see our Broward County tax dollars coming back.”CheckContinued from page 5

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30 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013 A new sign at Mr. Squeaky Car Wash, 499 W. Atlantic Blvd., has grabbed the attention of residents and nearby business owners. Bright and colorful, the Mr. Squeaky face caught the eye of Hamid Borjian, who said, “A street sign is the best way to attract customers to your local business. It is a throwback to a time when street signs for a business were unique and memorable. The new sign at Mr. Squeaky is the new landmark in Pompano Beach. It is amazing.” Mr. Squeaky Car Wash owner Richard Sasso, said the time and effort to display the latest Mr. Squeaky sign was well worth it. “It took about two years of total effort to get the sign finally built. The first step was to meet with the City of Pompano Beach zoning department to ensure the sign met with their code. The zoning and development installed the sign in January, both long-time and new customers give us a thumbs up,” he added. It appears the hard work and expense has paid off for Mr. Squeaky Car Wash. “We just had our best month Mr. Squeaky’s iconic sign attracts customers, compliments from communityever at Mr. Squeaky. We have steadily grown each month since we first opened seven years ago. We have even been voted as 1 of the Top 50 Car Washes in the USA by Modern Car Care Magazine .” services departments at the city reviewed the drawings for the proposed sign on multiple occasions. Each time it was reviewed, the city advised that the sign did in fact meet all of the city’s code requirements.” “I am very grateful to the many departments and staff members who reviewed the proposed sign and ultimately granted their support for it being built,” said Sasso. “On a typical day since we Richard Sasso, owner of Mr. Squeaky, recently debuted his new sign on West Atlantic Boulevard. [Photo courtesy of Mr. Squeaky]

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The Pelican 31 Friday, February 15, 2013

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32 The Pelican Friday, February 15, 2013