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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00327
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 02-01-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00335

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Friday, February 1, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 5 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican City manager’s pleas for marketing plan “lost in the vote”By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – To the dismay of the mayor and town manager, town commissioners here decided that now is not the right time to hire a rm to devise a town marketing strategy and plan. A motion to defer for six months a $64,5000 plan proposed by Ambit passed on Jan. 8 by a vote of 3-2 with only Mayor Roseann Minnet and Commissioner Chris Vincent against the deferral. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann noted that in the last scal year commissioners said the town needed a cohesive marketing strategy and plan. She chose Ambit from among three rms the town has on continuing contracts for marketing services because they have experience in the tourism market. Funds had previously See MARKETING on page 31 Divers get break on parking feesBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – In an effort to entice more divers to explore the town’s underwater attractions, commissioners agreed to grant 34 parking permits to divers for use on Datura Avenue, Hibiscus Avenue and Bougainvilla Drive. Those with permits, which cost $30, will park for free 6 to 10 a.m. and 7 to 11 p.m. except on Friday evenings or Saturdays. “These permits don’t guarantee parking,” Tony Bryan, nance director, explained. “If parking is available, they can get it. If not, they would pay for parking.” Commissioner Stuart Dodd, an See DIVERS on page 16 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Rosaly Di Maria Olortegui grew up here and she’s seen the beach area at Atlantic Boulevard and Pompano Beach Boulevard go from great to bad to great again. Tourists, beach residents, business owners and visitors from other Broward cities say the Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] has made dramatic improvements to the formerly poorly lit and run-down area. Di Maria Olortegui, daughter of Frank Di Maria, owner of Frank’s Ristorante & Pizza, in business at the beach since 1974, said the New look at Atlantic terminus lled with color, turf, trees; old parking lot just a memory improvements have made the area safer and more attractive for families and pedestrians. “Unfortunately, we did lose [the beach area] but it’s coming back. Before it was all dark and gloomy. Now, it’s well-lit and people have a reason to come back here. This is reminding me of how it used to be,” she said. Gone are the old and narrow gray sidewalks, the worn-out beige beach walls, overgrown bushes and thin palm trees scattered about. Now, after nearly $10 million [$7 million from the CRA and $3 million from the city] in improvements, the area is landscaped with neatly arranged See BEACH JOB on page 14 New greenway borders C-13 Canal. . Already attracting walkers and cyclistsBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – Residents in the far western reaches of Oakland Park now have a new place to go for a peaceful walk or bike ride. It’s the recently completed Northwest 39 Street Greenway, just west of the city’s re station off See GREENWAY on page 7 Florida House owner buying up some choice properties. . Latest acquisition is Brooks Restaurant By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach –The owner of Deer eld Florida House, an addiction rehab complex here, has amassed property in his neighborhood worth $8.25 million. Sherief Abu-Moustafa’s latest acquisition was Brooks Restaurant purchased for $2.3 million on January 1 of this year. In 2011, in a move protested by nearby residents, Abu-Moustafa See FLORIDA HOUSE on page 28 U n i t y i n T h e C o m m u n i t y F e b 2 Unity in The Community, Feb 2 . see ad on page 18Residents, tourists and business owners say the Community Redevelopment Agency improvements to the beach at the east end of Atlantic Boulevard and Pompano Beach Boulevard have revitalized the once dilapidated area. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]

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2 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Cast Your Advertising Net to 7 Northeast Broward Cities The Pelican • 954-783-8700SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Art 2-2 – NOBE Art Walk from 7 to 11 p.m. at North Beach Art Gallery, 3334 NE 34 St., Fort Lauderdale. 954667-0660. 2-6 – National League of American Pen Women hosts a juried exhibit from Feb. 6 to March 6 at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Participants include area women artists. Skolnick is open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays. 954-812-1860. 2-8 – Social Media & The Artist copyright law class from 7 to 9 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Court, Wilton Manors. Michelle Solomon, former executive producer with WPLG Local 10 and managing director of Editorial Content Providers, LLC, will speak. 954-6614740. 2-15 – Island City Artwalk from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Businesses host local artists and many serve food and refreshments. Visit www. islandcityartwalk.com.Auctions, Sales & Giveaways2-2 – Pompano Beach GreenMarket from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. Held every Saturday. 954-292-8040. 2-2 & 3 – Wilton Manors Green Market from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Held every Saturday and See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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The Pelican 3 Friday, February 1, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Problems with insuf cient power and frequent storms have hindered a biorock reef project off the coast of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. But now “it’s coming along really well,” Stephen Attis, president of Vone Research, Inc. of Pompano Beach, informed town commissioners at a recent meeting. The Biorock process, an invention of Dr. Thomas Goreau of the Global Coral Reef Alliance, uses low voltage electricity to grow limestone rock structures in the sea and accelerate growth of corals. The electrical current causes minerals to adhere to a metal structure. A frame, made of rebar or wire mesh, is anchored to the sea bottom. Solar-powered buoys provide the electric power to the structure which accelorates the growth of coral. Goreau has 300 similar projects, mostly in Bali. He recently received the United Nations Equator Award for his work in coral reef restoration, Jane Fawcett, operations manager for Vone, said. “He’s the foremost person in the world doing this work.” The biorock structure rst went in the water off LBTS on Sept. 3, 2011. It was See REEF on page 12 A frame, made of rebar or wire mesh, is anchored to the sea bottom. Solar-powered buoys provide the electric power to the structure which accelorates the growth of coral. [Photo courtesy of Marc Furth]Reef project to save coral has bumps but town leaders remain supportive

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4 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Developer to present project to commission By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFF Wilton Manors – The only bid to develop Hagen Park’s public parking lot was unanimously rejected by a committee established to review the proposal. The eight-member committee met Jan. 14 to review the project, a $14 million residential and commercial development proposed by IBI, an architecture and engineering rm with of ces in Pompano Beach. “The use of public lands for projects has a higher level Committee rejects residential development proposalof achievement and should be something special,” said Heidi Shafran, director of the Community Development Services Department, according to a record of the meeting. Committee members remain under a cone of silence and are prohibited from speaking about the proposal outside of public hearings. IBI’s proposal rated an average of 16 points out of 40 by the committee. The project includes between 120 and 280 residential units, 13,000 sq. ft. of retail and restaurant space, a rooftop pool and garden, 1.2-acre plaza and between 300 and 620 parking spaces; including a possible four-story parking garage. Parking was one of the main concerns raised by committee members who said IBI didn’t plan to build enough spots and the proposed garage would be in a location too far from Wilton Drive – on what is now Hagen Park’s only open space. The current number of parking spaces is 213. “[We] need to have parking closer to those who would use parking,” said Kevin Knorr, a resident and committee member. Previously, residents have also spoken out against what the project would do to Hagen’s viability as a park. Patrick Caan, committee member and Leisure Services Department director, said the space that would become the parking structure serves as a gathering spot for community festivals and events. [The proposal] doesn’t address Hagen Park and the role it plays in the community,” said Caan. Bob Mays, committee member and Finance Department director, doubts IBI can build the number of spaces it is proposing. Representatives could still convince commissioners to approve the development but they’ve already got two strikes against them – and at least a third strike [the majority of the commission] seems likely. At the Jan. 22 commission meeting, Vice Mayor Julie Carson and Commissioner Ted Galatis voted against allowing IBI to make a presentation at the Feb. 12 commission meeting; 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. Commissioner Tom Green said he would probably support the committee’s decision but wants to hear what IBI has to say. “I gured it wouldn’t hurt to just listen.” Patrea St. John, member of the city’s Planning and Zoning Board and vice president of IBI, said her rm wants to answer any questions and concerns the commission has. “I really want this to happen. I live in the community and believe in the project,” she said.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, February 1, 2013

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6 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XXI, Issue 5 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & Letters There were 46 people on 12 teams looking for answers to clues at the Wilton Manors Scavenger Hunt, Saturday afternoon, Jan. 26, in weather that our chamber of commerce spends fortunes on reporting to friends and relatives in the frozen north. The participants ranged in age between 5 and 73 years old! What is the address of the rst house sold in Wilton Manors? Where on Wilton Drive is there a rendition of the Willingham Towers? What was Hagen’s, of Hagen Park, rst name? How many Moons are there on Wilton Drive? Speci cs, please, and pictures of you in front of your answers! Organized by Adrienne Foland, a director of the Historical Society, the 12 teams were provided with “clues” which would lead to the answers. Departure times, starting at 1 p.m. from Hagen Park were noted and arrival times back at Richardson Park also recorded. The team with the most correct answers in shortest time won. Many of the clues required “photographic” proof. Ned Willingham, creator of Wilton Manors, would still be waiting at CVS for his lm to be developed, but, in this case, all the participants showed up with digital cameras and smart phones. The event was organized by the Historical Society and the Wilton Manors Development Alliance [WMDA], as a fund raiser for the Society’s work on the Richardson Carriage House and WMDA’s efforts with the Children’s Art Project. It was an effective fund raiser. More importantly, the participants thought it was a lot of fun. One team member asked random people on the street for help and was very impressed with how friendly folks in Wilton Manors are. And, the random people had good answers! As a family event, it provided all the participants with the sense that Wilton Manors has both history and is its own place. The perfect score, achieved by two teams, was 35. The Wilton Dolphins, Shoshana Shafran, Marlene Marante, and Heidi Shafran nished the course in 54 minutes. The Category Five Team, of Denise Melanson, Carol Whitman, and Danna Bhaggan also had a perfect score, and nished in 90 minutes. Third place went to the SFGN Super Snoopers, with 34 points at 60 minutes. The Snooper team consisted of John Fugate, Mike Trottier, Ryan Dixon, and Edwin Neiman. Good Wilton Hunting (with Massachusetts connections) also had 34 points and nished in 94 minutes. Rita and Gary Silverman, Anne French, and Sherri Miller know their stuff. In fact, everyone was a winner. It was a nice Saturday afternoon for a walk to stretch the intellect and chat with some nice people. How could one not be cheering for the “The Klue-dashians,” “Pirates of the Middle River,” and “Hunty-Boo-Boo.” Gift certi cates for the prize winners were provided by good friends of Wilton Manors: Rosie’s Restaurant, To The Moon Marketplace, Tropics Restaurant and Barton and Miller Cleaners, respectively. iberiaBank and Michael Pastorino manned a “Hint Station” at the north end of the Drive for those who needed hints, and/or water. The Courtyard Cafe stepped up to provide a great lunch, salad, sandwiches, and deep fried veggies at Richardson Park. Beer, wine, and sangria were in evidence. Support of the city from merchants and residents is a 75-year-old tradition in Wilton Manors. We are a better place because of it. Adrienne Foland and Krishan Manners provided organization. Mary and Ron Ulm, with Paul Kuta, provided clues as well as the major heavy lifting that an event of this nature inevitably requires. Adrienne Foland advises folks to be watching for clues about next year’s “Hunt.”Scavenger hunt meets all expectations of fun and fundsGood Wilton Hunting team members took fourth place in the annual scavenger hunt. [Left to right],Gary Silverman, Rita Silverman, Sherri Miller, Anne French and Adrienne Foland. [Photo courtesy of Wilton Manors Historical Society] Contributed by Benjamin LittleWILTON MANORS HISTORICAL SOCIETYBroward County Animal Care and Adoption will host a rabies clinic on Saturday, Feb. 9, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Reverend Samuel Delevoe Memorial Park, 2520 NW Sixth St., Fort Lauderdale. Pet owners will be able to have their dog or cat vaccinated against rabies and receive a Broward County Pet Registration tag. Cost for a one-year rabies vaccination and registration tag is $15 per pet. Only cash payments will be accepted. To qualify, pet owners must provide proof of Broward County residency, such as a valid Florida driver’s license or a current utility bill. No appointment is necessary and customers are taken on a rst come, rst served basis. All dogs must be on leashes and all cats must be in carriers. “Rabies is one of the deadliest of diseases, but also is easy to prevent,” said Dr. Tim Johnston, veterinarian of Animal Care and Adoption. “A simple yearly vaccination is all it takes to ensure the health and safety of our pets and our residents.” Information about other Animal Care and Adoption programs and services will be available to residents at the clinic. Broward County’s Animal Care and Adoption is dedicated to providing shelter for lost and surrendered animals as well as the successful adoption of homeless pets. The agency also coordinates the registration of dogs and cats and provides rabies vaccinations to encourage a healthier pet population. For more information, visit broward.org/Animal or “like us” on Facebook. com/BrowardPets.Never let this happen because you didn’t give your pet its rabies shotZora Neale Hurston, one of the most powerful American writers ever, is author of Their Eyes Were Watching God [1937]. I’ll never forget the description of Tea Cake trying to survive the ood caused by a Florida hurricane by hanging onto the tail of a cow through the unbridled waters around Belle Glade, Florida. Seeking rescue along with Tea Cake is a rabid dog atop the cow’s haunches. Those pages were very uncomfortable to me. Imagine hanging onto the tail of a cow who is swimming with the current and trying to ward off the rabid canine who sees you as the enemy. Great book. Read it, and take care of the animals on Feb. 9. See below. Anne SirenLow-cost rabies shots at Delevoe Memorial Park, Feb. 9

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The Pelican 7 Friday, February 1, 2013 Northwest 21 Avenue. The public is invited to an of cial ribbon cutting at the greenway at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 9. But many area residents haven’t waited for the opening. “It’s used all the time. Even while we were building it, residents were riding their bikes and walking their dogs on it,” said John Perez, project manager. The walkway consists of 6,550 linear feet of pathway with paths on the north and south sides of the C-13 Canal. “It’s a great place for residents on the west side of town to go, something to use,” Perez said. “When the trees are larger, they will have a nice covered area. It will be a useful, functional area.” Perez said a bridge will be built on the west side, connecting the area to the nearby Veterans Park, which has two decks for shing. The walkway was built with a $728,000 grant from Florida Department of Transportation and $33,000 in city funds. Following the ribbon cutting, Oakland Park Mayor Anne Sallee will lead a walk along the greenway. Charles Livio, city horticulturist, will explain the advantages of planting native vegetation and explain how this project will help attract birds, butter ies and other wildlife. Livio said the area was previously “real desert,” an empty barren area. He said many interesting native trees have been planted, including live oaks, slash pine, cabbage palms, bald cypress, silver buttonwood, GreenwayContinued from page 1orange dagger and a paradise tree. Native shrubs include American beauty berry, cocoplum, bloodberry, Indian hawthorne and some small ground covers, including holly and muhly grass. Some beds of wild owers are just germinating now. “It’s very exciting. The area is already used by people biking, jogging and walking,” Livio said. Bikers, walkers and nature seekers wasted no time in testing out the new Greenway in Oakland Park. On Feb. 9 at 10 a.m., everyone is invited for a tour that will be led by Mayor Anne Sallee. [Photo by Judy Vik]

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8 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 BriefsBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFActivity Mobility Center is lled with surprises to a rst time visitor because it offers so much more than the latest in scooters and other manufactured products that keep customers mobile. Located at 1401 SW 13 Court, it is just west of Andrews on 13 Court across from Stimpsons. Sitting down with owner, Carey Britton and general manager, Rich Ruggieri, The Pelican was amazed at the products offered and the customized t for clients to Scooters, beds, bathrooms, stair lifts, overhead patient lifts, power lifts, gait trainers for rehabilitation and more. Britton is a certi ed ATP [Assistant Technology Provider] with www.resna. org. He explains, “To become an ATP one must be an experienced rehab technologist, be endorsed by medical professionals and pass an examination. I am also a S.M.S. which is a Seating Mobility Specialist and I’m the only one in South Florida. When it comes to custom designing for our customers I am the main assessor.” The retail showroom is lled with a large selection of mobility assisting vehicles. According to General Manager Ruggieri, there’s a perfect answer for both children and adults with mobility challenges. He and Ruth Scheman are both 25 year experts as mobility consultants. Britton says, “We are thrilled to have Active Mobility Center stocks scooters and much more to make clients comfortable, mobile and independentthem as part of our team. We also have four full time service technicians who can custom make and service any adaptation needed. There is no company in South Florida that can match our kind of technological expertise.” “We accept most insurances and we have insurance specialists who help clients with the paper work required. We do home visits and assessments. Our technicians will service clients in their homes whenever necessary.” The goal of Active Mobility Center is to help clients remain functional and independent. “We listen,” Britton says, “and we build a relationship to nd the best answer to each individual’s needs.” The Pelican spoke to Ellen Cohen who, along with husband Bob, have been customers for 20 years. Ellen says, “They have been wonderful to deal with. My husband and I are both in wheeled vehicles. We have been totally pleased with the way we are cared for by Benay Britton [Carey’s mother]. She never pushes any product. She informs a customer and once a choice has been made, Active Mobility is eager to assist with any needed modi cations. I would never go anywhere else for our vehicles.” Ann Marie Koury, a nurse, says her patient who is con ned to a wheel chair has been made more comfortable thanks to the adaptations provided by Active Mobility. “The staff made us feel both welcome and con dent that we were in good hands.” In business since 1992, this company president shares a bit of his business’s history. “We started as Amigo Mobility Center, a Scooter franchise. By 2000, we realized that our clients’ mobility issues required more specialized and individualized equipment. We separated from the franchise in order to provide a full range of equipment which we design and service.” Behind the showroom is a huge service center with state-of-the-art equipment and a stockroom lled with supplies and parts. The sitting room has demo cushions and backs for customer trials and assessments. Ruggiari adds, “We feel the client deserves much more than simply choosing a wheeled vehicle. The choices are many. It takes expertise to assess what is actually the best vehicle, or adaptation for each customer’s needs.” This business is a Registered Rehab Technology Supplier. Britton sits on the board of directors of the Carey Britton, owner of Active Mobility Center, pauses for a photo with Ruth Scheman and Rich Ruggiari, general manager. The company showroom displays the best scooters made as well as other wheeled equipment—all of which can be adapted to a client for perfect t and function. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger] See ACTIVE MOBILITY on page 17New chair for Chamber Board of DirectorsDeer eld Beach – David Mirantz has been elected chairman of the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. Mirantz is vice president and branch manager at Bank United in Deer eld Beach. Newly elected directors are Lyn Clark, Broward Health North, Eric French, International Society of Autism, Dawn Lopez, Embassy Suites, Betty Masi, Seawood Builders, Lauren Schulman, Federal Self Storage, Niki Wilson, Paragon Entertainment Group. Directors with unexpired terms are Carlo Barbieri, Brazil Club, Chip Chapman, Doubletree by Hilton, Larry DeVille, Fast-Teks Computers, John Esposito, Advanced Insurance Underwriters, Bill Heaton, The Pelican Newspaper Gordon Vatch, Printing Xcetera, John Lombardi, Manufacturer’s Eyewear Direct, Rick Jorden, JM Enterprises, Jim Mathie, Chiefy LLC, Jim Lusk, Observer newspaper, Todd Wolf, A&S Cleaning, attorney Pat Murphy, Danielle Williams, Oceans 234, Kiku Martinson, Campbell & Rosemurgy Real Estate, past chair.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, February 1, 2013

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10 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Chief Ross Licata ts the old clich, ‘Tall, dark and handsome’ and much more. He’s pleasant, approachable and above all, he continues to keep the residents safe and bring honors to his community, Lighthouse Point, or LHP. He came to LHP in 2003 after retiring from the Delray Beach Police Department as a Police Commander. He says, “After 26 l/2 years in Delray I knew I was approaching the end of my career there. I heard that LHP was looking for a Chief. I applied for the job and was honored to get it. I was thrilled to be part of this smaller community with its home-town feel. I welcomed the opportunity to emphasize quality, community service which is very important here.” The Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce chose Licata to be a Shining Star and Light of the Community at its annual 2012 award luncheon, held at the exclusive Hillsboro Club in LHP.Chief Ross Licata, Lighthouse Point, is a national award winner and a local Shining Star, Light of the Community In 2010, with the help of Commander Mike Oh and the entire department, Chief Licata implemented a 26-camera License-Plate Recognition System in LHP. This system targets criminal offenders who travel into LHP to commit crimes. “Our city was a desirable target for criminals,” Licata says. “The main crimes were burglaries of vehicles, residences and business properties. Analysis showed us that the majority of the crimes were made by offenders living outside of the community. Criminals were driving here from other cities, usually from communities much further away. We wanted to catch these criminals when they entered LHP. A perimeter monitoring system, using license plate recognition, was implemented. In an effort to protect and improve quality of life for those who live in LHP, this project developed successful leads in criminal apprehension, criminal case clearances and the recovery of stolen property. To date, over 70 arrests for crimes including robbery, burglary, arson, auto theft, and fraud have been attributed to the bene ts of this camera technology. The department has recovered over a half million dollars worth of stolen property.” On Oct 1, 2012, Chief Ross Licata and Commander Mike Oh were own to San Diego, California to receive the IACP/Motorola Webber Seavey Award for Quality in Law Enforcement for the ‘Transient Offender Interdiction Program’. One of three such awards were presented world-wide for promoting a standard of excellence that exempli es law enforcement’s contribution and dedication to the quality of life in local communities. And that’s not all. Licata was recently voted President of Broward County Chiefs of Police Association. He already serves as Broward County Director of the Florida Police Chiefs’ Association. He explains, “You might Commander Mike Oh and Chief Licata were own to San Diego, California to receive the IACP/Motorola (International Association of Chiefs of Police/Motorola) Webber Seavey Award for Quality in Law Enforcement in 2012. The success of the Transient Offender Interdiction Program and its substantive results made LHP Police Department one of three international award winners. [Photo courtesy of Lighthouse Point]See CHIEF LICATA on page 22Plants & People Day at SampleMcDougald Pompano Beach Learn more about the local environment on Feb. 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Sample-McDougald House, 450 NE 10 St. Speakers will discuss good environmental practices, recycling, native plants, wildlife conservation, and similar causes. Vendors will be on hand selling products that support Pompano Proud’s mission, including the use of rain barrels, native and non-invasive plants, wildlife conservation and natural fertilizers. Guests speakers will discuss butter y gardens, tree ordinances and windmills. Guided tours of the Sample-McDougald House and the Centennial Garden will be ongoing. Tours are $5 per person. Free live entertainment and food available for sale. The event is open to the public. Call 954-292-8040. Music Under the StarsPompano Beach – The Parks, Recreation & Cultural Arts Department hosts its monthly Music Under the Stars event on Friday, Feb. 8 starting at 7 p.m. the event takes place south of the shing pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd., features the Justin Enco Band which plays rock, reggae and 80s music. Music Under the Stars is held the second Friday of every month. Call 954-786-4111.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, February 1, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – There isn’t anybody who doesn’t like a parade, and here at Founders’ Days Feb. 14 to17 there isn’t any entry in the parade that can’t come away with an award. No less than 15 prize-winning categories have been established, recognition for everything from best theme to best youthful performers to best civic club. If none of those merit attention, there is also a committee’s choice prize and a special award being made by the judges. The theme to be mindful of is “Journey Through Paradise.” The parade steps off from Founders’ Days parade is a chance for groups to win recognition. . Deer eld’s celebration is Feb. 14-17 “Any way you want’ em” was the slogan of this former business on South Federal Highway in Deer eld BeachPioneer Park Saturday, Feb. 15 at 10 a.m. and moves east on Hillsboro Boulevard to A1A, takes a northward turn and then reverses direction to the main beach parking lot. Entry forms and the prize categories are available on the city’s website, deer eldbeach.com. This is the 66th year the community has observed Founders’ Days which began as a BBQ in Pioneer Park to mark the end of the truck farming season. Back then, it was called Cracker Day, which meant no disrespect for the city’s early settlers, but rather was a term used to describe farmers cracking their whips over the heads of their mules as they plowed the elds. The event grew to include a carnival, entertainment and reworks and the venue was moved to the beach to accommodate more people. Although Founders’ Days has a long history, this year marks a rst: it will not be staged by community volunteers, but by the parks and recreation department. Originally, Cracker Day was a fundraiser for the Deer eld Beach Lions Club. As the members grew older and their numbers dwindled, a group led by Peggy Noland, not yet the mayor, took up the mission, moved it to the See FOUNDERS on page 16

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12 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Weather conditions require that buoys be removed at times. Attis expalins that removing and re-installing them has cost time and voltage. [Photo courtesy of Marc Furth]ReefContinued from page 3completely under power a year later on June 3, 2012. Trouble at the local site started with installation of the six underwater structures, Attis said. Divers were breaking drills until they switched to a half inch hammer drill. Then came problems with the surge. Each structure had to be cemented to the sea oor. The structures haven’t moved an inch since installation, Attis said. The buoys are another story. “The buoys are nothing but problems,” he said. “We’ve gotten good at putting the buoys back in place.” During monitoring last month, Attis said they found sponge colonies and oysters growing on the structure. “The project is working well, but it’s underpowered,” Attis said. “It’s working, and things are growing, but it’s very, very slow.” Town Manager Connie Hoffmann asked if it’s fair to say the buoys have been less operational than they have been operational. Attis said that’s because this area has had numerous bad storms, and every time there’s a bad storm, the buoys have to be taken out, then re t and put back. He said installing a wave generator, a technology that was not available when this structure rst went in, would alleviate that problem and provide the needed power. A wave generator is a self-contained buoy, Attis explained later. It contains a hinge inside, and as waves move up and down, the hinge moves, turns gears and generates electricity. “In the rst design (of the buoy at the LBTS site), the buoy top was too high, and waves smashed it,” he said. “Once it snapped, it broke free.” The design was changed and the main shaft lowered by two feet, and then it snapped. The design was changed again. “[The buoys] aren’t producing the power we’d like to have. [And we don’t have the] growth like we’ve seen in other places,” Attis said. “We’re below 100 watts, and it needs to be around 300 watts. It’s growing, slow but stronger.” This has been a bad season for storms, which messed up the buoys, he said. They had to be repaired and re-installed. Teams from Vone monitor the site monthly for sh and other biological organisms. “Could you take the buoys out and have the same growth?” Vice Mayor Scot Sasser asked. “The structure gets encased with calcium carbonate. If you had no power, the rebar would rust away in a couple years,” Attis said. “You need the charge to get limestone. Then the corals will spontaneously grow,” Fawcett explained. “We’re invested in this, and we want it to work,” Sasser said. “Do we need to look at other power sources rather than buoys?” “The best thing would be to look at getting more power,” Attis responded. “If we had 300 watts-plus, it would grow a lot quicker. But this has never been done before, and it ain’t easy. If we want something new, someone has to take a nosebleed. “It is going to work,” he said, noting they have to nd a wave generator. “If we had that, I wouldn’t have to go out in small storm warnings. The buoys are working but not well enough.” He said a wave generator costs about $30,000. Commissioner Chris Vincent, commending Attis on what they have done, said perhaps grants could be found to pay for the wave generator. A Vone team planned to be at the biorock reef transplanting corals onto the structure on the weekend following the meeting. When coral is dislodged, either naturally or from anchors, it dies if it isn’t re-attached, he said. Vone Research includes student volunteers “to ensure the younger generation will have an appreciation for the ocean,” Attis says. The team has spent more than 2,300 hours on this project.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, February 1, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The Curtain Call Playhouse production of “Kiss Me Kate,” the musical version of Shakespeare’s “Taming of the Shrew” opens this weekend at the Willow Theatre in A Cole Porter favorite in two performances hereCurtain Call players open in Boca Raton this weekendBoca Raton where nine performances are scheduled. Starring Tera Young and Peter Librach, the show plays here at the Herb Skolnick Center Feb. 16 and 17. Generally considered to be Cole Porter’s nest work, “Kiss Me Kate,” attracted audiences to more than 1,000 performances and won a Tony Award for best musical in 1949. It was revived on Broadway in 1999 and most recently, at London’s Old Vic Theatre in 2012. Directed by Young and Kris Coffelt, the musical is a play within a play featuring two romances, one between the director, played by Librach, and his ex-wife, played by Young, and another between two young cast members, one of which is a gambler. Enter two gangsters, mainstays of the era. This fun, melodious production features some of America’s favorite show tunes including “So in Love With You Am I,” “Too Darn Hot,” “Always True to You in my Fashion,” and “Another Op’nin, Another Show.” This is the rst time Curtain Call has staged “Kate” and the rst time Tara Young has sung the role but she comes to this one with years of famous roles on her resume including Dolly in “Hello, Dolly,” and Anna from “The King and I.” See KATE on page 15Tera Young and gangsters Chris D’Angelo and Bruce Metviner.

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14 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 vegetation and thick palm trees, blue handrails and benches and new lighting. A new concession stand/ visitors kiosk, transformed from an old storage shed, and freshly painted and renovated bathrooms dot the landscape. The CRA is in negotiations now with three companies, on behalf of the city, to run the concession stand and will present its recommendation to commissioners in a couple weeks. Horatio Danovich, CRA engineer, said the recommendation could be ready by the Feb. 12 commission meeting but would most likely be presented at the Feb. 26 meeting. The CRA also added new parking meters and trash receptacles, installed a brand new plaza at the end of Atlantic Boulevard that includes a water fountain and 5,400 sq. ft. of arti cial grass. New, wider sidewalks can be found along Pompano Beach Boulevard from Atlantic Boulevard to Northeast 5 Street and adjacent to the businesses between Pompano Beach Boulevard and A1A – with owners using the sidewalks next to them for customer seating and dining. A new $500,000 temporary paved parking lot provides 128 spaces, including nine for motorcycles. The city has a ve-year lease on the lot with the option to renew in two-year intervals for an additional four years. If the parking lot is ever removed as part of the hotel project developers say they want to build, the city will be reimbursed $80,000 per every month still left on the initial lease. Di Maria Olortegui said it’s hard to know if business has increased because of the improvements but three other businesses – Briny Irish Pub, Razzleberry’s ice cream shop and Miami Blues gift shop – say they have de nitely seen more customers. Danovich said reenergizing the area for pedestrians and merchants was the goal of the project. “The reality is that area has been pretty dormant and was in dire need of a huge facelift,” he said. “It’s amazing what a coat of paint will do. It’s never looked this nice,” said Julie Orr, owner of Razzleberry’s. Orr grew up in Pompano and opened her business near the beach nine years ago. “This should have been done 12 years ago. It’s never looked this nice.” Orr is amazed by the frequency of foreign languages being spoken by tourists – mainly from France, Germany and Canada – and hopes more of them buy condos and become more than just snow birds. After choosing Pompano as her escape route out of a harsh Quebec winter, Claudette Mcarthur found perhaps her favorite particular spot in Pompano – under the shade of the palm trees in the plaza. “I love it. It’s a nice place. I can’t go [out] much in the sun, so I’m here relaxing.” And along with more tourists grabbing some shade, sun or a cone of their favorite ice cream avor, Orr says she’s seeing more people from the nearby condos come into her store. Christine Nawar, resident at Sea Monarch condominium, said she’s never seen the area so busy, “especially in January.” Nawar said it has become “a lot more sociable” and she hopes more shopping can be added. “[I’d like to see] a high class outdoor mall.” Mickey Heby, owner of Miami Blues, which opened at the beach in 1991, said he and his customers are very happy with the improvements. Now, he hopes some kind of attraction, perhaps a carousel, can be built and give people more reasons to visit the area.Beach jobContinued from page 1This newly renovated kiosk/concession stand used to be a storage shed. Now, Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] of cials are in talks with three companies to provide food and refreshments to beachgoers. Horatio Danovich, CRA engineer, said the goal is to pick a company that will provide coffee, donuts and other breakfast items as well as sandwiches and other lunch fare. The CRA will present its recommendation to the city at the Feb. 12 or 26 commission meeting.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, February 1, 2013 Sunday. 954-592-0381. 2-2 – Aunt Mary’s Attic Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church, 2700 NE 36 St., Lighthouse Point. Household items, furniture, clothes, jewelry, books and more will be on sale. Refreshments will also be served. 954-943-9154. 2-3 – Deer eld Beach 2-2 & 3 – City-Wide Marke t from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. More than 200 vendors with a wide range of items, including: vintage and retro goods, collectibles, novelties, mint condition second-hand items, locally made products, edibles and more. Free admission. 954-785-7475.Auditions2-9 – Casting call for You’re a Good Man. Charlie Brown at Sol Theatre, 333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Appointments only. Auditions also held Feb. 10 and 11. 561-447-8829.Books & Lectures2-8 – Outdoor book fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Beach Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-357-7830. Also starring is her son Norman Young who plays the young romantic lead. Both Youngs are involved in education; she teaches music at Oakland Park Elementary School and Floyd Estates Elementary, he is a pianist at Westminster Academy. Also in lead roles are Michelle Zurschmiede Chris D’Angelo and Bruce Metviner. The musical had its true opening last Sunday before a sold out audience at the Sunrise Musical Theater. Young said, “It went very well.” At the Skolnick, “Kiss Me Kate,” is on stage for a dinner theater, Feb. 16, 6 p.m. and for a matinee, Feb. 17 at 2 p.m. Dinner theater tickets are $30; show only, $20. The Skolnick Theater is at 800 SW 36 Ave. For reservations call 954-786-4590. Show times at the Willow Theatre, 300 S. Military Trail, are 8 p.m. on Feb. 1, 2, 7 [sold out], 8, and 9 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Feb.2, 3, 9, 10. Tickets are $23 at 561-3473948. KateContinued from page 13SightingsContinued from page 2 Green Marke t at 8 a.m. at The Cove, Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal, at the Cove. Held every Sunday. 561-2391536 or 561-299-8684.See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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16 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-7838700!SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com avid diver said, “If it will help encourage diving, I’m 100 percent in favor of it.” Commissioner Chris Vincent, also a diver, said he favored the permits. He noted they need to be nontransferable and clear signage would be needed. Staff had suggested 50 dive permits, but Vice Mayor Scot Sasser questioned the need for so many. He suggested the smaller number of permits and commissioners approved 34 for use between May and Oct. 31. Steve Gagas of Gold Coast Scuba and John Boutin of the Windjammer Resort urged commissioners to approve the permits. “They will bring intangible good will and attention to LBTS,” Boutin said.DiversContinued from page 1 beach, expanded the days, and renamed the event Founders’ Days. This year, that committee, facing dwindling resources, bowed out and the city is the of cial sponsor. Contracted to handle vendors and coordinate the parade are DBFD Amusements, a company that staged the Country Music Fest here last August. Said Public Information Of cer Rebecca Medina, “This [Founders’ Days] was tossed into our laps at the last minute, but it is the largest event of the year. We were adamant about not letting it go away.” The carnival opens Thursday, Feb. 14, 6 to 10 p.m. and remains open through Sunday. The live music begins at 6 p.m. Friday and continues through Sunday until 5 p.m. Among the entertainers now booked are the Resolvers, Orange Sunshine, Andrew Morris, Uproot Hootenanny, Skinny Jimmy and the Stingrays and Pitbull of Blues. An arts and crafts show and vendor displays open Friday 6 to 10 p.m. and continue through Sunday. Fireworks, shot from the end of the shing pier, are being produced by the Zambelli Co. and are set for Saturday at 9 p.m. And of course food and cold drinks are available all weekend.Workers will be in the eld counting re hydrants and manholesDeer eld Beach The city is embarking on a $395,000 project to map all above ground sewer, water and storm water stations and has contracted with Woolpert, Inc. to provide the geographic information system [GIS] data. The survey work began Monday and will continue through September. Woolpert workers will wear logo uniforms, display an ID and carry a notice of the project with them. All mapping will be of hydrants, manholes, valves, etc., on public right of way according to GIS Coordinator Patrick Lockwitz. The surveyors will not be on private property. Newer annexed areas in the southwest sections of the city will not be affected as water is supplied by Broward County which has completed a similar survey there. According to Lockwitz, the information will be entered into a data base which will, in the future, help provide the city with maintenance budgets for the utility system. Lockwitz said the project “ takes a lot of time,” more than city workers would have. He estimated there are 2,500 re hydrants alone in the city. Woolpert surveyors may be in the eld seven days a week to meet their deadline. Many cities as well as the county are now mapping their utility systems, Lockwitz added, an unique application of technology to basic infrastructure. FoundersContinued from page 11

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The Pelican 17 Friday, February 1, 2013 national organization, which lobbies congress for the betterment of the industry and the client. Customers visiting the showroom will nd well known manufacturers of mobility vehicles represented such as Amigo, Pride, E.V. Rider and more. Britton says, “We differ from our competitors in that we have the knowledge and equipment to adapt these vehicles and make them even more functional. We’re competitive in price and seldom challenged by insurance companies.” “Every year we see improvements so our staff is required to have continued education to insure that they know how to work with the newest technology,” says Ruggieri. He adds, “Part of our service is to insure that the customer knows the proper function, maintenance and warranties on what they are buying and wheeling around in. When we make a delivery to a home, we spend up to an hour being sure the clients know everything about the use and care of their mobility vehicles.” Britton raps up this interview with, “It’s wonderful to go home every night knowing that we have improved the lives of others.” There’s a new, all natural product, Protandim, carried Active MobilityContinued from page 8 in the store that claims to reduce free radical damage linked to over 200 illnesses. Every member of the staff is taking it and giving it raves. For more information, stop by. Open Mon. to Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; appointments for emergencies available. Call 954-946-5793 or visit www. wheelchairguys.com.Lucille Scruggs, retired educator and church mother at Mount Calvary Baptist Churchis honored for over 50 years of service to the church and community. Scruggs taughtfor the majority of her career at Sanders Park Elementary School. She was an active Sunday School teacher and worked on several committees in the church. The event was chaired by Zadia Tyson. Pictured are Rev. Anthony Burrell, Honorable Judge Charlene Edwards Honeywell, (Scruggs’daughter), Honoree Lucille Scruggs and Zadia Tyson. Lucille Scruggs honored by church, community

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18 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Roger Montpetit doesn’t play shuffleboard very often, but when he does the silver skull on his stick sees all the action. He mounted the skull, with diamonds for eyes and a mohawk for a hairline, three years ago to give his stick a little more weight and a little more luck. “I put the diamonds in his eyes so he can see clearly enough. The skull was the perfect weight [to balance out my stick]. That’s why I made the Southern Coast Masters Tournament [in 2010].” Montpetit, a Deerfield Pompano celebrates 100 years of shuf eboardBeach resident, joined 25 other amateur and professional players at the Wild Doubles Tournament at McNab Park on Jan. 31 and Feb. 1, hosted by the Southeast Coast Division, which stretches from Miami to West Palm Beach. The purpose of Wild Doubles is to pair a professional player with an amateur and get amateurs more interested in the game. “And [amateurs] learn from it,” said Ken Offenther, state delegate with the Florida Shuffleboard Association. “We want to encourage amateurs to play and learn how to play better. We try to get as much participation as possible.” The tournament is also part of a series of statewide events celebrating 100 years of shuffleboard. “People think it’s an old people game but it’s anything but,” said Keith Sutton, past president of the Southeast See SHUFFLEBOARD on page 21Vicente Piccirillo, from Jupiter, lets one y at the Wild Doubles Shuf eboard Tournament at McNab Park in Pompano Beach on Jan. 31. The two-day tournament ends today. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]

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The Pelican 19 Friday, February 1, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFBella Roma Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria40 B SW 15th Street Pompano Beach 954-784-3696Pompano Beach For three years now, this clean, cozy pizzeria situated at the corner of McNab Road and S. Cypress has been impressing area residents and businesses with its endearing blend of authentic Italian fare and expeditious service. Owner Mike Buchinski, who has been operating a larger version of Bella Roma in Coconut Creek for the past 12 years, partnered with Pompano Beach’s Bella Roma restaurant delivers mouthwatering pizzas along with classic Italian faremany outstanding chefs who taught me everything I know and helped me develop my own style.” The menu is replete with all the succulent classics. From chicken marsala to veal parmigiana to shrimp Fra Diavolo to baked ziti, Bella Roma offers a bevy of delectable tastes and smells for every palate. “The roasted garlic chicken and broccoli in Asiago cream sauce is definitely one of my favorites,” says staff member Jessica Connolly. Other tempting poultry treats include the chicken Francese with white wine lemon butter sauce and the Caprese with fresh mozzarella and oven roasted tomatoes on a bed of delicate fettuccini. “The rigatoni a la vodka is one my favorites,” says Buchinski a native Floridian who spent some time in NY before returning to the warmer climes of the Sunshine State. “Locals know how good our food is. For example, our hand-made paninis and Owner Mike Buchinski and business partner Paul Moschella show off a few Bella Roma specialties including the highly popular vegetarian pizza. A house specialty – the rigatoni a la vodka with balsamic marinated grilled jumbo shrimp is enhanced by prosciutto, sauted shallots, hand-ground pecorino Romano cheese and pink vodka cream sauce.budding restaurateurs Paul Moschella and longtime associate Jeff Davis to create a second location that could reach customers all the way to A1A. “I have been in this business almost 25 years. I worked in a pizzeria in high school and with some help was eventually able to purchase it,” says the hardworking entrepreneur. “In the meantime, I was mentored by See BELLA ROMA on page 22

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20 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Many elderly people rely entirely on family or other trusted individuals to help them. Whether it is for physical needs or emotional needs, as people grow older they tend to need more and more help from others. This dependence on friend, neighbor, caregiver or family members makes an older person more vulnerable for abuse. It is estimated that 5% to 10% of elderly Americans are suffering abuse. In a recent national study of Adult Protective Services (APS), there were 253,421 reports of abuse of adults age 60+ or 832.6 reports for every 100,000 people over the age of 60+. The National Elder Abuse Incidence Study (National Center on Elder Abuse) found that more than 500,000 persons aged 60+ were victims of domestic abuse and that an estimated 84% of incidents are not reported to authorities, denying victims the protection and support they need.” Much attention has been focused on abuse in nursing homes but most of the elder abuse in this country is at the hands of family members or other independent, selfemployed caregivers in the home. There are a number of reasons why incidents of abuse, neglect, or exploitation are not reported to Adult Protective Services or other authorities. One of the most common reasons is the victim’s fear of losing support. Many of the perpetrators are family members and the victim fears that reporting the crime will result in removal of the caregiver, as the perpetrator may face incarceration or may discontinue relations with the victim once accused, charged, or convicted. Many of these victims fear that by reporting abuse they will be left alone and expected to care for themselves or they will be forced to live in a nursing home. The following is a list of indicators of abuse, neglect or exploitation. It is important to note that the following lists are merely indicators and may not always be violations. Signs of Abuse: Unexplained bruises, welts, fractures, abrasions or lacerations. Multiple bruises in various stages of healing. Multiple/repeat injuries. Low self-esteem or loss of self determination. Withdrawn, passive. Fearful. Depressed, hopeless. Soiled linen or clothing. Social Isolation Signs of Neglect/Self-Neglect: Dehydration. Malnourishment. Inappropriate or soiled clothing. Odorous. Over/under medicated. Deserted, abandoned or unattended. Lack of medical necessities or assistive devices. Unclean environment. Social Isolation Signs of Exploitation: Missing/ ”disappearing” property. Inadequate living environment. Frequent/recent property title changes or will changes. Excessive home repair bills. Forced to sign over control of finances. No/limited money for food, clothes and other amenities. At Senior Helpers, we place the utmost importance on ensuring our caregivers receive the latest training and are fully credentialed. Our caregivers are thoroughly screened before they can become employees of Senior Helpers and each has the opportunity to participate in the Senior Helpers University program to attain additional education. Senior Helpers has all Florida licensing requirements so you can be assured that our caregiver is properly credentialed to perform the level of care that your senior loved one needs. To hire Home Health Agency call 954-707-5030Hidden Secrets of Elder AbuseADVERTISEMENT

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The Pelican 21 Friday, February 1, 2013 Coast Division. In shuffleboard, the object is to push a puck down the court into a painted triangle divided into squares. The closer to the top of the triangle a puck lands the more points are awarded. The game also allows for players to knock their opponents’ puck out of play or knock it into a spot that could take away points. “It’s a true sport. There’s offense and defense. I can stop my opponent from doing his best. It’s a much better sport than golf,” said Jay Fitzpatrick, president of the Southeast Coast Division. “It’s a hundred times cheaper and anybody can play it.” For information on the Southeast Coast Division, call Keith Sutton at 954-783-7177. Shuf eboardContinued from pageSightingsContinued from page 152-9 – Book sale from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Imperial Point Library, 5989 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954-492-1881. 2-9 – Book fair from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. 954-566-9019. 2-16 – Book fair from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-357-7595Business2-6 – Ribbon cutting at Mediterraneo Grill and Caf Cucina Siciliana, 420 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Cost is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. RSVP by Feb. 5. 954941-2940. RSVP at info@ pompanobeachchamber.com. 2-7 – Breakfast N’ Deer eld from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce Banquet Room, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. 954427-1050. 2-8 – The Originals breakfast networking group meets at 8 a.m. at Seaside Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. Attendees must pay for their own breakfast. Email cob3@bellsouth. net for info.Children & Family2-2 – Unity in the Community from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., Pompano Free food, entertainment and activities. 954-586-1123. 2-8 – Sol Children Theatre Troupe evening social from 6 to 8 p.m. at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Free admission. Register for spring session. 561-447-8829. 2-8 – Mirror, Mirror at 7 p.m. at Villages of Hillsboro Park, 4111 NW 6 Street, Deer eld Beach. Admission is free. Movie is rated PG. 954480-4429.Clubs, Charity & Civic Organizations2-6 – Oakland Park Friends of the Library meets from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Oakland Park Library,1298 NE 37 St. 954-630-4270. See SIGHTINGS on page 25

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22 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 describe my function as being a conduit between Broward Chiefs and the Florida Police Chief Association. It keeps me connected to my counterparts in Broward County. I stay abreast of crime issues in the county and in the state. This enhanced relationship means I am very tuned into traveling criminals.”A look at the manLicata came to this area in Florida with his family when he was 14. He attended Coconut Creek High School. He says, “I was hired by the Delray Police Dept. when I was 19 and I already had a twoyear degree. While working in the department, I attended Palm Beach Atlantic College and earned a B.S. degree in Organizational Management. I built a career there and left because in the course of my career, I developed an interest in becoming a police chief.” And now, as police chief, he heads up a department with 42 dedicated and sworn of cers and support staff. He says, “Like every other small community, we must always remember that we are part of something much larger. Crime doesn’t know borders, and as part of the Miami Dade/Broward metro area, Lighthouse Point Police Department must always be focused on preventing criminal elements from violating the peace and safety of those who live in our city.” He and his wife, Peggy, have two daughters and as of two weeks ago, they have three grandchildren, two boys and a girl. “We’re a close family and I spend whatever free time I have with my family. We all still live in Delray Beach. He wraps up this interview saying, “Here in LHP our citizens get a great deal of personalized service. We have close ties with people. Some of our of cers have been here for many years and established connections to many residents. Our commitment is to customer service and building positive community relations.” Thank you, Chief Licata for your dedicated service to your community and for heading up a department that has brought many honors to LHP.Chief LicataContinued from page 10meatball parm subs are huge sellers,” says co-owner Moschella who specializes in the promotion and marketing aspects of the business. “Once you taste our food, you will be hooked!” The vegetarian menu comes loaded with fresh tomatoes, garlic, spinach, broccoli, eggplant, green peppers, onion, olive oil and pecorino Romano. “We have great pizza, great food and a great reputation. People even recognize us from the Coconut Creek restaurant,” adds Buchinski who already has plans to expand his eatery to a 40seat restaurant next spring. “We use the highest quality ingredients and everything is made fresh to order.” “My mother Nol has been the biggest positive influence in my life. She has helped me through many tough times, especially after the passing of my brother and father. I really owe everything to her,” says Buchinski who is dedicated to providing the best dining experience possible for his customers. “We do a lot of catering for office functions, birthday parties and everything in between,” says Buchinski. “We are also very flexible with regard to special requests. If you want lobster tails, then just call ahead of time and we will prepare them for you!” By the way, guests are encouraged to bring their own wine for which there is no corking fee. For a sweet ending, be sure to try cannoli, cheesecake or the always satisfying chocolate thunder cake. Buon appetito! Bella RomaContinued from page 19

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The Pelican 23 Friday, February 1, 2013 Paula Hedglon sees chiropractic care as an ongoing way to stay healthy. Walking down the long hallway at her chiropractic center in Pompano Beach, visitors can read testimonials from patients who have watched their health improve, but many of them talk about additional benefits that were surprises. They are are what Dr. Hedglon calls ‘miracles.’ One patient, 44, came because she could not move her neck. After a neck scan and an x-ray, Dr. Hedglon saw in her neck a bone fusion. “When the spinal bones go out of alignment, it causes nerve interference in the spine. I adjusted her neck with a ‘toggle.’ After three months of care she went back to her primary physician. She could not only move her neck, her doctor told her that her kidney, atrophied since birth, had regenerated and was growing.” Another patient with Bell’s Palsy, was unable to open his mouth on the left side for a year and a half. After one adjustment he was able to open his mouth. The testimonials are real; the patients include their photographs for all to see. Dr. Hedglon has her own philosophy as to these “miracles,” a word she uses freely in her practice. “The body can replicate and heal itself if there is no interference with the brain. This is healing from the inside out. The brain sends messages through the spinal cord and then to the organs. My job is to clear the way for the messages.” She says “stress” is the biggest interference in healing, and stress presents itself in three forms: physical, chemical and mental. God does the healing,” she says. “I just adjust, or move the bone that is causing pressure on the spinal cord” Prior to completing her chiropractic degree, Dr. Hedglon taught upper grades at St. Elizabeth Roman Catholic School in Pompano Beach. She earned her degree in education at Florida State University. She earned her degree in chiropractic care from Life Chiropractic College, Marietta, GA. in 1985. But this small, quiet-spoken woman makes no claims on her part other than releasing the body’s own innate healing ability. Her personal faith emanates a quiet confidence in her chosen profession. The days begin at Hedglon Chiropractic Center with meditations and prayer, and the atmosphere reflects a calm and settling comfort for patients. She builds strong relationships with her patients through her skills of caring. Dr. Hedglon is not alone with her philosophy. There are a growing number of chiropractors like Dr. Hedglon who have chosen the philosophy of Dr. James M. Sigafoose, a recognized leader in “natural healing.” “More and more people want to stop living on drugs. We help them realize that the body has its own healing experience,” she says. Her practice is for the whole family, and she encourages parents to start their children early with the world of chiropractic healing. “We see a lot of families. This is my mission, from womb to tomb,” she adds. Children are welcomed at Hedglon’s Center. They also benefit from the experience. She explains that children aren’t always aware of something being wrong with their bodies. They can have traumas that impact their well-being and go for years or a lifetime accepting an issue that could be healed. “The first trauma is birth,” says Dr. Hedglon. She recounts the story of a newborn whose father, a Hedglon Chiropractic Center offers a natural way to get well and stay healthy Broward Sheriff ‘s Office deputy, was a regular patient. When it was apparent at birth that his child was unable to nurse because he could not move his head, the midwife recommended chiropractic care. “When I adjusted the baby, he was able to move his head and nurse. Then the whole family continued the care, coming twice a week at first and then weekly,” she says. “Every muscle in the body, including the sucking reflex, is controlled by a nerve. Without the connection, the muscle cannot do its job.” “It’s good to set up regular checkups for the entire family—like people do with the dentist—to maintain a body that is able to continually heal itself,” she says. Dr. Hedglon’s introduction to chiropractic care came to her from her great uncle, Dr. Frank Fasulo, a pioneer in chiropractic care. He graduated from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1947. When Hedglon’s brother, Armand, was injured in a fall and hit the back of his head, Dr. Fasulo took care of him using chiropractic adjustments. Today, Hedglon’s brother is also a chiropractor, practicing in Margate.Children respond especially well to chiropractic care. Here, Dr. Paula checks Savion as Jasira hugs her brother. He was rst checked right after being born. The staff of Hedglon Chiropractic Center: Michele, Dr. Paula, Marilyn, Alex, Tom and Catherine.“More and more people want to stop living on drugs. We help them realize that the body has its own healing experience.” Dr. Hedglon ADVERTISEMENT

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24 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Pompano Beach Elisabeth von Trapp will perform in a free concert at St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 1111 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach at 7 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 8. “Elisabeth is the granddaughter of Maria and Baron von Trapp, whose story inspired The Sound of Music. A free will offering will be collected. Cookies and light refreshments will be available after the performance. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church is beginning its second year offering musical concerts. At 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 9, the Gold Coast Jazz Society will offer New Orleans style jazz for a Mardi Gras sensation on the last Saturday before Ash Wednesday. Tickets for the jazz concert on Saturday are $15 and include two complimentary glasses of wine at the reception that follows. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church is a developing, multicultural parish with services in English, Spanish and Portuguese. Come, See and Share Our Peace. English celebrations of the Holy Eucharist are at 8 a.m. and a Choral Eucharist at 10:30 a.m., on Sundays. Masses in Spanish are offered at 7:30 p.m. on Saturdays and 12:30 p.m. on Sundays. The Mass is offered in Portuguese at 7 p.m. on Saturdays. Free von Trapp concert Feb. 8 Deerfield Beach Dr. Bruce Janke will discuss the advantages of hip replacement and answer questions on Feb. 12 at 6 p.m. at Broward Health North Conference Center, 201 E. Sample Road, Deerfield Beach. Participants will learn more about anterior hip replacements from this leading orthopedic surgeon and medical director of the Joint Replacement Center at BHN. Dr. Janke and partner Dr. Steven Naide have performed more than 2,000 anterior hip replacements using the hana table, which results in no muscles cut, less pain, faster recovery and no standard precautions. This event is free, but space is limited. Call 954-759-7400 to reserve a seat.Hip replacement lecture, Feb. 12Dr. Bruce JankeRossano, SalSal Rossano Sr, 85, of Smallwood, NY and Pompano Beach, died Jan 26 in Greenville, SC. Direct memorial gifts to Lustgarten Foundation @ www.lustgarten.org.Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700 for obituary information. Obituary

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The Pelican 25 Friday, February 1, 2013 Broward County Sheriff’s Office The Kangol Robber first appeared on Broward Sheriff’s Office detectives’ radar Nov.14 when he robbed the Pet Supermarket in Pompano Beach. A month later, around 2 p.m. Dec. 13, he walked into the FedEx Office store at 1650 N. Federal Highway in Pompano Beach and held employees at gunpoint. Initially, he walked around the store while talking on a cell phone. He picked up a notepad and approached the cashier to pay. As soon as the register opened, he took out a silver handgun and pointed it at the employees as he ordered them to get on the floor. He emptied the cash drawer and ordered a second employee to open the safe. He took that employee’s money and his driver’s license and fled. The suspect is a black male in his mid to late 20s. He’s about 5’8” tall, weighs approximately 160 lbs. and is seen on video wearing a khaki, long-sleeve shirt, brown pants, brown shoes and a brown Kangol hat. The suspect is also being sought by the Margate Police Department for two robberies on Jan. 2 at City Trends and Advanced Auto Parts. Anyone with information is asked to contact BSO Robbery Detective Roger Peterson at 954-321-4270 or 954-493-TIPS (8477) or www.browardcrimestoppers. org. Three robberies under his belt, Kangol robber still at large SPECIAL TO THE PELICANIn recognition and in celebration of the birthday of The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., State Representative Gwyn Clarke-Reed, District 92, presented backpacks to students from the public elementary schools in District 92. Two students from each school were chosen to receive a backpack filled with school supplies. Wells Fargo Bank donated the backpacks presented to these students. The following students were selected by each of their teachers because they demonstrated the characteristics and qualities of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This is an annual event presented by State Representative Gwyndolen Clarke-Reed. Schools and students receiving the awards were Charles Drew Elementary Tyler Curry and Christan Moore; Deerfield Park Elementary Quincy Allen and Amanda Brown; Lloyd Estates Elementary Victoria Dassas and Diana Ford; C. Markham Elementary Omyra Velez and Denley Joubert; North Andrews Gardens Elementary Daniel Pierre and Nyteria Williams ; Oriole Elementary Damon Jackson and Marcus Anderson; Palmview Elementary Jason McWhorter and Sirah Valez; Park Ridge Elementary Jonathan Valcin and Jorgeana Tardi; Sanders Park Elementary Diaina Lofton and DaMoria Grant; Tedder Elementary Robens Alexis and Jean Vincent; Quiet Waters Elementary Christopher Bush and Lela William. Local students honored for strong character SPECIAL TO THE PELICAN SightingsContinued from page 21 2-6 – Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach meets at 12 p.m. at Seaside Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-783-4999. 2-10 – Fundraising and food pairing event from 4 to 6 p.m. at The Heart of the Olive, Olive, 816 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Wine, avored oils and other foods will be served. Part of the proceeds bene t The Pantry of Broward. Cost is $10. 754222-8071.Education 2-4 – Goldcoast Toastmasters Club meets at 7 p.m. at Denny’s, 3151 Powerline See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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26 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Send The Pelican your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.comClassi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 NOW HIRING BREAKFAST COOKS!! Part Or Full Time. All Shifts. Open 7 Days. Apply 2211 Wilton Drive Wilton Manors – Courtyard Caf. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days. References Available. 954-482-5494. HHA SEEKS Weekends & Eves. Mon – Fri. Light Housekeeping – Prepare Meals. Speak English. U. S. Citizen. Experienced References Available. 561-908-1017. 2-1 HOME HEALTH AIDE – Private Certified. Day Or Nights. Providing Loving & Professional Care. Honest & Reliable. Affordable Rates. References Available. 954678-7754. CERTIFIED CNA – Honest, Reliable, Seeking Position To Take Care Of Your Loved Ones. Live In Or Out. Excellent References. 954-682-1198. SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 2-8 MARCELA’S CLEANING – Residential Cleaning. Affordable Service You Can Trust! Experienced & GREAT References. 954-376-0524. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill, Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954-818-9538. HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed.. www.NewAvionics.Com. 954568-1991. C SELL YOUR BUSINESS!! Call Russell Cohen 954-646-7651 – www. abiz4sale.comrcohen@ tworld.com Transworld Business Brokers Lic R.E. Broker. MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CCOLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 2-8 POMPANO BEACH – Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38’ x 13’. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 2-8 MOBILE HOME SALESDEERFIELD BEACH DOUBLE 24x60’ 2/2 – New Siding – Windows – Water Heater – A/C – Flooring – Overroof – Corner Lot – Enclosed Front Porch 10x24’ – New Shower Stalls. $28,900. Call 954-325-1515. HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,200 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH – LEISUREVILLE 3/2 – 1 Car Garage. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease. Utilities Not Included. Available March 1st. 954-6498867. 2-8 ROOMS FOR RENTDEERFIELD – PVT ROOM & BATH In Double Wide Mobile Home. 50+. W/D – Complete Kitchen Use. Heated Pool. $550 Mo. + 1/2 Sec. 954-588-8940. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. REAL ESTATE FOR SALEPOMPANO PROPERTIES FOR SALE – RIVERGATE – T/H Rarely Available. 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath/1-CG – ICW View $475K. 3228 TOWNHOMES/CAMELOT – 2/2 T/H, One Floor Only! Totally Renovated, Approx. 1/2 Block To Ocean $280K. SEA HAVEN #321 B – Remodeled. 2/2 – Adjacent To Marina $155K. GARDEN AIRE VILLAGE S. #415, 2/2 Approx. 1 Mile To Sea! $110K. Contact PJ Carswell, Atlantic Prop. Int. Inc. – 954-242-4260. pj@atlanticprop.com 2-1

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The Pelican 27 Friday, February 1, 2013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE – DEERFIELD. Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny With Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furn. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $56,000. 561-372-9837. POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324.CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH ADULT CONDO 55+. 1 / 1 Nicely Furnished Condo. Ready To Move-in. $800 Month. 1950 SE 5th Court. Call 954-943-5531. POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 2-8 BEACH PADS FOR RENTShort Or Long Term. Luxury furnished/unfurnished studios for your short or long term stay. Daily rates now available (apply to certain units only when available). Longer the stay, better the value. Small pets welcome. Tropical pool, coin laundry, private parking. 1/1 available after March 2 – 1 left!!! Call today to book your private getaway!! All Bills Paid!!! WI-FI, Premium Cable, Water, Electric and more.. Contact Pax-Properties @ 888-729-4948 or 561-541-0308 – Photos @ www.beachpads. net 2-8 POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL. Efficiency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 2-1 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 – ALL NEW! QUIET BUILDING WITH COURTYARD!!. Annual Lease $900 Month. Call 609-638-1291. 2-8 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248736-1533. POMPANO / MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 Avenue – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished – Unfurnished. $650 $850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 2-8 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 2-22 BEACHY-KEEN! 2 Bedroom 2 Bath1 Block From The Sand In NE Pompano. Annual Lease $1,275 Month. 954-614-8428. LIGHTHOUSE POINT – MARINA AREA. Very Attractive Large 2/2. Rent Dock At Marina & Walk Home. $1,700 Month Unfurnished. Agent 954-614-8428. POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 2-8 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-22 UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent in a Psychologists Of ce For A Solo Professional. $950 / Month. In The Gateway Centre – 2040 East Sample Rd Lighthouse Point. Windowed, Unfurnished Of ce 14’ by 12.5’. 954-942-3344. 2-8 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 2-8 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,2 00 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 2-22

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28 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com bought a cigar store at 504 S. Federal Highway for $1.3 million and converted it into a detox facility. The Brooks property, a 12,474 square foot building and parking lot, is next door. Contacted this week, AbuMoustafa would not say if he has plans for the building. “I have no idea what God has in store. I bought it as a good investment, a business opportunity.” Single family homeowners living behind the cigar store on SE 5 Street and SE 5 Court, attempted to ght the detox center, on the grounds it was not compatible with the neighborhood. The city rst denied Abu-Moustafa’s application to convert the cigar store, and then backed off when threatened with a civil right lawsuit by his attorney. Under the federal Fair Housing Act and provisions of the Americans With Disabilities Act, people with addictions are classi ed as disabled and cannot to be discriminated against when it comes to housing. Abu-Moustafa began his investment in Deer eld Beach 10 years ago when he purchased a portion of what is now Florida House, a large complex on the corner of Federal Highway and SE 5 Court, for $1.3 million. Later he purchased adjacent buildings for $830,000 and established a somewhat luxurious campus for private patients recovering from addictions. Last year he paid $1.6 million for the Yucatan restaurant property at 525 S. Federal Highway, across from Florida House. No renovations have been made there yet. Abu-Moustafa has also acquired four homes in the area west of Federal Highway, buying some at the height of the real estate boom. Now valued at $515,120 by the Broward County Property Appraiser, his original $924,200 investment has put him upside down on those properties by some $400,000. However, his commercial properties have withstood the real estate downturn. Those and the single-family homes are valued for tax purposes at $7.9 million, coming close the retail prices he paid of $8.25 million. 2012 taxes on all these parcels, some of the choicest land in town, were $184,241. Figures for 2013 have not yet been posted. Abu-Moustafa is touchy about his business acquisitions. He said he has received threatening letters about his operation when in fact he has “turned places into beautiful spots. I employ 200 people, I bring money into the community, I help people. I have done nothing but positive things for the community. How do I educate the public about what I do?” Among other properties Abu-Moustafa has purchased recently is a former pain clinic at 318-320 Hillsboro Boulevard which he has converted into a wellness center for clients of Florida House. “Why don’t people ever talk about that?” he said.Florida HouseContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 29 Friday, February 1, 2013 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – GFS celebrated its 156th store on Jan. 22 with free food and a giant pair of scissors to cut the ribbon during the grand opening festivities. GFS employees, managers and executives along with city officials from Lighthouse Point and Pompano Beach, and the chambers of commerce from those cities, all piled in front of the entrance to cut the ribbon. County Commissioner Chip LaMarca was also at the event. Lighthouse Point Mayor Fred Schorr said the opening of GFS is an example of the business-friendly atmosphere in Lighthouse Point. “What it says is ‘we look forward to working with you.’” GFS is a 115-year-old family-owned wholesale company that got its start by selling to restaurants Mayor declares new GFS a sign that Lighthouse Point is business friendly but has since opened to the public. The store’s inventory includes meats, spices, vegetables, cups, plates, kitchen equipment, restaurant uniforms and more. No membership is required GFS employees, managers and executives along with city of cials from Lighthouse Point and Pompano Beach and their respective chambers of commerce – including Lighthouse Point Mayor Fred Schorr, Lighthouse Point Commissioner Earl Maucker, Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher and County Commissioner Chip LaMarca – all piled in front of the new GFS Marketplace, 3620 N. Federal Hwy., Lighthouse Point, on Jan. 22 to celebrate the store’s grand opening.but business owners can sign up for a rewards program where they get rebates at the end of the year, depending on how much they spend. Call GFS in Lighthouse Point at 954-783-5200. Lighthouse Point Mayor Fred Schorr said the opening of GFS is an example of the business-friendly atmosphere in Lighthouse Point. “What it says is ‘we look forward to working with you,’” said Schorr.

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30 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Send your fishing news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Lighthouse Point – Anglers looking for a big catch this weekend should have plenty of variety to choices. “There’s been some kings, scattered dolphin, a few sailfish, and a few black fin tunas,” said Jeff Walls, manager at RJ Boyle Studios in Lighthouse Point. “There have been quite a few blue marlin seen here in the last week and some white Anglers have big choices this weekendmarlin mixed in too.” And if a nearby cold front blows into Broward this weekend, Walls says the chance to catch a sailfish should increase. “The wind will be blowing pretty good for Friday and Saturday. Expect the winds out of the northeast.” Road, Oakland Park. 954-7829951 or 954-718-0543.Events & Activities2-10 – Bingo at 1 p.m. at St. Henry’s Catholic Church, 1500 S. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach. 10 regular games and a three-part jackpot game. Doors open at 12 p.m. Prizes and refreshments. 954-785-2450.Health & Fitness2-4 – Men’s Health Screening from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954279-7946. 2-10 – Hedglon Chiropractic Center 1313 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach, holds an open house from 1 to 4 p.m. Experts will talk about chiropractic matters. Free computer scan, spinal exams, x-rays [if needed] and food and music. RSVP at 954-9461799. 2-16 & 17 – Reiki class from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Lisa’s Healing Center. 4301 N. Federal Hwy. Suite 4, Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $100. 954-782-6564. SightingsContinued from page 25

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The Pelican 31 Friday, February 1, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! been budgeted for the plan. The proposed plan included surveying in the West Commercial retail area and in the Anglin Square area, visiting hoteliers and analyzing surveys hotel guests ll out, identifying target markets, developing a marketing message and marketing themes. Kathy Koch, a principal with Ambit, said the rm would provide research to target the audience the town wants to attract. “It’s critical to understand what attracts tourists or business to your city,” she said. By talking to and visiting folks who live and visit here,’ . you will understand who is coming, what they hope to nd and what keeps them coming back.” In a similar move, Delray Beach changed Atlantic Avenue from ho-hum to an area where something is happening all the time, Koch said. “We spoke with residents and business owners who felt they had a charming city and developed a campaign to ‘Keep the Charm.’” Hollywood is working to attract tourists, Koch said. They know that many of their visitors come from cruise ships, and the port is bringing in two more Oasis ships. “Every week 5,400 visitors are on and off the ships. We’re advising them to plan an extra day at the beginning or end of their trip” (to stay in Hollywood.) Koch said Ambit also worked with Hallandale Beach. “They put together a plan, and many more condos did go up.” All the plans started with research, Koch said. “You are in the midst of so many things,” she said of LBTS. “Last year Broward County had more tourists than ever. The port and airport are growing. The economy is de nitely on the upswing. The last thing you want to do is not get your share.” While he liked the proposal, Commissioner Mark Brown said he wants to see the development work [on Commercial Boulevard] done as quickly and ef ciently as possible. “I don’t want to spend a lot of money now when we may need that money.” Brown said he doesn’t see a need to spend $64,000 on a marketing plan now when in six to eight months the downtown renovation will be completed. “Whom will we market to? Broward County, central Florida, internationally?” Brown asked, adding he didn’t have a good idea now what the strategy would be. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser agreed with Brown. “What are we marketing? Construction and a reef without enough power?” Sasser said he’s not big on surveys. “I’d rather have a strategy on the people not coming here. We’re being very business-friendly. If we put a market plan together, who will join with us? This is not the right time and not a priority for me. We can talk again next year.” Commissioner Vincent asked Koch to explain why the plan was needed now. “It seems to make sense to understand who you are trying to reach. You wouldn’t implement it until your improvements are done, but we would have done the research, planned the media placement and you’d be ready to go.” Until the research was done in Hollywood, she said city of cials hadn’t realized the number of visitors coming from across Alligator Alley. Koch said now was a good time to do the surveys because so many people are here. She said interviewers would ask why the visitors are here, what they think of the town and what their expectations are. Are they looking to dive or shop, for example. Minnet said she sees the plan as a way to create measurable tools. While she understands the hesitation, she said, “I think this is the time so we have a plan so when the right time comes, we can implement it. We know LBTS is a destination. We need to know who is coming to live, to stay and to do business. “I’m in favor of doing this and in favor of sooner rather than later,” Minnet said. Vincent also said he supported the plan. Hoffmann said she echoed what the mayor said, adding, “We often think we know our clientele, but market research points out things we don’t know. The time is now. This is the right time.” Hoffmann said Pompano Beach has a development plan and is advertising for a tourism manager. “In Fort Lauderdale, the area near the Bonnet House is trying to become like Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. They’re buying up motels and putting in sidewalk cafes. I don’t want to get lost in the dust.” She added that the commission is always saying the chamber should be doing more marketing. “But we don’t have the knowledge to tell the chamber what they should be doing.” Brown suggested the commission address the marketing plan in the next scal year, which starts Oct 1. Hoffmann said by the time the improvements on Commercial Boulevard are completed, “We will have so much to market.” Sasser remained unconvinced the marketing plan was the right way to go. “I think we should help by investing in the town. I think businesses should step up.” Dodd suggested bringing back the proposal for the marketing plan in six months. “If we wait, we miss the season” (for gathering the research), Hoffmann said. “I’m concerned this is the wrong time until we get the town rebuilt,” Dodd said. “We will get more tourist response when we’re done. I want the answers, but this is putting the cart before the horse.” Dodd moved the commission defer the matter for six months, and Sasser seconded his motion. The motion passed. MarketingContinued from page 1

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Friday, February 1, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 5 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican City managers pleas for marketing plan lost in the voteBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea To the dismay of the mayor and town manager, town commissioners here decided that now is not the right time to hire a rm to devise a town marketing strategy and plan. A motion to defer for six months a $64,5000 plan proposed by Ambit passed on Jan. 8 by a vote of 3-2 with only Mayor Roseann Minnet and Commissioner Chris Vincent against the deferral. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann noted that in the last scal year commissioners said the town needed a cohesive marketing strategy and plan. She chose Ambit from among three rms the town has on continuing contracts for marketing services because they have experience in the tourism market. Funds had previously See MARKETING on page 31 Divers get break on parking feesBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea In an effort to entice more divers to explore the towns underwater attractions, commissioners agreed to grant 34 parking permits to divers for use on Datura Avenue, Hibiscus Avenue and Bougainvilla Drive. Those with permits, which cost $30, will park for free 6 to 10 a.m. and 7 to 11 p.m. except on Friday evenings or Saturdays. These permits dont guarantee parking, Tony Bryan, nance director, explained. If parking is available, they can get it. If not, they would pay for parking. Commissioner Stuart Dodd, an See DIVERS on page 16 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Rosaly Di Maria Olortegui grew up here and shes seen the beach area at Atlantic Boulevard and Pompano Beach Boulevard go from great to bad to great again. Tourists, beach residents, business owners and visitors from other Broward cities say the Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] has made dramatic improvements to the formerly poorly lit and run-down area. Di Maria Olortegui, daughter of Frank Di Maria, owner of Franks Ristorante & Pizza, in business at the beach since 1974, said the New look at Atlantic terminus lled with color, turf, trees; old parking lot just a memory improvements have made the area safer and more attractive for families and pedestrians. Unfortunately, we did lose [the beach area] but its coming back. Before it was all dark and gloomy. Now, its well-lit and people have a reason to come back here. This is reminding me of how it used to be, she said. Gone are the old and narrow gray sidewalks, the worn-out beige beach walls, overgrown bushes and thin palm trees scattered about. Now, after nearly $10 million [$7 million from the CRA and $3 million from the city] in improvements, the area is landscaped with neatly arranged See BEACH JOB on page 14 New greenway borders C-13 Canal. . Already attracting walkers and cyclistsBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Residents in the far western reaches of Oakland Park now have a new place to go for a peaceful walk or bike ride. Its the recently completed Northwest 39 Street Greenway, just west of the citys re station off See GREENWAY on page 7 Florida House owner buying up some choice properties. . Latest acquisition is Brooks Restaurant By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The owner of Deer eld Florida House, an addiction rehab complex here, has amassed property in his neighborhood worth $8.25 million. Sherief Abu-Moustafas latest acquisition was Brooks Restaurant purchased for $2.3 million on January 1 of this year. In 2011, in a move protested by nearby residents, Abu-Moustafa See FLORIDA HOUSE on page 28Unity in The Community, Feb 2 Unity in The Community, Feb 2. . see ad on page 18Residents, tourists and business owners say the Community Redevelopment Agency improvements to the beach at the east end of Atlantic Boulevard and Pompano Beach Boulevard have revitalized the once dilapidated area. [Photo by Michael dOliveira]

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2 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Cast Your Advertising Net to 7 Northeast Broward Cities The Pelican 954-783-8700SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Art 2-2 NOBE Art Walk from 7 to 11 p.m. at North Beach Art Gallery, 3334 NE 34 St., Fort Lauderdale. 954667-0660. 2-6 National League of American Pen Women hosts a juried exhibit from Feb. 6 to March 6 at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Participants include area women artists. Skolnick is open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays. 954-812-1860. 2-8 Social Media & The Artist copyright law class from 7 to 9 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Court, Wilton Manors. Michelle Solomon, former executive producer with WPLG Local 10 and managing director of Editorial Content Providers, LLC, will speak. 954-6614740. 2-15 Island City Artwalk from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Businesses host local artists and many serve food and refreshments. Visit www. islandcityartwalk.com.Auctions, Sales & Giveaways2-2 Pompano Beach GreenMarket from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. Held every Saturday. 954-292-8040. 2-2 & 3 Wilton Manors Green Market from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Held every Saturday and See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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The Pelican 3 Friday, February 1, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Problems with insuf cient power and frequent storms have hindered a biorock reef project off the coast of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. But now its coming along really well, Stephen Attis, president of Vone Research, Inc. of Pompano Beach, informed town commissioners at a recent meeting. The Biorock process, an invention of Dr. Thomas Goreau of the Global Coral Reef Alliance, uses low voltage electricity to grow limestone rock structures in the sea and accelerate growth of corals. The electrical current causes minerals to adhere to a metal structure. A frame, made of rebar or wire mesh, is anchored to the sea bottom. Solar-powered buoys provide the electric power to the structure which accelorates the growth of coral. Goreau has 300 similar projects, mostly in Bali. He recently received the United Nations Equator Award for his work in coral reef restoration, Jane Fawcett, operations manager for Vone, said. Hes the foremost person in the world doing this work. The biorock structure rst went in the water off LBTS on Sept. 3, 2011. It was See REEF on page 12 A frame, made of rebar or wire mesh, is anchored to the sea bottom. Solar-powered buoys provide the electric power to the structure which accelorates the growth of coral. [Photo courtesy of Marc Furth]Reef project to save coral has bumps but town leaders remain supportive

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4 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Developer to present project to commission By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFF Wilton Manors The only bid to develop Hagen Parks public parking lot was unanimously rejected by a committee established to review the proposal. The eight-member committee met Jan. 14 to review the project, a $14 million residential and commercial development proposed by IBI, an architecture and engineering rm with of ces in Pompano Beach. The use of public lands for projects has a higher level Committee rejects residential development proposalof achievement and should be something special, said Heidi Shafran, director of the Community Development Services Department, according to a record of the meeting. Committee members remain under a cone of silence and are prohibited from speaking about the proposal outside of public hearings. IBIs proposal rated an average of 16 points out of 40 by the committee. The project includes between 120 and 280 residential units, 13,000 sq. ft. of retail and restaurant space, a rooftop pool and garden, 1.2-acre plaza and between 300 and 620 parking spaces; including a possible four-story parking garage. Parking was one of the main concerns raised by committee members who said IBI didnt plan to build enough spots and the proposed garage would be in a location too far from Wilton Drive on what is now Hagen Parks only open space. The current number of parking spaces is 213. [We] need to have parking closer to those who would use parking, said Kevin Knorr, a resident and committee member. Previously, residents have also spoken out against what the project would do to Hagens viability as a park. Patrick Caan, committee member and Leisure Services Department director, said the space that would become the parking structure serves as a gathering spot for community festivals and events. [The proposal] doesnt address Hagen Park and the role it plays in the community, said Caan. Bob Mays, committee member and Finance Department director, doubts IBI can build the number of spaces it is proposing. Representatives could still convince commissioners to approve the development but theyve already got two strikes against them and at least a third strike [the majority of the commission] seems likely. At the Jan. 22 commission meeting, Vice Mayor Julie Carson and Commissioner Ted Galatis voted against allowing IBI to make a presentation at the Feb. 12 commission meeting; 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. Commissioner Tom Green said he would probably support the committees decision but wants to hear what IBI has to say. I gured it wouldnt hurt to just listen. Patrea St. John, member of the citys Planning and Zoning Board and vice president of IBI, said her rm wants to answer any questions and concerns the commission has. I really want this to happen. I live in the community and believe in the project, she said.

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6 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White, Christopher Siren Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XXI, Issue 5 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & Letters There were 46 people on 12 teams looking for answers to clues at the Wilton Manors Scavenger Hunt, Saturday afternoon, Jan. 26, in weather that our chamber of commerce spends fortunes on reporting to friends and relatives in the frozen north. The participants ranged in age between 5 and 73 years old! What is the address of the rst house sold in Wilton Manors? Where on Wilton Drive is there a rendition of the Willingham Towers? What was Hagens, of Hagen Park, rst name? How many Moons are there on Wilton Drive? Speci cs, please, and pictures of you in front of your answers! Organized by Adrienne Foland, a director of the Historical Society, the 12 teams were provided with clues which would lead to the answers. Departure times, starting at 1 p.m. from Hagen Park were noted and arrival times back at Richardson Park also recorded. The team with the most correct answers in shortest time won. Many of the clues required photographic proof. Ned Willingham, creator of Wilton Manors, would still be waiting at CVS for his lm to be developed, but, in this case, all the participants showed up with digital cameras and smart phones. The event was organized by the Historical Society and the Wilton Manors Development Alliance [WMDA], as a fund raiser for the Societys work on the Richardson Carriage House and WMDAs efforts with the Childrens Art Project. It was an effective fund raiser. More importantly, the participants thought it was a lot of fun. One team member asked random people on the street for help and was very impressed with how friendly folks in Wilton Manors are. And, the random people had good answers! As a family event, it provided all the participants with the sense that Wilton Manors has both history and is its own place. The perfect score, achieved by two teams, was 35. The Wilton Dolphins, Shoshana Shafran, Marlene Marante, and Heidi Shafran nished the course in 54 minutes. The Category Five Team, of Denise Melanson, Carol Whitman, and Danna Bhaggan also had a perfect score, and nished in 90 minutes. Third place went to the SFGN Super Snoopers, with 34 points at 60 minutes. The Snooper team consisted of John Fugate, Mike Trottier, Ryan Dixon, and Edwin Neiman. Good Wilton Hunting (with Massachusetts connections) also had 34 points and nished in 94 minutes. Rita and Gary Silverman, Anne French, and Sherri Miller know their stuff. In fact, everyone was a winner. It was a nice Saturday afternoon for a walk to stretch the intellect and chat with some nice people. How could one not be cheering for the The Klue-dashians, Pirates of the Middle River, and Hunty-Boo-Boo. Gift certi cates for the prize winners were provided by good friends of Wilton Manors: Rosies Restaurant, To The Moon Marketplace, Tropics Restaurant and Barton and Miller Cleaners, respectively. iberiaBank and Michael Pastorino manned a Hint Station at the north end of the Drive for those who needed hints, and/or water. The Courtyard Cafe stepped up to provide a great lunch, salad, sandwiches, and deep fried veggies at Richardson Park. Beer, wine, and sangria were in evidence. Support of the city from merchants and residents is a 75-year-old tradition in Wilton Manors. We are a better place because of it. Adrienne Foland and Krishan Manners provided organization. Mary and Ron Ulm, with Paul Kuta, provided clues as well as the major heavy lifting that an event of this nature inevitably requires. Adrienne Foland advises folks to be watching for clues about next years Hunt.Scavenger hunt meets all expectations of fun and fundsGood Wilton Hunting team members took fourth place in the annual scavenger hunt. [Left to right],Gary Silverman, Rita Silverman, Sherri Miller, Anne French and Adrienne Foland. [Photo courtesy of Wilton Manors Historical Society] Contributed by Benjamin LittleWILTON MANORS HISTORICAL SOCIETYBroward County Animal Care and Adoption will host a rabies clinic on Saturday, Feb. 9, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Reverend Samuel Delevoe Memorial Park, 2520 NW Sixth St., Fort Lauderdale. Pet owners will be able to have their dog or cat vaccinated against rabies and receive a Broward County Pet Registration tag. Cost for a one-year rabies vaccination and registration tag is $15 per pet. Only cash payments will be accepted. To qualify, pet owners must provide proof of Broward County residency, such as a valid Florida drivers license or a current utility bill. No appointment is necessary and customers are taken on a rst come, rst served basis. All dogs must be on leashes and all cats must be in carriers. Rabies is one of the deadliest of diseases, but also is easy to prevent, said Dr. Tim Johnston, veterinarian of Animal Care and Adoption. A simple yearly vaccination is all it takes to ensure the health and safety of our pets and our residents. Information about other Animal Care and Adoption programs and services will be available to residents at the clinic. Broward Countys Animal Care and Adoption is dedicated to providing shelter for lost and surrendered animals as well as the successful adoption of homeless pets. The agency also coordinates the registration of dogs and cats and provides rabies vaccinations to encourage a healthier pet population. For more information, visit broward.org/Animal or like us on Facebook. com/BrowardPets.Never let this happen because you didnt give your pet its rabies shotZora Neale Hurston, one of the most powerful American writers ever, is author of Their Eyes Were Watching God [1937]. Ill never forget the description of Tea Cake trying to survive the ood caused by a Florida hurricane by hanging onto the tail of a cow through the unbridled waters around Belle Glade, Florida. Seeking rescue along with Tea Cake is a rabid dog atop the cows haunches. Those pages were very uncomfortable to me. Imagine hanging onto the tail of a cow who is swimming with the current and trying to ward off the rabid canine who sees you as the enemy. Great book. Read it, and take care of the animals on Feb. 9. See below. Anne SirenLow-cost rabies shots at Delevoe Memorial Park, Feb. 9

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The Pelican 7 Friday, February 1, 2013 Northwest 21 Avenue. The public is invited to an of cial ribbon cutting at the greenway at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 9. But many area residents havent waited for the opening. Its used all the time. Even while we were building it, residents were riding their bikes and walking their dogs on it, said John Perez, project manager. The walkway consists of 6,550 linear feet of pathway with paths on the north and south sides of the C-13 Canal. Its a great place for residents on the west side of town to go, something to use, Perez said. When the trees are larger, they will have a nice covered area. It will be a useful, functional area. Perez said a bridge will be built on the west side, connecting the area to the nearby Veterans Park, which has two decks for shing. The walkway was built with a $728,000 grant from Florida Department of Transportation and $33,000 in city funds. Following the ribbon cutting, Oakland Park Mayor Anne Sallee will lead a walk along the greenway. Charles Livio, city horticulturist, will explain the advantages of planting native vegetation and explain how this project will help attract birds, butter ies and other wildlife. Livio said the area was previously real desert, an empty barren area. He said many interesting native trees have been planted, including live oaks, slash pine, cabbage palms, bald cypress, silver buttonwood, GreenwayContinued from page 1orange dagger and a paradise tree. Native shrubs include American beauty berry, cocoplum, bloodberry, Indian hawthorne and some small ground covers, including holly and muhly grass. Some beds of wild owers are just germinating now. Its very exciting. The area is already used by people biking, jogging and walking, Livio said. Bikers, walkers and nature seekers wasted no time in testing out the new Greenway in Oakland Park. On Feb. 9 at 10 a.m., everyone is invited for a tour that will be led by Mayor Anne Sallee. [Photo by Judy Vik]

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8 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 BriefsBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFActivity Mobility Center is lled with surprises to a rst time visitor because it offers so much more than the latest in scooters and other manufactured products that keep customers mobile. Located at 1401 SW 13 Court, it is just west of Andrews on 13 Court across from Stimpsons. Sitting down with owner, Carey Britton and general manager, Rich Ruggieri, The Pelican was amazed at the products offered and the customized t for clients to Scooters, beds, bathrooms, stair lifts, overhead patient lifts, power lifts, gait trainers for rehabilitation and more. Britton is a certi ed ATP [Assistant Technology Provider] with www.resna. org. He explains, To become an ATP one must be an experienced rehab technologist, be endorsed by medical professionals and pass an examination. I am also a S.M.S. which is a Seating Mobility Specialist and Im the only one in South Florida. When it comes to custom designing for our customers I am the main assessor. The retail showroom is lled with a large selection of mobility assisting vehicles. According to General Manager Ruggieri, theres a perfect answer for both children and adults with mobility challenges. He and Ruth Scheman are both 25 year experts as mobility consultants. Britton says, We are thrilled to have Active Mobility Center stocks scooters and much more to make clients comfortable, mobile and independentthem as part of our team. We also have four full time service technicians who can custom make and service any adaptation needed. There is no company in South Florida that can match our kind of technological expertise. We accept most insurances and we have insurance specialists who help clients with the paper work required. We do home visits and assessments. Our technicians will service clients in their homes whenever necessary. The goal of Active Mobility Center is to help clients remain functional and independent. We listen, Britton says, and we build a relationship to nd the best answer to each individuals needs. The Pelican spoke to Ellen Cohen who, along with husband Bob, have been customers for 20 years. Ellen says, They have been wonderful to deal with. My husband and I are both in wheeled vehicles. We have been totally pleased with the way we are cared for by Benay Britton [Careys mother]. She never pushes any product. She informs a customer and once a choice has been made, Active Mobility is eager to assist with any needed modi cations. I would never go anywhere else for our vehicles. Ann Marie Koury, a nurse, says her patient who is con ned to a wheel chair has been made more comfortable thanks to the adaptations provided by Active Mobility. The staff made us feel both welcome and con dent that we were in good hands. In business since 1992, this company president shares a bit of his businesss history. We started as Amigo Mobility Center, a Scooter franchise. By 2000, we realized that our clients mobility issues required more specialized and individualized equipment. We separated from the franchise in order to provide a full range of equipment which we design and service. Behind the showroom is a huge service center with state-of-the-art equipment and a stockroom lled with supplies and parts. The sitting room has demo cushions and backs for customer trials and assessments. Ruggiari adds, We feel the client deserves much more than simply choosing a wheeled vehicle. The choices are many. It takes expertise to assess what is actually the best vehicle, or adaptation for each customers needs. This business is a Registered Rehab Technology Supplier. Britton sits on the board of directors of the Carey Britton, owner of Active Mobility Center, pauses for a photo with Ruth Scheman and Rich Ruggiari, general manager. The company showroom displays the best scooters made as well as other wheeled equipmentall of which can be adapted to a client for perfect t and function. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger] See ACTIVE MOBILITY on page 17New chair for Chamber Board of DirectorsDeer eld Beach David Mirantz has been elected chairman of the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. Mirantz is vice president and branch manager at Bank United in Deer eld Beach. Newly elected directors are Lyn Clark, Broward Health North, Eric French, International Society of Autism, Dawn Lopez, Embassy Suites, Betty Masi, Seawood Builders, Lauren Schulman, Federal Self Storage, Niki Wilson, Paragon Entertainment Group. Directors with unexpired terms are Carlo Barbieri, Brazil Club, Chip Chapman, Doubletree by Hilton, Larry DeVille, Fast-Teks Computers, John Esposito, Advanced Insurance Underwriters, Bill Heaton, The Pelican Newspaper Gordon Vatch, Printing Xcetera, John Lombardi, Manufacturers Eyewear Direct, Rick Jorden, JM Enterprises, Jim Mathie, Chiefy LLC, Jim Lusk, Observer newspaper, Todd Wolf, A&S Cleaning, attorney Pat Murphy, Danielle Williams, Oceans 234, Kiku Martinson, Campbell & Rosemurgy Real Estate, past chair.

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10 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Chief Ross Licata ts the old clich, Tall, dark and handsome and much more. Hes pleasant, approachable and above all, he continues to keep the residents safe and bring honors to his community, Lighthouse Point, or LHP. He came to LHP in 2003 after retiring from the Delray Beach Police Department as a Police Commander. He says, After 26 l/2 years in Delray I knew I was approaching the end of my career there. I heard that LHP was looking for a Chief. I applied for the job and was honored to get it. I was thrilled to be part of this smaller community with its home-town feel. I welcomed the opportunity to emphasize quality, community service which is very important here. The Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce chose Licata to be a Shining Star and Light of the Community at its annual 2012 award luncheon, held at the exclusive Hillsboro Club in LHP.Chief Ross Licata, Lighthouse Point, is a national award winner and a local Shining Star, Light of the Community In 2010, with the help of Commander Mike Oh and the entire department, Chief Licata implemented a 26-camera License-Plate Recognition System in LHP. This system targets criminal offenders who travel into LHP to commit crimes. Our city was a desirable target for criminals, Licata says. The main crimes were burglaries of vehicles, residences and business properties. Analysis showed us that the majority of the crimes were made by offenders living outside of the community. Criminals were driving here from other cities, usually from communities much further away. We wanted to catch these criminals when they entered LHP. A perimeter monitoring system, using license plate recognition, was implemented. In an effort to protect and improve quality of life for those who live in LHP, this project developed successful leads in criminal apprehension, criminal case clearances and the recovery of stolen property. To date, over 70 arrests for crimes including robbery, burglary, arson, auto theft, and fraud have been attributed to the bene ts of this camera technology. The department has recovered over a half million dollars worth of stolen property. On Oct 1, 2012, Chief Ross Licata and Commander Mike Oh were own to San Diego, California to receive the IACP/Motorola Webber Seavey Award for Quality in Law Enforcement for the Transient Offender Interdiction Program. One of three such awards were presented world-wide for promoting a standard of excellence that exempli es law enforcements contribution and dedication to the quality of life in local communities. And thats not all. Licata was recently voted President of Broward County Chiefs of Police Association. He already serves as Broward County Director of the Florida Police Chiefs Association. He explains, You might Commander Mike Oh and Chief Licata were own to San Diego, California to receive the IACP/Motorola (International Association of Chiefs of Police/Motorola) Webber Seavey Award for Quality in Law Enforcement in 2012. The success of the Transient Offender Interdiction Program and its substantive results made LHP Police Department one of three international award winners. [Photo courtesy of Lighthouse Point]See CHIEF LICATA on page 22Plants & People Day at SampleMcDougald Pompano Beach Learn more about the local environment on Feb. 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Sample-McDougald House, 450 NE 10 St. Speakers will discuss good environmental practices, recycling, native plants, wildlife conservation, and similar causes. Vendors will be on hand selling products that support Pompano Prouds mission, including the use of rain barrels, native and non-invasive plants, wildlife conservation and natural fertilizers. Guests speakers will discuss butter y gardens, tree ordinances and windmills. Guided tours of the Sample-McDougald House and the Centennial Garden will be ongoing. Tours are $5 per person. Free live entertainment and food available for sale. The event is open to the public. Call 954-292-8040. Music Under the StarsPompano Beach The Parks, Recreation & Cultural Arts Department hosts its monthly Music Under the Stars event on Friday, Feb. 8 starting at 7 p.m. the event takes place south of the shing pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd., features the Justin Enco Band which plays rock, reggae and 80s music. Music Under the Stars is held the second Friday of every month. Call 954-786-4111.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, February 1, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach There isnt anybody who doesnt like a parade, and here at Founders Days Feb. 14 to17 there isnt any entry in the parade that cant come away with an award. No less than 15 prize-winning categories have been established, recognition for everything from best theme to best youthful performers to best civic club. If none of those merit attention, there is also a committees choice prize and a special award being made by the judges. The theme to be mindful of is Journey Through Paradise. The parade steps off from Founders Days parade is a chance for groups to win recognition. . Deer elds celebration is Feb. 14-17 Any way you want em was the slogan of this former business on South Federal Highway in Deer eld BeachPioneer Park Saturday, Feb. 15 at 10 a.m. and moves east on Hillsboro Boulevard to A1A, takes a northward turn and then reverses direction to the main beach parking lot. Entry forms and the prize categories are available on the citys website, deer eldbeach.com. This is the 66th year the community has observed Founders Days which began as a BBQ in Pioneer Park to mark the end of the truck farming season. Back then, it was called Cracker Day, which meant no disrespect for the citys early settlers, but rather was a term used to describe farmers cracking their whips over the heads of their mules as they plowed the elds. The event grew to include a carnival, entertainment and reworks and the venue was moved to the beach to accommodate more people. Although Founders Days has a long history, this year marks a rst: it will not be staged by community volunteers, but by the parks and recreation department. Originally, Cracker Day was a fundraiser for the Deer eld Beach Lions Club. As the members grew older and their numbers dwindled, a group led by Peggy Noland, not yet the mayor, took up the mission, moved it to the See FOUNDERS on page 16

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12 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Weather conditions require that buoys be removed at times. Attis expalins that removing and re-installing them has cost time and voltage. [Photo courtesy of Marc Furth]ReefContinued from page 3completely under power a year later on June 3, 2012. Trouble at the local site started with installation of the six underwater structures, Attis said. Divers were breaking drills until they switched to a half inch hammer drill. Then came problems with the surge. Each structure had to be cemented to the sea oor. The structures havent moved an inch since installation, Attis said. The buoys are another story. The buoys are nothing but problems, he said. Weve gotten good at putting the buoys back in place. During monitoring last month, Attis said they found sponge colonies and oysters growing on the structure. The project is working well, but its underpowered, Attis said. Its working, and things are growing, but its very, very slow. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann asked if its fair to say the buoys have been less operational than they have been operational. Attis said thats because this area has had numerous bad storms, and every time theres a bad storm, the buoys have to be taken out, then re t and put back. He said installing a wave generator, a technology that was not available when this structure rst went in, would alleviate that problem and provide the needed power. A wave generator is a self-contained buoy, Attis explained later. It contains a hinge inside, and as waves move up and down, the hinge moves, turns gears and generates electricity. In the rst design (of the buoy at the LBTS site), the buoy top was too high, and waves smashed it, he said. Once it snapped, it broke free. The design was changed and the main shaft lowered by two feet, and then it snapped. The design was changed again. [The buoys] arent producing the power wed like to have. [And we dont have the] growth like weve seen in other places, Attis said. Were below 100 watts, and it needs to be around 300 watts. Its growing, slow but stronger. This has been a bad season for storms, which messed up the buoys, he said. They had to be repaired and re-installed. Teams from Vone monitor the site monthly for sh and other biological organisms. Could you take the buoys out and have the same growth? Vice Mayor Scot Sasser asked. The structure gets encased with calcium carbonate. If you had no power, the rebar would rust away in a couple years, Attis said. You need the charge to get limestone. Then the corals will spontaneously grow, Fawcett explained. Were invested in this, and we want it to work, Sasser said. Do we need to look at other power sources rather than buoys? The best thing would be to look at getting more power, Attis responded. If we had 300 watts-plus, it would grow a lot quicker. But this has never been done before, and it aint easy. If we want something new, someone has to take a nosebleed. It is going to work, he said, noting they have to nd a wave generator. If we had that, I wouldnt have to go out in small storm warnings. The buoys are working but not well enough. He said a wave generator costs about $30,000. Commissioner Chris Vincent, commending Attis on what they have done, said perhaps grants could be found to pay for the wave generator. A Vone team planned to be at the biorock reef transplanting corals onto the structure on the weekend following the meeting. When coral is dislodged, either naturally or from anchors, it dies if it isnt re-attached, he said. Vone Research includes student volunteers to ensure the younger generation will have an appreciation for the ocean, Attis says. The team has spent more than 2,300 hours on this project.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, February 1, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The Curtain Call Playhouse production of Kiss Me Kate, the musical version of Shakespeares Taming of the Shrew opens this weekend at the Willow Theatre in A Cole Porter favorite in two performances hereCurtain Call players open in Boca Raton this weekendBoca Raton where nine performances are scheduled. Starring Tera Young and Peter Librach, the show plays here at the Herb Skolnick Center Feb. 16 and 17. Generally considered to be Cole Porters nest work, Kiss Me Kate, attracted audiences to more than 1,000 performances and won a Tony Award for best musical in 1949. It was revived on Broadway in 1999 and most recently, at Londons Old Vic Theatre in 2012. Directed by Young and Kris Coffelt, the musical is a play within a play featuring two romances, one between the director, played by Librach, and his ex-wife, played by Young, and another between two young cast members, one of which is a gambler. Enter two gangsters, mainstays of the era. This fun, melodious production features some of Americas favorite show tunes including So in Love With You Am I, Too Darn Hot, Always True to You in my Fashion, and Another Opnin, Another Show. This is the rst time Curtain Call has staged Kate and the rst time Tara Young has sung the role but she comes to this one with years of famous roles on her resume including Dolly in Hello, Dolly, and Anna from The King and I. See KATE on page 15Tera Young and gangsters Chris DAngelo and Bruce Metviner.

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14 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 vegetation and thick palm trees, blue handrails and benches and new lighting. A new concession stand/ visitors kiosk, transformed from an old storage shed, and freshly painted and renovated bathrooms dot the landscape. The CRA is in negotiations now with three companies, on behalf of the city, to run the concession stand and will present its recommendation to commissioners in a couple weeks. Horatio Danovich, CRA engineer, said the recommendation could be ready by the Feb. 12 commission meeting but would most likely be presented at the Feb. 26 meeting. The CRA also added new parking meters and trash receptacles, installed a brand new plaza at the end of Atlantic Boulevard that includes a water fountain and 5,400 sq. ft. of arti cial grass. New, wider sidewalks can be found along Pompano Beach Boulevard from Atlantic Boulevard to Northeast 5 Street and adjacent to the businesses between Pompano Beach Boulevard and A1A with owners using the sidewalks next to them for customer seating and dining. A new $500,000 temporary paved parking lot provides 128 spaces, including nine for motorcycles. The city has a ve-year lease on the lot with the option to renew in two-year intervals for an additional four years. If the parking lot is ever removed as part of the hotel project developers say they want to build, the city will be reimbursed $80,000 per every month still left on the initial lease. Di Maria Olortegui said its hard to know if business has increased because of the improvements but three other businesses Briny Irish Pub, Razzleberrys ice cream shop and Miami Blues gift shop say they have de nitely seen more customers. Danovich said reenergizing the area for pedestrians and merchants was the goal of the project. The reality is that area has been pretty dormant and was in dire need of a huge facelift, he said. Its amazing what a coat of paint will do. Its never looked this nice, said Julie Orr, owner of Razzleberrys. Orr grew up in Pompano and opened her business near the beach nine years ago. This should have been done 12 years ago. Its never looked this nice. Orr is amazed by the frequency of foreign languages being spoken by tourists mainly from France, Germany and Canada and hopes more of them buy condos and become more than just snow birds. After choosing Pompano as her escape route out of a harsh Quebec winter, Claudette Mcarthur found perhaps her favorite particular spot in Pompano under the shade of the palm trees in the plaza. I love it. Its a nice place. I cant go [out] much in the sun, so Im here relaxing. And along with more tourists grabbing some shade, sun or a cone of their favorite ice cream avor, Orr says shes seeing more people from the nearby condos come into her store. Christine Nawar, resident at Sea Monarch condominium, said shes never seen the area so busy, especially in January. Nawar said it has become a lot more sociable and she hopes more shopping can be added. [Id like to see] a high class outdoor mall. Mickey Heby, owner of Miami Blues, which opened at the beach in 1991, said he and his customers are very happy with the improvements. Now, he hopes some kind of attraction, perhaps a carousel, can be built and give people more reasons to visit the area.Beach jobContinued from page 1This newly renovated kiosk/concession stand used to be a storage shed. Now, Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] of cials are in talks with three companies to provide food and refreshments to beachgoers. Horatio Danovich, CRA engineer, said the goal is to pick a company that will provide coffee, donuts and other breakfast items as well as sandwiches and other lunch fare. The CRA will present its recommendation to the city at the Feb. 12 or 26 commission meeting.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, February 1, 2013 Sunday. 954-592-0381. 2-2 Aunt Marys Attic Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church, 2700 NE 36 St., Lighthouse Point. Household items, furniture, clothes, jewelry, books and more will be on sale. Refreshments will also be served. 954-943-9154. 2-3 Deer eld Beach 2-2 & 3 City-Wide Market from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. More than 200 vendors with a wide range of items, including: vintage and retro goods, collectibles, novelties, mint condition second-hand items, locally made products, edibles and more. Free admission. 954-785-7475.Auditions2-9 Casting call for Youre a Good Man. Charlie Brown at Sol Theatre, 333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Appointments only. Auditions also held Feb. 10 and 11. 561-447-8829.Books & Lectures2-8 Outdoor book fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Beach Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-357-7830. Also starring is her son Norman Young who plays the young romantic lead. Both Youngs are involved in education; she teaches music at Oakland Park Elementary School and Floyd Estates Elementary, he is a pianist at Westminster Academy. Also in lead roles are Michelle Zurschmiede Chris DAngelo and Bruce Metviner. The musical had its true opening last Sunday before a sold out audience at the Sunrise Musical Theater. Young said, It went very well. At the Skolnick, Kiss Me Kate, is on stage for a dinner theater, Feb. 16, 6 p.m. and for a matinee, Feb. 17 at 2 p.m. Dinner theater tickets are $30; show only, $20. The Skolnick Theater is at 800 SW 36 Ave. For reservations call 954-786-4590. Show times at the Willow Theatre, 300 S. Military Trail, are 8 p.m. on Feb. 1, 2, 7 [sold out], 8, and 9 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Feb.2, 3, 9, 10. Tickets are $23 at 561-3473948. KateContinued from page 13SightingsContinued from page 2 Green Marke t at 8 a.m. at The Cove, Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal, at the Cove. Held every Sunday. 561-2391536 or 561-299-8684.See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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16 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-7838700!SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com avid diver said, If it will help encourage diving, Im 100 percent in favor of it. Commissioner Chris Vincent, also a diver, said he favored the permits. He noted they need to be nontransferable and clear signage would be needed. Staff had suggested 50 dive permits, but Vice Mayor Scot Sasser questioned the need for so many. He suggested the smaller number of permits and commissioners approved 34 for use between May and Oct. 31. Steve Gagas of Gold Coast Scuba and John Boutin of the Windjammer Resort urged commissioners to approve the permits. They will bring intangible good will and attention to LBTS, Boutin said.DiversContinued from page 1 beach, expanded the days, and renamed the event Founders Days. This year, that committee, facing dwindling resources, bowed out and the city is the of cial sponsor. Contracted to handle vendors and coordinate the parade are DBFD Amusements, a company that staged the Country Music Fest here last August. Said Public Information Of cer Rebecca Medina, This [Founders Days] was tossed into our laps at the last minute, but it is the largest event of the year. We were adamant about not letting it go away. The carnival opens Thursday, Feb. 14, 6 to 10 p.m. and remains open through Sunday. The live music begins at 6 p.m. Friday and continues through Sunday until 5 p.m. Among the entertainers now booked are the Resolvers, Orange Sunshine, Andrew Morris, Uproot Hootenanny, Skinny Jimmy and the Stingrays and Pitbull of Blues. An arts and crafts show and vendor displays open Friday 6 to 10 p.m. and continue through Sunday. Fireworks, shot from the end of the shing pier, are being produced by the Zambelli Co. and are set for Saturday at 9 p.m. And of course food and cold drinks are available all weekend.Workers will be in the eld counting re hydrants and manholesDeer eld Beach The city is embarking on a $395,000 project to map all above ground sewer, water and storm water stations and has contracted with Woolpert, Inc. to provide the geographic information system [GIS] data. The survey work began Monday and will continue through September. Woolpert workers will wear logo uniforms, display an ID and carry a notice of the project with them. All mapping will be of hydrants, manholes, valves, etc., on public right of way according to GIS Coordinator Patrick Lockwitz. The surveyors will not be on private property. Newer annexed areas in the southwest sections of the city will not be affected as water is supplied by Broward County which has completed a similar survey there. According to Lockwitz, the information will be entered into a data base which will, in the future, help provide the city with maintenance budgets for the utility system. Lockwitz said the project takes a lot of time, more than city workers would have. He estimated there are 2,500 re hydrants alone in the city. Woolpert surveyors may be in the eld seven days a week to meet their deadline. Many cities as well as the county are now mapping their utility systems, Lockwitz added, an unique application of technology to basic infrastructure. FoundersContinued from page 11

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The Pelican 17 Friday, February 1, 2013 national organization, which lobbies congress for the betterment of the industry and the client. Customers visiting the showroom will nd well known manufacturers of mobility vehicles represented such as Amigo, Pride, E.V. Rider and more. Britton says, We differ from our competitors in that we have the knowledge and equipment to adapt these vehicles and make them even more functional. Were competitive in price and seldom challenged by insurance companies. Every year we see improvements so our staff is required to have continued education to insure that they know how to work with the newest technology, says Ruggieri. He adds, Part of our service is to insure that the customer knows the proper function, maintenance and warranties on what they are buying and wheeling around in. When we make a delivery to a home, we spend up to an hour being sure the clients know everything about the use and care of their mobility vehicles. Britton raps up this interview with, Its wonderful to go home every night knowing that we have improved the lives of others. Theres a new, all natural product, Protandim, carried Active MobilityContinued from page 8 in the store that claims to reduce free radical damage linked to over 200 illnesses. Every member of the staff is taking it and giving it raves. For more information, stop by. Open Mon. to Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; appointments for emergencies available. Call 954-946-5793 or visit www. wheelchairguys.com.Lucille Scruggs, retired educator and church mother at Mount Calvary Baptist Churchis honored for over 50 years of service to the church and community. Scruggs taughtfor the majority of her career at Sanders Park Elementary School. She was an active Sunday School teacher and worked on several committees in the church. The event was chaired by Zadia Tyson. Pictured are Rev. Anthony Burrell, Honorable Judge Charlene Edwards Honeywell, (Scruggsdaughter), Honoree Lucille Scruggs and Zadia Tyson. Lucille Scruggs honored by church, community

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18 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Roger Montpetit doesnt play shuffleboard very often, but when he does the silver skull on his stick sees all the action. He mounted the skull, with diamonds for eyes and a mohawk for a hairline, three years ago to give his stick a little more weight and a little more luck. I put the diamonds in his eyes so he can see clearly enough. The skull was the perfect weight [to balance out my stick]. Thats why I made the Southern Coast Masters Tournament [in 2010]. Montpetit, a Deerfield Pompano celebrates 100 years of shuf eboardBeach resident, joined 25 other amateur and professional players at the Wild Doubles Tournament at McNab Park on Jan. 31 and Feb. 1, hosted by the Southeast Coast Division, which stretches from Miami to West Palm Beach. The purpose of Wild Doubles is to pair a professional player with an amateur and get amateurs more interested in the game. And [amateurs] learn from it, said Ken Offenther, state delegate with the Florida Shuffleboard Association. We want to encourage amateurs to play and learn how to play better. We try to get as much participation as possible. The tournament is also part of a series of statewide events celebrating 100 years of shuffleboard. People think its an old people game but its anything but, said Keith Sutton, past president of the Southeast See SHUFFLEBOARD on page 21Vicente Piccirillo, from Jupiter, lets one y at the Wild Doubles Shuf eboard Tournament at McNab Park in Pompano Beach on Jan. 31. The two-day tournament ends today. [Photo by Michael dOliveira]

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The Pelican 19 Friday, February 1, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFBella Roma Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria40 B SW 15th Street Pompano Beach 954-784-3696Pompano Beach For three years now, this clean, cozy pizzeria situated at the corner of McNab Road and S. Cypress has been impressing area residents and businesses with its endearing blend of authentic Italian fare and expeditious service. Owner Mike Buchinski, who has been operating a larger version of Bella Roma in Coconut Creek for the past 12 years, partnered with Pompano Beachs Bella Roma restaurant delivers mouthwatering pizzas along with classic Italian faremany outstanding chefs who taught me everything I know and helped me develop my own style. The menu is replete with all the succulent classics. From chicken marsala to veal parmigiana to shrimp Fra Diavolo to baked ziti, Bella Roma offers a bevy of delectable tastes and smells for every palate. The roasted garlic chicken and broccoli in Asiago cream sauce is definitely one of my favorites, says staff member Jessica Connolly. Other tempting poultry treats include the chicken Francese with white wine lemon butter sauce and the Caprese with fresh mozzarella and oven roasted tomatoes on a bed of delicate fettuccini. The rigatoni a la vodka is one my favorites, says Buchinski a native Floridian who spent some time in NY before returning to the warmer climes of the Sunshine State. Locals know how good our food is. For example, our hand-made paninis and Owner Mike Buchinski and business partner Paul Moschella show off a few Bella Roma specialties including the highly popular vegetarian pizza. A house specialty the rigatoni a la vodka with balsamic marinated grilled jumbo shrimp is enhanced by prosciutto, sauted shallots, hand-ground pecorino Romano cheese and pink vodka cream sauce.budding restaurateurs Paul Moschella and longtime associate Jeff Davis to create a second location that could reach customers all the way to A1A. I have been in this business almost 25 years. I worked in a pizzeria in high school and with some help was eventually able to purchase it, says the hardworking entrepreneur. In the meantime, I was mentored by See BELLA ROMA on page 22

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20 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Many elderly people rely entirely on family or other trusted individuals to help them. Whether it is for physical needs or emotional needs, as people grow older they tend to need more and more help from others. This dependence on friend, neighbor, caregiver or family members makes an older person more vulnerable for abuse. It is estimated that 5% to 10% of elderly Americans are suffering abuse. In a recent national study of Adult Protective Services (APS), there were 253,421 reports of abuse of adults age 60+ or 832.6 reports for every 100,000 people over the age of 60+. The National Elder Abuse Incidence Study (National Center on Elder Abuse) found that more than 500,000 persons aged 60+ were victims of domestic abuse and that an estimated 84% of incidents are not reported to authorities, denying victims the protection and support they need. Much attention has been focused on abuse in nursing homes but most of the elder abuse in this country is at the hands of family members or other independent, selfemployed caregivers in the home. There are a number of reasons why incidents of abuse, neglect, or exploitation are not reported to Adult Protective Services or other authorities. One of the most common reasons is the victims fear of losing support. Many of the perpetrators are family members and the victim fears that reporting the crime will result in removal of the caregiver, as the perpetrator may face incarceration or may discontinue relations with the victim once accused, charged, or convicted. Many of these victims fear that by reporting abuse they will be left alone and expected to care for themselves or they will be forced to live in a nursing home. The following is a list of indicators of abuse, neglect or exploitation. It is important to note that the following lists are merely indicators and may not always be violations. Signs of Abuse: Unexplained bruises, welts, fractures, abrasions or lacerations. Multiple bruises in various stages of healing. Multiple/repeat injuries. Low self-esteem or loss of self determination. Withdrawn, passive. Fearful. Depressed, hopeless. Soiled linen or clothing. Social Isolation Signs of Neglect/Self-Neglect: Dehydration. Malnourishment. Inappropriate or soiled clothing. Odorous. Over/under medicated. Deserted, abandoned or unattended. Lack of medical necessities or assistive devices. Unclean environment. Social Isolation Signs of Exploitation: Missing/ disappearing property. Inadequate living environment. Frequent/recent property title changes or will changes. Excessive home repair bills. Forced to sign over control of finances. No/limited money for food, clothes and other amenities. At Senior Helpers, we place the utmost importance on ensuring our caregivers receive the latest training and are fully credentialed. Our caregivers are thoroughly screened before they can become employees of Senior Helpers and each has the opportunity to participate in the Senior Helpers University program to attain additional education. Senior Helpers has all Florida licensing requirements so you can be assured that our caregiver is properly credentialed to perform the level of care that your senior loved one needs. To hire Home Health Agency call 954-707-5030Hidden Secrets of Elder AbuseADVERTISEMENT

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The Pelican 21 Friday, February 1, 2013 Coast Division. In shuffleboard, the object is to push a puck down the court into a painted triangle divided into squares. The closer to the top of the triangle a puck lands the more points are awarded. The game also allows for players to knock their opponents puck out of play or knock it into a spot that could take away points. Its a true sport. Theres offense and defense. I can stop my opponent from doing his best. Its a much better sport than golf, said Jay Fitzpatrick, president of the Southeast Coast Division. Its a hundred times cheaper and anybody can play it. For information on the Southeast Coast Division, call Keith Sutton at 954-783-7177. Shuf eboardContinued from pageSightingsContinued from page 152-9 Book sale from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Imperial Point Library, 5989 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954-492-1881. 2-9 Book fair from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. 954-566-9019. 2-16 Book fair from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-357-7595Business2-6 Ribbon cutting at Mediterraneo Grill and Caf Cucina Siciliana, 420 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Cost is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. RSVP by Feb. 5. 954941-2940. RSVP at info@ pompanobeachchamber.com. 2-7 Breakfast N Deereld from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce Banquet Room, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. 954427-1050. 2-8 The Originals breakfast networking group meets at 8 a.m. at Seaside Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. Attendees must pay for their own breakfast. Email cob3@bellsouth. net for info.Children & Family2-2 Unity in the Community from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., Pompano Free food, entertainment and activities. 954-586-1123. 2-8 Sol Children Theatre Troupe evening social from 6 to 8 p.m. at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Free admission. Register for spring session. 561-447-8829. 2-8 Mirror, Mirror at 7 p.m. at Villages of Hillsboro Park, 4111 NW 6 Street, Deer eld Beach. Admission is free. Movie is rated PG. 954480-4429.Clubs, Charity & Civic Organizations2-6 Oakland Park Friends of the Library meets from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Oakland Park Library,1298 NE 37 St. 954-630-4270. See SIGHTINGS on page 25

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22 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 describe my function as being a conduit between Broward Chiefs and the Florida Police Chief Association. It keeps me connected to my counterparts in Broward County. I stay abreast of crime issues in the county and in the state. This enhanced relationship means I am very tuned into traveling criminals.A look at the manLicata came to this area in Florida with his family when he was 14. He attended Coconut Creek High School. He says, I was hired by the Delray Police Dept. when I was 19 and I already had a twoyear degree. While working in the department, I attended Palm Beach Atlantic College and earned a B.S. degree in Organizational Management. I built a career there and left because in the course of my career, I developed an interest in becoming a police chief. And now, as police chief, he heads up a department with 42 dedicated and sworn of cers and support staff. He says, Like every other small community, we must always remember that we are part of something much larger. Crime doesnt know borders, and as part of the Miami Dade/Broward metro area, Lighthouse Point Police Department must always be focused on preventing criminal elements from violating the peace and safety of those who live in our city. He and his wife, Peggy, have two daughters and as of two weeks ago, they have three grandchildren, two boys and a girl. Were a close family and I spend whatever free time I have with my family. We all still live in Delray Beach. He wraps up this interview saying, Here in LHP our citizens get a great deal of personalized service. We have close ties with people. Some of our of cers have been here for many years and established connections to many residents. Our commitment is to customer service and building positive community relations. Thank you, Chief Licata for your dedicated service to your community and for heading up a department that has brought many honors to LHP.Chief LicataContinued from page 10meatball parm subs are huge sellers, says co-owner Moschella who specializes in the promotion and marketing aspects of the business. Once you taste our food, you will be hooked! The vegetarian menu comes loaded with fresh tomatoes, garlic, spinach, broccoli, eggplant, green peppers, onion, olive oil and pecorino Romano. We have great pizza, great food and a great reputation. People even recognize us from the Coconut Creek restaurant, adds Buchinski who already has plans to expand his eatery to a 40seat restaurant next spring. We use the highest quality ingredients and everything is made fresh to order. My mother Nol has been the biggest positive influence in my life. She has helped me through many tough times, especially after the passing of my brother and father. I really owe everything to her, says Buchinski who is dedicated to providing the best dining experience possible for his customers. We do a lot of catering for office functions, birthday parties and everything in between, says Buchinski. We are also very flexible with regard to special requests. If you want lobster tails, then just call ahead of time and we will prepare them for you! By the way, guests are encouraged to bring their own wine for which there is no corking fee. For a sweet ending, be sure to try cannoli, cheesecake or the always satisfying chocolate thunder cake. Buon appetito! Bella RomaContinued from page 19

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The Pelican 23 Friday, February 1, 2013 Paula Hedglon sees chiropractic care as an ongoing way to stay healthy. Walking down the long hallway at her chiropractic center in Pompano Beach, visitors can read testimonials from patients who have watched their health improve, but many of them talk about additional benefits that were surprises. They are are what Dr. Hedglon calls miracles. One patient, 44, came because she could not move her neck. After a neck scan and an x-ray, Dr. Hedglon saw in her neck a bone fusion. When the spinal bones go out of alignment, it causes nerve interference in the spine. I adjusted her neck with a toggle. After three months of care she went back to her primary physician. She could not only move her neck, her doctor told her that her kidney, atrophied since birth, had regenerated and was growing. Another patient with Bells Palsy, was unable to open his mouth on the left side for a year and a half. After one adjustment he was able to open his mouth. The testimonials are real; the patients include their photographs for all to see. Dr. Hedglon has her own philosophy as to these miracles, a word she uses freely in her practice. The body can replicate and heal itself if there is no interference with the brain. This is healing from the inside out. The brain sends messages through the spinal cord and then to the organs. My job is to clear the way for the messages. She says stress is the biggest interference in healing, and stress presents itself in three forms: physical, chemical and mental. God does the healing, she says. I just adjust, or move the bone that is causing pressure on the spinal cord Prior to completing her chiropractic degree, Dr. Hedglon taught upper grades at St. Elizabeth Roman Catholic School in Pompano Beach. She earned her degree in education at Florida State University. She earned her degree in chiropractic care from Life Chiropractic College, Marietta, GA. in 1985. But this small, quiet-spoken woman makes no claims on her part other than releasing the bodys own innate healing ability. Her personal faith emanates a quiet confidence in her chosen profession. The days begin at Hedglon Chiropractic Center with meditations and prayer, and the atmosphere reflects a calm and settling comfort for patients. She builds strong relationships with her patients through her skills of caring. Dr. Hedglon is not alone with her philosophy. There are a growing number of chiropractors like Dr. Hedglon who have chosen the philosophy of Dr. James M. Sigafoose, a recognized leader in natural healing. More and more people want to stop living on drugs. We help them realize that the body has its own healing experience, she says. Her practice is for the whole family, and she encourages parents to start their children early with the world of chiropractic healing. We see a lot of families. This is my mission, from womb to tomb, she adds. Children are welcomed at Hedglons Center. They also benefit from the experience. She explains that children arent always aware of something being wrong with their bodies. They can have traumas that impact their well-being and go for years or a lifetime accepting an issue that could be healed. The first trauma is birth, says Dr. Hedglon. She recounts the story of a newborn whose father, a Hedglon Chiropractic Center offers a natural way to get well and stay healthy Broward Sheriff s Office deputy, was a regular patient. When it was apparent at birth that his child was unable to nurse because he could not move his head, the midwife recommended chiropractic care. When I adjusted the baby, he was able to move his head and nurse. Then the whole family continued the care, coming twice a week at first and then weekly, she says. Every muscle in the body, including the sucking reflex, is controlled by a nerve. Without the connection, the muscle cannot do its job. Its good to set up regular checkups for the entire familylike people do with the dentistto maintain a body that is able to continually heal itself, she says. Dr. Hedglons introduction to chiropractic care came to her from her great uncle, Dr. Frank Fasulo, a pioneer in chiropractic care. He graduated from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1947. When Hedglons brother, Armand, was injured in a fall and hit the back of his head, Dr. Fasulo took care of him using chiropractic adjustments. Today, Hedglons brother is also a chiropractor, practicing in Margate.Children respond especially well to chiropractic care. Here, Dr. Paula checks Savion as Jasira hugs her brother. He was rst checked right after being born. The staff of Hedglon Chiropractic Center: Michele, Dr. Paula, Marilyn, Alex, Tom and Catherine.More and more people want to stop living on drugs. We help them realize that the body has its own healing experience. Dr. Hedglon ADVERTISEMENT

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24 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Pompano Beach Elisabeth von Trapp will perform in a free concert at St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 1111 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach at 7 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 8. Elisabeth is the granddaughter of Maria and Baron von Trapp, whose story inspired The Sound of Music. A free will offering will be collected. Cookies and light refreshments will be available after the performance. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church is beginning its second year offering musical concerts. At 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 9, the Gold Coast Jazz Society will offer New Orleans style jazz for a Mardi Gras sensation on the last Saturday before Ash Wednesday. Tickets for the jazz concert on Saturday are $15 and include two complimentary glasses of wine at the reception that follows. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church is a developing, multicultural parish with services in English, Spanish and Portuguese. Come, See and Share Our Peace. English celebrations of the Holy Eucharist are at 8 a.m. and a Choral Eucharist at 10:30 a.m., on Sundays. Masses in Spanish are offered at 7:30 p.m. on Saturdays and 12:30 p.m. on Sundays. The Mass is offered in Portuguese at 7 p.m. on Saturdays. Free von Trapp concert Feb. 8 Deerfield Beach Dr. Bruce Janke will discuss the advantages of hip replacement and answer questions on Feb. 12 at 6 p.m. at Broward Health North Conference Center, 201 E. Sample Road, Deerfield Beach. Participants will learn more about anterior hip replacements from this leading orthopedic surgeon and medical director of the Joint Replacement Center at BHN. Dr. Janke and partner Dr. Steven Naide have performed more than 2,000 anterior hip replacements using the hana table, which results in no muscles cut, less pain, faster recovery and no standard precautions. This event is free, but space is limited. Call 954-759-7400 to reserve a seat.Hip replacement lecture, Feb. 12Dr. Bruce JankeRossano, SalSal Rossano Sr, 85, of Smallwood, NY and Pompano Beach, died Jan 26 in Greenville, SC. Direct memorial gifts to Lustgarten Foundation @ www.lustgarten.org.Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700 for obituary information. Obituary

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The Pelican 25 Friday, February 1, 2013 Broward County Sheriffs Office The Kangol Robber first appeared on Broward Sheriffs Office detectives radar Nov.14 when he robbed the Pet Supermarket in Pompano Beach. A month later, around 2 p.m. Dec. 13, he walked into the FedEx Office store at 1650 N. Federal Highway in Pompano Beach and held employees at gunpoint. Initially, he walked around the store while talking on a cell phone. He picked up a notepad and approached the cashier to pay. As soon as the register opened, he took out a silver handgun and pointed it at the employees as he ordered them to get on the floor. He emptied the cash drawer and ordered a second employee to open the safe. He took that employees money and his drivers license and fled. The suspect is a black male in his mid to late 20s. Hes about 5 tall, weighs approximately 160 lbs. and is seen on video wearing a khaki, long-sleeve shirt, brown pants, brown shoes and a brown Kangol hat. The suspect is also being sought by the Margate Police Department for two robberies on Jan. 2 at City Trends and Advanced Auto Parts. Anyone with information is asked to contact BSO Robbery Detective Roger Peterson at 954-321-4270 or 954-493-TIPS (8477) or www.browardcrimestoppers. org. Three robberies under his belt, Kangol robber still at large SPECIAL TO THE PELICANIn recognition and in celebration of the birthday of The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., State Representative Gwyn Clarke-Reed, District 92, presented backpacks to students from the public elementary schools in District 92. Two students from each school were chosen to receive a backpack filled with school supplies. Wells Fargo Bank donated the backpacks presented to these students. The following students were selected by each of their teachers because they demonstrated the characteristics and qualities of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This is an annual event presented by State Representative Gwyndolen Clarke-Reed. Schools and students receiving the awards were Charles Drew Elementary Tyler Curry and Christan Moore; Deerfield Park Elementary Quincy Allen and Amanda Brown; Lloyd Estates Elementary Victoria Dassas and Diana Ford; C. Markham Elementary Omyra Velez and Denley Joubert; North Andrews Gardens Elementary Daniel Pierre and Nyteria Williams ; Oriole Elementary Damon Jackson and Marcus Anderson; Palmview Elementary Jason McWhorter and Sirah Valez; Park Ridge Elementary Jonathan Valcin and Jorgeana Tardi; Sanders Park Elementary Diaina Lofton and DaMoria Grant; Tedder Elementary Robens Alexis and Jean Vincent; Quiet Waters Elementary Christopher Bush and Lela William. Local students honored for strong character SPECIAL TO THE PELICAN SightingsContinued from page 21 2-6 Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach meets at 12 p.m. at Seaside Grill, 1406 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-783-4999. 2-10 Fundraising and food pairing event from 4 to 6 p.m. at The Heart of the Olive, Olive, 816 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Wine, avored oils and other foods will be served. Part of the proceeds bene t The Pantry of Broward. Cost is $10. 754222-8071.Education 2-4 Goldcoast Toastmasters Club meets at 7 p.m. at Dennys, 3151 Powerline See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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26 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Send The Pelican your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.comClassi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 NOW HIRING BREAKFAST COOKS!! Part Or Full Time. All Shifts. Open 7 Days. Apply 2211 Wilton Drive Wilton Manors Courtyard Caf. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days. References Available. 954-482-5494. HHA SEEKS Weekends & Eves. Mon Fri. Light Housekeeping Prepare Meals. Speak English. U. S. Citizen. Experienced References Available. 561-908-1017. 2-1 HOME HEALTH AIDE Private Certified. Day Or Nights. Providing Loving & Professional Care. Honest & Reliable. Affordable Rates. References Available. 954678-7754. CERTIFIED CNA Honest, Reliable, Seeking Position To Take Care Of Your Loved Ones. Live In Or Out. Excellent References. 954-682-1198. SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 2-8 MARCELAS CLEANING Residential Cleaning. Affordable Service You Can Trust! Experienced & GREAT References. 954-376-0524. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill, Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954-818-9538. HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed.. www.NewAvionics.Com. 954568-1991. C SELL YOUR BUSINESS!! Call Russell Cohen 954-646-7651 www. abiz4sale.comr cohen@ tworld.com. Transworld Business Br okers Lic R.E. Broker. MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CCOLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 2-8 POMPANO BEACH Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38 x 13. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 2-8 MOBILE HOME SALESDEERFIELD BEACH DOUBLE 24x60 2/2 New Siding Windows Water Heater A/C Flooring Overroof Corner Lot Enclosed Front Porch 10x24 New Shower Stalls. $28,900. Call 954-325-1515. HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,200 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-22 POMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 3/2 1 Car Garage. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease. Utilities Not Included. Available March 1st. 954-6498867. 2-8 ROOMS FOR RENTDEERFIELD PVT ROOM & BATH In Double Wide Mobile Home. 50+. W/D Complete Kitchen Use. Heated Pool. $550 Mo. + 1/2 Sec. 954-588-8940. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. REAL ESTATE FOR SALEPOMPANO PROPERTIES FOR SALE RIVERGATE T/H Rarely Available. 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath/1-CG ICW View $475K. 3228 TOWNHOMES/CAMELOT 2/2 T/H, One Floor Only! Totally Renovated, Approx. 1/2 Block To Ocean $280K. SEA HAVEN #321 B Remodeled. 2/2 Adjacent To Marina $155K. GARDEN AIRE VILLAGE S. #415, 2/2 Approx. 1 Mile To Sea! $110K. Contact PJ Carswell, Atlantic Prop. Int. Inc. 954-242-4260. pj@atlanticprop.com. 2-1

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The Pelican 27 Friday, February 1, 2013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE DEERFIELD. Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny With Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furn. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $56,000. 561-372-9837. POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324.CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH ADULT CONDO 55+. 1 / 1 Nicely Furnished Condo. Ready To Move-in. $800 Month. 1950 SE 5th Court. Call 954-943-5531. POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 2-8 BEACH PADS FOR RENTShort Or Long Term. Luxury furnished/unfurnished studios for your short or long term stay. Daily rates now available (apply to certain units only when available). Longer the stay, better the value. Small pets welcome. Tropical pool, coin laundry, private parking. 1/1 available after March 2 1 left!!! Call today to book your private getaway!! All Bills Paid!!! WI-FI, Premium Cable, Water, Electric and more.. Contact Pax-Properties @ 888-729-4948 or 561-541-0308 Photos @ www.beachpads. net. 2-8 POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL. Efficiency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 2-1 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 ALL NEW! QUIET BUILDING WITH COURTYARD!!. Annual Lease $900 Month. Call 609-638-1291. 2-8 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248736-1533. POMPANO / MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 Avenue 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished Unfurnished. $650 $850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 2-8 FOR RENT!! ANNUAL 2/2 Magni cent View LHP Marina/ Intracoastal. Unfurnished. No Pets. 954-801-4717. 2-22 BEACHY-KEEN! 2 Bedroom 2 Bath1 Block From The Sand In NE Pompano. Annual Lease $1,275 Month. 954-614-8428. LIGHTHOUSE POINT MARINA AREA. Very Attractive Large 2/2. Rent Dock At Marina & Walk Home. $1,700 Month Unfurnished. Agent 954-614-8428. POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 2-8 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-22 UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent in a Psychologists Of ce For A Solo Professional. $950 / Month. In The Gateway Centre 2040 East Sample Rd Lighthouse Point. Windowed, Unfurnished Of ce 14 by 12.5. 954-942-3344. 2-8 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 2-8 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,2 00 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 2-22

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28 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com bought a cigar store at 504 S. Federal Highway for $1.3 million and converted it into a detox facility. The Brooks property, a 12,474 square foot building and parking lot, is next door. Contacted this week, AbuMoustafa would not say if he has plans for the building. I have no idea what God has in store. I bought it as a good investment, a business opportunity. Single family homeowners living behind the cigar store on SE 5 Street and SE 5 Court, attempted to ght the detox center, on the grounds it was not compatible with the neighborhood. The city rst denied Abu-Moustafas application to convert the cigar store, and then backed off when threatened with a civil right lawsuit by his attorney. Under the federal Fair Housing Act and provisions of the Americans With Disabilities Act, people with addictions are classi ed as disabled and cannot to be discriminated against when it comes to housing. Abu-Moustafa began his investment in Deer eld Beach 10 years ago when he purchased a portion of what is now Florida House, a large complex on the corner of Federal Highway and SE 5 Court, for $1.3 million. Later he purchased adjacent buildings for $830,000 and established a somewhat luxurious campus for private patients recovering from addictions. Last year he paid $1.6 million for the Yucatan restaurant property at 525 S. Federal Highway, across from Florida House. No renovations have been made there yet. Abu-Moustafa has also acquired four homes in the area west of Federal Highway, buying some at the height of the real estate boom. Now valued at $515,120 by the Broward County Property Appraiser, his original $924,200 investment has put him upside down on those properties by some $400,000. However, his commercial properties have withstood the real estate downturn. Those and the single-family homes are valued for tax purposes at $7.9 million, coming close the retail prices he paid of $8.25 million. 2012 taxes on all these parcels, some of the choicest land in town, were $184,241. Figures for 2013 have not yet been posted. Abu-Moustafa is touchy about his business acquisitions. He said he has received threatening letters about his operation when in fact he has turned places into beautiful spots. I employ 200 people, I bring money into the community, I help people. I have done nothing but positive things for the community. How do I educate the public about what I do? Among other properties Abu-Moustafa has purchased recently is a former pain clinic at 318-320 Hillsboro Boulevard which he has converted into a wellness center for clients of Florida House. Why dont people ever talk about that? he said.Florida HouseContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 29 Friday, February 1, 2013 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point GFS celebrated its 156th store on Jan. 22 with free food and a giant pair of scissors to cut the ribbon during the grand opening festivities. GFS employees, managers and executives along with city officials from Lighthouse Point and Pompano Beach, and the chambers of commerce from those cities, all piled in front of the entrance to cut the ribbon. County Commissioner Chip LaMarca was also at the event. Lighthouse Point Mayor Fred Schorr said the opening of GFS is an example of the business-friendly atmosphere in Lighthouse Point. What it says is we look forward to working with you. GFS is a 115-year-old family-owned wholesale company that got its start by selling to restaurants Mayor declares new GFS a sign that Lighthouse Point is business friendly but has since opened to the public. The stores inventory includes meats, spices, vegetables, cups, plates, kitchen equipment, restaurant uniforms and more. No membership is required GFS employees, managers and executives along with city of cials from Lighthouse Point and Pompano Beach and their respective chambers of commerce including Lighthouse Point Mayor Fred Schorr, Lighthouse Point Commissioner Earl Maucker, Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher and County Commissioner Chip LaMarca all piled in front of the new GFS Marketplace, 3620 N. Federal Hwy., Lighthouse Point, on Jan. 22 to celebrate the stores grand opening.but business owners can sign up for a rewards program where they get rebates at the end of the year, depending on how much they spend. Call GFS in Lighthouse Point at 954-783-5200. Lighthouse Point Mayor Fred Schorr said the opening of GFS is an example of the business-friendly atmosphere in Lighthouse Point. What it says is we look forward to working with you, said Schorr.

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30 The Pelican Friday, February 1, 2013 Send your fishing news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Lighthouse Point Anglers looking for a big catch this weekend should have plenty of variety to choices. Theres been some kings, scattered dolphin, a few sailfish, and a few black fin tunas, said Jeff Walls, manager at RJ Boyle Studios in Lighthouse Point. There have been quite a few blue marlin seen here in the last week and some white Anglers have big choices this weekendmarlin mixed in too. And if a nearby cold front blows into Broward this weekend, Walls says the chance to catch a sailfish should increase. The wind will be blowing pretty good for Friday and Saturday. Expect the winds out of the northeast. Road, Oakland Park. 954-7829951 or 954-718-0543.Events & Activities2-10 Bingo at 1 p.m. at St. Henrys Catholic Church, 1500 S. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach. 10 regular games and a three-part jackpot game. Doors open at 12 p.m. Prizes and refreshments. 954-785-2450.Health & Fitness2-4 Mens Health Screening from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. 954279-7946. 2-10 Hedglon Chiropractic Center 1313 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach, holds an open house from 1 to 4 p.m. Experts will talk about chiropractic matters. Free computer scan, spinal exams, x-rays [if needed] and food and music. RSVP at 954-9461799. 2-16 & 17 Reiki class from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Lisas Healing Center. 4301 N. Federal Hwy. Suite 4, Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $100. 954-782-6564. SightingsContinued from page 25

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The Pelican 31 Friday, February 1, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! been budgeted for the plan. The proposed plan included surveying in the West Commercial retail area and in the Anglin Square area, visiting hoteliers and analyzing surveys hotel guests ll out, identifying target markets, developing a marketing message and marketing themes. Kathy Koch, a principal with Ambit, said the rm would provide research to target the audience the town wants to attract. Its critical to understand what attracts tourists or business to your city, she said. By talking to and visiting folks who live and visit here, . you will understand who is coming, what they hope to nd and what keeps them coming back. In a similar move, Delray Beach changed Atlantic Avenue from ho-hum to an area where something is happening all the time, Koch said. We spoke with residents and business owners who felt they had a charming city and developed a campaign to Keep the Charm. Hollywood is working to attract tourists, Koch said. They know that many of their visitors come from cruise ships, and the port is bringing in two more Oasis ships. Every week 5,400 visitors are on and off the ships. Were advising them to plan an extra day at the beginning or end of their trip (to stay in Hollywood.) Koch said Ambit also worked with Hallandale Beach. They put together a plan, and many more condos did go up. All the plans started with research, Koch said. You are in the midst of so many things, she said of LBTS. Last year Broward County had more tourists than ever. The port and airport are growing. The economy is de nitely on the upswing. The last thing you want to do is not get your share. While he liked the proposal, Commissioner Mark Brown said he wants to see the development work [on Commercial Boulevard] done as quickly and ef ciently as possible. I dont want to spend a lot of money now when we may need that money. Brown said he doesnt see a need to spend $64,000 on a marketing plan now when in six to eight months the downtown renovation will be completed. Whom will we market to? Broward County, central Florida, internationally? Brown asked, adding he didnt have a good idea now what the strategy would be. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser agreed with Brown. What are we marketing? Construction and a reef without enough power? Sasser said hes not big on surveys. Id rather have a strategy on the people not coming here. Were being very business-friendly. If we put a market plan together, who will join with us? This is not the right time and not a priority for me. We can talk again next year. Commissioner Vincent asked Koch to explain why the plan was needed now. It seems to make sense to understand who you are trying to reach. You wouldnt implement it until your improvements are done, but we would have done the research, planned the media placement and youd be ready to go. Until the research was done in Hollywood, she said city of cials hadnt realized the number of visitors coming from across Alligator Alley. Koch said now was a good time to do the surveys because so many people are here. She said interviewers would ask why the visitors are here, what they think of the town and what their expectations are. Are they looking to dive or shop, for example. Minnet said she sees the plan as a way to create measurable tools. While she understands the hesitation, she said, I think this is the time so we have a plan so when the right time comes, we can implement it. We know LBTS is a destination. We need to know who is coming to live, to stay and to do business. Im in favor of doing this and in favor of sooner rather than later, Minnet said. Vincent also said he supported the plan. Hoffmann said she echoed what the mayor said, adding, We often think we know our clientele, but market research points out things we dont know. The time is now. This is the right time. Hoffmann said Pompano Beach has a development plan and is advertising for a tourism manager. In Fort Lauderdale, the area near the Bonnet House is trying to become like Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Theyre buying up motels and putting in sidewalk cafes. I dont want to get lost in the dust. She added that the commission is always saying the chamber should be doing more marketing. But we dont have the knowledge to tell the chamber what they should be doing. Brown suggested the commission address the marketing plan in the next scal year, which starts Oct 1. Hoffmann said by the time the improvements on Commercial Boulevard are completed, We will have so much to market. Sasser remained unconvinced the marketing plan was the right way to go. I think we should help by investing in the town. I think businesses should step up. Dodd suggested bringing back the proposal for the marketing plan in six months. If we wait, we miss the season (for gathering the research), Hoffmann said. Im concerned this is the wrong time until we get the town rebuilt, Dodd said. We will get more tourist response when were done. I want the answers, but this is putting the cart before the horse. Dodd moved the commission defer the matter for six months, and Sasser seconded his motion. The motion passed. MarketingContinued from page 1

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