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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00327
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 01-25-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00334

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Friday, January 25, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 4 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Cities not rushing to take Wheelabrator’s incentive moneyOP latest to defer decision By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park Although signi cant nancial incentives are being offered by Wheelabrator for waste disposal contracts signed by Jan. 31, many cities are taking a waitandsee attitude. At recent meetings, Oakland Park, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Deer eld Beach, Hillsboro Beach See INCENTIVES on page 25By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Hillsboro Beach restaurant tycoon Wayne Lobdell discovered that the cure for his medical condition combined traditional medicine with some new approaches. He was so grateful that he gave the UHealth Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center $500,000 to develop a series of lectures and workshops focusing on mind-body wellness. The rst in the series was held this month at UHealth’s Deer eld Beach location in Newport Center. It dealt with rheumatology, psoriatic arthritis Cured using alternative therapies, restaurant mogul endows wellness program at UHealth Sylvesterand osteoarthritis. Along with the latest medical information presented by Dr. Christine Savage, attendees learned about nutrition, exercise and lifestyle changes that can positively affect their disease. They also got a free lunch, in this case samples from a cooking demonstration. “Our integrative health team is meant to complement our medical team,” said Diana Edwards, who is coordinating the lecture series endowed by Lobdell who also gave another $100,000 to Sylvester for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma research. The lectures will be given the second and fourth Tuesday of each month beginning at noon. In February, on the 12th and the 26th, the topic will be the latest advances in treating cardio-vascular disease. Although, UHealth Sylvester is a cancer treatment center, the Lobdell MindBody Wellness Program will cover a broader range of topics, all kinds of chronic diseases and conditions, Edwards said. “Knowledge is power. You have to be your own best advocate so that if, God forbid, something happens in the future you will be informed ,” Edwards said. “Holistic approaches can optimize the medical outcomes.”See CURE on page 14 WHAT HAPPENED TO THE HOUSE? Shutters askew, untrained vines, weeds and neglect cover the once pristine Sample-McDougald House on Northeast 10 Street, the city’s museum. To nd the answer to this mystery, see page 7. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira] City manager to pick Cooper City BSO chief as Pompano’s next top copBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Broward Sheriff’s Of ce [BSO Captain John Hale began his police career as a patrol of cer in this city in 1987 and will return soon as its chief. Beach said Hale has an excellent track record and credentials and his appointment could come as early as today. “At this point in time my intentions are to select him as the next chief of police,” said Beach. Commissioners met with Hale, chief of Cooper City since 2004, on Wednesday and a the ones The See HALE on page 12

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2 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Art 1-27 – Riverwalk Sunday Arts from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Esplande Park, 400 SW 2 St., Fort Lauderdale. Held the fourth Sunday of the month and features local artists, performers, photographers and others as they perform and sell their wares and sell to the public. 954-468-1541. 2-6National League of American Pen Women hosts a juried exhibit from Feb. 6 to March 6 at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Participants include area women artists. Call 954-812-1860.Auctions, etc.1-26 – Super Rummage Plant and Bake Sale from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Hosted by the Garden Club of LBTS. 583-356-2090. 1-26 & 27 – Nautical Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St. Admission is $5 per person. Children 12 and under are free. Visit www. nautical eamarket.com. 1-26 – Free tree giveaway from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954630-4511. 2-2 – Aunt Mary’s Attic Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church, 2700 NE 36 St., Lighthouse Point. Household items, furniture, clothes, jewelry, books and more will be on sale. Refreshments will also be served. 954-943-9154. 2-2 & 3 – City-Wide Market from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. More than 200 vendors with a wide range of items, including: vintage and retro goods, collectibles, novelties, mint condition second-hand items, locally made products, edibles and more. Free admission. 954-785-7475.Auditions2-9 – Casting call for You’re a Good Man. Charlie Brown at Sol Theatre, 333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Appointments only. Auditions also held Feb. 10 and 11. 561-447-8829.Books & Lectures1-30 – Joan Caras will discuss her books, The Holocaust Survivor Cookbook and Miracles & Meal, Jan. 30 at 7 p.m. at 4431 NE 27 Ave., Lighthouse Point. The books contain collections of recipes and stories of Holocaust survivors from throughout the world. Suggested donation is $10 per person. 917-9727185. 2-9 – Book sal e from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Imperial Point Library, 5989 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Books, DVD’s, CD’s, audio books and comic books for sale. 954-492-1881. 2-21 Local author Deborah Sharp will speak at 11:30 a.m. at Delray Beach Golf Club, 2200 Highland Ave. Famous for her hysterical Mace Mystery novels, Sharp will share how she takes her protagonist “Mama” on book tours. Cost is $25. Lunch included. 561865-9756.See SIGHTINGS on page 3Pompano Beach – New Presbyterian Church will hold its Patriotic Spectacular Concert on Sunday, Feb. 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Pompano Beach High School, 600 NE 13 Ave. The concert will honor veterans, current members of the military, police and re personnel. A family who lost their son in Afghanistan will also be honored. Performers include the Spirit of Liberty Fife & Drum, Hundred Voice Choir, King’s Brass Band, Soloist Phil Alongi, New Young Patriots and Children’s Youth Choir. Visit www.newpres.org or call 954-275-9335.

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The Pelican 3 Friday, January 25, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – On their second attempt, city commissioners recently approved a poll worker agreement with the Broward County Supervisor of Elections for the March 12 municipal election. Commissioner Shari McCartney, who had earlier asked that the city try for a better agreement, noted that the number of poll workers McCartney gets better deal with poll workers in March, re contract rati edwas reduced by half after the city sent a request to do so. The number of workers has been reduced from 126 to 63. “Imagine what we could do if we really negotiated this,” McCartney said. “Imagine what we could do if we really knew the costs of the election.” McCartney said she is aware that the supervisor of elections has the authority to run the elections, but she challenges the costs. She has asked for an audit and said she will bring the issue back again. Commissioner Jed Shank commended McCartney for pushing the issue. The vote on the poll worker agreement was 4-1, McCartney dissenting. Fire ghter contract rati edOakland Park In a 3-2 vote, commissioners rati ed an agreement between the SightingsContinued from page 2Business1-26 & 27 – Southeast Florida Chamber Expo Home Show from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Local businesses showcase their products and services for the home. 561-245-8985. 2-7 – Breakfast N’ Deer eld from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce Banquet Room, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. 954427-1050. Children & Family2-2 – Unity in the Community from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. Free food, entertainment and activities. 954-586-1123.Clubs, etc.2-13 – Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets at 10 a.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 Ave., Pompano Beach. Group meets every second Wednesday of the month except April and December. 954-786-3902. See SIGHTINGS on page 21 See FIRE on page 24

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4 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 By Mike d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – The frustrating and sometimes comical story of the Yawt Property may nally see its last chapter written soon. On Tuesday, commissioners voted to reduce the amount in liens owed on the Yawt Property, located on Northeast 24 Street, from $1.227 million to $441,000. Vice Mayor Julie Carson was the only no vote. “I would have liked $600,000,” she said. Members of the Peter Yawt Trust, which owns the property, want to sell the sixacre lot to Pinnacle Housing Group. The Miami-based developer plans to build a $32 million apartment complex with 155 units, a dog park, clubhouse and pool, which could be nished by the end Wilton Manors’ Yawt Property called a “Carl Hiaasen novel”of 2014. Funds from the sale will be used to pay the liens. Commissioner Ted Galatis said if the city demanded too much money the owners might walk away from the deal and leave the city still dealing with a blighted area. The lien amount stems from years of code violations, interest accruing on the violations, legal fees incurred by the city and unpaid utility liens. Galatis said the city has been dealing with problems on the property, previously known as the Middle River Trailer Park, since at least 2002. Carson and Galatis expressed a negative view of the fees and expenses incurred by those representing the Yawt’s owners. Mayor Gary Resnick and Commissioner Scott Newton said it wasn’t in the interest of the city to worry about how much the lawyers make. Carson asked if the representatives of the Yawt Trust were planning to reduce their fees along with asking the city to reduce its costs. William Webb, a certi ed public accountant and the only representative to respond, said he had been working for free on the issue and hasn’t tallied up any of his fees yet. “I’m curious if we’re all team players or if the city is the only one that’s going to take a hit,” said Carson. Galatis supports the planned project but expressed anger that the same people who stalled the development of the site would make money when it was sold. Webb blamed the city’s headache on Hurricane Wilma and on Mary and Nancy Yawt, members of the trust. Mayor Gary Resnick called blaming Wilma “disingenuous” because the problems began before the storm hit in 2005. Webb said Mary Yawt refused to sign-off on a $10 million deal to develop the six-acre property years ago and Nancy Yawt delayed legal proceedings – going as far as to jump through windows and lie about her identity to avoid being served court documents by process servers. “This is a Carl Hiaasen novel,” joked Resnick. Yawt representatives asked commissioners to reduce the amount to $110,000. Commissioner Scott Newton made a motion to reduce it to 25 percent, $387,000. “This has been an eyesore preventing development for years. I’m sorry but I’m not going to support that,” said Resnick. “The residents of this city deserve more than 25 percent.”

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The Pelican 5 Friday, January 25, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – It was a short lived crime. Four of Dist. 3 candidate Caryl Berner’s signs were stolen this week from the Pines Golf Course on Century Boulevard. Within a day, however, maintenance workers at the golf course found the signs discarded in a dumpster. At press time, Berner was making arrangements to Stolen signs another issue for candidate without fundsput the 18-inch by 24-inch advertisements up again. Berner, who claimed she was destitute when ling her qualifying papers to run in the March election, said “I am on a limited budget. I really don’t have the money. Losing the signs was a hardship on me.” Election laws here allow a candidate to avoid fees by claiming a hardship. The city also does not accept signatures in lieu of the $100 ling fee, and the $279 commission qualifying fee. Berner is the only one of ve candidates in the municipal election to le without paying the fees. If she has money left in her campaign account after the election, she must pay up. “I believe people should be able to run without money. Of course it is easier to get your message and yourself known if you have a large campaign account,” Berner said. Berner reported the stolen signs to BSO but the case is likely closed. Berner said she had permission from the owners of the golf course to erect her campaign material on private property. “People who steal signs are despicable,” she said. “Someone is making an effort to serve their community and another is agrantly thwarting that effort.” NOT HER FIRST SIGN ISSUE Two years ago, Berner successfully convinced city of cials to ban smoking on the beaches, a happier signage issue.

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6 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XXI, Issue 4 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & LettersPompano Beach Children enrolled in an after-school program at the Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library got a special treat recently when representatives of Florida Grand Opera paid a visit. Jean Sensale, Florida Grand Opera’s teaching artist, explained how opera tells a story, but the actors are singing. She stressed how being able to read is key to everything else, whether the music is opera, rap or rock. She led the children in coordination exercises, stressed the importance of speaking clearly and taught them about rhythm. They practiced making music with sticks and maracas. Soprano Amy Alvarado wowed the young audience by singing ‘Go the Distance’ from ‘Hercules’ and an aria from ‘Carmen.’ Aim of the visit was to expose the youngsters to opera at an early age. [Staff photo by Judy Vik] Passing on the majesty of opera Holy Cross celebrates Heart MonthFort Lauderdale – To highlight the importance of a healthy heart, Holy Cross Hospital, 4725 N. Federal Hwy., will host a series of educational events dealing with heart issues. The programs are free and open to the public. Call 954-351-7804 to RSVP for each event. Wednesday, Feb. 6 – Dinner with the Doctor discussing Medical Fact vs. Fiction: Where do you get your medical information? at 4 p.m. with cardiologist Charles Russo, M.D. at Holy Cross Hospital in the Sister Innocent Conference Center. Thursday, Feb. 7 – Time Out for Women with the program The Way to a Woman’s Healthy Heart at 6 p.m. with cardiologist Vicente Font, M.D. at the Dorothy Mangurian Comprehensive Women’s Center, 1000 NE 56 St., Fort Lauderdale. RSVP for this program is at 954-351-7804. Wednesday, Feb. 13 – Mind, Body & Medicine with the program Calm the Anxious Mind: It’s Good for Your Heart from 4 to 5 p.m. at Holy Cross Hospital in the Sister Innocent Conference Center. Wednesday, Feb. 20 – The Cardiac Hour with the program How to Prevent a Heart Attack or Stroke at 6 p.m. with cardiologists Alan Rosenbaum, M.D. and Ricky Schneider, M.D. at Marriott Heron Bay, 11775 Heron Bay Blvd., Coral Springs. Wednesday, Feb. 27 – It’s a Guy Thing! with the program Pedal to the Metal: Don’t Let Your Heart Slow You Down at 6 p.m. with Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiologist Daniel Weitz, M.D. at Xtreme Indoor Karting, 5300 N. Powerline Road, Fort Lauderdale.Adopt a sea turtle nestBroward – The National Save The Sea Turtle Foundation is looking for donors to adopt a sea turtle nest for the upcoming sea turtle season, March through October. The cost to adopt is $40 per nest and those who donate will get a picture of the nest, their name on the nest and information on how many hatchlings came from the nest. Visit www.savetheseaturtle.org or call 954-3519333.Nautical Flea MarketPompano Beach – The Nautical Flea Market will be held Saturday, Jan. 26 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Community Park, 820 NE 18 Ave. Fishing tackle, dock boxes, boat shoes, nautical art and jewelry, motors, dinghy’s, scuba gear, antique goods, boats on trailers and more will be on sale. Admission is $5 per person and children 12 and under are free. Visit www.nautical eamarket.com or call 954-786-4111. Election Connection Pompano Beach – Voters can check their voter status, get educated on how to use voting machines and update their registration information on Friday, Feb. 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Voter registration forms will also be available to ll out. An Election Connection event will also be held Wednesday, Feb. 6 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Oakland Park City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. Call 954-357-7050 or visit www.browardsoe.org.A new year and a new beginning at the Broward Sheriff’s Of ceSheriff Scott IsraelBROWARD SHERIFF’S OFFICEEach year when we celebrate the New Year, it brings the opportunity for change. In a vote of con dence by the citizens of Broward County, I have been humbled and privileged to have been elected to serve as the Sheriff of Broward County. Throughout my professional career, I have been faced with many tasks and challenges. Through every situation, I rose to meet those challenges and I am committed to doing the same as your Sheriff. When we consider the responsibilities of the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, the nation’s largest fully accredited agency, it’s important to remember its mission to protect and serve the public. Our goals going forward will be to establish a cohesive, productive and diverse working environment within the Agency and to build strong, long-term partnerships with the community. We will focus on crime prevention; crime control and enforcement; re safety and awareness; and maintain the highest standards for employee education, training and professionalism. The members of my Command Staff will lead by example, upholding the State and Federal laws and be open, honest and scally responsible to the community we serve. To the men and women of the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, I respect and appreciate you and look forward to working with you. Your hard work, dedication and professionalism sets this agency apart as a shining example in our community. We will work together, in support of one another and for the bene t of the nearly two million people we serve in Broward County. On behalf of the men and women of the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, I wish you and your family a very Happy and Safe New Year! I look forward to serving you as the Sheriff of Broward County and together building a safer community.Ask the Broward Property AppraiserLauderdale-By-The-Sea – The Broward Property Appraiser will host an educational seminar on Thursday, Jan. 31 at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Drive. Call 954-784-9495. Questions that will be answered are: What is portability? What tax exemptions am I eligible for? What is the valuation process?

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The Pelican 7 Friday, January 25, 2013 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – When Patricia Peabody showed up at the Sample-McDougald House Tuesday to give tours she thought the historic house had suffered some kind of calamity. “I thought something horrible has happened to our house,” she said. Turns out, it was just a little bit of TV magic. The overgrowth of vines and grime on the walls and columns, known in the industry as “age wash,” were the work of the set decoration team for “The Glades,” a ctional crime drama on A&E that takes place primarily in Sample-McDougald House makes it to the small screen Broward County. “I didn’t know any of this was going on. But I’m glad I came. This is just wonderful,” said Peabody, who volunteers as a docent at Sample-McDougald. The Glades,” which premiered in 2010, has lmed in various locations throughout Broward including Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood and Hallandale. With three seasons under its belt, the temporary transformation of Sample-McDougald is in preparation for the upcoming season four premier. In the episode, detectives go into the house looking for an elderly woman but nd her ghost instead. Filming took place Thursday night and ended early Friday morning. “We’re making it look like more of a haunted house,” said Set Designer Gabby Villarreal on Tuesday. “We’re just trying to make it look like it’s an overgrown plantation. Like it hasn’t been touched in years.” And Sample-McDougald’s early 20th Century architecture lends itself to the type of work Villarreal does. It makes things easier because it has lot of character and interesting features literally built into it. “It’s always interesting going into a period house. The architecture of the house really helps guide my world,” said Villarreal. In addition to the rundown look the crew gave the outside, the inside was also made to look decrepit with cobwebs and a paint that made the walls look old and worn-out. “And we’re putting in a little taxidermy to make it look creepy,” said Villarreal. The crew also brought in their own furniture and even made some temporary landscaping additions, including a few dead trees. But fans of the historic home, built in 1916 by Albert Neal Sample on Dixie Highway and moved to its current location at 450 NE 10 St. in 2001, need not worry about what happens now that lming is over. Lee Waldo, director of operations for SampleMcDougald, said everything will be restored just as it was Christopher Belcarries, the greens department, puts up some vines to give Sample-McDougald an overgrown look.See HOUSE page 17

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8 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 BriefsBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFAs a former smoker who chokes on smoke, this Pelican writer was not eager to write a story about a tobacco business. But sitting down with one of the owners of Tobacco Row at 334 McNab Rd. in Pompano Beach changed my attitude. This interview took place before the store opened. At the suggestion of Angela Lowe, one of the owners, it took place just outside the door where the air was fresh. Lowe’s sensitivity to anti-Tobacco, smoking accessories and self defense supplies are abundant at Tobacco Row in Pompano BeachKathy Libonati-Dressel (L) and Angela Lowe are sisters and owners of Tobacco Row in Pompano Beach. The store sells tobacco, smoking accessories, cigars, pipes, Hookahs and Self Defense Supplies. smoke folks and her amazing knowledge of her subject was engaging and quickly brought about an attitude adjustment. “We’re a family owned and operated business,” she said rmly. My sister and partner, Kathy LibonatiDressel lives in New Jersey, but she visits often and communicates with me daily to stay tuned to what’s happening here. My husband and other family siblings help out, but Kathy and I are the owners. We opened last June and combined it with self defense supplies which my husband and I have been selling for the past seven years at the Swap Shop.” There’s a back story. Angela says, “Kathy is also my angel. I have a lot of health problems. I was just sort of hanging around, depressed by all the doctors, the tests and my health. I had given up on an active life. Since opening this store everything has changed. I feel useful, happy, much healthier, productive and my goal is to repay Kathy for making me an active participant in the business world.” She continues, “I love my store and my customers. We’re all on a rst name basis. I know their life stories. We’ve built a good customer base, and they are as loyal to us as we are to them.” The store stocks four types of tobacco in addition to tubes and machines. Angela says, “We sell machines in different price ranges. There’s a hand roller at $10 and a top of the line is a $75 electric machine. Our best sellers are Powermatic 1 and 2. No. 1 is manual and No. 2 is electric. They are our best sellers because they make the process simple.” Cigars are available from 69 cents to their most popular $9 hand-rolled Romeo and Julieta. Pipe smokers seem to be declining, but the shop still stocks pipes from $10 to $20. Hookah, glass containers lled with avored tobacca, or shisha, are also available. The user smokes tobacco through a hose. Angela explains that it is often used by smokers who want both avor and tobacco. She shows just one of many avors available-a 100gram can of white grape and blueberry shisha which sells for $10. Hookahs range from $15 to $52 and, according to this owner, there are a lot of hookah smokers who mainly smoke in their homes. Denise has been a customer from day one. “I love Angela,” she says. ”She’s like a step-mom to me. She’s dependable, reliable and responsible. I buy tobacco, and I bought a roll-your-own manual machine. I save a huge amount over the price of commercial cigarettes. I visit Tobacco Row about twice a week, and after I get what I need, I stay to visit with Angela.” Another customer, Nunzio, says, “Angela is not only a sweet lady, but she also treats her customers with respect. Until I get smart enough to quit, buying my own tobacco, tubes and manual roll-yourSee TOBACCO ROW on page 9Pompano Beach – Ric Green president of the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, left, cuts the ribbon during the grand opening of Heart of the Olive, 816 N. Federal Hwy., on Jan. 16. Heart of the Olive offers an assortment of olive oils, furniture from Indonesia, handmade pottery and baskets, jarred food, coffee, tea, spices, rubs, salt, picture frames made from materials salvaged after Hurricane Katrina, books, paintings and salad bowls from Africa. Heart of the Olive will host a romantic food and wine tasting on Feb. 6 from 5 to 8 p.m. A $10 donation is requested. Call 754-222-8071. Also pictured are owner Frank Roth and his father, Jack. [Photo courtesy of Andrea Freygang]Heart of The Olive cuts ribbon for store, wine tasting set for Feb. 6 Copyright law and the artistWilton Manors – The Central Area Neighborhood Association of Wilton Manors will host a seminar, Copyright Law & The Artist, on Friday, Feb. 1 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Court. Robert E. Pershes, Esq., a patent, trademark and copyright attorney, will present the lecture. Call 954661-4740.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, January 25, 2013 own machine is a good thing to do. It’s convenient and I save at least 60 percent since I switched from commercial cigarettes. Now I spend $30 on the equivalent amount of cigarettes that used to cost me $70 a carton.” Although smoking has a bad reputation, it has not affected the two owners of this shop. Business is good. They both smoke despite Angela’s Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease [COPD] Asked why she continues when it is wrecking her health, she says, “It’s too hard to quit. I hate that I smoke, but at least when I make my own cigarettes I know they are lled with only natural tobacco and not the harmful chemicals found in commercial cigarettes.” Tobacco Row sells loose all natural tobacco to men and women who roll their own which is a big money saver for smokers.Self Defense SuppliesAngela stresses, “We don’t promote violence; we promote safety. Everything we sell is legal and we make sure our customers know how to use these items only to defend themselves. Some of our customers are knife collectors or hunting enthusiasts. No rearms are sold here. I will never use a gun. To me, guns are to kill and I will never put myself in that position. I fully believe you can defend yourself in better ways without killing.” The store stocks Stun guns, Numchucks, and Pepper Spray. The Spring Assist is a pocket knife with a thousand uses like opening boxes, cleaning sh etc. On the counter of this well run business by this well informed woman is a stack of a print outs of the Florida “Dangerous Weapon” Laws for every customer to take home and read. Angela translates it in simple terms. “If you are going to carry a concealed weapon (including knives) you must have a concealed weapons permit. If you do not have that permit, your weapon must show.” For further information, call 954-781-3413. Open Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sat. 11 to 6. Delivery available locally. Tobacco RowContinued from page 10

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10 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Pelican met with three dedicated members of the Society of St. Vincent DePaul at its thrift store at 2323 N. Dixie Hwy. in Pompano Beach. Unlike many similar stores, this thrift shop is spotless and amazingly well organized with clothing hung neatly in racks, grouped by sizes and often even by color and type. Shoppers will nd beautiful furniture, clothing for men, women and children, books, art work, televisions, drapes, linens, pillows, dishes –all attractively displayed.Estee MartinVolunteer Estee Martin, a young vibrant woman, says, “Our store manager, Sam Battaglia is responsible for this attractive thrift store featuring some wonderful donations. I volunteer here, working with Sam, whenever I can. I work full time at R.S. Financial, a nance company in Boca Raton so my volunteer hours in the shop vary, but I’m emotionally very much involved. When I’m here, I organize donations, clean the store, stage the area and furniture, help with pricing, sales, scheduling donation pick ups and more. I was recently added to the committee which helps Sam with store operations.” Some donations are very upscale and can bring much more cash to the cause by marketing them elsewhere. Martin has just began to list these rare but valuable donations on Craig’s list and she intends to learn how to do the same on E-Bay. “I want to maximize the amount of money I can help generate for the society,” she explains. “ We just received an entire collection of baseball cards spanning 50 years. There could be great value included in this collection, but we need to research the cards to nd out their worth. This could be a major donation to the Society.” Martin is a single parent of two recent college graduates. Her daughter and son live in Massachusetts, so she says, “ I have a lot of free time and I choose to give much of my free time to this great society. I’ve met incredible ladies in this group who have become my new family.”Mike MoriartyMike Moriarty, is a volunteer co-chair with Beth Society of St. Vincent De Paul is helping the poor around the world; Broward County included Klemens, for the annual Friends of the Poor 5K Walk/ Run coming soon on March 9. He says, “This is one of our most important fund raisers of the year, and I’m sure the donations we receive are a major contribution to the “Friends of the Poor” which is a national effort of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. St. Gabriel Conference hosts this walk when the snowbirds are here in order to have the most participation.” The Walk begins at 8 a.m. with registration at 7 a.m. The event will be held at St. Gabriel Catholic Church, 731 North Ocean Blvd. in Pompano Beach at A1A and NE 7 St. The primary Three dedicated volunteers in the Society of St. Vincent de Paul were gathered at the Thrift Store for a recent interview. L to R are Mike Moriarty, Joyce Murray and Estee Martin.See ST. VINCENT on page 11 Briefs Les Mack TrioBoca Raton – The Les Mack Trio performs from 3 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 10 at the Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd., Boca Raton. Whether it’s the music of the duo Special Edition, the Trio or Quartet, or the foot-tapping riverboat, Les Mack music covers standards, big band, Latin, nineties, show tunes and Dixieland music from the style of New Orleans to Chicago. Free admission. Call 561-299-8684.Free waste and prescription disposalFort Lauderdale – A free drop-off event for household hazardous waste, used electronics and old medications will take place on Sunday, Jan. 27, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., at 301 N. Andrews Ave. Accepted items include prescription medicine, leftover paint, pesticides, electronics and rechargeable batteries. Items not accepted are stereos, microwaves, kitchen appliances, explosives, biohazardous waste and business-generated waste. Proof of Broward County residency such as a driver’s license or current utility bill is required. Call 954-474-1837.Scavengers take the streets in Wilton ManorsWilton Manors – The Wilton Manors Scavenger Hunt takes place Saturday, Jan. 26 from 1 to 3 p.m. starting at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. The event will consist of teams of three to four people each running around Wilton Manors looking for clues. Cost is $10 for one ticket or two tickets for $15. Children 12 and under are free if they are with an adult. Winners will be chosen based on correct answers. Visit www.scavengerhunt. developwm.org or call Adrienne Foland at 954-2056594.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, January 25, 2013 objective of the Walk is to bring awareness of and show solidarity with the poor here in Broward County. There is no fee to walk or run in this event. Donations are encouraged but are strictly voluntary. Moriarty says, “Last year we had over 165 walkers and runners and we are hoping for even more this year. For further information call 954621-6027.Joyce MurrayJoyce Murray is a member of St. Gabriel Conference where Mary Ann Carlson is the current president. Murray was available to tell us about this world famous Society. The Society of Vincent St. Paul was founded in France in 1833 for the sole purpose of helping the poor. A group of college men recognized the need to help the poor and that continues to motivate this worthy group world-wide. At the last count on record, there were 760,000 volunteers around the world. The international base is in Paris, France. The United States base is in St. Louis, Missouri. Murray explains, “The grass roots are the local conferences. Pompano Beach is part of the North Broward District Council. Our local conference includes St. Elizabeth of Hungary and St. Gabriel. A report to the Parishioners of St. Gabriel prepared by President Carlson indicates that the conference income comes from member donations, poorbox donations, fund raising, twinning and other income. 80 percent of that income went to those who are served. 10 percent went to twinning & dues and 9 percent went to operating and fund raising. The same report lists the way in which people are served. Home visits to those in need resulted in rent, utility, food and prescription drug assistance. In association with Holy Cross Hospital, the Starquest Transportation Van took clients to medical appointments, food shopping, church attendance and social events. At Seaview Rehabilitation and Assisted Living, there were monthly visits, birthday parties, and gifts at Christmas and Easter. St. Laurence Chapel received prayer services, sandwiches and gifts at the two holidays. Meals were served to the needy and the homeless in the area. There was one sit down meal, two meals to go, transportation vouchers, water and snacks given. Murray, a retired teacher says, “I choose to give a lot of time to the Society. We are called Vincentians and our purpose is to grow closer to God. Our works ow from this motivation. I come from a middle class, mid-western family. We were all taught to give back. And now, when I see the great needs in so many areas, there aren’t enough hours in the day, nor money in the till to do what we would like to do, and what needs to be done.” Murray, with a partner Vincentian, make visits to clients in their homes to assess their nancial, emotional and spiritual needs, and to see how they can directly help. They also refer clients to the agencies which might give them long term assistance. She says, “Our help line receives calls from people in distress and we respond. How many we visit depends on the number of calls for help received. The dynamics change with the geographical location of the Conference. Last year the parishioners of the Archdiocese of Miami served 65,363 people, putting in 99,208 hours of volunteer service. “The district council of North Broward reports assisting over 5,000 families with 16,000 of volunteer work and $225, 000 distributed to those in need. “We differ from many social services in that our rst priority is to become closer to God and bring His love to the service.” At that point, Murray excused herself as she had promised a sick client that she would do the marketing. With a cheerful smile, she left for the grocery store with the client’s list. The Pelican thanks this worthy group for its dedication to those in need locally and internationally. Thrift store number is 954-942-2242. To volunteer in this Conference contact St. Elizabeth of Hungary at 954942-2161 or St. Gabriel at 954-943-9717. St. VincentContinued from page 10 Special Deer eld Commission meetingDeer eld Beach – There will be a special commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall, 150 NE 2 Ave., to discuss authorizing the lease of the pier restaurant. A second meeting will be held Feb. 12. Call 954-480-4200. Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700

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12 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Pelican interviewed say they would have no problem with City Manager Dennis Beach selecting him as the next chief. Captain Wayne Adkins is serving as acting chief until a permanent candidate is selected. Hale would succeed Lt. Colonel William Knowles who was promoted by Sheriff Scott Israel in January and transferred to BSO’s Public Safety Building in Fort Lauderdale. Per the city’s contract agreement, BSO has to provide at least three suggestions to replace Knowles. City Manager Dennis Beach will make the decision to hire the new chief, but the act is always done with the mutual consent of the city commission. Commissioner Rex Hardin called Hale a “good t” for Pompano. “I don’t think there’s a need to have three names. Let’s get this taken care of as quickly as possible so we can have some leadership.” Vice Mayor George Brummer said he isn’t expecting to be asked for his approval of Hale but he’s not worried about Beach’s ability to make the right decision. “Nobody asked me, for instance, if I wanted Bill Knowles [as chief],” said Brummer. And although Brummer said Hale has a little catching up to do, “in the sense of knowing how things are done today [in Pompano],” he seemed satis ed after the meeting. “He knows the neighborhoods and the city and I really couldn’t ask for more,” said Brummer. Hale served the former Pompano Beach Police Department as a patrol of cer, HaleContinued from page 1criminal investigations detective, patrol sergeant and internal affairs sergeant. He joined BSO when it took over operations in Pompano in 1999. After the merger, he served as Pompano Beach District Area 2 captain, the executive lieutenant for Areas 1 and 2 and the administrative sergeant in Area 2. Hale holds both an associate in science in police studies and a bachelor of science in criminal justice management from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. He is a graduate of the Florida Atlantic University Center for Advanced Criminal Justice Studies’ Executive Leadership Program and the 234th session of the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia. Mayor Lamar Fisher, who said he’s known Hale for a long time, expressed no doubts. “He was born and raised in Pompano,” said Fisher. “All the indication shows he would be an excellent t for us. Even [former sheriff Al] Lamberti was talking about [promoting him].” Commissioner Barry Dockswell declined to give his opinion and The Pelican was unable to reach Commissioners Woodrow Poitier and Charlotte Burrie in time for publication.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, January 25, 2013 Martin Luther King celebration bring riotous laughter to those who lived through civil rights and contemplation from the younger set By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Ed Phillips, wearing suspenders and a dapperlooking hat, could not resist the music, the dancing and the spirit. It was Monday, the day the rst black president took his oath for a second term. It was also Dr. Martin Luther King Day. And the place was Ely High School. Ed threaded his way to the area just below the stage where he raised his hands over his head, swung his body to the beat and clapped his hands.Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher takes in some heavy humor dished out by Vickie Winans at the Dr. Martin Luther King celebration, Monday at Blanche Ely High School in Pompano Beach.The gym was packed with fans who celebrated MLK Day with laughter, prayers and a few pokes For Catherine Hill, it was a time to dance.See MLK on page 18 CommentaryEvery band room in the country smells like a combination of wellworn uniforms and brass trombones. To band members that smell is the aroma of their elite status as students. They are the ones most often representing their school as the Ely Marching Tigers did on Monday to honor Dr. Martin Luther King. On this national holiday when other students slept in, the Tigers showed up at 7:30 a.m. for line-up at 8. Then they fell into a two-hour march. Who doesn’t love a parade? It was clear that the community that surrounds Ely loves a parade evidenced by the celebration residue, abandoned beach chairs along Fifth Avenue, neighbors still outside chatting and several exhausted students in the band room turning in their uniforms. The Tiger parade has always maintained one strong tradition: stopping at the home of the late Blanche General Ely [1904 -1993], the woman who came to Pompano in the 20s and left her mark on this city’s and Broward’s schools. On this day, band students followed the decades-old tradition. When the band neared 15th Street and Sixth Avenue, it halted in front of Mrs. Ely’s home, now a museum. Here they played the alma mater. In years past, when Mrs. Ely was in residence there, the student council president presented her with owers.David Barrett, Porcha Tigner, Laurence Jeanlus, Zariyah Brown and BrandenMcCrone are waiting for a second wind after their twohour march in celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Day. As these students relaxed in the uniform room, across the way, others were celebrating with songs, prayers and a lot of comedy. [Staff p hotos] In the band room, students re ect on their own lives, their heritage and their responsibility to be the next leaders See MLK BAND on page 20Band students are the ne results of Dr. King’s crusade

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14 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! “It is an approach that will begin to address the physical, emotional and social needs of all our patients,” said M. Beatriz Currier, M.D., Medical Director of the Courtelis Center and Cancer Support Services at Sylvester, and Chief of the Division of Consultation Psychiatry. Spearheaded by Currier, the Lobdell Mind-Body Wellness Program integrates traditional medicine with complementary medical techniques, including acupuncture, massage therapy, yoga, tai chi, and herbal medicine therapy, and psychological therapies that include meditation, guided visual imagery, progressive muscle relaxation and cognitive behavior therapy. Ashwin Mehta, M.D., assistant professor of clinical and hospital medicine and Medical Director of the Sylvester Integrative Medicine Service, will provide integrative medicine evaluations and interventions with a team of clinicians trained in mind-body medicine. “It really helps cancer patients. Using an individual approach, we add nutrition, exercise, sleep tips, meditation, and supplements. We get good results,” Dr. Mehta said. The service, in place for about a year, is open to all and Dr. Mehta encourages it for well people to improve their health and prevent disease. The addition of the luncheon lectures will empower the community with information they need, he added. “Don’t confuse integrative medicine with alternative medicine,” Dr. Mehta said. “We are not throwing out medicine. In conjunction with medicine, we provide support for symptoms and a plan for living. We target in ammation, strengthen the immune system. Integrative medicine is the medicine of the future. There is a shift to prevention, an emphasis on using wellness models to address chronic conditions. Anything else is incomplete.” At the lecture series held Jan. 8, Lobdell, 71, who has conquered his gastric disease said, “I think the mind and body wellness aspect of it was an important part of it, and I feel that mind and body wellness is not just for when you’re not feeling well, but it can prevent you from feeling bad . preventive care is very bene cial.” Lobdell’s recovery began after he was directed to Dr. Joseph Rosenblatt, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Hematology/ Oncology, UHealth, who told him, “Ok, we’re going to get a team of doctors and we’re going to make you feel better.” After a few months, Lobdell said, he was better, thanks to Currier, Mehta and the team of UHealth specialists who worked to address his physical and emotional needs, and to what he calls “the keys” to maintaining his good health: a correct diet and exercise regimen, counseling, yoga, meditation, massage and acupuncture. “I have survived tough times and I felt the need to CureContinued from page 1give something back. I donate to a teaching restaurant in Michigan and in Florida I was waiting for something to come along. This seemed like it. The word hasn’t spread yet, but what could be better? A free lunch and information about your health.” A self-made millionaire, Lobdell owns 72 Taco Bells and Pizza Huts headquartered in Traverse City, MI. Living seven months in Florida, Lobdell now runs three miles every other day, exercises and meditates 15 minutes daily, plays golf and has found a new interest, horse racing. “I’m not in it to make money,” he said this week. “My dream would be to have a horse in the Kentucky Derby.” He has hired the leading trainers in the game and names his horses after his grandchildren. One ran this week at Gulfstream. Lobdell doesn’t see the irony in owning fast food restaurants and his gastric complaints. Although he is no longer involved in the daily operations of his food chains, he says Taco Bell does offer lighter fare. His sons also own various restaurant outlets and the industry Lobdell said “more and more is cognizant of providing healthy choices. Like in any restaurant or grocery store, it is a matter of selecting the right options,” he said. “I eat at Taco Bells.” Lobdell has written his memoir, “Climb from the Cellar,” and his wife presented both Currier and Mehta with copies, thanking the physicians “for making Wayne as good as new.” To attend the mind-body wellness lectures, reserve with Edwards at 954-698-3606 or by email at dedwards@med. miami.edu. Seating is limited. Wayne Lobdell and his wife Terry.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, January 25, 2013

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16 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013

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The Pelican 17 Friday, January 25, 2013 before. “It’s more invasive than you can ever imagine. And when it’s over everything is going to be okay,” said Waldo, who has rented out her own home for lm crews in the past. And as The Pelican interviewed Waldo she was keeping a watchful eye on the set decorators, making sure they didn’t damage the house. But while this is the house’s biggest ever role in show business, it isn’t the rst time its been in front of a camera. Waldo said a Kodak commercial was lmed here sometime in the 60s and a bank from the Carolinas lmed a commercial on the porch last April. “We though it was funny that they were shooting a commercial in Florida for a southern exterior,” said Waldo. But Sample-McDougald’s HouseContinued from page 7architecture, very rare in an area that has bulldozed much of its history, attracts those looking for something different. Dan Hobby, executive director of the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society, said the house is uniquely situated for those looking for something special – whether it be for a wedding or a TV show seen nationally by three million viewers each week. “Well, certainly anybody would realize the distinct character and historical nature of the house lends itself to that atmosphere,” said Hobby. And as a private organization, the preservation society is always looking for ways of raising money. Hobby said the contract prohibits him from disclosing the amount of money A&E paid to lm but said the funds would go towards maintenance and preservation. “Every contribution or funds raised helps the house out. But, as with any nonpro t, you can’t rely on one element to fund the organization,” he said. The house is also sustained through private rentals for weddings, lunches, community events and membership fees. As for the question of whether or not Sample-McDougald has ever had any real hauntings, Waldo said she’s never heard of any stories of ghosts or spirits hanging around before. “But after this it may be a more interesting tale,” she said. Lewis Bowen, scenic artist, applies “age wash” to make the house look dirty.

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18 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 And, according to the day’s entertainer Vickie Winans, clapping is best done by black persons. Winans had made her way into the audience, about 500 people on folding chairs in the school gym. It was she who revealed a major difference between white and black people. “You see,” she said, wiping the side of her head with a soggy handkerchief. “Black people clap on the beat.” She claps, gyrates, claps again and so on. “White people clap on the rst beat and by the time they get their hands back, it’s the nineteenth beat.” The audience roars. Winans talks about Jesus. “Give Jesus a hand!” she says. The people in the folding chairs obey with their hands and feet. Some stand. Winans starts singing. The she complains that she feels about a “block away” from the audience. “We came to a party today. I want the young people up close.” Shy at the invitation, the children began to approach the stage. Soon there are more than 100 youngsters at her feet. Phillips urges his own children move up to the stage. The tall black goddess is comfortable in having her way. The children arrive as she sings. Toddlers dance all over the gym oor, laughing and falling—never missing a beat. A BSO of cer moves close to the children and straightens out the vinyl that protects the mighty Tigers basketball court. A trio of young girls hold hands and dance in a circle to the beat. Winans moves in on Mayor Lamar Fisher. She says, “Mr. Mayor, you and I have hair of different texture.” She points a nger to the graying sides of the mayor’s black hair. “But my edges is not like your edges.” She laughs. The audience follows. She returns to “texture. We are the only people who need a steel comb. What kind of a day was God having?” She returns to the mayor. “Most of cials show up at these functions, say what they got to say and go. But you stayed. You gonna get points for that.” Winans says she loves the city. “Ya’ll don’t do things regular. Pompano Beach goes over the top.” It seems Winans can’t go much longer. She’s 60, sweating, complaining of her hot head under the wrong wig while she’s standing in the wrong shoes. There is no racism here. There is just laughter and celebration of one of America’s heroes. But she keeps on long beyond her contracted performance time. Her voice never cracks. She breaks into song as she stomps over the blue vinyl in her four-inch heels. She tells stories of growing up poor, and the audience knows that this woman has risen beyond the pain of poverty with her tales. “All 12 of us were nearsighted, so Mother just goes to the doctor with one of us for a examination and orders 12 pairs of glasses with the same prescription.” Winans has effectively turned this day into a celebration of comedy, song and dance instead of long speeches and somber moments. And she ends it with a line that could very well be her own mantra. “Let your ways please the Lord, and let the chips fall where they may.” MLKContinued from page 13 33rd Annual Festival of ArtsDeer eld Beach – The 33rd Annual Festival of Arts will be held on Saturday, Jan. 26 and Sunday, Jan. 27 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. south of the International Fishing Pier, next to the Main Beach Parking Lot, 149 SE 21 Ave. Visit vwww.deer eld-beach.com or call 954-480-4200.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, January 25, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN WRITERCasa Frida5441 N. Federal Hwy. Fort Lauderdale954-530-3668 “There is Mexican food and then there is food from Mexico,” says Casa Frida owner Victor Bocos who along with his wife Julieta have turned this quaint eatery into a vibrant culinary hotspot. “We make truly authentic recipes following folkloric traditions.” This charmingly decorated restaurant features genuine Mexican artwork adorning every square inch of the place along with innumerable pictures of its famous namesake – Frida Kohla. The iconically unibrowed painter hails from the Bocos’ hometown of Mexico City and her self-portraits fetch in the millions at auctions. Sidle up to the cozy bar area for a refreshing sangria, margarita, cold beer or one of the many fine wines that make up the spectacular oenological offering at Casa Frida. “I have been in the restaurant business my whole life,” says Victor, the former sommelier at celebrity chef Todd English’s Osteria da Campo. “I especially love wine and am very dedicated to providing great wines at the lowest prices. In fact, I have won awards from Wine Spectator magazine for my wine lists. This is why we offer very high-end wines but also very inexpensive, good value wines.” “We like to combine audio, visual and gastronomic experiences all at once,” adds the gregarious restaurateur who puts original documentaries and traditional Mexican concert music on the large flat screen TV. A great starter for cheese aficionados is the classic Queso Fundido. This delightful dish features flamemelted Chihuahua cheese with chorizo or mushroom served in earthenware casseroles. The garlic white wine clams and tangy shrimp ceviche are also noteworthy options. “We are known for having the best guacamole in Broward,” says Victor while pointing to a SunSentinel review that gives the restaurant high praise for its superior ability to make this avocado-based classic. On the entre front, patrons can enjoy grilled steak, chicken and roasted pork in a variety of preparations. From quesadillas to tamales, burritos to sopes (stuffed corn dough boats) and even sizzling fajitas, all roads lead to the same delectable gastronomic destination. Combinations platters allow Fort Lauderdale’s Casa Frida sets the bar for authentic Mexican fare Julieta and Victor Bocos are pleased to welcome guests to Casa Frida – named after the famous Mexican artist Frida The Clams Ahogadas are sauted with roasted Ancho pepper, garlic and white wine. They are served with crispy garlic bread for dipping. See CASA FRIDA on page 28

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20 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 This year, we found a handful of band members resting in the band uniform room. When asked about the signi cance of this day, their answers didn’t vary much. Said David Barrett, “Dr. King paved the way for us to have an education. The least we can do is to take advantage of that”. Laurence Jeanlus doesn’t mind that her name sounds like a boy’s. She came to Pompano Beach from Haiti as a young child. School is a big part of her life. She is a junior, a member of the honor society and plays the clarinet. She says this school is like a second home and “everyone here is like family.” But in response to the day of recognition, Laurence posited some basic tenets of leadership, a quality she and her peers agree is critical to success. “You’ll get [to your goal] if you’re not taking shortcuts, and you will be a leader. Some parents are always over-rewarding their kids without making them responsible. I clean our bathrooms, wash dishes and babysit my younger sister. Chores help me accept responsibility. How can I expect to be a responsible person in a job if I haven’t already learned to be responsible?” Porscha Tigner plays the clarinet. “If I could, I would say thank you to Dr. King. He had the courage to stand up. Today we marched without people throwing stuff at us. My grandmother said people used to look down on her. She couldn’t go out after dark to certain parts of town. She called that a ‘bad combination.’ But today we are president.” All these students will ever know about pre-civilrights days will be through the history books and their elders. Dr. King said he saw the “promised land,” and he knew he might not make it there. These youngsters never saw Dr. King’s mountain. They have their own mountains to climb and new promised lands to sow. Anne Siren, PublisherMLK bandContinued from page 13

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The Pelican 21 Friday, January 25, 2013 2-25 – Retired Educators group meets at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca Raton. Speaker Linda Weil, environmentalist and community activist, will discuss the global approach to thinking and acting. New members welcome. 954-255-6360 or 561-483-5445.Education & Self Development1-25 – Cooking class at 7:30 p.m. at The Heart of the Olive, 816 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Class led by chef Nick Quay, and will include demonstrations on how to use olive oils, balsamic, salts, rubs, dips, spreads and more. Reservation required. Cost is $20, deposit is $10. 754-222-8071.Events & Activities1-26 – Pet Expo from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Citi Centre, corner of Federal Highway and Copans Road in Pompano Beach. Best-dressed pet contest, product samplings, pet training demonstrations, animal CPR instruction and more. Free admission. Vendors wanted. 954-943-4683. 1-26 – Grand Reopening and Model Train Swap Meet from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the historic Amtrak/Tri-Rail Station, 1300 West Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Features three operating model train layouts and museum displays of railroad memorabilia. Vendor tables for model trains and accessories. Free admission. 954-448-8935. 2-14 – Valentine’s Day Dinner and Musicale at 6:30 p.m. at Assumption Catholic Church, 2001 S. Ocean Blvd., Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Dinner buffet, dessert table, raf es, music and dancing. Cost is $25 per person. 954941-7647.Health & Fitness1-26 – Pilates class at 8 a.m. at Ocean Manor Resort, 4040 Galt Ocean Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $10. Class held every Saturday. Yogalates, Sundays, Thursdays and Fridays. 754-779-7519. 1-27 – Medicine and hazardous waste materials take back from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 301 n. Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954-828-8000. 2-10 – Hedglon Chiropractic Center 1313 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach, holds an open house from 1 to 4 p.m. Experts will talk about chiropractic matters. Free computer scan, spinal exams, x-rays [if needed] and food and music. RSVP at 954-9461799. SightingsContinued from page 3 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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22 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Music 1-26 – Legends of DooWop Uncensored at 7 p.m. at Coral Springs Center for the Performing Arts, 2855 Coral Springs Drive. Tickets are $37. 954-344-5999. 1-27 – Romantic Revelry at 4 p.m. at Lynn University’s Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. From the Studio of Roberta Rust; romantic piano music by Chopin, Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, Liszt and others, performed by conservatory students. Rust contributes commentary. Tickets are $10. 561-237-7000. 1-27 – Chanticleer in Concert at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church of Fort Lauderdale, 401 SE 15 Ave. Grammy award-winning a capella ensemble presents original interpretations of vocal literature from Renaissance to Jazz. Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for students. 954-462-6200. 1-26 & 27 – Ars Flores Orchestra presents Mozart, Vivaldi, Gershwin and more at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday at the Miniaci Performing Arts Center, 3100 Ray Ferraro Jr. Blvd., Davie, and on Sunday at 4:30 p.m. at Colony Theatre, 1040 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. 954-262-5303. 1-31 – Violin Master Class with Guillermo Figueroa at 7 p.m. at Lynn University’s Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Guillermo Figueroa is music director of both the New Mexico Symphony and the Music in the Mountains Festival in Colorado as well as principal guest conductor of the Puerto Rico Symphony. Free admission. 561-756-4298 2-2 – Gold Coast Jazz Society free concert from 3 to 4 p.m. at Coral Springs Museum of Art, 2855 Coral Springs Drive. 954-340-5000. 2-3 – Jazz Brunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Esplande Park, 400 SW 2 St, Fort Lauderdale. Jazz artists perform on four stages while brunch is served. Held the rst Sunday of every month. 954-8285363. 2-7 at 7 p.m. Pianist Francesco Attesti performs at Herb Skolnick Community Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $12. 954-786-4590. 2-9 – Sign up to perform at First Congregational Church 2501 NE 30 Street, Fort Lauderdale, at 7:30 p.m. Sign-up at 7 p.m. Cost is $5. 954-328-8878. See SIGHTINGS on page 29SightingsContinued from page 21

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The Pelican 23 Friday, January 25, 2013 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach This city’s Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] has 500 ways for new business owners to make their grand openings grander. Through its incentive program, new business owners can be reimbursed up to $500 for expenses – including food, promotional items or entertainment – related to their grand opening festivities. “It’s an incentive for [business owners] to give something back to the community,” said Shanna Benson, special events and marketing manager for the CRA. Receipts and invoices of expenses must be provided to the CRA. And owners can’t charge their customers for the items and expenses they’re being reimbursed for. “It’s only for something that is given away for free,” said Benson. So far this year, the Beach Grille and Vega Lounge, both in the East CRA, have utilized the program. Benson said the CRA has set aside enough money for 20 grand openings this year. Tom Carrabba, owner of Beach Grille, used the program to offer free samples of his Philly cheese steaks, marinated chicken, Angus burgers, French fries and funnel cakes. “We had a lot of great food. That’s what the CRA brought to the table,” said Carrabba. To qualify, a business must be new and located Checkers Old Munchen owner Mat Moore [left] and Randall Stevens, a Checkers Old Munchen customer. [Photos by Mike d’Oliveira] Shanna Benson, special events and marketing manager for Pompano’s Community Redevelopment Agency, and her husband, Michael Benson.CRA incentives reimburse businesses up to $500 for grand openings within the boundaries of one of the city’s CRA’s. The East CRA encompasses the beach area from Northeast 5 Street to Southeast 2 Street and the area around Atlantic Boulevard from Northeast 2 Street to Southeast 2 Street west to Northeast 18 Avenue. The NW CRA extends east to west from Dixie Highway to Powerline Road and Northwest 31 Ave and north to south from Copans Road to Atlantic Boulevard. Old Downtown Pompano and city hall are also included in the NW CRA. And along with reimbursement for expenses, the CRA also helps business owners promote their openings. Beach Grille’s grand opening was held near the city’s shing pier in conjunction with the city’s monthly Music Under the Stars event on Jan. 11. “The CRA had some creative visions and helped advertise it. I think everyone from town of cials to the people who live in this area really saw what [business in] Pompano Beach could be when done correctly,” said Carrabba. The most recent business to utilize the program is Checkers Old Munchen, which celebrated its re-grand opening on Jan. 17. Last March a re forced owner See CRA on page 28

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24 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Metro Broward Professional Fire ghters Local 3080 and the city. Commissioners Jed Shank and Suzanne Boisvenue dissented. In early December, commissioners resolved a contract impasse between the city and the union when they approved a plan that raised the minimum retirement age from 42 to 52, with 20 years of service. They also set the maximum pension at 70 percent of salary, down from 85 percent. Changes don’t apply to those within seven years of retirement. The agreement was submitted to the union, and while battalion chiefs accepted the contract, the union rank and le did not which means this contract will be imposed on the rank and le through the end of this scal year. The contract will then be re-negotiated for rank and le. The new contract for battalion chiefs will continue for three years.Sallee decides not to seek re-electionOakland Park Mayor Anne Sallee decided not to run for re-election in the March 12 city election. Asked by The Pelican about her decision, she emailed this response: “It was not an easy decision. But if you read the history of American FireContinued from page 3 See SALLEE on page 29

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The Pelican 25 Friday, January 25, 2013 IncentivesContinued from page 1and Wilton Manors commissions delayed making a decision until other options can be weighed. Since 1986, most Broward County cities have been part of an interlocal agreement, or ILA, for solid waste disposal services through the Broward Solid Waste Disposal District. That district is expiring July 2 and will not be renewed. The county has entered into contracts with Wheelabrator, a division of Waste Management, and SunBergeron to provide solid waste disposal services after July 2 and municipalities can procure services from one or both of the contractors. Or they can seek other vendors. In Oakland Park, Wheelabrator offered the city a loyalty incentive of $325,440, for its residential and commercial waste services contract. This incentive is reduced to $162,720 if the city doesn’t execute an agreement by Jan. 31 the offer ends June 30. The loyalty incentive is equal to an estimated $2 a ton for municipal solid waste over a ve-year period, and half that amount after Jan. 31. In Oakland Park, Wheelabrator has bid to dispose of solid waste for $42 per ton. This is the least expensive option available even without the loyalty incentive, according to a report Kenneth Resor, public works director, provided to commissioners. Currently the cost of solid waste disposal is $57 a ton, or $9 million annually. By choosing Wheelabrator by Jan. 31, the city could realize a savings over the next ve years of $531,690. Wheelabrator has provided reliable, although expensive, service to the city over the past 20 years, Resor wrote. The Wheelabrator agreement with the county provides an initial ve-year term, with three ve-year renewal periods. The method of disposal is incineration, and the disposal service would be provided at the “north” incinerator, at 2600 Wiles Road known commonly as “Mount Trashmore.” The facility is owned by Wheelabrator North Broward. The Sun-Bergeron agreement with the county also provides an initial ve-year term, with three ve-year renewal periods. Final disposal of municipal solid waste is provided at eight permitted facilities in Florida, including both incineration and land ll methods. The city’s solid waste would be hauled to a transfer facility at 1750 SW 43 Terrace, Deer eld Beach. Cost for residential and commercial waste would be $45.25 per ton. Cost for residential and commercial waste would be $43.25 per ton. Waste would be hauled to a transfer facility in Davie or to an alternative facility. Staff in Oakland Park had anticipated knowing the results of Fort Lauderdale’s request for solid waste services in determining the best rates but that city has put off opening those bids until Jan. 23 and could exercise its policy of not releasing bid proposals for another 30 days. Oakland Park City Manager John Stunson said he preferred the commission wait to make a decision until Fort Lauderdale receives its proposals. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue has asked for legal opinions from the state attorney general, state’s attorney and the county inspector general on whether the nancial incentives Wheelabrator is offering are legal. Noting the price differences offered -$43.25 per ton from Sun-Bergeron and $42 from Wheelabrator – Commissioner Jed Shank said, “It may come as a shock to you, but it may be worth paying a premium for what you get. It may be worth a three percent premium now with an eye to the future.” “I want to make sure we’re getting the best bang for the buck,” said Vice Mayor John Adornato. “If there’s an ethical issue, I want it cleared up.” Commissioners tabled the matter until February. The vote was 4-0, Commissioner Shari McCartney abstaining. Commissioners in Lauderdale-by-the-Sea and Deer eld Beach also want to evaluate the proposals Fort Lauderdale receives before making its decision on solid waste services. LBTS postponed the issue until a Feb. 12 meeting. Wheelabrator offered the town an incentive payment of $64,310 if they sign by Jan. 31. In Deer eld, the full bonus is $503,370. Hollywood is also seeking bids and Deer eld commissioners say they want that information before making a decision. In LBTS, Choice Environmental is also in the mix, offering contracts from one to ve years. With a ve-year contract, their price is $40 a ton for disposal. Commissioner Mark Brown said he didn’t mind foregoing the Jan. 31 deadline. “Let’s take our time and make the right decision. There are so many options now and more coming. Let’s have staff crunch the numbers and make the best recommendation.” Commissioner Stuart Dodd said he was surprised at the maneuvering going on. “Wheelabrator is trying to bribe us with incentives. Now they’re offering incentives to stay with them after having stuck it to municipalities for 20 years,” Dodd said. He noted that at least six cities have accepted the incentive payments, including Coral Springs at $829,200. In Hillsboro Beach, where Choice has the solid waste collection contract, commissioners took no action at their meeting earlier this month, letting Wheelabrator’s $14,500 bonus lie on the table. A representative of Choice said his company had also been waiting on bids received in Fort Lauderdale and suggested a “third party may come forward.” In Pompano Beach, negotiations commence in 2014.

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26 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 NOW HIRING BREAKFAST COOKS!! Part Or Full Time. All Shifts. Open 7 Days. Apply 2211 Wilton Drive Wilton Manors – Courtyard Caf. 2-1SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days. References Available. 954-482-5494. 1-25 SHOPPING ASSISTANT – Need Help? Shopping, Deliveries, Errands. I’m Your Gal. $12/Hr. Call Mary At 954214-7860. 1-25 HOME HEALTH AIDE – Private Certified. Day Or Nights. Providing Loving & Professional Care. Honest & Reliable. Affordable Rates. References Available. 954-6787754. 2-1 CHURCH FOR RENTCHURCH FOR RENT – Pompano Beach! Well Furnished. Great Sound System Available. Seats 20. MUST RENT! Only $275/ MONTH. Please Call For Availability! 954-588-4985 Or 754-281-0922. 1-25 LOST AND FOUNDCAMERA FOUND ON Pompano Beach Weekend Of January 19th, 2013. To Claim, Please Email abarb@aol.com With Camera In The Subject Line. 1-25 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 2-8 CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 2-8 VISION ELECTRIC INCLicensed/Insured. Electrical Service & Installation. No Job Too Small. #EC13002184 – Call 954-274-4513. 1-25 MARCELA’S CLEANING – Residential Cleaning. Affordable Service You Can Trust! Experienced & GREAT References. 954-376-0524. 2-1 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C SELL YOUR BUSINESS!! Call Russell Cohen 954-646-7651 – www. abiz4sale.comrcohen@ tworld.com Transworld Business Brokers Lic R.E. Broker. 2-1 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 1-25 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 2-8 GARAGE SALESDEERFIELD BEACH MOVING SALE!! Sat / Sun 9am. 1321 SE 2 Street. Household, Appliances, Furniture, Clothes. MUCH MORE!!!!!! Great Bargains. 1-25 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH – Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38’ x 13’. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 1-25 POMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL – Off NE 14 St. Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water & Electric. Up To 33’ $325 Month. 954-7814994. 1-25 MOBILE HOME SALESDEERFIELD BEACH DOUBLE 24x60’ 2/2 – New Siding – Windows – Water Heater – A/C – Flooring – Overroof – Corner Lot – Enclosed Front Porch 10x24’ – New Shower Stalls. $28,900. Call 954-325-1515. 1-25

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The Pelican 27 Friday, January 25, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,200 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 LIGHTHOUSE POINT Spacious 2/2 Furn + Library / Office. Breakfast Bar With Den Off Kitchen. Large Covered Patio – Pool. Many Amenities. 954-8182388. 1-25 ROOMS FOR RENTDEERFIELD – PVT ROOM & BATH In Double Wide Mobile Home. 50+. W/D – Complete Kitchen Use. Heated Pool. $550 Mo. + 1/2 Sec. 954-5888940. 2-1 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE – DEERFIELD. Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny With Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furn. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $56,000. 561-3729837. 2-1 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 2-8 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 2-1CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 / 1 Nicely Furnished Condo. Ready To Move-in. $800 Month. 1950 SE 5th Court. 55+. Call 954943-5531. 1-25 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 2-1 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 2-8 BEACH PADS FOR RENTShort Or Long Term. Luxury furnished/unfurnished studios for your short or long term stay. Daily rates now available (apply to certain units only when available). Longer the stay, better the value. Small pets welcome. Tropical pool, coin laundry, private parking. 1/1 available after March 2 – 1 left!!! Call today to book your private getaway!! All Bills Paid!!! WI-FI, Premium Cable, Water, Electric and more.. Contact Pax-Properties @ 888-729-4948 or 561-541-0308 – Photos @ www.beachpads. net 2-8 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 2-1 POMPANO – ATLANTIC / ICW Area. Duplex 1/1 – Yard. Utilities Paid Including Electric. Lease $900 Month/1 Month FREE! 954-415-8838. 1-25 BEACHY-KEEN! 2 Bedroom 2 Bath1 Block From The Sand In NE Pompano. Annual Lease $1,275 Month. 954-6148428. 2-1 LIGHTHOUSE POINT – MARINA AREA. Very Attractive Large 2/2. Rent Dock At Marina & Walk Home. $1,700 Month Unfurnished. Agent 954-614-8428. 2-1 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – NW – NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $725 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 1-25 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent in a Psychologists Of ce For A Solo Professional. $950 / Month. In The Gateway Centre – 2040 East Sample Rd Lighthouse Point. Windowed, Unfurnished Of ce 14’ by 12.5’. 954-942-3344. 2-8 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 2-8 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 1-25

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28 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 guests to mix and match these various specialties. “My wife just loves this place. That’s why we are here today for her birthday,” says Coral Ridge resident David Wald who had brought the whole family along for the celebration. Casa Frida’s signature dish is Cochinita Pibil. It is based on an ancient Mayan recipe featuring oven roasted shredded suckling pig that has been banana leaf wrapped and marinated overnight in a flavorful mixture achiote pepper, garlic, coriander seeds, cloves and annatto paste. Other favorites include the whole fried tilapia with garlic sauce, Chile Rellenos (lightly battered and fried cheese stuffed Poblano peppers with tomato and white wine sauce), the fish Veracruz and the breaded pork loin steak with fried plantains. “Our moles (pronounced molez) are excellent. They are in fact the symbol of true Mexican cuisine,” asserts Victor of this emblematic, rich and often chocolate-based sauce. “We use 14 different ingredients such as walnuts, pecans, almonds, sesame seeds, cinnamon, plums, raisins, plantains, several varieties of peppers and, of course, chocolate.” “Personally, the green mole is my favorite. We make it from scratch with roasted pumpkin, tomatillo, sesame seeds, cilantro, parsley, lettuce and spinach. It has a nice herbal taste with a silky, velvety finish. We serve it over jumbo tiger prawns.” This friendly eatery is clearly dedicated to providing high-quality fare at affordable prices, especially considering that most of the ingredients are imported directly from Mexico. In fact, the authenticity is so undeniable that Casa Frida has been recognized by the Mexican Consulate in Miami for the excellence of its cuisine. The lunch menu starts at $7.50 and the dinner offerings begin at $12. Happy hour is from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday to Friday. There is ample free parking and major credit cards are accepted. For dessert, give the churros, flan or three milk cake a try. Enjoy! Casa FridaContinued from page 19 The breaded pork loin steak with sweet fried plantains, rice and refried beans is a customer favorite.Mat Moore to close his doors for months and make repairs. Although Checkers Old Munchen isn’t new, Benson said the CRA made an exception because of the re. “It was a big deal to have them back. They’re a long time favorite here in Pompano so we wanted to just extend it to them as well.” To celebrate his return, Moore gave out free beer samples and appetizers along with Checkers’ usual fare, including bratwurst, knockwurst, potato pancakes and liverwurst. “It was a great turnout. We’re happy to be back.” For more information on the incentive program, call Shanna Benson at 954-7867824.CRAContinued from page 23

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The Pelican 29 Friday, January 25, 2013 Government, our founding fathers did not intend for any citizen to make a career of public service, rather for each person to find his time and place to volunteer and then return to the citizenry. Serving as an elected official was never a goal of mine, it was my contribution to my SalleeContinued from page 24community. “I have been honored to serve the people of Oakland Park for the past four years. I am excited to report that I have a new granddaughter in Boston and children getting married in distant locations (we’ve had three weddings in three years and another to come in October.) With all that going on, I cannot commit to live in Oakland Park for four more years. While I have no plans to leave, I cannot guarantee that I will stay either. I would not run knowing that I might leave early and cause the expense of a special election. I have given four years to Oakland Park and am ready to return to life as an active resident. “Oakland Park is at an exciting place right now with the Culinary Destination plans, and I still have work to do between now and March. I will be able to focus on the work at hand without the distraction of a campaign. Good people have registered to run in Oakland Park, and I wish them luck.” 2-10 – Les Mack Trio performs from 3 to 4 p.m. at SightingsContinued from page 22Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd., Boca Raton. Performances include Dixieland music from New Orleans to Chicago. Free admission. 561-299-8684. 2-17 – Passionate Piano Featruing Pianist Catherine Lan at 4 p.m. at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $20 for members and $25 for non-members. 561-998-7784.

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30 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Send your fishing news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point – This winter season has been tough for shing days. Lots of wind and weather have made it dif cult to get any shing time in offshore. But, put in a full day and you should be pleased with your catch this weekend. The boat Flight Plan out of Hillsboro Beach shed on Wednesday for two hours and released seven sail sh, a black n tuna and a big king sh. Capt. Casey Hunt was shing in 150 ft. of water right outside Hillsboro Inlet and said the water was beautiful and the sh were biting. The sword sh bite was The shing has been tough, but great catches are still thereslow early in the week, which was mostly due to lack of current. But I believe as we get closer to the full moon we will see the shing pick up. I shed for swords yesterday, all day, so call us when you get this paper and we will have an up to date report for you. Also, don’t be afraid to go after the grey tile sh. They have been biting in 375 ft. off of the steeple in Fort Lauderdale. Call us if you need any assistance. Get tight! Deer eld Beach Last Saturday was a wet and cold day for a shing tournament but boats signed up for the 3rd Annual Two Georges Bill sh Tournament and went out into the Atlantic anyway. The event is a continuation of the tournament that was started by the restaurant’s previous owners when Two Georges was known as The Cove Marina & Restaurant. And all anglers who braved the rain and rough seas did it for a good cause: raising money for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Broward County.Wet weather hits Two Georges shing tourneyThe crew of Rebound John Henry, Captain Stan Hunt, Chris Lemieux and Tom Bardes, with a 29.7-pound king sh. James Gamper and Derrick Milo from the Poseidon Too with the 29.7-pound wahoo. Two Georges owner Steve Skaggs and tournament organizer Denise Buzzelli.

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The Pelican 31 Friday, January 25, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! entertainer Vickie Winans, clapping is best done by black persons. Winans had made her way into the audience, about 500 people on folding chairs in the school gym. It was she who revealed a major difference between white and black people. “You see,” she said, wiping the side of her head with a soggy handkerchief. “Black people clap on the beat.” She claps, gyrates, claps again and so on. “White people clap on the rst beat and by the time they get their hands back, it’s the nineteenth beat.” The audience roars. Winans talks about Jesus. “Give Jesus a hand!” she says. The people in the folding chairs obey with their hands and feet. Some stand. Winans starts singing. The she complains that she feels about a “block away” from the audience. “We came to a party today. I want the young people up close.” Phillips’ children move up to the stage. The tall black goddess is comfortable in having her way. The children arrive as she sings. Toddlers dance all over the gym oor, laughing and falling—never missing a beat. A BSO of cer moves close to the children and straightens out the vinyl that protects the mighty Tigers basketball court. A trio of young girls hold hands and dance in a circle to the beat. Winans moves in on Mayor Lamar Fisher. She says, “Mr. Mayor, you and I have hair of different texture.” She points a nger to the graying sides of the mayor’s black hair. “But my edges is not like your edges.” She laughs. The audience follows. She returns to “texture. We are the only people who need a steel comb. What kind of a day was God having?” She returns to the mayor. “Most of cials show up at these functions, say what they got to say and go. But you stayed. You gonna get points for that.” Winens says she loves the city. “Ya’ll don’t do things regular. Pompano Beach goes over the top.” It seems Winans can’t go much longer. She’s 60, sweating, complaining of her hot head under the wrong wig while she’s standing in the wrong shoes. There is no racism here. There is just laughter and celebration of one of America’s heroes. But she keeps on long beyond her contracted performance time. Her voice never cracks. She breaks into song as she stomps over the blue vinyl in her four-inch heels. She tells stories of growing up poor, and the audience knows that this woman has risen beyond the pain of poverty with her tales. “All 12 of us were nearsighted, so Mother just goes to the doctor with one of us for a examination and orders 12 pairs of glasses with the same prescription.” She has effectively turned this day into a celebration of comedy, song and dance instead of long speeches and somber moments. And she ends it with a line that could very well be her own mantra. “Let your ways please the Lord, and let the chips fall where they may.” MLKContinued from page 20

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32 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013



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Friday, January 25, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 4 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Cities not rushing to take Wheelabrators incentive moneyOP latest to defer decision By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park Although signi cant nancial incentives are being offered by Wheelabrator for waste disposal contracts signed by Jan. 31, many cities are taking a waitandsee attitude. At recent meetings, Oakland Park, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Deer eld Beach, Hillsboro Beach See INCENTIVES on page 25By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Hillsboro Beach restaurant tycoon Wayne Lobdell discovered that the cure for his medical condition combined traditional medicine with some new approaches. He was so grateful that he gave the UHealth Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center $500,000 to develop a series of lectures and workshops focusing on mind-body wellness. The rst in the series was held this month at UHealths Deer eld Beach location in Newport Center. It dealt with rheumatology, psoriatic arthritis Cured using alternative therapies, restaurant mogul endows wellness program at UHealth Sylvesterand osteoarthritis. Along with the latest medical information presented by Dr. Christine Savage, attendees learned about nutrition, exercise and lifestyle changes that can positively affect their disease. They also got a free lunch, in this case samples from a cooking demonstration. Our integrative health team is meant to complement our medical team, said Diana Edwards, who is coordinating the lecture series endowed by Lobdell who also gave another $100,000 to Sylvester for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma research. The lectures will be given the second and fourth Tuesday of each month beginning at noon. In February, on the 12th and the 26th, the topic will be the latest advances in treating cardio-vascular disease. Although, UHealth Sylvester is a cancer treatment center, the Lobdell MindBody Wellness Program will cover a broader range of topics, all kinds of chronic diseases and conditions, Edwards said. Knowledge is power. You have to be your own best advocate so that if, God forbid, something happens in the future you will be informed , Edwards said. Holistic approaches can optimize the medical outcomes.See CURE on page 14 WHAT HAPPENED TO THE HOUSE? Shutters askew, untrained vines, weeds and neglect cover the once pristine Sample-McDougald House on Northeast 10 Street, the citys museum. To nd the answer to this mystery, see page 7. [Photo by Michael dOliveira] City manager to pick Cooper City BSO chief as Pompanos next top copBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Broward Sheriffs Of ce [BSO Captain John Hale began his police career as a patrol of cer in this city in 1987 and will return soon as its chief. Beach said Hale has an excellent track record and credentials and his appointment could come as early as today. At this point in time my intentions are to select him as the next chief of police, said Beach. Commissioners met with Hale, chief of Cooper City since 2004, on Wednesday and a the ones The See HALE on page 12

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2 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Art 1-27 Riverwalk Sunday Arts from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Esplande Park, 400 SW 2 St., Fort Lauderdale. Held the fourth Sunday of the month and features local artists, performers, photographers and others as they perform and sell their wares and sell to the public. 954-468-1541. 2-6National League of American Pen Women hosts a juried exhibit from Feb. 6 to March 6 at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Participants include area women artists. Call 954-812-1860.Auctions, etc.1-26 Super Rummage, Plant and Bake Sale from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Hosted by the Garden Club of LBTS. 583-356-2090. 1-26 & 27 Nautical Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St. Admission is $5 per person. Children 12 and under are free. Visit www. nautical eamarket.com. 1-26 Free tree giveaway from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954630-4511. 2-2 Aunt Marys Attic Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church, 2700 NE 36 St., Lighthouse Point. Household items, furniture, clothes, jewelry, books and more will be on sale. Refreshments will also be served. 954-943-9154. 2-2 & 3 City-Wide Market from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. More than 200 vendors with a wide range of items, including: vintage and retro goods, collectibles, novelties, mint condition second-hand items, locally made products, edibles and more. Free admission. 954-785-7475.Auditions2-9 Casting call for Youre a Good Man. Charlie Brown at Sol Theatre, 333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Appointments only. Auditions also held Feb. 10 and 11. 561-447-8829.Books & Lectures1-30 Joan Caras will discuss her books, The Holocaust Survivor Cookbook and Miracles & Meal, Jan. 30 at 7 p.m. at 4431 NE 27 Ave., Lighthouse Point. The books contain collections of recipes and stories of Holocaust survivors from throughout the world. Suggested donation is $10 per person. 917-9727185. 2-9 Book sale from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Imperial Point Library, 5989 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Books, DVDs, CDs, audio books and comic books for sale. 954-492-1881. 2-21 Local author Deborah Sharp will speak at 11:30 a.m. at Delray Beach Golf Club, 2200 Highland Ave. Famous for her hysterical Mace Mystery novels, Sharp will share how she takes her protagonist Mama on book tours. Cost is $25. Lunch included. 561865-9756.See SIGHTINGS on page 3Pompano Beach New Presbyterian Church will hold its Patriotic Spectacular Concert on Sunday, Feb. 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Pompano Beach High School, 600 NE 13 Ave. The concert will honor veterans, current members of the military, police and re personnel. A family who lost their son in Afghanistan will also be honored. Performers include the Spirit of Liberty Fife & Drum, Hundred Voice Choir, Kings Brass Band, Soloist Phil Alongi, New Young Patriots and Childrens Youth Choir. Visit www.newpres.org or call 954-275-9335.

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The Pelican 3 Friday, January 25, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park On their second attempt, city commissioners recently approved a poll worker agreement with the Broward County Supervisor of Elections for the March 12 municipal election. Commissioner Shari McCartney, who had earlier asked that the city try for a better agreement, noted that the number of poll workers McCartney gets better deal with poll workers in March, re contract rati edwas reduced by half after the city sent a request to do so. The number of workers has been reduced from 126 to 63. Imagine what we could do if we really negotiated this, McCartney said. Imagine what we could do if we really knew the costs of the election. McCartney said she is aware that the supervisor of elections has the authority to run the elections, but she challenges the costs. She has asked for an audit and said she will bring the issue back again. Commissioner Jed Shank commended McCartney for pushing the issue. The vote on the poll worker agreement was 4-1, McCartney dissenting. Fire ghter contract rati edOakland Park In a 3-2 vote, commissioners rati ed an agreement between the SightingsContinued from page 2Business1-26 & 27 Southeast Florida Chamber Expo Home Show from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Local businesses showcase their products and services for the home. 561-245-8985. 2-7 Breakfast N Deer eld from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce Banquet Room, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. 954427-1050. Children & Family2-2 Unity in the Community from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. Free food, entertainment and activities. 954-586-1123.Clubs, etc.2-13 Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets at 10 a.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 Ave., Pompano Beach. Group meets every second Wednesday of the month except April and December. 954-786-3902. See SIGHTINGS on page 21 See FIRE on page 24

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4 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 By Mike dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors The frustrating and sometimes comical story of the Yawt Property may nally see its last chapter written soon. On Tuesday, commissioners voted to reduce the amount in liens owed on the Yawt Property, located on Northeast 24 Street, from $1.227 million to $441,000. Vice Mayor Julie Carson was the only no vote. I would have liked $600,000, she said. Members of the Peter Yawt Trust, which owns the property, want to sell the sixacre lot to Pinnacle Housing Group. The Miami-based developer plans to build a $32 million apartment complex with 155 units, a dog park, clubhouse and pool, which could be nished by the end Wilton Manors Yawt Property called a Carl Hiaasen novelof 2014. Funds from the sale will be used to pay the liens. Commissioner Ted Galatis said if the city demanded too much money the owners might walk away from the deal and leave the city still dealing with a blighted area. The lien amount stems from years of code violations, interest accruing on the violations, legal fees incurred by the city and unpaid utility liens. Galatis said the city has been dealing with problems on the property, previously known as the Middle River Trailer Park, since at least 2002. Carson and Galatis expressed a negative view of the fees and expenses incurred by those representing the Yawts owners. Mayor Gary Resnick and Commissioner Scott Newton said it wasnt in the interest of the city to worry about how much the lawyers make. Carson asked if the representatives of the Yawt Trust were planning to reduce their fees along with asking the city to reduce its costs. William Webb, a certi ed public accountant and the only representative to respond, said he had been working for free on the issue and hasnt tallied up any of his fees yet. Im curious if were all team players or if the city is the only one thats going to take a hit, said Carson. Galatis supports the planned project but expressed anger that the same people who stalled the development of the site would make money when it was sold. Webb blamed the citys headache on Hurricane Wilma and on Mary and Nancy Yawt, members of the trust. Mayor Gary Resnick called blaming Wilma disingenuous because the problems began before the storm hit in 2005. Webb said Mary Yawt refused to sign-off on a $10 million deal to develop the six-acre property years ago and Nancy Yawt delayed legal proceedings going as far as to jump through windows and lie about her identity to avoid being served court documents by process servers. This is a Carl Hiaasen novel, joked Resnick. Yawt representatives asked commissioners to reduce the amount to $110,000. Commissioner Scott Newton made a motion to reduce it to 25 percent, $387,000. This has been an eyesore preventing development for years. Im sorry but Im not going to support that, said Resnick. The residents of this city deserve more than 25 percent.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, January 25, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach It was a short lived crime. Four of Dist. 3 candidate Caryl Berners signs were stolen this week from the Pines Golf Course on Century Boulevard. Within a day, however, maintenance workers at the golf course found the signs discarded in a dumpster. At press time, Berner was making arrangements to Stolen signs another issue for candidate without fundsput the 18-inch by 24-inch advertisements up again. Berner, who claimed she was destitute when ling her qualifying papers to run in the March election, said I am on a limited budget. I really dont have the money. Losing the signs was a hardship on me. Election laws here allow a candidate to avoid fees by claiming a hardship. The city also does not accept signatures in lieu of the $100 ling fee, and the $279 commission qualifying fee. Berner is the only one of ve candidates in the municipal election to le without paying the fees. If she has money left in her campaign account after the election, she must pay up. I believe people should be able to run without money. Of course it is easier to get your message and yourself known if you have a large campaign account, Berner said. Berner reported the stolen signs to BSO but the case is likely closed. Berner said she had permission from the owners of the golf course to erect her campaign material on private property. People who steal signs are despicable, she said. Someone is making an effort to serve their community and another is agrantly thwarting that effort. NOT HER FIRST SIGN ISSUE Two years ago, Berner successfully convinced city of cials to ban smoking on the beaches, a happier signage issue.

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6 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XXI, Issue 4 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & LettersPompano Beach Children enrolled in an after-school program at the Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library got a special treat recently when representatives of Florida Grand Opera paid a visit. Jean Sensale, Florida Grand Operas teaching artist, explained how opera tells a story, but the actors are singing. She stressed how being able to read is key to everything else, whether the music is opera, rap or rock. She led the children in coordination exercises, stressed the importance of speaking clearly and taught them about rhythm. They practiced making music with sticks and maracas. Soprano Amy Alvarado wowed the young audience by singing Go the Distance from Hercules and an aria from Carmen. Aim of the visit was to expose the youngsters to opera at an early age. [Staff photo by Judy Vik] Passing on the majesty of opera Holy Cross celebrates Heart MonthFort Lauderdale To highlight the importance of a healthy heart, Holy Cross Hospital, 4725 N. Federal Hwy., will host a series of educational events dealing with heart issues. The programs are free and open to the public. Call 954-351-7804 to RSVP for each event. Wednesday, Feb. 6 Dinner with the Doctor discussing Medical Fact vs. Fiction: Where do you get your medical information? at 4 p.m. with cardiologist Charles Russo, M.D. at Holy Cross Hospital in the Sister Innocent Conference Center. Thursday, Feb. 7 Time Out for Women with the program The Way to a Womans Healthy Heart at 6 p.m. with cardiologist Vicente Font, M.D. at the Dorothy Mangurian Comprehensive Womens Center, 1000 NE 56 St., Fort Lauderdale. RSVP for this program is at 954-351-7804. Wednesday, Feb. 13 Mind, Body & Medicine with the program Calm the Anxious Mind: Its Good for Your Heart from 4 to 5 p.m. at Holy Cross Hospital in the Sister Innocent Conference Center. Wednesday, Feb. 20 The Cardiac Hour with the program How to Prevent a Heart Attack or Stroke at 6 p.m. with cardiologists Alan Rosenbaum, M.D. and Ricky Schneider, M.D. at Marriott Heron Bay, 11775 Heron Bay Blvd., Coral Springs. Wednesday, Feb. 27 Its a Guy Thing! with the program Pedal to the Metal: Dont Let Your Heart Slow You Down at 6 p.m. with Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiologist Daniel Weitz, M.D. at Xtreme Indoor Karting, 5300 N. Powerline Road, Fort Lauderdale.Adopt a sea turtle nestBroward The National Save The Sea Turtle Foundation is looking for donors to adopt a sea turtle nest for the upcoming sea turtle season, March through October. The cost to adopt is $40 per nest and those who donate will get a picture of the nest, their name on the nest and information on how many hatchlings came from the nest. Visit www.savetheseaturtle.org or call 954-3519333.Nautical Flea MarketPompano Beach The Nautical Flea Market will be held Saturday, Jan. 26 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Community Park, 820 NE 18 Ave. Fishing tackle, dock boxes, boat shoes, nautical art and jewelry, motors, dinghys, scuba gear, antique goods, boats on trailers and more will be on sale. Admission is $5 per person and children 12 and under are free. Visit www.nautical eamarket.com or call 954-786-4111. Election Connection Pompano Beach Voters can check their voter status, get educated on how to use voting machines and update their registration information on Friday, Feb. 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Voter registration forms will also be available to ll out. An Election Connection event will also be held Wednesday, Feb. 6 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Oakland Park City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. Call 954-357-7050 or visit www.browardsoe.org.A new year and a new beginning at the Broward Sheriffs Of ceSheriff Scott IsraelBROWARD SHERIFFS OFFICEEach year when we celebrate the New Year, it brings the opportunity for change. In a vote of con dence by the citizens of Broward County, I have been humbled and privileged to have been elected to serve as the Sheriff of Broward County. Throughout my professional career, I have been faced with many tasks and challenges. Through every situation, I rose to meet those challenges and I am committed to doing the same as your Sheriff. When we consider the responsibilities of the Broward Sheriffs Of ce, the nations largest fully accredited agency, its important to remember its mission to protect and serve the public. Our goals going forward will be to establish a cohesive, productive and diverse working environment within the Agency and to build strong, long-term partnerships with the community. We will focus on crime prevention; crime control and enforcement; re safety and awareness; and maintain the highest standards for employee education, training and professionalism. The members of my Command Staff will lead by example, upholding the State and Federal laws and be open, honest and scally responsible to the community we serve. To the men and women of the Broward Sheriffs Of ce, I respect and appreciate you and look forward to working with you. Your hard work, dedication and professionalism sets this agency apart as a shining example in our community. We will work together, in support of one another and for the bene t of the nearly two million people we serve in Broward County. On behalf of the men and women of the Broward Sheriffs Of ce, I wish you and your family a very Happy and Safe New Year! I look forward to serving you as the Sheriff of Broward County and together building a safer community.Ask the Broward Property AppraiserLauderdale-By-The-Sea The Broward Property Appraiser will host an educational seminar on Thursday, Jan. 31 at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Drive. Call 954-784-9495. Questions that will be answered are: What is portability? What tax exemptions am I eligible for? What is the valuation process?

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The Pelican 7 Friday, January 25, 2013 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When Patricia Peabody showed up at the Sample-McDougald House Tuesday to give tours she thought the historic house had suffered some kind of calamity. I thought something horrible has happened to our house, she said. Turns out, it was just a little bit of TV magic. The overgrowth of vines and grime on the walls and columns, known in the industry as age wash, were the work of the set decoration team for The Glades, a ctional crime drama on A&E that takes place primarily in Sample-McDougald House makes it to the small screen Broward County. I didnt know any of this was going on. But Im glad I came. This is just wonderful, said Peabody, who volunteers as a docent at Sample-McDougald. The Glades, which premiered in 2010, has lmed in various locations throughout Broward including Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood and Hallandale. With three seasons under its belt, the temporary transformation of Sample-McDougald is in preparation for the upcoming season four premier. In the episode, detectives go into the house looking for an elderly woman but nd her ghost instead. Filming took place Thursday night and ended early Friday morning. Were making it look like more of a haunted house, said Set Designer Gabby Villarreal on Tuesday. Were just trying to make it look like its an overgrown plantation. Like it hasnt been touched in years. And Sample-McDougalds early 20th Century architecture lends itself to the type of work Villarreal does. It makes things easier because it has lot of character and interesting features literally built into it. Its always interesting going into a period house. The architecture of the house really helps guide my world, said Villarreal. In addition to the rundown look the crew gave the outside, the inside was also made to look decrepit with cobwebs and a paint that made the walls look old and worn-out. And were putting in a little taxidermy to make it look creepy, said Villarreal. The crew also brought in their own furniture and even made some temporary landscaping additions, including a few dead trees. But fans of the historic home, built in 1916 by Albert Neal Sample on Dixie Highway and moved to its current location at 450 NE 10 St. in 2001, need not worry about what happens now that lming is over. Lee Waldo, director of operations for SampleMcDougald, said everything will be restored just as it was Christopher Belcarries, the greens department, puts up some vines to give Sample-McDougald an overgrown look.See HOUSE page 17

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8 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 BriefsBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFAs a former smoker who chokes on smoke, this Pelican writer was not eager to write a story about a tobacco business. But sitting down with one of the owners of Tobacco Row at 334 McNab Rd. in Pompano Beach changed my attitude. This interview took place before the store opened. At the suggestion of Angela Lowe, one of the owners, it took place just outside the door where the air was fresh. Lowes sensitivity to anti-Tobacco, smoking accessories and self defense supplies are abundant at Tobacco Row in Pompano BeachKathy Libonati-Dressel (L) and Angela Lowe are sisters and owners of Tobacco Row in Pompano Beach. The store sells tobacco, smoking accessories, cigars, pipes, Hookahs and Self Defense Supplies. smoke folks and her amazing knowledge of her subject was engaging and quickly brought about an attitude adjustment. Were a family owned and operated business, she said rmly. My sister and partner, Kathy LibonatiDressel lives in New Jersey, but she visits often and communicates with me daily to stay tuned to whats happening here. My husband and other family siblings help out, but Kathy and I are the owners. We opened last June and combined it with self defense supplies which my husband and I have been selling for the past seven years at the Swap Shop. Theres a back story. Angela says, Kathy is also my angel. I have a lot of health problems. I was just sort of hanging around, depressed by all the doctors, the tests and my health. I had given up on an active life. Since opening this store everything has changed. I feel useful, happy, much healthier, productive and my goal is to repay Kathy for making me an active participant in the business world. She continues, I love my store and my customers. Were all on a rst name basis. I know their life stories. Weve built a good customer base, and they are as loyal to us as we are to them. The store stocks four types of tobacco in addition to tubes and machines. Angela says, We sell machines in different price ranges. Theres a hand roller at $10 and a top of the line is a $75 electric machine. Our best sellers are Powermatic 1 and 2. No. 1 is manual and No. 2 is electric. They are our best sellers because they make the process simple. Cigars are available from 69 cents to their most popular $9 hand-rolled Romeo and Julieta. Pipe smokers seem to be declining, but the shop still stocks pipes from $10 to $20. Hookah, glass containers lled with avored tobacca, or shisha, are also available. The user smokes tobacco through a hose. Angela explains that it is often used by smokers who want both avor and tobacco. She shows just one of many avors available-a 100gram can of white grape and blueberry shisha which sells for $10. Hookahs range from $15 to $52 and, according to this owner, there are a lot of hookah smokers who mainly smoke in their homes. Denise has been a customer from day one. I love Angela, she says. Shes like a step-mom to me. Shes dependable, reliable and responsible. I buy tobacco, and I bought a roll-your-own manual machine. I save a huge amount over the price of commercial cigarettes. I visit Tobacco Row about twice a week, and after I get what I need, I stay to visit with Angela. Another customer, Nunzio, says, Angela is not only a sweet lady, but she also treats her customers with respect. Until I get smart enough to quit, buying my own tobacco, tubes and manual roll-yourSee TOBACCO ROW on page 9Pompano Beach Ric Green president of the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, left, cuts the ribbon during the grand opening of Heart of the Olive, 816 N. Federal Hwy., on Jan. 16. Heart of the Olive offers an assortment of olive oils, furniture from Indonesia, handmade pottery and baskets, jarred food, coffee, tea, spices, rubs, salt, picture frames made from materials salvaged after Hurricane Katrina, books, paintings and salad bowls from Africa. Heart of the Olive will host a romantic food and wine tasting on Feb. 6 from 5 to 8 p.m. A $10 donation is requested. Call 754-222-8071. Also pictured are owner Frank Roth and his father, Jack. [Photo courtesy of Andrea Freygang]Heart of The Olive cuts ribbon for store, wine tasting set for Feb. 6 Copyright law and the artistWilton Manors The Central Area Neighborhood Association of Wilton Manors will host a seminar, Copyright Law & The Artist, on Friday, Feb. 1 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Court. Robert E. Pershes, Esq., a patent, trademark and copyright attorney, will present the lecture. Call 954661-4740.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, January 25, 2013 own machine is a good thing to do. Its convenient and I save at least 60 percent since I switched from commercial cigarettes. Now I spend $30 on the equivalent amount of cigarettes that used to cost me $70 a carton. Although smoking has a bad reputation, it has not affected the two owners of this shop. Business is good. They both smoke despite Angelas Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease [COPD] Asked why she continues when it is wrecking her health, she says, Its too hard to quit. I hate that I smoke, but at least when I make my own cigarettes I know they are lled with only natural tobacco and not the harmful chemicals found in commercial cigarettes. Tobacco Row sells loose all natural tobacco to men and women who roll their own which is a big money saver for smokers.Self Defense SuppliesAngela stresses, We dont promote violence; we promote safety. Everything we sell is legal and we make sure our customers know how to use these items only to defend themselves. Some of our customers are knife collectors or hunting enthusiasts. No rearms are sold here. I will never use a gun. To me, guns are to kill and I will never put myself in that position. I fully believe you can defend yourself in better ways without killing. The store stocks Stun guns, Numchucks, and Pepper Spray. The Spring Assist is a pocket knife with a thousand uses like opening boxes, cleaning sh etc. On the counter of this well run business by this well informed woman is a stack of a print outs of the Florida Dangerous Weapon Laws for every customer to take home and read. Angela translates it in simple terms. If you are going to carry a concealed weapon (including knives) you must have a concealed weapons permit. If you do not have that permit, your weapon must show. For further information, call 954-781-3413. Open Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sat. 11 to 6. Delivery available locally. Tobacco RowContinued from page 10

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10 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Pelican met with three dedicated members of the Society of St. Vincent DePaul at its thrift store at 2323 N. Dixie Hwy. in Pompano Beach. Unlike many similar stores, this thrift shop is spotless and amazingly well organized with clothing hung neatly in racks, grouped by sizes and often even by color and type. Shoppers will nd beautiful furniture, clothing for men, women and children, books, art work, televisions, drapes, linens, pillows, dishes all attractively displayed.Estee MartinVolunteer Estee Martin, a young vibrant woman, says, Our store manager, Sam Battaglia is responsible for this attractive thrift store featuring some wonderful donations. I volunteer here, working with Sam, whenever I can. I work full time at R.S. Financial, a nance company in Boca Raton so my volunteer hours in the shop vary, but Im emotionally very much involved. When Im here, I organize donations, clean the store, stage the area and furniture, help with pricing, sales, scheduling donation pick ups and more. I was recently added to the committee which helps Sam with store operations. Some donations are very upscale and can bring much more cash to the cause by marketing them elsewhere. Martin has just began to list these rare but valuable donations on Craigs list and she intends to learn how to do the same on E-Bay. I want to maximize the amount of money I can help generate for the society, she explains. We just received an entire collection of baseball cards spanning 50 years. There could be great value included in this collection, but we need to research the cards to nd out their worth. This could be a major donation to the Society. Martin is a single parent of two recent college graduates. Her daughter and son live in Massachusetts, so she says, I have a lot of free time and I choose to give much of my free time to this great society. Ive met incredible ladies in this group who have become my new family.Mike MoriartyMike Moriarty, is a volunteer co-chair with Beth Society of St. Vincent De Paul is helping the poor around the world; Broward County included Klemens, for the annual Friends of the Poor 5K Walk/ Run coming soon on March 9. He says, This is one of our most important fund raisers of the year, and Im sure the donations we receive are a major contribution to the Friends of the Poor which is a national effort of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. St. Gabriel Conference hosts this walk when the snowbirds are here in order to have the most participation. The Walk begins at 8 a.m. with registration at 7 a.m. The event will be held at St. Gabriel Catholic Church, 731 North Ocean Blvd. in Pompano Beach at A1A and NE 7 St. The primary Three dedicated volunteers in the Society of St. Vincent de Paul were gathered at the Thrift Store for a recent interview. L to R are Mike Moriarty, Joyce Murray and Estee Martin.See ST. VINCENT on page 11 Briefs Les Mack TrioBoca Raton The Les Mack Trio performs from 3 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 10 at the Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd., Boca Raton. Whether its the music of the duo Special Edition, the Trio or Quartet, or the foot-tapping riverboat, Les Mack music covers standards, big band, Latin, nineties, show tunes and Dixieland music from the style of New Orleans to Chicago. Free admission. Call 561-299-8684.Free waste and prescription disposalFort Lauderdale A free drop-off event for household hazardous waste, used electronics and old medications will take place on Sunday, Jan. 27, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., at 301 N. Andrews Ave. Accepted items include prescription medicine, leftover paint, pesticides, electronics and rechargeable batteries. Items not accepted are stereos, microwaves, kitchen appliances, explosives, biohazardous waste and business-generated waste. Proof of Broward County residency such as a drivers license or current utility bill is required. Call 954-474-1837.Scavengers take the streets in Wilton ManorsWilton Manors The Wilton Manors Scavenger Hunt takes place Saturday, Jan. 26 from 1 to 3 p.m. starting at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. The event will consist of teams of three to four people each running around Wilton Manors looking for clues. Cost is $10 for one ticket or two tickets for $15. Children 12 and under are free if they are with an adult. Winners will be chosen based on correct answers. Visit www.scavengerhunt. developwm.org or call Adrienne Foland at 954-2056594.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, January 25, 2013 objective of the Walk is to bring awareness of and show solidarity with the poor here in Broward County. There is no fee to walk or run in this event. Donations are encouraged but are strictly voluntary. Moriarty says, Last year we had over 165 walkers and runners and we are hoping for even more this year. For further information call 954621-6027.Joyce MurrayJoyce Murray is a member of St. Gabriel Conference where Mary Ann Carlson is the current president. Murray was available to tell us about this world famous Society. The Society of Vincent St. Paul was founded in France in 1833 for the sole purpose of helping the poor. A group of college men recognized the need to help the poor and that continues to motivate this worthy group world-wide. At the last count on record, there were 760,000 volunteers around the world. The international base is in Paris, France. The United States base is in St. Louis, Missouri. Murray explains, The grass roots are the local conferences. Pompano Beach is part of the North Broward District Council. Our local conference includes St. Elizabeth of Hungary and St. Gabriel. A report to the Parishioners of St. Gabriel prepared by President Carlson indicates that the conference income comes from member donations, poorbox donations, fund raising, twinning and other income. 80 percent of that income went to those who are served. 10 percent went to twinning & dues and 9 percent went to operating and fund raising. The same report lists the way in which people are served. Home visits to those in need resulted in rent, utility, food and prescription drug assistance. In association with Holy Cross Hospital, the Starquest Transportation Van took clients to medical appointments, food shopping, church attendance and social events. At Seaview Rehabilitation and Assisted Living, there were monthly visits, birthday parties, and gifts at Christmas and Easter. St. Laurence Chapel received prayer services, sandwiches and gifts at the two holidays. Meals were served to the needy and the homeless in the area. There was one sit down meal, two meals to go, transportation vouchers, water and snacks given. Murray, a retired teacher says, I choose to give a lot of time to the Society. We are called Vincentians and our purpose is to grow closer to God. Our works ow from this motivation. I come from a middle class, mid-western family. We were all taught to give back. And now, when I see the great needs in so many areas, there arent enough hours in the day, nor money in the till to do what we would like to do, and what needs to be done. Murray, with a partner Vincentian, make visits to clients in their homes to assess their nancial, emotional and spiritual needs, and to see how they can directly help. They also refer clients to the agencies which might give them long term assistance. She says, Our help line receives calls from people in distress and we respond. How many we visit depends on the number of calls for help received. The dynamics change with the geographical location of the Conference. Last year the parishioners of the Archdiocese of Miami served 65,363 people, putting in 99,208 hours of volunteer service. The district council of North Broward reports assisting over 5,000 families with 16,000 of volunteer work and $225, 000 distributed to those in need. We differ from many social services in that our rst priority is to become closer to God and bring His love to the service. At that point, Murray excused herself as she had promised a sick client that she would do the marketing. With a cheerful smile, she left for the grocery store with the clients list. The Pelican thanks this worthy group for its dedication to those in need locally and internationally. Thrift store number is 954-942-2242. To volunteer in this Conference contact St. Elizabeth of Hungary at 954942-2161 or St. Gabriel at 954-943-9717. St. VincentContinued from page 10 Special Deer eld Commission meetingDeer eld Beach There will be a special commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall, 150 NE 2 Ave., to discuss authorizing the lease of the pier restaurant. A second meeting will be held Feb. 12. Call 954-480-4200. Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700

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12 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Pelican interviewed say they would have no problem with City Manager Dennis Beach selecting him as the next chief. Captain Wayne Adkins is serving as acting chief until a permanent candidate is selected. Hale would succeed Lt. Colonel William Knowles who was promoted by Sheriff Scott Israel in January and transferred to BSOs Public Safety Building in Fort Lauderdale. Per the citys contract agreement, BSO has to provide at least three suggestions to replace Knowles. City Manager Dennis Beach will make the decision to hire the new chief, but the act is always done with the mutual consent of the city commission. Commissioner Rex Hardin called Hale a good t for Pompano. I dont think theres a need to have three names. Lets get this taken care of as quickly as possible so we can have some leadership. Vice Mayor George Brummer said he isnt expecting to be asked for his approval of Hale but hes not worried about Beachs ability to make the right decision. Nobody asked me, for instance, if I wanted Bill Knowles [as chief], said Brummer. And although Brummer said Hale has a little catching up to do, in the sense of knowing how things are done today [in Pompano], he seemed satis ed after the meeting. He knows the neighborhoods and the city and I really couldnt ask for more, said Brummer. Hale served the former Pompano Beach Police Department as a patrol of cer, HaleContinued from page 1criminal investigations detective, patrol sergeant and internal affairs sergeant. He joined BSO when it took over operations in Pompano in 1999. After the merger, he served as Pompano Beach District Area 2 captain, the executive lieutenant for Areas 1 and 2 and the administrative sergeant in Area 2. Hale holds both an associate in science in police studies and a bachelor of science in criminal justice management from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. He is a graduate of the Florida Atlantic University Center for Advanced Criminal Justice Studies Executive Leadership Program and the 234th session of the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia. Mayor Lamar Fisher, who said hes known Hale for a long time, expressed no doubts. He was born and raised in Pompano, said Fisher. All the indication shows he would be an excellent t for us. Even [former sheriff Al] Lamberti was talking about [promoting him]. Commissioner Barry Dockswell declined to give his opinion and The Pelican was unable to reach Commissioners Woodrow Poitier and Charlotte Burrie in time for publication.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, January 25, 2013 Martin Luther King celebration bring riotous laughter to those who lived through civil rights and contemplation from the younger set By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Ed Phillips, wearing suspenders and a dapperlooking hat, could not resist the music, the dancing and the spirit. It was Monday, the day the rst black president took his oath for a second term. It was also Dr. Martin Luther King Day. And the place was Ely High School. Ed threaded his way to the area just below the stage where he raised his hands over his head, swung his body to the beat and clapped his hands.Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher takes in some heavy humor dished out by Vickie Winans at the Dr. Martin Luther King celebration, Monday at Blanche Ely High School in Pompano Beach.The gym was packed with fans who celebrated MLK Day with laughter, prayers and a few pokes For Catherine Hill, it was a time to dance.See MLK on page 18 CommentaryEvery band room in the country smells like a combination of wellworn uniforms and brass trombones. To band members that smell is the aroma of their elite status as students. They are the ones most often representing their school as the Ely Marching Tigers did on Monday to honor Dr. Martin Luther King. On this national holiday when other students slept in, the Tigers showed up at 7:30 a.m. for line-up at 8. Then they fell into a two-hour march. Who doesnt love a parade? It was clear that the community that surrounds Ely loves a parade evidenced by the celebration residue, abandoned beach chairs along Fifth Avenue, neighbors still outside chatting and several exhausted students in the band room turning in their uniforms. The Tiger parade has always maintained one strong tradition: stopping at the home of the late Blanche General Ely [1904 -1993], the woman who came to Pompano in the 20s and left her mark on this citys and Browards schools. On this day, band students followed the decades-old tradition. When the band neared 15th Street and Sixth Avenue, it halted in front of Mrs. Elys home, now a museum. Here they played the alma mater. In years past, when Mrs. Ely was in residence there, the student council president presented her with owers.David Barrett, Porcha Tigner, Laurence Jeanlus, Zariyah Brown and BrandenMcCrone are waiting for a second wind after their two-hour march in celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Day. As these students relaxed in the uniform room, across the way, others were celebrating with songs, prayers and a lot of comedy. [Staff photos] In the band room, students re ect on their own lives, their heritage and their responsibility to be the next leaders See MLK BAND on page 20Band students are the ne results of Dr. Kings crusade

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14 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! It is an approach that will begin to address the physical, emotional and social needs of all our patients, said M. Beatriz Currier, M.D., Medical Director of the Courtelis Center and Cancer Support Services at Sylvester, and Chief of the Division of Consultation Psychiatry. Spearheaded by Currier, the Lobdell Mind-Body Wellness Program integrates traditional medicine with complementary medical techniques, including acupuncture, massage therapy, yoga, tai chi, and herbal medicine therapy, and psychological therapies that include meditation, guided visual imagery, progressive muscle relaxation and cognitive behavior therapy. Ashwin Mehta, M.D., assistant professor of clinical and hospital medicine and Medical Director of the Sylvester Integrative Medicine Service, will provide integrative medicine evaluations and interventions with a team of clinicians trained in mind-body medicine. It really helps cancer patients. Using an individual approach, we add nutrition, exercise, sleep tips, meditation, and supplements. We get good results, Dr. Mehta said. The service, in place for about a year, is open to all and Dr. Mehta encourages it for well people to improve their health and prevent disease. The addition of the luncheon lectures will empower the community with information they need, he added. Dont confuse integrative medicine with alternative medicine, Dr. Mehta said. We are not throwing out medicine. In conjunction with medicine, we provide support for symptoms and a plan for living. We target in ammation, strengthen the immune system. Integrative medicine is the medicine of the future. There is a shift to prevention, an emphasis on using wellness models to address chronic conditions. Anything else is incomplete. At the lecture series held Jan. 8, Lobdell, 71, who has conquered his gastric disease said, I think the mind and body wellness aspect of it was an important part of it, and I feel that mind and body wellness is not just for when youre not feeling well, but it can prevent you from feeling bad . preventive care is very bene cial. Lobdells recovery began after he was directed to Dr. Joseph Rosenblatt, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Hematology/ Oncology, UHealth, who told him, Ok, were going to get a team of doctors and were going to make you feel better. After a few months, Lobdell said, he was better, thanks to Currier, Mehta and the team of UHealth specialists who worked to address his physical and emotional needs, and to what he calls the keys to maintaining his good health: a correct diet and exercise regimen, counseling, yoga, meditation, massage and acupuncture. I have survived tough times and I felt the need to CureContinued from page 1give something back. I donate to a teaching restaurant in Michigan and in Florida I was waiting for something to come along. This seemed like it. The word hasnt spread yet, but what could be better? A free lunch and information about your health. A self-made millionaire, Lobdell owns 72 Taco Bells and Pizza Huts headquartered in Traverse City, MI. Living seven months in Florida, Lobdell now runs three miles every other day, exercises and meditates 15 minutes daily, plays golf and has found a new interest, horse racing. Im not in it to make money, he said this week. My dream would be to have a horse in the Kentucky Derby. He has hired the leading trainers in the game and names his horses after his grandchildren. One ran this week at Gulfstream. Lobdell doesnt see the irony in owning fast food restaurants and his gastric complaints. Although he is no longer involved in the daily operations of his food chains, he says Taco Bell does offer lighter fare. His sons also own various restaurant outlets and the industry Lobdell said more and more is cognizant of providing healthy choices. Like in any restaurant or grocery store, it is a matter of selecting the right options, he said. I eat at Taco Bells. Lobdell has written his memoir, Climb from the Cellar, and his wife presented both Currier and Mehta with copies, thanking the physicians for making Wayne as good as new. To attend the mind-body wellness lectures, reserve with Edwards at 954-698-3606 or by email at dedwards@med. miami.edu. Seating is limited. Wayne Lobdell and his wife Terry.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, January 25, 2013

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16 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013

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The Pelican 17 Friday, January 25, 2013 before. Its more invasive than you can ever imagine. And when its over everything is going to be okay, said Waldo, who has rented out her own home for lm crews in the past. And as The Pelican interviewed Waldo she was keeping a watchful eye on the set decorators, making sure they didnt damage the house. But while this is the houses biggest ever role in show business, it isnt the rst time its been in front of a camera. Waldo said a Kodak commercial was lmed here sometime in the 60s and a bank from the Carolinas lmed a commercial on the porch last April. We though it was funny that they were shooting a commercial in Florida for a southern exterior, said Waldo. But Sample-McDougalds HouseContinued from page 7architecture, very rare in an area that has bulldozed much of its history, attracts those looking for something different. Dan Hobby, executive director of the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society, said the house is uniquely situated for those looking for something special whether it be for a wedding or a TV show seen nationally by three million viewers each week. Well, certainly anybody would realize the distinct character and historical nature of the house lends itself to that atmosphere, said Hobby. And as a private organization, the preservation society is always looking for ways of raising money. Hobby said the contract prohibits him from disclosing the amount of money A&E paid to lm but said the funds would go towards maintenance and preservation. Every contribution or funds raised helps the house out. But, as with any nonpro t, you cant rely on one element to fund the organization, he said. The house is also sustained through private rentals for weddings, lunches, community events and membership fees. As for the question of whether or not Sample-McDougald has ever had any real hauntings, Waldo said shes never heard of any stories of ghosts or spirits hanging around before. But after this it may be a more interesting tale, she said. Lewis Bowen, scenic artist, applies age wash to make the house look dirty.

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18 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 And, according to the days entertainer Vickie Winans, clapping is best done by black persons. Winans had made her way into the audience, about 500 people on folding chairs in the school gym. It was she who revealed a major difference between white and black people. You see, she said, wiping the side of her head with a soggy handkerchief. Black people clap on the beat. She claps, gyrates, claps again and so on. White people clap on the rst beat and by the time they get their hands back, its the nineteenth beat. The audience roars. Winans talks about Jesus. Give Jesus a hand! she says. The people in the folding chairs obey with their hands and feet. Some stand. Winans starts singing. The she complains that she feels about a block away from the audience. We came to a party today. I want the young people up close. Shy at the invitation, the children began to approach the stage. Soon there are more than 100 youngsters at her feet. Phillips urges his own children move up to the stage. The tall black goddess is comfortable in having her way. The children arrive as she sings. Toddlers dance all over the gym oor, laughing and fallingnever missing a beat. A BSO of cer moves close to the children and straightens out the vinyl that protects the mighty Tigers basketball court. A trio of young girls hold hands and dance in a circle to the beat. Winans moves in on Mayor Lamar Fisher. She says, Mr. Mayor, you and I have hair of different texture. She points a nger to the graying sides of the mayors black hair. But my edges is not like your edges. She laughs. The audience follows. She returns to texture. We are the only people who need a steel comb. What kind of a day was God having? She returns to the mayor. Most of cials show up at these functions, say what they got to say and go. But you stayed. You gonna get points for that. Winans says she loves the city. Yall dont do things regular. Pompano Beach goes over the top. It seems Winans cant go much longer. Shes 60, sweating, complaining of her hot head under the wrong wig while shes standing in the wrong shoes. There is no racism here. There is just laughter and celebration of one of Americas heroes. But she keeps on long beyond her contracted performance time. Her voice never cracks. She breaks into song as she stomps over the blue vinyl in her four-inch heels. She tells stories of growing up poor, and the audience knows that this woman has risen beyond the pain of poverty with her tales. All 12 of us were nearsighted, so Mother just goes to the doctor with one of us for a examination and orders 12 pairs of glasses with the same prescription. Winans has effectively turned this day into a celebration of comedy, song and dance instead of long speeches and somber moments. And she ends it with a line that could very well be her own mantra. Let your ways please the Lord, and let the chips fall where they may. MLKContinued from page 13 33rd Annual Festival of ArtsDeer eld Beach The 33rd Annual Festival of Arts will be held on Saturday, Jan. 26 and Sunday, Jan. 27 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. south of the International Fishing Pier, next to the Main Beach Parking Lot, 149 SE 21 Ave. Visit vwww.deer eld-beach.com or call 954-480-4200.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, January 25, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN WRITERCasa Frida5441 N. Federal Hwy. Fort Lauderdale954-530-3668There is Mexican food and then there is food from Mexico, says Casa Frida owner Victor Bocos who along with his wife Julieta have turned this quaint eatery into a vibrant culinary hotspot. We make truly authentic recipes following folkloric traditions. This charmingly decorated restaurant features genuine Mexican artwork adorning every square inch of the place along with innumerable pictures of its famous namesake Frida Kohla. The iconically unibrowed painter hails from the Bocos hometown of Mexico City and her self-portraits fetch in the millions at auctions. Sidle up to the cozy bar area for a refreshing sangria, margarita, cold beer or one of the many fine wines that make up the spectacular oenological offering at Casa Frida. I have been in the restaurant business my whole life, says Victor, the former sommelier at celebrity chef Todd Englishs Osteria da Campo. I especially love wine and am very dedicated to providing great wines at the lowest prices. In fact, I have won awards from Wine Spectator magazine for my wine lists. This is why we offer very high-end wines but also very inexpensive, good value wines. We like to combine audio, visual and gastronomic experiences all at once, adds the gregarious restaurateur who puts original documentaries and traditional Mexican concert music on the large flat screen TV. A great starter for cheese aficionados is the classic Queso Fundido. This delightful dish features flamemelted Chihuahua cheese with chorizo or mushroom served in earthenware casseroles. The garlic white wine clams and tangy shrimp ceviche are also noteworthy options. We are known for having the best guacamole in Broward, says Victor while pointing to a SunSentinel review that gives the restaurant high praise for its superior ability to make this avocado-based classic. On the entre front, patrons can enjoy grilled steak, chicken and roasted pork in a variety of preparations. From quesadillas to tamales, burritos to sopes (stuffed corn dough boats) and even sizzling fajitas, all roads lead to the same delectable gastronomic destination. Combinations platters allow Fort Lauderdales Casa Frida sets the bar for authentic Mexican fare Julieta and Victor Bocos are pleased to welcome guests to Casa Frida named after the famous Mexican artist Frida The Clams Ahogadas are sauted with roasted Ancho pepper, garlic and white wine. They are served with crispy garlic bread for dipping. See CASA FRIDA on page 28

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20 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 This year, we found a handful of band members resting in the band uniform room. When asked about the signi cance of this day, their answers didnt vary much. Said David Barrett, Dr. King paved the way for us to have an education. The least we can do is to take advantage of that. Laurence Jeanlus doesnt mind that her name sounds like a boys. She came to Pompano Beach from Haiti as a young child. School is a big part of her life. She is a junior, a member of the honor society and plays the clarinet. She says this school is like a second home and everyone here is like family. But in response to the day of recognition, Laurence posited some basic tenets of leadership, a quality she and her peers agree is critical to success. Youll get [to your goal] if youre not taking shortcuts, and you will be a leader. Some parents are always over-rewarding their kids without making them responsible. I clean our bathrooms, wash dishes and babysit my younger sister. Chores help me accept responsibility. How can I expect to be a responsible person in a job if I havent already learned to be responsible? Porscha Tigner plays the clarinet. If I could, I would say thank you to Dr. King. He had the courage to stand up. Today we marched without people throwing stuff at us. My grandmother said people used to look down on her. She couldnt go out after dark to certain parts of town. She called that a bad combination. But today we are president. All these students will ever know about pre-civilrights days will be through the history books and their elders. Dr. King said he saw the promised land, and he knew he might not make it there. These youngsters never saw Dr. Kings mountain. They have their own mountains to climb and new promised lands to sow. Anne Siren, PublisherMLK bandContinued from page 13

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The Pelican 21 Friday, January 25, 2013 2-25 Retired Educators group meets at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca Raton. Speaker Linda Weil, environmentalist and community activist, will discuss the global approach to thinking and acting. New members welcome. 954-255-6360 or 561-483-5445.Education & Self Development1-25 Cooking class at 7:30 p.m. at The Heart of the Olive, 816 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Class led by chef Nick Quay, and will include demonstrations on how to use olive oils, balsamic, salts, rubs, dips, spreads and more. Reservation required. Cost is $20, deposit is $10. 754-222-8071.Events & Activities1-26 Pet Expo from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Citi Centre, corner of Federal Highway and Copans Road in Pompano Beach. Best-dressed pet contest, product samplings, pet training demonstrations, animal CPR instruction and more. Free admission. Vendors wanted. 954-943-4683. 1-26 Grand Reopening and Model Train Swap Meet from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the historic Amtrak/Tri-Rail Station, 1300 West Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Features three operating model train layouts and museum displays of railroad memorabilia. Vendor tables for model trains and accessories. Free admission. 954-448-8935. 2-14 Valentines Day Dinner and Musicale at 6:30 p.m. at Assumption Catholic Church, 2001 S. Ocean Blvd., Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Dinner buffet, dessert table, raf es, music and dancing. Cost is $25 per person. 954941-7647.Health & Fitness1-26 Pilates class at 8 a.m. at Ocean Manor Resort, 4040 Galt Ocean Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $10. Class held every Saturday. Yogalates, Sundays, Thursdays and Fridays. 754-779-7519. 1-27 Medicine and hazardous waste materials take back from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 301 n. Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954-828-8000. 2-10 Hedglon Chiropractic Center 1313 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach, holds an open house from 1 to 4 p.m. Experts will talk about chiropractic matters. Free computer scan, spinal exams, x-rays [if needed] and food and music. RSVP at 954-9461799. SightingsContinued from page 3 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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22 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Music 1-26 Legends of DooWop Uncensored at 7 p.m. at Coral Springs Center for the Performing Arts, 2855 Coral Springs Drive. Tickets are $37. 954-344-5999. 1-27 Romantic Revelry at 4 p.m. at Lynn Universitys Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. From the Studio of Roberta Rust; romantic piano music by Chopin, Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, Liszt and others, performed by conservatory students. Rust contributes commentary. Tickets are $10. 561-237-7000. 1-27 Chanticleer in Concert at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church of Fort Lauderdale, 401 SE 15 Ave. Grammy award-winning a capella ensemble presents original interpretations of vocal literature from Renaissance to Jazz. Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for students. 954-462-6200. 1-26 & 27 Ars Flores Orchestra presents Mozart, Vivaldi, Gershwin and more at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday at the Miniaci Performing Arts Center, 3100 Ray Ferraro Jr. Blvd., Davie, and on Sunday at 4:30 p.m. at Colony Theatre, 1040 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. 954-262-5303. 1-31 Violin Master Class with Guillermo Figueroa at 7 p.m. at Lynn Universitys Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Guillermo Figueroa is music director of both the New Mexico Symphony and the Music in the Mountains Festival in Colorado as well as principal guest conductor of the Puerto Rico Symphony. Free admission. 561-756-4298 2-2 Gold Coast Jazz Society free concert from 3 to 4 p.m. at Coral Springs Museum of Art, 2855 Coral Springs Drive. 954-340-5000. 2-3 Jazz Brunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Esplande Park, 400 SW 2 St, Fort Lauderdale. Jazz artists perform on four stages while brunch is served. Held the rst Sunday of every month. 954-8285363. 2-7 at 7 p.m. Pianist Francesco Attesti performs at Herb Skolnick Community Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $12. 954-786-4590. 2-9 Sign up to perform at First Congregational Church, 2501 NE 30 Street, Fort Lauderdale, at 7:30 p.m. Sign-up at 7 p.m. Cost is $5. 954-328-8878. See SIGHTINGS on page 29SightingsContinued from page 21

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The Pelican 23 Friday, January 25, 2013 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach This citys Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] has 500 ways for new business owners to make their grand openings grander. Through its incentive program, new business owners can be reimbursed up to $500 for expenses including food, promotional items or entertainment related to their grand opening festivities. Its an incentive for [business owners] to give something back to the community, said Shanna Benson, special events and marketing manager for the CRA. Receipts and invoices of expenses must be provided to the CRA. And owners cant charge their customers for the items and expenses theyre being reimbursed for. Its only for something that is given away for free, said Benson. So far this year, the Beach Grille and Vega Lounge, both in the East CRA, have utilized the program. Benson said the CRA has set aside enough money for 20 grand openings this year. Tom Carrabba, owner of Beach Grille, used the program to offer free samples of his Philly cheese steaks, marinated chicken, Angus burgers, French fries and funnel cakes. We had a lot of great food. Thats what the CRA brought to the table, said Carrabba. To qualify, a business must be new and located Checkers Old Munchen owner Mat Moore [left] and Randall Stevens, a Checkers Old Munchen customer. [Photos by Mike dOliveira] Shanna Benson, special events and marketing manager for Pompanos Community Redevelopment Agency, and her husband, Michael Benson.CRA incentives reimburse businesses up to $500 for grand openings within the boundaries of one of the citys CRAs. The East CRA encompasses the beach area from Northeast 5 Street to Southeast 2 Street and the area around Atlantic Boulevard from Northeast 2 Street to Southeast 2 Street west to Northeast 18 Avenue. The NW CRA extends east to west from Dixie Highway to Powerline Road and Northwest 31 Ave and north to south from Copans Road to Atlantic Boulevard. Old Downtown Pompano and city hall are also included in the NW CRA. And along with reimbursement for expenses, the CRA also helps business owners promote their openings. Beach Grilles grand opening was held near the citys shing pier in conjunction with the citys monthly Music Under the Stars event on Jan. 11. The CRA had some creative visions and helped advertise it. I think everyone from town of cials to the people who live in this area really saw what [business in] Pompano Beach could be when done correctly, said Carrabba. The most recent business to utilize the program is Checkers Old Munchen, which celebrated its re-grand opening on Jan. 17. Last March a re forced owner See CRA on page 28

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24 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Metro Broward Professional Fire ghters Local 3080 and the city. Commissioners Jed Shank and Suzanne Boisvenue dissented. In early December, commissioners resolved a contract impasse between the city and the union when they approved a plan that raised the minimum retirement age from 42 to 52, with 20 years of service. They also set the maximum pension at 70 percent of salary, down from 85 percent. Changes dont apply to those within seven years of retirement. The agreement was submitted to the union, and while battalion chiefs accepted the contract, the union rank and le did not which means this contract will be imposed on the rank and le through the end of this scal year. The contract will then be re-negotiated for rank and le. The new contract for battalion chiefs will continue for three years.Sallee decides not to seek re-electionOakland Park Mayor Anne Sallee decided not to run for re-election in the March 12 city election. Asked by The Pelican about her decision, she emailed this response: It was not an easy decision. But if you read the history of American FireContinued from page 3 See SALLEE on page 29

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The Pelican 25 Friday, January 25, 2013 IncentivesContinued from page 1and Wilton Manors commissions delayed making a decision until other options can be weighed. Since 1986, most Broward County cities have been part of an interlocal agreement, or ILA, for solid waste disposal services through the Broward Solid Waste Disposal District. That district is expiring July 2 and will not be renewed. The county has entered into contracts with Wheelabrator, a division of Waste Management, and SunBergeron to provide solid waste disposal services after July 2 and municipalities can procure services from one or both of the contractors. Or they can seek other vendors. In Oakland Park, Wheelabrator offered the city a loyalty incentive of $325,440, for its residential and commercial waste services contract. This incentive is reduced to $162,720 if the city doesnt execute an agreement by Jan. 31 the offer ends June 30. The loyalty incentive is equal to an estimated $2 a ton for municipal solid waste over a ve-year period, and half that amount after Jan. 31. In Oakland Park, Wheelabrator has bid to dispose of solid waste for $42 per ton. This is the least expensive option available even without the loyalty incentive, according to a report Kenneth Resor, public works director, provided to commissioners. Currently the cost of solid waste disposal is $57 a ton, or $9 million annually. By choosing Wheelabrator by Jan. 31, the city could realize a savings over the next ve years of $531,690. Wheelabrator has provided reliable, although expensive, service to the city over the past 20 years, Resor wrote. The Wheelabrator agreement with the county provides an initial ve-year term, with three ve-year renewal periods. The method of disposal is incineration, and the disposal service would be provided at the north incinerator, at 2600 Wiles Road known commonly as Mount Trashmore. The facility is owned by Wheelabrator North Broward. The Sun-Bergeron agreement with the county also provides an initial ve-year term, with three ve-year renewal periods. Final disposal of municipal solid waste is provided at eight permitted facilities in Florida, including both incineration and land ll methods. The citys solid waste would be hauled to a transfer facility at 1750 SW 43 Terrace, Deer eld Beach. Cost for residential and commercial waste would be $45.25 per ton. Cost for residential and commercial waste would be $43.25 per ton. Waste would be hauled to a transfer facility in Davie or to an alternative facility. Staff in Oakland Park had anticipated knowing the results of Fort Lauderdales request for solid waste services in determining the best rates but that city has put off opening those bids until Jan. 23 and could exercise its policy of not releasing bid proposals for another 30 days. Oakland Park City Manager John Stunson said he preferred the commission wait to make a decision until Fort Lauderdale receives its proposals. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue has asked for legal opinions from the state attorney general, states attorney and the county inspector general on whether the nancial incentives Wheelabrator is offering are legal. Noting the price differences offered -$43.25 per ton from Sun-Bergeron and $42 from Wheelabrator Commissioner Jed Shank said, It may come as a shock to you, but it may be worth paying a premium for what you get. It may be worth a three percent premium now with an eye to the future. I want to make sure were getting the best bang for the buck, said Vice Mayor John Adornato. If theres an ethical issue, I want it cleared up. Commissioners tabled the matter until February. The vote was 4-0, Commissioner Shari McCartney abstaining. Commissioners in Lauderdale-by-the-Sea and Deer eld Beach also want to evaluate the proposals Fort Lauderdale receives before making its decision on solid waste services. LBTS postponed the issue until a Feb. 12 meeting. Wheelabrator offered the town an incentive payment of $64,310 if they sign by Jan. 31. In Deer eld, the full bonus is $503,370. Hollywood is also seeking bids and Deereld commissioners say they want that information before making a decision. In LBTS, Choice Environmental is also in the mix, offering contracts from one to ve years. With a ve-year contract, their price is $40 a ton for disposal. Commissioner Mark Brown said he didnt mind foregoing the Jan. 31 deadline. Lets take our time and make the right decision. There are so many options now and more coming. Lets have staff crunch the numbers and make the best recommendation. Commissioner Stuart Dodd said he was surprised at the maneuvering going on. Wheelabrator is trying to bribe us with incentives. Now theyre offering incentives to stay with them after having stuck it to municipalities for 20 years, Dodd said. He noted that at least six cities have accepted the incentive payments, including Coral Springs at $829,200. In Hillsboro Beach, where Choice has the solid waste collection contract, commissioners took no action at their meeting earlier this month, letting Wheelabrators $14,500 bonus lie on the table. A representative of Choice said his company had also been waiting on bids received in Fort Lauderdale and suggested a third party may come forward. In Pompano Beach, negotiations commence in 2014.

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26 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 NOW HIRING BREAKFAST COOKS!! Part Or Full Time. All Shifts. Open 7 Days. Apply 2211 Wilton Drive Wilton Manors Courtyard Caf. 2-1SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days. References Available. 954-482-5494. 1-25 SHOPPING ASSISTANT Need Help? Shopping, Deliveries, Errands. Im Your Gal. $12/Hr. Call Mary At 954214-7860. 1-25 HOME HEALTH AIDE Private Certified. Day Or Nights. Providing Loving & Professional Care. Honest & Reliable. Affordable Rates. References Available. 954-6787754. 2-1 CHURCH FOR RENTCHURCH FOR RENT Pompano Beach! Well Furnished. Great Sound System Available. Seats 20. MUST RENT! Only $275/ MONTH. Please Call For Availability! 954-588-4985 Or 754-281-0922. 1-25 LOST AND FOUNDCAMERA FOUND ON Pompano Beach Weekend Of January 19th, 2013. To Claim, Please Email abarb@aol.com With Camera In The Subject Line. 1-25 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 2-8 CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 2-8 VISION ELECTRIC INCLicensed/Insured. Electrical Service & Installation. No Job Too Small. #EC13002184 Call 954-274-4513. 1-25 MARCELAS CLEANING Residential Cleaning. Affordable Service You Can Trust! Experienced & GREAT References. 954-376-0524. 2-1 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C SELL YOUR BUSINESS!! Call Russell Cohen 954-646-7651 www. abiz4sale.comr cohen@ tworld.com. Transworld Business Br okers Lic R.E. Broker. 2-1 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 1-25 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 2-8 GARAGE SALESDEERFIELD BEACH MOVING SALE!! Sat / Sun 9am. 1321 SE 2 Street. Household, Appliances, Furniture, Clothes. MUCH MORE!!!!!! Great Bargains. 1-25 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38 x 13. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 1-25 POMPANO BEACH CALIBAN CANAL Off NE 14 St. Causeway. No Fixed Bridges. Water & Electric. Up To 33 $325 Month. 954-7814994. 1-25 MOBILE HOME SALESDEERFIELD BEACH DOUBLE 24x60 2/2 New Siding Windows Water Heater A/C Flooring Overroof Corner Lot Enclosed Front Porch 10x24 New Shower Stalls. $28,900. Call 954-325-1515. 1-25

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The Pelican 27 Friday, January 25, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,200 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 LIGHTHOUSE POINT Spacious 2/2 Furn + Library / Office. Breakfast Bar With Den Off Kitchen. Large Covered Patio Pool. Many Amenities. 954-8182388. 1-25 ROOMS FOR RENTDEERFIELD PVT ROOM & BATH In Double Wide Mobile Home. 50+. W/D Complete Kitchen Use. Heated Pool. $550 Mo. + 1/2 Sec. 954-5888940. 2-1 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-19 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE DEERFIELD. Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny With Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furn. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $56,000. 561-3729837. 2-1 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 2-8 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 2-1CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 / 1 Nicely Furnished Condo. Ready To Move-in. $800 Month. 1950 SE 5th Court. 55+. Call 954943-5531. 1-25 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 2-1 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 2-8 BEACH PADS FOR RENTShort Or Long Term. Luxury furnished/unfurnished studios for your short or long term stay. Daily rates now available (apply to certain units only when available). Longer the stay, better the value. Small pets welcome. Tropical pool, coin laundry, private parking. 1/1 available after March 2 1 left!!! Call today to book your private getaway!! All Bills Paid!!! WI-FI, Premium Cable, Water, Electric and more.. Contact Pax-Properties @ 888-729-4948 or 561-541-0308 Photos @ www.beachpads. net. 2-8 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 2-1 POMPANO ATLANTIC / ICW Area. Duplex 1/1 Yard. Utilities Paid Including Electric. Lease $900 Month/1 Month FREE! 954-415-8838. 1-25 BEACHY-KEEN! 2 Bedroom 2 Bath1 Block From The Sand In NE Pompano. Annual Lease $1,275 Month. 954-6148428. 2-1 LIGHTHOUSE POINT MARINA AREA. Very Attractive Large 2/2. Rent Dock At Marina & Walk Home. $1,700 Month Unfurnished. Agent 954-614-8428. 2-1 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 NW NE 2/1 New $9952/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $725 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 1-25 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 UPSCALE OFFICE For Rent in a Psychologists Of ce For A Solo Professional. $950 / Month. In The Gateway Centre 2040 East Sample Rd Lighthouse Point. Windowed, Unfurnished Of ce 14 by 12.5. 954-942-3344. 2-8 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 2-8 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 1-25

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28 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 guests to mix and match these various specialties. My wife just loves this place. Thats why we are here today for her birthday, says Coral Ridge resident David Wald who had brought the whole family along for the celebration. Casa Fridas signature dish is Cochinita Pibil. It is based on an ancient Mayan recipe featuring oven roasted shredded suckling pig that has been banana leaf wrapped and marinated overnight in a flavorful mixture achiote pepper, garlic, coriander seeds, cloves and annatto paste. Other favorites include the whole fried tilapia with garlic sauce, Chile Rellenos (lightly battered and fried cheese stuffed Poblano peppers with tomato and white wine sauce), the fish Veracruz and the breaded pork loin steak with fried plantains. Our moles (pronounced molez) are excellent. They are in fact the symbol of true Mexican cuisine, asserts Victor of this emblematic, rich and often chocolate-based sauce. We use 14 different ingredients such as walnuts, pecans, almonds, sesame seeds, cinnamon, plums, raisins, plantains, several varieties of peppers and, of course, chocolate. Personally, the green mole is my favorite. We make it from scratch with roasted pumpkin, tomatillo, sesame seeds, cilantro, parsley, lettuce and spinach. It has a nice herbal taste with a silky, velvety finish. We serve it over jumbo tiger prawns. This friendly eatery is clearly dedicated to providing high-quality fare at affordable prices, especially considering that most of the ingredients are imported directly from Mexico. In fact, the authenticity is so undeniable that Casa Frida has been recognized by the Mexican Consulate in Miami for the excellence of its cuisine. The lunch menu starts at $7.50 and the dinner offerings begin at $12. Happy hour is from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday to Friday. There is ample free parking and major credit cards are accepted. For dessert, give the churros, flan or three milk cake a try. Enjoy! Casa FridaContinued from page 19 The breaded pork loin steak with sweet fried plantains, rice and refried beans is a customer favorite.Mat Moore to close his doors for months and make repairs. Although Checkers Old Munchen isnt new, Benson said the CRA made an exception because of the re. It was a big deal to have them back. Theyre a long time favorite here in Pompano so we wanted to just extend it to them as well. To celebrate his return, Moore gave out free beer samples and appetizers along with Checkers usual fare, including bratwurst, knockwurst, potato pancakes and liverwurst. It was a great turnout. Were happy to be back. For more information on the incentive program, call Shanna Benson at 954-7867824.CRAContinued from page 23

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The Pelican 29 Friday, January 25, 2013 Government, our founding fathers did not intend for any citizen to make a career of public service, rather for each person to find his time and place to volunteer and then return to the citizenry. Serving as an elected official was never a goal of mine, it was my contribution to my SalleeContinued from page 24community. I have been honored to serve the people of Oakland Park for the past four years. I am excited to report that I have a new granddaughter in Boston and children getting married in distant locations (weve had three weddings in three years and another to come in October.) With all that going on, I cannot commit to live in Oakland Park for four more years. While I have no plans to leave, I cannot guarantee that I will stay either. I would not run knowing that I might leave early and cause the expense of a special election. I have given four years to Oakland Park and am ready to return to life as an active resident. Oakland Park is at an exciting place right now with the Culinary Destination plans, and I still have work to do between now and March. I will be able to focus on the work at hand without the distraction of a campaign. Good people have registered to run in Oakland Park, and I wish them luck. 2-10 Les Mack Trio performs from 3 to 4 p.m. at SightingsContinued from page 22Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd., Boca Raton. Performances include Dixieland music from New Orleans to Chicago. Free admission. 561-299-8684. 2-17 Passionate Piano Featruing Pianist Catherine Lan at 4 p.m. at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $20 for members and $25 for non-members. 561-998-7784.

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30 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013 Send your fishing news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point This winter season has been tough for shing days. Lots of wind and weather have made it difcult to get any shing time in offshore. But, put in a full day and you should be pleased with your catch this weekend. The boat Flight Plan out of Hillsboro Beach shed on Wednesday for two hours and released seven sail sh, a black n tuna and a big king sh. Capt. Casey Hunt was shing in 150 ft. of water right outside Hillsboro Inlet and said the water was beautiful and the sh were biting. The sword sh bite was The shing has been tough, but great catches are still thereslow early in the week, which was mostly due to lack of current. But I believe as we get closer to the full moon we will see the shing pick up. I shed for swords yesterday, all day, so call us when you get this paper and we will have an up to date report for you. Also, dont be afraid to go after the grey tile sh. They have been biting in 375 ft. off of the steeple in Fort Lauderdale. Call us if you need any assistance. Get tight! Deer eld Beach Last Saturday was a wet and cold day for a shing tournament but boats signed up for the 3rd Annual Two Georges Bill sh Tournament and went out into the Atlantic anyway. The event is a continuation of the tournament that was started by the restaurants previous owners when Two Georges was known as The Cove Marina & Restaurant. And all anglers who braved the rain and rough seas did it for a good cause: raising money for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Broward County.Wet weather hits Two Georges shing tourneyThe crew of Rebound, John Henry, Captain Stan Hunt, Chris Lemieux and Tom Bardes, with a 29.7-pound king sh. James Gamper and Derrick Milo from the Poseidon Too with the 29.7-pound wahoo. Two Georges owner Steve Skaggs and tournament organizer Denise Buzzelli.

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The Pelican 31 Friday, January 25, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! entertainer Vickie Winans, clapping is best done by black persons. Winans had made her way into the audience, about 500 people on folding chairs in the school gym. It was she who revealed a major difference between white and black people. You see, she said, wiping the side of her head with a soggy handkerchief. Black people clap on the beat. She claps, gyrates, claps again and so on. White people clap on the rst beat and by the time they get their hands back, its the nineteenth beat. The audience roars. Winans talks about Jesus. Give Jesus a hand! she says. The people in the folding chairs obey with their hands and feet. Some stand. Winans starts singing. The she complains that she feels about a block away from the audience. We came to a party today. I want the young people up close. Phillips children move up to the stage. The tall black goddess is comfortable in having her way. The children arrive as she sings. Toddlers dance all over the gym oor, laughing and fallingnever missing a beat. A BSO of cer moves close to the children and straightens out the vinyl that protects the mighty Tigers basketball court. A trio of young girls hold hands and dance in a circle to the beat. Winans moves in on Mayor Lamar Fisher. She says, Mr. Mayor, you and I have hair of different texture. She points a nger to the graying sides of the mayors black hair. But my edges is not like your edges. She laughs. The audience follows. She returns to texture. We are the only people who need a steel comb. What kind of a day was God having? She returns to the mayor. Most of cials show up at these functions, say what they got to say and go. But you stayed. You gonna get points for that. Winens says she loves the city. Yall dont do things regular. Pompano Beach goes over the top. It seems Winans cant go much longer. Shes 60, sweating, complaining of her hot head under the wrong wig while shes standing in the wrong shoes. There is no racism here. There is just laughter and celebration of one of Americas heroes. But she keeps on long beyond her contracted performance time. Her voice never cracks. She breaks into song as she stomps over the blue vinyl in her four-inch heels. She tells stories of growing up poor, and the audience knows that this woman has risen beyond the pain of poverty with her tales. All 12 of us were nearsighted, so Mother just goes to the doctor with one of us for a examination and orders 12 pairs of glasses with the same prescription. She has effectively turned this day into a celebration of comedy, song and dance instead of long speeches and somber moments. And she ends it with a line that could very well be her own mantra. Let your ways please the Lord, and let the chips fall where they may. MLKContinued from page 20

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32 The Pelican Friday, January 25, 2013