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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00327
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 01-11-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00332

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Friday, January 11, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 2 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican With her father, Dale Gibson joining in prayer at the Annual Dr. Martin Luther King prayer breakfast, Jade, 5, appears to contemplate the event and its meaning. The Interfaith Breakfast took place at the E. Pat Larkins Civic Center in Pompano Beach. The event was sponsored by the MLK committee and Pompano Christian Clergy Council. The Rev. James Smith, senior pastor at New Jerusalem Baptist Church was the keynote speaker.Open seat draws three candidates; mayor is opposedBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Three candidates are vying for the District 3 city commission seat. Mayor Peggy Noland faces a challenge from longtime political rival Jean Robb, and Dist. 4 Commissioner Bill Ganz drew no opposition and is re-elected. The activity in District 3, comprised of Century Village East and Crystal Lake, is spurred by incumbent commissioner Marty Popelsky being ineligible to run due to term limits. Two candidates, Caryl Berner and Donna Capoblanco, have run before; the other, Richard Rosenzweig, is a newcomer to local politics. Signs of the times reveal community service still active, important to manyBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When visitors and residents drive down Federal Highway near the municipal golf course here, the citys service organizations are prominently on display. Its been a work in progress for about six years and was completed two or three months ago, said Al Siefert, past president of the Rotary Club of Pompano Beach. Rotary took the lead in constructing the monument which exhibits the logos of seven service organizations and has room for seven more. There are some clubs in the process of getting their signs put up right now, he said. Rotary, the Exchange Club and the Pompano Beach Garden Club, along with a $10,000 contribution from the City Of Pompano Beach, funded the sign. And contributions are still welcome, said Joanne Nelson, Rotarys executive secretary. Siefert said the former logos were on an old chain-link fence that was rusty and needed replacing. It really looked bad. Im glad the new ones done, said Siefert. Now, it shows a See SIGNS on page 14 See DEERFIELD CANDIDATES on page 16 We Can Help Logos of civic clubs in Pompano Beach nd a new home on Federal Highway, thanks to the city and the Pompano Beach Rotary Club. Now the city waits for other clubs to take up the rest of the space. [Staff photo by Mike DOliveira] Eight vie for mayor, commission seats in PompanoBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The race to occupy the mayors seat and commission seats in Districts 2 and 4 has brought out eight candidates. Challenging incumbent Mayor Lamar Fisher in the March 12 election are Marcus McDougale and David Baumwald. Opposing incumbent Dist. 2 See POMPANO ELECTIONS on page 24

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2 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Jeffrey Sneed, public works employee, and his family enjoyed the MLK breakfast at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center last Saturday. He is pictured with his wife, Regina, and daughters Jessica, 16 and Natalie, 17. [Staff photo]Art 1-11 Juried art exhibition from 8 to 10 p.m. at Rossetti Fine Art Gallery, 132 McNab Road, Pompano Beach. 954247-9580. 1-12 Watercolor classes by Henriette Arnold from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 Ave., Pompano. Cost is $15. Extra help available at 9 a.m. 954-920-4574. 1-12 Wrap it in Plaster from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Coral Springs Museum of Art, 2855 Coral Springs Drive Coral Springs. Cost is $4 per person. 954-340-5000. 1-16 Spin Art and Knot Art from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. 954-594-0444. 1-17 Life drawing class from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Rossetti Fine Art Gallery, 132 McNab Road, Pompano Beach. Class is held Thursdays. 954-247-9580. 1-18 Island City Art Walk from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Businesses along the street host an artist and serve up free appetizers and refreshments. Visit islandcityartwalk.com. 1-18 Fort Lauderdale Orchid Show at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 Ne 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Show runs until Jan. 20; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are $5 for advance purchase, $10 at the door. Children 12 and under are free when accompanied by an adult. Visit www. os.org or 954-828-5380.Auctions & Sales1-12 Yard sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Vendors wanted. 954-390-2115 or 954-3902130. 1-12 & 13 Tropical Postcard Show and Sale at the Pompano Beach Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $3. Free appraisals. 305-666-0219. 1-19 Yard sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954630-4511. 1-26 & 27 Nautical Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St. Admission is $5 per person. Children 12 and under are free. Visit www. nautical eamarket.com.See SIGHTINGS on page 13

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The Pelican 3 Friday, January 11, 2013 By Steven WolfSPECIAL TO THE PELICANHand Me Silver, a standardbred race horse who performed the Hot to Trot reworks show at Pompano Park, has died of natural causes. He was 27 years old. A magni cent looking chestnut gelding with a blonde mane and tail and four white-stocking feet, Hand Me Silver was foaled in Australia on Oct. 26, 1985. Sired by Under A Cloud from the Silvers Colt mare Silvers Chariot, Hand Me Silver Hand Me Silver, reworks stunt show horse, dies at 27 was not that great a racing horse, but under the tutelage of trainer/driver and master stuntman, Vincent Silvestro of New South Wales, Australia, the horse became a star. With Silvestro standing on the shafts of his race sulky, the reins in his teeth and 10,000 candle power marine ares in each hand, Hand Me Silver would race around a dark track pulling a platform attached to the back of the sulky while Silvestro would ignite more than 2,000 rounds of pyrotechnic explosives set to music in one of the wildest Vincent Silvestro and Hand Me Silver perform the Hot To Trot Fireworks Stunt Show at Pompano Park, Pompano Beach on Feb. 3, 2007. [Lap Time Photo by Skip Smith] displays of horsemanship ever seen. Of all the horses I trained and worked with over the years for the Hot To Trot shows, Hand Me Silver was the best. Silvestro said. And there will never be another one like him. He was extra special. Not only was he good looking but he was the smartest horse I ever saw. He loved the applause he would get when we would return to the winners circle after a show. He looked forward to it, See HAND ME SILVER on page 17

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4 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Newly-elected Broward Sheriff Scott Israel promoted the two top-ranking BSO of cials in this town. Both will be moved to other positions within the agency. District Chief Oscar Llerena was promoted to major and Lt. Angelo Cedeno, executive of cer, was promoted to captain. I am proud that Sheriff Scott Israel has selected me to lead the Youth Intervention & Enforcement Division, which is tasked with addressing juvenile justice issues, including efforts to combat juvenile recidivism and keeping our kids out of jail, Llerena said Wednesday. This is one of the most important issues he will address as sheriff. Cedeno has been assigned Sheriff promotes two BSO of cersto BSO Internal Affairs Division. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann reported the promotions to town commissioners this week. She said Cedeno has been recognized for his talent and ability and transferred out to a downtown job. We all have a deep affection for Angie Cedeno, she said. He will be doing good things for Broward County. We have been informed there will be a change in command in almost every city that BSO serves, Hoffmann said. A large number of BSO employees retired, and 30 employees were let go with the election of a new sheriff. Many positions opened, and there were many opportunities for promotions, she said. Weve always said we didnt want to lose Oscar or Angie. They t so well here, Hoffmann said. The only way we would want that [would be] if they were promoted. Llerena said he wont be leaving until a new district chief is in place. The towns contract with BSO requires that they propose three candidates for chief if Llerena is moving out. Hoffmann said she and Llerena will nd Cedenos replacement within the ranks. A reception for Llerena and Cedeno will be planned.By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Unhappy with the cost of dispatch services from the county, city commissioners have paid the $113,000 they were billed but under protest and with an eye towards nding an alternative. The bill comes from the City of Fort Lauderdale and is what of cials there say is Wilton Manors share of the costs incurred from the county. I would like to know City seeks alternative to dispatch services more details because thats where the devil is in the details. [Lets] pay them under protest and demand an accounting going forward, said Commissioner Ted Galatis. Vice Mayor Julie Carson voted no because she said she wanted more information rst. I would have preferred to wait two weeks and have the city attorney determine some of the facts surrounding the case. When an emergency call See WILTON MANORS on page 23

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The Pelican 5 Friday, January 11, 2013 Pompanos Pioneer Families: The CheshiresOne of the Pompano Beach Historical Societys most popular program topics is pioneer families,and on Jan. 16, the organization will take a look at one family that has had a signi cant in uence on the communitys political, economic and civic development. First arriving here in the early 1920s from northern Florida, the extended family, over the years, became owners of one of the largest acreage of agricultural land in the region. Members of the family were also active in business enterprises and political endeavors. A panel of Cheshire family members will discuss their memories of the rst generation of Cheshires to arrive in Pompano, their accomplishments and personalities. Scheduled panelists include Newana Cheshire Bowman, Bebe Cheshire Delk, and Gwen Cheshire Collier with other family members invited to join in. There will also be some voices from the past. The free program begins at 7 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Historical Society, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach) and is open to the public. There is plenty of free parking available and light refreshments will follow the program. For more information, call 954 292-8040. By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Many years ago Mike McClain went to a food tasting event in New York Citys Central Park. He was so impressed by the experience he vowed to bring something similar to this city one day. Nine years ago, he had the chance. The edging LHP Chamber of Commerce needed to establish a fundraising and McLain was asked to come up with a plan. His idea became the hugely successful Taste of Lighthouse Point, an event With champagne utes and silent auction prizes in hand, members of the Taste of LHP committee are nalizing plans for this years event. From leftDiane Jurcik, Lou Patrone, Patty Miranda, Penny Morris, Mike McClain, Kimberly Bean, Charlie Spalma, Charlie Davis. [Photo by Jeff Graves]Annual Chamber Tasting event returns Jan. 20that had a slow start but today tends to be a sellout. This year, 20 local restaurants will participate Jan. 22 at the Lighthouse Point Yacht and Tennis Club. McClain estimates 400 to 450 people, most of them residents or business owners in the city, will attend. McClain headed up the event for three years and then turned it over to other Chamber presidents, noteably Michelle Greene who held the reins for many years. This year, Kimberly Bean heads up the silent auction donations and is assembling spa treatments, tness gifts, a $500 tooth whitening procedure and the most sought after, a vacation in a Vail condominium. The lineup of food vendors will offer tastes of everything from appetizers to desserts. Wine and water are included in the cost of the ticket, $50. Participating See TASTE on page 11

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6 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XXI, Issue 2 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & Letters Pompano Beach Want to help two great local charities and at the same time promote your business and have more fun than a barrel of monkeys? Then sign up ASAP to be a sponsor and compete in the Unity In The Community Bounce Horse Derby that will take place on Saturday, February 2, 2013 as part of the day long Unity In The Community activities at the Pompano Community Park at 2001 NE 10 ST Pompano Beach, Fl. between 11:00 am and 3 p.m. The two charities running the bounce horse derby are Pompano Has Heart, Inc. which is the citys disaster relief charity that raises money and commodities to help those in need both locally and abroad and the host charity is Unity In The Community of Pompano Beach, Inc. Both charities are 501(c-3) not for pro t groups. For a $200 donation sponsors will get to have their jockey compete in the 40 foot grueling stretch course that will be on the turf (grass) in front Grab a good horse to ride at the Bounce Horse Derby on Feb. 2 of the Community Stage next to the Pompano Amphitheater. First place prize for the winning sponsor of the bounce horse derby is the coveted Derby Trophy Cup and the bragging rights for all South Florida for one year. There will also be wagering for prizes on the bounce horse derby. The bounce horse derby will take place rain or shine and if more than six sponsors enter the race there will be elimination heats held before the nale. Everything is free to the public for Unity In The Community Day. That includes parking, admission, free food and beverages, live music, display booths, childrens activities, cultural groups and special demonstrations by the Broward Sheriffs Of ce. This event is organized by Pompano Beach citizens to bring people of every culture and religion together to foster Unity. For more information call 954-6543757. That John Wayne feeling hits these riders as they saddle up to raise funds for charity. Riders are still needed for the upcoming Unity in the Community event. Thieves rob organization of materials, but not resolveTo the Editor, Community organizations are often about giving. Mt. Bethel Human Services is such an organization. For Thanksgiving we distributed over 75 baskets to the needy, enough clothes to supply a community and other household items to those in need at our quarterly Free Market. At Christmas time we provided over 100 families with toys so that kids in a blighted area of the county could experience the same joy on Christmas Day as others in af uent neighborhoods. Those are the types of services Mt. Bethel has provided Broward County families for the past 19 years. The mission of the organization, however, is not only about giving but about building families. It is our belief that as the family goes, so goes society. This is the reason for the 3rd Annual 33311 Walk on January 26 in partnership with Broward AWARE! Protecting OUR Children and other committed organizations. Unfortunately, while working to meet the needs of a distressed community we ourselves became the target of willful destruction. On New Years Day, the administrative of ce of Mt. Bethel was burglarized. Several computers and other items of value were stolen. This in itself set the agency back tremendously. As if it werent enough, two days later the thieves visited our of ces again; this time targeting a counselors of ce and that of the executive director. Again, computers and other important electronic devices were taken. Be be that as it may, the break-ins have only strengthened our resolve to continue Building Families, Changing Lives! Mt. Bethel now needs the communitys support to replace the items taken by thieves. Please consider a tax deductible donation by sending your check to Mount Bethel Human Services, 1021 NW 6th Street, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311 or contribute on-line at www.mountbethel.org and designate your gift for Human Services. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Please help us as we continue to help those considered the least, the lost and the left out! May this New Year shower blessings upon you! Rosby L. Glover Executive Director Mt. Bethel Human Services CorporationChildrens Piano Competition needs support for February eventBy Anne SirenPUBLISHEROn Feb. 23, about 150 children from the tri-county area will arrive at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, holding on to their music. They will play their pieces before esteemed pianists from throughout the state who will judge their talent. These are the children who rarely make the newspapers. They are too busy with their studies, their music, their sports and families. They are easy to ignore and forget when it comes to donations. But we think differently. We believe community support is needed for all children, whether they are in need of aid or if they are simply trying to do the right thing: practice, study and take part in their families. We believe that children get a special message when they are recognized and supported by the members of their community. The piano competition here in Pompano Beach has been recognizing these children for more than 19 years. On Feb. 23, they will be honored for their performances with critiques, performing at the winners recital and taking home the trophies. Please support this years event with your support of any kind at all. A check for $10 tells us you are out there and this performance is important to you as well. All of us are volunteers. The event is overseen by members of the Music Teachers Association of Broward County. This event needs new patrons to continue. If you read this, and you can help, please mail your check to: The City of Pompano Beach, 100 West Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, Florida 33060. The winners recital takes place on Feb. 23 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. at 7 p.m. It is free and open to the public.N.E. Focal Point fashion show fundraiserLighthouse Point The N.E. Focal Point Auxiliary hosts the 15th Annual Fashion Show Luncheon, Elegance of America, Jan. 30 at 11:30 a.m. at the Lighthouse Point Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42 St. The afternoon will include lunch, fashion show, entertainment and door prizes. Ticket donations are $50 each. Limited seating is available. Fashions by Sondro at the Cove include casual, cruise and evening wear. Proceeds from this annual fundraiser bene t the N.E. Focal Point in Deer eld Beach. For tickets or sponsorship information, call 954-480-4460.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, January 11, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-TheSea -Town commissioners recognized two Fountainhead condominium employees Tuesday for their exceptional display of bravery and courage resulting in saving the life of another. Commissioners proclaimed Mario and Howie Ochoa Day in honor of the brothers, who jumped in the ocean fully clothed to pull out and save a drowning man on Nov. 1. The Ochoas were at the scene working to repair damages after Tropical Storm Sandy blew through the area and ruined some of the condos property. They were digging and removing sand when they saw a man walking on a sandbar, built up from the damage.Maintenance team at Fountainhead lauded for their life-saving actions Mario and Howie OchoaIts by Gods graces we were watching him, Mario said. We turned our heads, and he ended up going under water. We saw him oating on top of the water, and we knew something was wrong. He was blue, not breathing. We ran to him, fully clothed, Mario said. The water was over our heads. We had to struggle. It took both of us to get him out. We dragged him out onto the beach. My brother started pumping him and giving CPR and reviving him. The victim had swallowed a lot of water. As Howie performed CPR, the man foamed at the mouth, and water spewed out. They turned him on his side so he would release more water. As they ran to help the man, Mario said he screamed out to co-workers to call 911. When paramedics arrived, the man had started breathing again. Paramedics transported him to a hospital, where he was treated for several days. The Ochoas received American Red Cross training in CPR at the Fountainhead. If not, we wouldnt have known what to do, Mario said. Mario, 27, a six-year employee, is the maintenance manager and chief engineer at the condominium. Howie, 26, a three-year employee, is a security guard who was helping with beach clean-up that day. The victim was a Canadian staying at the Galt Towers condominium a few blocks south of the Fountainhead. He came later to thank them and express how fortunate he was to be able to go back to Canada to see his grandkids. It was a touching moment, Mario said. Were very grateful we could be there to help. We were in the right place at the right time, Mario said. Wed do the same for anybody. Were very proud of them, said Carrie Donnelly, assistant property manager. At the commission meeting, Dr. Robert Kramer, a Fountainhead board member, said the Ochoas are valued employees. He said any building on the beach should ensure their staff is CPRtrained, as the Fountainhead does. One drowning is one too many. Theyve given a powerful example of the best in human nature. Thank you gentlemen. We salute you, he said. This is overwhelming for us, Mario said of the honors. Were very grateful everyone is doing this. Its amazing, Howie added.

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8 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 BriefsBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFSitting down with Jim Barry, owner of Aloha Air Conditioning Service and Sales is like visiting with an old friend. A modest man, Barry says, My dad is gone, but I still live by his philosophy which is Its all about the customer. I apprenticed with my father in Washington D.C. where I was raised. When he moved to Florida, I followed him, and we became partners. That was in 1982. We started with one truck, and Aloha now has 20 trucks on the road. They are manned by experienced technicians who are licensed and factory trained. Every technician has a computer and an iPhone which means we have instant communication, allowing us to elevate our service and lower costs to our customers. Most of my team have been with me for many years. They and I return to school regularly to be kept abreast of the newest technology. Aloha service trucks are equipped to service, maintain, and install air conditioners from one-ton to 200-tons. The company also sells the newest models from Rheem, Carrier, American Standard, Mitsubishi and more. Business has changed a great deal since Barry opened his rst company. He says, The new conditioners use about one third of the electricity that the early models used. They remove the humidity much more Aloha service technicians are just a phone call away from solving your air conditioning problems effectively than they did, and in Florida thats important. Its the humidity, not the temperature that makes us so uncomfortable. This is a very important new improvement. In fact, he advises, a new air conditioner is almost like an investment because it pays you back every month in Jim Barry [left], president of Aloha A/C is proud of his eet of 20 trucks. One truck, named Cooling for a Cure, is a pink Susan Coman truck which promotes the cure for cancer theme. [Photos courtesy of Aloha Air Conditioning]See ALOHA on page 9Model Train Swap MeetDeer eld Beach The Grand Re-Opening and Model Train Swap Meet will be held on Saturday, Jan. 26 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the historic Amtrak/Tri-Rail Station, 1300 West Hillsboro Blvd. The event is presented by the South Florida Railway Museum of Deer eld Beach and features three operating model train layouts and museum displays of railroad memorabilia. There will be vendor tables for model trains and accessories. Admission and parking are free. For more information, visit www.sfrm. org or call 954-448-8935. Pet Expo at Citi CentrePompano Beach Citi Centre, located at the corner of Federal Highway and Copans Road, will hold its annual Pet Expo on Saturday, Jan. 26 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be a bestdressed pet contest, product samplings, pet training demonstrations, animal CPR instruction and more. Admission is free for all ages. Vendors who want to participate should call 954-943-4683. For more information on upcoming events at Citi Centre, visit www.facebook.com/ PompanoCitiCentre or www. pompanociticentre.com.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, January 11, 2013 savings and those savings are tax free. Florida Power and Light will help you make the investment with their rebate program. Old air conditioners are expensive to run just like old gas guzzling cars are expensive to run. The units we sell come with a 10-year factory warranty on parts. Dennis Nadeau, owner of Card Geniuses in Pompano Beach, is a 15-year client who has taken Barrys advice. He says, If an air conditioner is over ve years old, you would be smart to have a new one installed. We did and the amount of money we saved on our monthly bill was amazing. On top of that we got a credit from FPL. Aloha has always given us great advice. The techs are professionals who know exactly how to solve problems with conditioners. Catherine Merlo, owner of Family Rentals and Guest Services in Boca/Delray, has been a client for way over 20 years. She says, Aloha is a wonderful company. They service both my business and my home. The technicians are all courteous and knowledgeable. They treat you like family and truly do care about their customers. They never leave until the customer is completely satis ed. Asked how he came to name his company Aloha, Barry says, I wanted a name that re ects my pleasure in doing business in a paradise like South Florida. I wanted the name to be a friendly greeting. We service our clients six days a week and do not charge more on Saturdays. It doesnt seem fair to penalize a client who works and cant be home until Saturday. Were also bi-lingual and can send a Spanish speaking technician when requested. Our web site allows visitors to learn about us in English and in Spanish. Its all about satisfying the customer.| One of Alohas 20 trucks is a pink Susan Komen truck which promotes the cure for cancer theme. Its called Cooling for a Cure and its a permanent part of the service eet. This is just one of the major charities supported by Aloha. Call 855-922-5642 or visit the web site at alohaac.com. AlohaContinued from page 8

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10 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Juried art show exhibitWilton Manors The winners of Art Gallery 21s Juried Art Show will be presented on Friday, Jan. 18 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Court. For more information, visit www.CANAWM.org or call 954-661-4740.Rabies clinicBroward County Animal Care and Adoption will host a Rabies Clinic on Saturday, Jan. 12 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Colohatchee Park, 1975 N.E. 15 Ave. Pet owners can have their dog or cat vaccinated against rabies and receive a Broward County pet registration tag. Cost for a one-year rabies vaccination and registration tag is $15 per pet. Only cash payments will be accepted. To qualify, pet owners must provide proof of Broward County residency such as a valid Florida drivers license or a current utility bill. No appointment is necessary and customers are taken on a rst-come, rstserved basis. All dogs must be on leashes and all cats must be in carriers. Call 954-3591313 or 954-359-1010 for more information.Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. SampleMcDougald House Hosts Car Show On Saturday, Jan. 18, the Sample-McDougald House at Centennial Park, 450 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach, will host an antique and classic automobile show on the grounds of the historic structure. As many as 50 cars will be on display, ranging from a Model T Ford to 1960s muscle cars. The City of Pompano Beachs 1926 re engine will also be at the show. The antique and classic cars will participate through the Antique Automobile Club of America, Fort Lauderdale Chapter. The 1916 SampleMcDougald House will be open for tours during the automobile show. Admission to the car show and the historic house is $5 per person. Children under 12 are free. The car show and house tours will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on January 19th. Call Jerry Bowman at 954 298-0854 Contestant Roger Mazzeo Contestant Ed Zako Contestant Trish Michael Contestant Karen Arlene Lefand Contestant Judy SnearyBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRemembering the success of the television show, The Dating Game, back in the 60s and 70s, Broward Health North decided to launch a take off of the show for seniors. Its all part of the medical centers year round campaign to help the health of the community, and in this case, the senior community. Behind this fun event is Dr. H. Murray Todd, neurologist and medical director of the Centers Neurologic Institute. Todd is a rm believer in exercising the mind and body to repel the traditional ailments of aging. Hes made his point with many successful programs such as Senior Dance Competition, Seniors Got Talent, and soon, SeniorStyle Dating Game. Dr. Todd will be hand to introduce the dating game, even as he stresses the importance of Senior Dating Game comes to Broward Health North on Wednesday, Jan. 23 from 3 to 5 p.m.socialization to the senior community. Turning Dr. Todds game plan into a reality is Lyn Clark, regional manager in charge of marketing and community relations. On Monday, Jan. 7, auditions for players of the dating game were held and almost 100 men and women responded to the casting call which was held in the conference center. On hand to re questions at the contestants and judge those auditioning were: Connie Doyle Loewenthal, senior account executive with Clear Channel Media, who was on the actual The Dating Game in the 70s, Amber Statler, president of Statler Media Inc. and this Pelican reporter. Loewenthal was a winning contestant on the actual Dating Game in 1978. Asked about the experience, she giggled as she recalled what happened over 30 years ago. I do remember drawing a blank when it was time to choose one of the three men. I chose a man who owned a garage and he turned out to be a good choice, though I recall hoping he would not have grease under his ngernails. My date and I won a ski trip to New Mexico. We had a great time, but I dont think we ever saw each other again. Some of the criteria, used to determine future players of Senior Dating Game, were rst impressions, originality and charisma, energy and See SENIOR DATING on page 11

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The Pelican 11 Friday, January 11, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! In Lighthouse PointOfferdahls, 2400 N. Federal Hwy. Lighthouse Point Marina, 2831 Marina Circle Red Fox Diner, 3640 N. Federal Hwy. Lighthouse Point Police Dept., 3701 NE 22nd Ave. Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St. Bone sh Macs, 2002 E. Sample Rd. Packys 4480 N. Federal Hwy pizzazz, and communication skills. There was a lot of laughter and clapping during the interviewing of candidates. Clark and her staff will tabulate all of the judges comments and choose the rst four contestants who will play the Senior Dating Game. The winners will receive a gift certi cate to a local restaurant and a free dessert at Cold Stone Creamery. The winning couple can choose to go out together, or separately. As this judge was about to depart, she found out that two of the contestants who had hung around to listen to the competition had gravitated to each other. The result was a real date made between the CPA who wanted to become a stand up comedian and the travel buff who claimed to be a psychic. Join the fun on Jan. 23 when the winning contestants meet at the Senior Dating Game. What: Free Senior Dating Game Where: Broward Health NorthConference Center, 201 E. Sample Road, Deer eld Beach When: Wednesday, Jan. 23 from 3 to 5 p.m. The event is free, but seating is limited to the rst 150 guests. Watch the game . Senior dating Continued from page 10 Childrens choir now being formedPompano Beach Children from ages six to 16 are invited to sign up for Childrens Choir of Pompano Beach, a school to train voices for performance. Auditions take place Jan. 17 from 4:30 to 9 p.m. at St. Martins Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. Concerts will take place at the church. Cost is $35 for registration and $15 per class. Call 561-317-3866.Tropical Postcard show, Jan. 12, 13 at Pompano Center Postcards from the past have their own tales, some with messages and some with photos of days gone by. Vendors of antique and new postcards will be on hand at the Emma Lou Olson Civic center, 1801 NE 6 St., Jan. 12 and 13 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free appraisals and buyers will be present. Dealer booths are still available. Entrance is $3. The event is open to the public. Call 305666-0219 TasteContinued from page 5restaurants include Bobby Rubinos, Bone sh Mac, CapsPlace, Costco, de Campo Osteria, Duffys, Edible Arrangements, CFS Market place, Hot Tomato, J. Marks,La Mimosa, LHP Yacht Club, Litos Turf & Surf, The Nauti Dawg Marina Caf, Oceans 234, Olympic Flame Diner, Packys Sports Grill, Publix, Red Fox Diner and Sicilian Oven. Purchase tickets at taste@ LHPCHmaber.com, or at 3640 N. Federal Highway. For more, call 954-946-6610.

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12 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach When Cecil Asher spoke to this commission on Tuesday, he was sick with the u. But he so frustrated, he felt the trip was necessary. Asher loves golf. He plays three times a week and is often the rst in line to tee off. Prior to this year, Asher paid annual dues of $800 to play on either of the citys courses, The Pines or The Palms. But last year, the city spent $3 million to redesign the Pines course. They chose Greg Norman Golf Course Design to modernize the course and give the city a championship course. And the price to play has changed. Asher says that during the construction, some holes on the Palms course were closed, turning an 18-hole game into 17 holes. Closures were due to equipment parked on the Palms course to accommodate the Pines work. The Pines course surrounds the Palms course. Says Asher, I understood that. I stayed with the city because I was excited about the Greg Norman design. But other players werent as understanding. Membership dropped by nearly half. Asher stayed for another reason. The new Greg Golfers handicapped by construction want city to compensate for lossNorman course was expected to open in November, and members had free play there for the remainder of the year. November came and went, but the golf course remained under construction. I didnt get the value of my membership, says Asher, referring to the numerous times one or two holes were closed on the Palms course. The Greg Norman course opened in December. In January membership fees rose to $1,400 to play both courses. And golf cart fees went up, he adds. On Tuesday, Asher admonished the commission for not compensating the players who stayed with the city during construction. Asked what he wants, he says both courses for one year at the $800 fee. They offered me a few free plays, he adds, but thats not what I want. Commissioner Rex Hardin agrees. I understand his feelings of not receiving the value he paid for. But then Hardin says its something that the city staff has to resolve. He [Asher] should be compensated for this year. But what? A check? Additional playing privileges? Others will have different choices. Hardin said he thought that issue had been resolved in December. We had given direction to make the loyal members happy. We were all caught at-footed [when the problem arose again on Tiuesday.] Greg Martzolf, golf course general manager, said, Its See GOLF on page 13 Grand opening of Greg Norman coursePompano Beach After almost a year of being closed, the Pines Course at the Municipal Golf Course is ready for its grand reopening. The city will be celebrating the nished product with a ceremony on Wednesday, Jan. 16 at 10 a.m. at the course, 1101 N. Federal Hwy. Of cials said the goal of the revamped course was to bring in more golfers, golfers who might patronize local businesses before or after they play a round and increase economic activity in the area. To set up a tee time or get information about a membership, call 954-781-0426.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, January 11, 2013 a conversation now. I will be seeking the direction of the commission and the city manager. The Greg Norman Golf Course will have its grand opening on Jan. 16, 1101 N. Federal Hwy. at 10 a.m. The event is free and open to the public.Books & Lectures1-16 King: Look beyond the Dream to discover the man from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library, 2800 NW 9 Court, Pompano Beach. 954357-7670. 1-21 Marjory Lyons, Ph. D., will give a talk and review of the book Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson at 10 a.m. at All Saints Episcopal Church, at 6 p.m. at Water Mill Flowers, 5600 NW 12 Ave., #304, Fort Lauderdale. 954772-0200. 1-16 Ribbon cutting at Heart of the Olive, 816 N. Federal Highway, Pompano Beach, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Free samples of oil and balsamic dips and spreads. 754-222-8071. 1-17 Grand re-opening of Checkers Old Munchen, 2209 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Beer tastings and menu samplings. 954-785-7565. 1-24 Wilton Manors Business Association meeting at 12 p.m. at Primanti Brothers, 516 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Wilton Manors. 954565-7100.Children & Family1-12 Outdoor garden from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Bvld., Pompano Beach. For children ve and older. 954-357-7595.Clubs & Civic Organizations1-11 The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Group meets every Friday. 954-786-3274. 1-14 Pompano Beach Garden Club meets at 12:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Open to the public. The program Planting for Song Birds will be presented by Ann Wiley, member of the Audubon Society. Refreshments will be served. 954-943-0029. 1-15 Oakland Park Garden Club meets at 6:30 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. 954-6304511. 1-15 Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. 1-15 Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-972-7178.SightingsContinued from page 2 333 Tarpon Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $10. 954205-3552. 1-23 Beach Readers Book Club from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Beach Branch Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954357-7830.Business1-11 Ribbon cutting at Beach Grille, 3414 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, from 5 to 7 p.m. Free samples of their signature items such as funnel fries and Philly cheese steaks. 954-946-6000. 1-14 Wilton Manors Business Association meeting LYONS See SIGHTINGS on page 15 GolfContinued from page 12

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14 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 person coming into the city that we have these civic clubs available. And lets people know when and where to meet, he added. Here are some of the clubs The Pelican reached this week. Rotary Club of Pompano Beach Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Galuppis, 1103 N Federal Hwy, Pompano Beach 954-786-3274 The reach of the Rotary Club of Pompano Beach is near and far. In the Philippines, Rotary has funded over 100 cleft palate surgeries for children who could not afford the procedure on their own. In Guatemala, the club paid for the purchase of two dirt bikes to help doctors deliver polio vaccinations to children. We originally started with donating a generator for a dental boat [in Guatemala], said Ian McCarver, chair of Rotary Foundation and scholarship chair. The goal of Rotary International is to eliminate polio worldwide. Its a great program. Were down to three countries Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria. India was just certi ed as polio free, said McCarver. Closer to home, the group funds scholarships for students at Blanche Ely High School and Pompano Beach High School. It also helps the Boys & Grils Club and Woodhouse [a facility that helps adults who are disabled], most recently with the building of a new fence, and In the past weve done Rebuilding Together, which is similar to Habitat for Humanity where you can go in an refurbish homes. We give anywhere from $15,000 to $35,000 a year to charities, said McCarver. Exchange Club of Pompano Beach Wednesdays at 12 p.m. LHP Yacht and Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42 St. 954-783-6694 The Exchange Clubs mission is one focused on the needs of children. Basically, we raise money for underprivileged or underserved children, said President Robert Friedman. Its about child abuse prevention. Thats what we do. Its sort of like a Rotary Club with a different slant. Two of the biggest recipients of the nancial help given by Exchange are the Broward Childrens Center and the Childrens Healing Institute. We give money to other places but those are our two biggest recipients and we only give money out locally, said Friedman. Exchange also assists Habitat For Humanity, various youth projects, partners with alumni from the National Football League and donates scholarship money through essay contests. The Garden Club of Pompano Beach Second Monday at 12:30 p.m. Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. 954-731-4510 The Garden Club of Pompano Beach is dedicated to promoting and encouraging horticulture-related activities in the city and beyond. Mainly we do a lot of SignsContinued from page 1 See SIGNS on page 15

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The Pelican 15 Friday, January 11, 2013 activities aimed towards raising money for groups that we support, said Gloria Scroggin, president of the Garden Club. A portion of the money they raise funds camperships at Wekiva Youth Camp in Apopka. There, campers go through a program, sponsored by the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs, that teaches them to appreciate nature in Florida and to get the kids interested in our world. The Garden Club also assists the Youth Garden Club at Pompano Beach Elementary School, awards scholarships for students studying ecology and plants trees for Habitat For Humanity and the SampleMcDougald House. The things we do in Pompano Beach are important, said Scroggin. Soroptomist Meets second Wednesdays of the month at 5:30 p.m. Lighthouse Point Yacht and Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42 St. 954-234-5339 Soroptomist means Best for Women, said Sandy Johnson, president of the Soroptomist in Pompano Beach. But, as Johnson puts it, her Soroptomist club isnt just about helping women. Were a bit of a renegade [group]. While the organization supports causes like education for women in Afghanistan and gives college scholarships to women, it also focuses on helping other groups of people, especially children. The Soroptomists scholarships go to help women so theyll be better able to support their family in the future. From the very beginning weve worked to help Woodhouse. We also work to raise funds for Broward Childrens Center and also the Childrens Health Institute. We try to keep everything here right here in the local area, said Johnson. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club Tuesdays at 7:30 a.m. Galuppis, 1103 N Federal Hwy. 954-972-7178 A lot of the focus of the Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club is on education. Our main project is dictionaries for third graders, said Bill Zobus, secretary. We started with just one school and the project was accepted so well that we added more schools that year. Each year since then we have added a few more schools. Now, the organization passes out 2,664 dictionaries to 126 classrooms in 18 public schools in Pompano Beach, Coconut Creek, North Lauderdale and West Park. Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club also assists those living at the SOS Childrens Village with gift cards from Target. Monetary donations to the Boys & Girls Clubs and Tomorrows Rainbow, an organization that helps children deal with the death of a family member. But their charity isnt con ned to children. Members also donated help to tornado victims in Joplin, Mo as well as paralyzed veterans. Were always looking for things to do, said Zobus.SignsContinued from page 14 1-16 Exchange Club of Pompano Beach meets at 12 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Yacht and Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42 St. Group meets every Wednesday. 954-7836694. 1-19 Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-7828096.1-22 Card party from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Cost is $4 and includes desert, coffee or tea. Reservations required. 561479-2002. 2-13 Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets at 10 a.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 Ave., Pompano Beach. Group meets every second Wednesday of the month except April and December. 954-786-3902.Education & Self Development1-13 What would Martin Luther King do? SightingsContinued from page 13 See SIGHTINGS on page 18

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16 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Berner, 64, ran unsuccessfully for mayor four years ago, although she said this week she would have preferred to run for the commission but saw she was up against hanky panky in the Village and so switched her race. She is the founder of the Century Village Relay for Life Team and was on the board of Master Management but has given up both to run for of ce. She served for a brief time on the DB Housing Authority. Berner said she would have run even if Popelsky was a candidate citing injustices she feels exists in the city. Capoblanco, 62, also ran four years ago seeking the District 3 seat. A 10year resident of CVE, she has held all major positions within the Village including the presidency of Master Management, and a seat on the Century Village board of directors. Capoblanco is currently president of her building and on the recreation committee. Now retired, Capoblanco, was a business consultant for many years and more recently the owner of a memory game which she marketed to assisted living facilities. She said she is running to give residents of the district a choice. Rosenzweig, 74, came here ve years ago from Silver Springs, MD where he was in the wholesale food distribution business and active politically in precinct and county government. Locally, he is a member of the Jewish War Veterans, the Democratic club and a member of Temple Beth Israel. Although he never sought of ce in the past because his area had so many eligible candidates, Rosenzweig said now the time seems right. Among the things that concern him are safety and senior citizen issues. Noland, 61, will go up against former mayor Jean Robb who challenged her four years ago. Robb, 81, has disagreed with the administration on many fronts, most notably opposing the public service tax enacted in 2011. She served as mayor from 1980 to 1993. Noland is seeking her fourth, four-year term on the commission, her second as mayor. She won over a large eld in 2009.No challengers in Hillsboro BeachHillsboro Beach Incumbents Mayor Dan Dodge, Vice Mayor Claire Schubert and Commissioner Javier Garcia drew no opponents and are re-elected. Dodge was rst elected in 2003 and has been mayor for two years. Schubert and Garcia were both elected to two-year terms in 2011. The town passed a law in 2008 limiting commissioners to four, two-year terms. Municipal elections take place March 12. Deer eld candidatesContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, January 11, 2013 bowing his head up and down and saying thank you to the crowds. Hand Me Silver and Silvestro graced the cover and centerfold of Australias People Magazine and was selected by noted author and celebrity George Plimpton in his PBS Series, Fireworks, A History and Celebration, as the best reworks performance in all of Australia/New Zealand. He was such a tough horse that in January 1997 I raced Hand Me Silver in the rst event at the Tamworth Music Festival in Australia. Silvestro explained. And he won. It was his rst and only win as a racehorse. I used that race as his warm-up because later on the card after the fth race I returned with him and did the Hot To Trot show and the people were amazed. Hand Me Silver left his native Australia to come to the United States in 1997 and performed his rst show ever on North American soil at North eld Park in Cleveland, Ohio on May 31. On that night Hand Me Silver showed me he was the best horse ever. Silvestro said. It was raining so hard they had ood warnings in the area. But 9,000 people had come to the track and we had to do the show. Despite the rain and a sloppy track, Hand Me Silver never missed a beat. Even when some geese from the in eld ew at his head and under his feet he did not blink an eyelid and kept right on pacing away. He was unbelievable. During the off-season, Hand Me Silver was used for hippo therapy at a local equine center in the mornings, allowing mentally and physically handicapped children to ride him for their therapy session and in the afternoon the riding academy used him for children learning to ride and jump small fences. Performing throughout Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand, Hand Me Silver graced such events at the world renowned Royal Adelaide Music Festival, the Perth Royal Show, The Gold Coast City Show, Auckland Trotting Club, seven straight New Years Eve venues in Kalgoorlie and more than 20 shows at the famous Harold Park in Sydney. During his show years in the United States, Hand Me Silver performed nine straight years at Pompano Park. He also did shows at Hawthorne Raceway in Chicago, Pocono Downs (PA), Tioga Downs (NY), Garden State Park (NJ), Rosecroft Raceway (MD), Harrington Raceway (DE), Saratoga Raceway (NY), Ladbroke at the Meadows (PA) and the Zanesville County Blue Ribbon Fair in Ohio. After his last show at Pompano Park, Silvestro explained. We gave Hand Me Silver to a family in southern Florida who had a companion horse. They had cared for him in the past, had plenty of trails to ride on and I knew they would take excellent care of him. I will always have fond memories of Hand Me Silver. There will never be another one like him. Hand Me SilverContinued from page 3

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18 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 SightingsContinued from page 15discussion at 11 a.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park, 33309. Free lunch. 954-531-1928. 1-15 Class on tax updates for 2013 at 6 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954-9466398.Health & Fitness1-15 Knee pain class hosted by Dr. Paul Meli from 4 to 5 p.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E Sample Road, Deer eld Beach. 954-7597400. 1-15 New Year Health Goals: An Enlightened Women Lecture Series from 6 to 7 p.m. at Broward Health Coral Springs Medical Of ce Complex, 3100 Coral Hills Drive. 954-759-7400. 1-15 High Tea & Trivia Eat. Drink. Think. from 3 to 4 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point cafeteria, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Tailored for seniors age 65 and older. Prizes awarded. 954-759-7400. 1-16 Free quit smoking program from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. at the Wilton Manors Public Library, 500 NE 26 St. 305-942-6378. 1-16 Alzheimers Caregiver Support Group meets from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, located at 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld Beach. Group is for individuals caring for people with Alzheimers disease, memory impairments, dementia, and cognitive limitations. 954480-4463. 1-16 Suicide Prevention Survivors Group from 7 to 8 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Registration required. 954980-9628.Music 1-13 Sunday Matinee Music at 3 p.m. at Boca Raton Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd. Jim Kovalcik Trio, featuring Jim Kovalcik on ute, Jason Hanley on guitar and Steve Jernigan on bass. 561-239-1536. 1-13 Goldberg Variations performed at 5 p.m. by Simone Dinnerstein at Knight Concert Hall at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami. 305-949-6722 1-13 Music at St. Paul, 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach at 3 p.m. Mei Mei Luo and Daphne Spottiswoode perform Corelli, Gershwin, Chopin and more. Requested donation $15. 561-278-6003.See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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The Pelican 19 Friday, January 11, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF Taj restaurant 201 SE 15 Terrace Cove Shopping Center Deer eld Beach 954-427-0423 Lunch buffet Monday to Sunday 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dinner buffet Wednesday and Sunday 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. la carte Monday to Sunday 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. tajindianrestaurant.comOur food is primarily from the Northern part of India, says Anoop Chopra, an experienced restaurateur who has owned and operated several Indian restaurants in Florida and Canada over the past three decades. We do an excellent, extensive lunch Taj restaurant brings all the exotic avors of India to the heart of Deer eld A sampler plate of chicken Tandoori, butter chicken, Basmati rice, Naan bread, chickpeas, potatoes, beef curry and deep-fried onion Bhaji.buffet seven days a week, evening buffet Wednesdays and Sundays, and our la carte menu is available every night. Now in its ninth year of operation near the intersection of Hillsboro Blvd. and the Intracoastal Waterway, the Taj is essentially the only legitimate game in town for authentic, flavor-laden Indian specialties. Everything is made fresh using a plethora of exotic spices imported directly from the second most populous country in the world. Upon entering this rich, woodsy eatery decorated in a style representative of the ancient Indus Valley civilization on which it is based, the maelstrom of pungent scents and titillating flavors instantly transports patrons to the gastronomic nexus of the Indian subcontinent. The menu is chock-full of all the specialties that make Indian cuisine so desirable. Appetizers such as beef samosas, deep fried onion bhaji morsels, spiced lamb kebabs, potato patties, artisanal unleavened breads and soul-warming lentil soups are a great way to start off the culinary voyage. One of the main attractions is the Indian version of Oodles of Tandoori chicken can be enjoyed for one low price at the all-youcan-eat Taj buffet.See TAJ on page 29

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20 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 If you are considering receiving home care, you may be given advice to hire a private attendant. Due to the cost and the increasing shortage of quality in-home caregivers, many families turn to private individuals rather than working through an agency. While at first glance this may seem reasonable, it can cause numerous problems and create unexpected liabilities for the family, who may become the employer of the independent caregiver. There are a number of very compelling reasons why it is a much wiser decision to utilize an legal agency as the employer of your inhome attendants. Tax Issues. As a private employer, you are required to pay Social Security, unemployment and payroll taxes, and workers compensation insurance. Many private caregivers will represent themselves as independent contractors, ostensibly relieving you of these tax obligations. However, this can be a dangerous misrepresentation of the facts. When a caregiver works in your home privately typically you will be considered the employer. If your worker does not meet his or her payroll tax obligations, this responsibility falls to you as the employer. This can be a serious obligation because it may involve back payroll taxes with interest and penalties, civil fines and the possibility of criminal penalties. If your worker is ever injured while working for you, or files for unemployment insurance when she or he stops working for you, or if your worker becomes unhappy and develops a grievance against you, and decides to report you or file a legal claim or lawsuit, you could be become subject to significant costs and penalties. If you had that worker for a few years, the back taxes, penalties and interest could be enormous. This is not an exaggerated fear.Protection from elder abuse and exploitation Unfortunately, there is the potential for both physical abuse and nancial waste when work is being done on behalf of a frail, functionally limited, and often cognitively impaired older adult. While most individuals who become private caregivers do so out of a desire to help others and to contribute to the community, Elder Issues AdvertisementAgency, or private caregiver?there are predators who seek caregiving jobs with the intention of taking advantage. This becomes especially easy when the attendant and the recipient of care are isolated in a private home with little or no supervision. Families usually do not fail to provide supervision out of malicious neglect. Supervision is often dif cult because of geographic distance, lack of expertise, or a strong emotional dependence of the senior upon the attendant. Furthermore, families often do not have the time or the resources to do criminal background checks, or to contact references, if they even think to ask for references. Sometimes families are so grateful for the care provided by an aide that they are also vulnerable to dependence, then manipulation and exploitation. Even if these crimes are not pre-meditated, they are frequently crimes of opportunity. Next week we will talk about bene ts of agency supervision, some of the responsibilities in hiring private caregiver and cost. We are not providing legal or tax advice. Please consult with your professional advisers before you engage any private caregivers. To hire a licensed, insured, bonded home health agency and to get information on any elder issues call Senior Helpers of Florida at 954-7075030.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, January 11, 2013 Relay team sets fundraiser at Baja CafeHillsboro Beach For the first time, Hillsboro Beach is participating in the Deerfield Beach/Lighthouse Point Relay for Life, an annual event that benefits the American Cancer Society. Relay Fiesta at the Baja Caf, 1310 S. Federal Highway in Deerfield Beach, will be held uesday, Jan. 15, 5:30 p.m. until closing. Fifteen percent of the revenues from food and drink will go to Relay. Local chair is Vice Mayor Claire Schubert who said, There will be fabulous food, fantastic raffles and the wonderful feeling of supporting Relay for Life by just eating the best Mexican food ever. For more, call Schubert at 954-426-4394. 1-17 Instrumental Collaborative Piano Departmental Recital at 7:30 p.m. at Lynn Universitys Keith C. & Elaine Johnson World Performing Arts Centre, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets are $10. 561-2379000. 1-20 And All That Jazz featuring the Rob Prestor Jazz Trio at 4 p.m. at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $20 for members and $25 for non-members. 561-998-7784. 1-26 Painting portrait workshop from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Rossetti Fine Art Gallery, 132 McNab Road, Pompano Beach. 954-247-9580. 1-20 Annie Moses Band performs at 4 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church The Pink Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. The band is known for its fusion of jazz, classical, country, bluegrass and pop. Suggested donation is $10 for adults, $5 for students and free for children 12 and under. Visit www.pinkpres.org or 954941-2308.Sports & Activities 1-12 & 19 Northeast Little League baseball signup from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wimberly Field batting cage, 4000 NE 3 Ave., Oakland Park. League is boys and girls ages 5 to 18. Jan. 26 is the last day to register. Volunteer and sponsorship opportunities available. Email davemcleod33@aol.com or 954793-2348. SightingsContinued from page 18 See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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22 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700! By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Imagine if you were taken from your home, put on a train where your parents were saying goodbye, Nick Winton said to Deerfield Beach Middle School students this week. Thats what happened to the lucky Czechoslovakian children in 1938 just before Hitler invaded Prague. Torn from their families at a young age most of them survived in England and went on to have successful lives, lives they owe to Wintons 103-year-old father, Sir Nicholas Winton. At the time, Sir Nicholas was a 28-year-old English stockbroker who had no thought of becoming a hero. On a visit to Prague, he saw refugee camps where the Nazis were holding Jews, Blacks and intellectuals. This will end badly, he thought and so began the task of removing Jewish children from the country. It required getting the House of Commons to approve legislation allowing the children into England, organizing train transportation to that country and finding the children homes and schools. The mission became known as Kindertransport and in the year or so it was allowed, saved the lives of 669 children. He didnt go looking for this, the younger Winton said. But when he saw an opportunity, he did something. It shows what an enormous difference one person can make. I still get a lump on my throat when I talk about it. Winton is in the U.S. to promote a documentary about his fathers extraordinary efforts. The movie, Nickys Family, opens in Florida Jan. 11 at selected venues such at the Living Room Theatre on Nick Winton, at Deer eld Beach Middle School Wednesday, autographed a poster advertising the documentary Nickys Family, an account of his fathers humanitarian effort that saved the lives of 669 Jewish children before the Germans invaded Czechoslovakia in 1938. Pictured with him are Steve Ben-Canaan and Rebecca Israel. Students learn how one man made a dif ferenceSee DIFFERENCE on page 25

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The Pelican 23 Friday, January 11, 2013 Wilton Manorsmade in Wilton Manors its answered by Broward Sheriffs Of ce [BSO] employees inside the Fort Lauderdale Police Station. According to Deputy Fire Chief William Findlan, 10,872 calls originated from Wilton Manors in 2011 with 189,758 from Fort Lauderdale. Mayor Gary Resnick said the county is double charging residents for dispatch services. They get $40 million [in cell phone communication tax revenue to fund dispatch services], he Wilton Manors Police Chief Paul OConnell suggested possible alternatives, including dispatch services directly from BSO. The city has until April to come up with an alternative. This is three months before we have to have another plan in place, said Resnick.City reduces payment in lieu of parking requirementsWilton Manors Commissioners reduced the amount of money business owners have to pay in lieu of providing parking spaces from $18,000 per space to $10,000 per space. The move, said City Manager Joseph Gallegos, is designed to encourage more development by easing restrictions on parking and making Wilton Manors more competitive with other cities, some of which charge less Hollywood charges $5,000 per space, Dania Beach charges $6,500, Fort Lauderdale charges $4,000 for commercial and $12,000 for hotels, motels and time shares and Oakland Park charges $15,000. I guess I support it because we want to attract visitors to Wilton Manors, said Mayor Gary Resnick. Commissioners also gave nal approval to regulations that allow vending carts on Wilton Drive and Dixie Highway. Originally, the city allowed food and beverage carts on public and private property. But after objections from business owners who were worried the carts would hurt their business, commissioners revised the regulations. Now, only carts that are set-up on private property with the permission of a business owner are allowed. But so far only one vending cart owner has applied for a permit to operate on Dixie Highway. Commissioner Tom Green said he was disappointed no carts had been set-up on Wilton Drive, something he thinks would enhance the atmosphere along the street. I hope someone will look at this. If not, Ill bring it up again, he said. Fundraisers to bene t Island City Foundation Wilton Manors The Island City Foundation, the citys charitable organization, will be the recipient of two upcoming fundraisers one put on by the Pride Center at Equality Park and one put on by the city itself. An Evening in Paradise will take place on Saturday, Jan. 19 from 7 to 11 p.m. at Richardson Park, 1937 Wilton Drive. Its estimated that the city will get a minimum of $5,000 from the event or 10 percent of the funds raised, whichever is greater. VIP tickets are $150 and include access to a private bar, lounge and specialty hors doeuvres. Regular tickets are $100. Visit www.pridecenter orida.org to buy tickets. To show off the city, ofcials will close down Wilton Drive on Friday, Feb. 15 for HeArts on the Drive. The street will be closed from the Northeast 4 Avenue Bridge to Five Points from 4 p.m. to midnight while the event will take place from 6 to 10 p.m. The idea is to promote the city and the restaurants that call Wilton Drive home. Restaurants that participate would put out tables and chairs along Wilton Drive and serve their customers right on the street. Its also the same time as Art Walk so theres that energy as well, said Heidi Shafran, community development services department director. To cover the $3,000 cost of closing down the street, the city is looking for six community sponsors to contribute $500 each. Beyond that, the city is also looking for restaurants to participate. The cost of being part of the event would be based on the size of the establishment ranging from $100 to $500. To become a sponsor, call Randy Welker, economic development coordinator, at 954-3902187.City applies for marine patrol grantWilton Manors At the request of Police Chief Paul OConnell, the city has applied for a $17,000 grant from the Broward County Marine Advisory Committee. If approved, the grant will be used to reimburse the city for expenses related to its marine of cers patrolling the North and South Forks of the Middle River. The grant, which requires no matching funds from the city, would pay for 53 eight-hour patrol shifts and include ve holiday shifts.

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24 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Commissioner Charlotte Burrie is Thomas Terwilliger while Dist. 4 Commissioner Woodrow Poitier is up against former commissioner Ed Phillips and Joseph Wells.MayorMayor Lamar Fisher, 52, has been in his current elected position since 2007. The owner of Fisher Auction House, Fishers family has had roots in Pompano for generations. Fisher cites his Mayors Stimulus Package, beach redevelopment, the new bus transit center on Dixie Highway, golf course redevelopment and the planned library and cultural center next to city hall as examples of why voters should re-elect him. The proof of our success is now being seen throughout the city and I truly serve the people of our city and want to continue for another term. I fought hard for the land use amendment which will enable the redevelopment of the Dixie/MLK Corridor and prepare for the transit oriented corridor, said Fisher. We need to focus now on our transit station along the FEC railroad and the quality development around that area. Challenger Marcus McDougale, 40, a native of Pompano Beach and graduate of Blanche Ely High School, said if elected mayor he will Pompano Beach electionsContinued from page 1focus on childhood obesity, tax incentives for residents and creating a more uni ed community. I want to see more economic relief to the communities of Pompano. McDougale said hes employed as an educator and community advocate but declined to say what company he works for. Now more than ever, I feel like I could be a part of that process of change. I can de nitely be instrumental and work with some of the other local community gures. Challenger David Baumwald, 47, a member of the community appearance committee and construction project manager for D And M Home Development, has lived in Pompano for over 30 years and wants to see an improved beach area, more tourism, a better economy and less crime. The businesses on Federal Highway are going dead. I want to bring jobs and tourism back to our city. And were no longer a destination and crime is out of hand. There were 11 A/C units stolen in one day in my neighborhood. In 1998, Baumwald was arrested and charged with cocaine possession, intent to purchase cocaine, obstruction of a criminal investigation and served 13 months, according to the Florida Department of Corrections. That was a long time ago. I was in a car with someone who purchased it so we both got charged. I was getting a ride home. Wrong place. Wrong time, he said. Had I had a real lawyer I would have walked away from this scot free.District 2Commissioner Charlotte Burrie, 68, in of ce for six years and a resident of Pompano for 50 years, said voters should re-elect her because of her accomplishments, including the revamped Greg Norman Golf Course and increased community policing. But Burrie, who works as an attorney, also gives less tangible reasons. I have been working for the residents in the community and Ive accomplished many things and I will continue to work for my community if re-elected. Ive always had an open door and Im here to serve the community. Tom Terwilliger, 67, a resident of South Florida for 15 years and Pompano for three years, ran for state senate in Michigan in his early 20s and wants to try again for city commission in Pompano. Now Im semi-retired and Ive got the time to do it. Public service takes a lot more than just a regular 40-hour work week. With a background in investment banking, Terwilliger said he knows what it takes to work with city budgets. I know what it is to run a balanced budget, he said, adding that he also wants to make government more ef cient See POMPANO ELECTIONS on page 25

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The Pelican 25 Friday, January 11, 2013 and protect the civil liberties and rights of Pompanos citizens.District 4Commissioner Woodrow Poitier, 65, has been in of ce since 2008 when he nished out the term of the late E. Pat Larkins, Commissioner Woodrow Poitier is the owner of L.C. Poitier Funeral Home. Im really enjoying the job now a lot more than I did the rst time around. And because of that its getting easier to do. And, he says, things are happening because of Woody. Things like improvements to the Northwest Community Redevelopment Area. Im into the job and Im making things happen. Im getting progress done on Martin Luther King Boulevard and the faade program is being taken advantage of. Ed Phillips, 62, served as city commissioner from 2000 to 2002 and hes ready to get back on the dais. The owner of PF Insurance, Phillips has been in Pompano for over 50 years. Im running to respond to the needs of Dist. 4. My top priorities will be to listen, to listen, to listen. And then implement. Asked if he had any speci c plans, Right now, I just need to listen to what the needs of Dist. 4 are. I may have some ideas but I dont want to talk about them this early in the campaign. The Pelican was not able to reach Joseph Wells in time for publication. Pompano electionsContinued from page 24the campus of Florida Atlantic University. His appearance at DBMS was arranged by Steve Ben-Canaan who, with Lynn Wolf, teaches holocaust studies at the school. The presentation was given to only one other Broward County school. Very few students are getting this chance, BenCanaan said as he urged the young audience to sign up for a field trip to see the film later in the month. This is the story of how one man changed the world. It is estimated there are 6,000 to 7,000 descendents of those Kindertransport children. Almost all the parents who put their children on Sir Wintons trains died at Auschwitz. One of the Kindertransport survivors, Rebecca Israel, made history real for the students by talking about her dad, Ben Abels, who was put on the train at age 14. An adventurous boy, Abels was actually excited to be on his own but then found life to be a challenge, failing at boarding school, returning to Prague only to find it controlled by the Communists, eventually earning a doctorate in physics. And here the story gets more interesting. Abels came to the U.S. where he made his own survivor contribution. He invented the thermal electric generator used today to power the Mars Rover. If this man had not survived, maybe the thermal generator would not have been invented, Ben-Canaan told the students. Its another example of how one person can change the world. Winton said many of the survivors grew up to be people of great importance. Sir Winton kept his wartime activity secret for more than 50 years until his notes were discovered by his wife. It was then that he began receiving accolades and his story told in interviews and films. Today, there is a movement by 120,000 children in the Czech Republic to award Sir Winton the Nobel Peace Prize. The petitions are available for student signatures at DBMS or online at Change.org/ petitions/Czech-Republicnominate-sir-nicholas-wintonfor-the-nobel-peace-prize DifferenceContinued from page 22

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26 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 NOW HIRING BREAKFAST COOKS!! Part Or Full Time. All Shifts. Open 7 Days. Apply 2211 Wilton Drive Wilton Manors Courtyard Caf. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. HOME HEALTH AIDE To Care For Alzheimer Patient. Tube Feeding. Run Errands, Light Cooking. Also Airport Trips! Call 954-226-2089. 1-11 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-11 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available Love To Clean Windows! Refrigerators, Ovens. No Problem. FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 1-11 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954818-9538. 1-11 MIKE THE GARDENER The All American Yardman Yard And Garden Care Get Te Best For Less! Call 561-5436337. 1-18 VISION ELECTRIC INCLicensed/Insured. Electrical Service & Installation. No Job Too Small. #EC13002184 Call 954-274-4513. 1-25 MARCELAS CLEANING Residential Cleaning. Affordable Service You Can Trust! Experienced & GREAT References. 954-376-0524. 2-1 REMODELING SPECIALTIES Flooring Wood & Tile Drywall Painting Carpentry. Licensed. Reasonable. Experienced. Patrick & Frank 954-696-8596 Or 954-404-2163. 1-11 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 111 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C SELL YOUR BUSINESS!! Call Russell Cohen 954-646-7651 www. abiz4sale.comr cohen@ tworld.com. Transworld Business Br okers Lic R.E. Broker. 2-1 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CCOLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 1-25 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 1-1 1 WHITE WICKER DINING ROOM Set Includes 4 Chairs 42 Round Table / Glass Top. $125. Lighthouse Point. 954782-0339. 1-11 CO-OP FOR SALEPOMPANO LARGE 1 BEDROOM CO-OP Screened Porch. 55/Over. No Pets. Heated Pool. Near Beach, Golf, Shopping. $65,000 Furnished. 302-690-8285. 1-18 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 27 Friday, January 11, 2013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 In Deer eld BeachWalgreens, 1005 S. Federal Hwy. Walgreens, 1325 N. Military Trail Peking Tokyo, S.E. 10th Street Shopping Center Josephs Italian Pastries, 788 S. Federal Hwy. Hot Tomatoe, 626 S. Federal Hwy. Marlees Diner, 699 S. Federal Hwy. One Price Dry Cleaners, 273 S. Federal Hwy. OPEN HOUSESPOMPANO SUNDAY 12-3PM. 999 N RIVERSIDE DR # 2. Directly On The Intracoastal With Million Dollar Water Views As You Enter This 2 /2 1st Floor Corner Unit. Monthly Maintenance Only $269 Per Month. W / D In Unit. Camille Hall Balistreri R.E. 954-254-2085. GARAGE SALEPOMPANO BEACH SATURDAY & SUNDAY 8am. 220 SE 22 Avenue. Moving Sale!!! All MUST GO! Great Bargains. 1-11 REAL ESTATE SERVICESSELLING OR BUYING Choose Someone You Can Trust 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen. YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 1-11 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38 x 13. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO CHARMING 2/1 Home. Asking $975 Per Month. 611 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 1-25 POMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,200 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 POMPANO BEACH Leisureville. 3/2 1 Car Garage,. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease Utilities Not Included. Available February 1st. 954649-8867. 1-11 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE / DEERFIELD Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny w/Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furnished. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $56K. 561-372-9837. 1-11 POMPANO AEGEAN Oceanfront Corner 2/2 Direct Ocean View From Every Room. Huge Wraparound Balcony. W/D In Unit. Garage Park 2 Cars. Hot Tub Pool Exercise Room. Widest Beach In Area. Dynasty R.E. 954-295-2356. POMPANO BEACH 2 /2 Fabulous Ocean & Intracoastal Views From SE Corner 15th Floor! Reduced! $249,900. Carole Stephan Greater Broward Realty. 954-6955937. POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 1-11 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 2-1 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 Apt With Screened Room Available In Residential Neighborhood. $1,000 Month Yearly Lease. Call 609-638-1291. 1-18 BEACHY-KEEN! 2 Bedroom 2 Bath1 Block From The Sand In NE Pompano. Annual Lease $1,275 Month. 954-614-8428. POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL. Efficiency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 NW NE 2/1 New $9752/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-998-5681. POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 1-25 CHURCH FOR RENT! Pompano Beach. Well Furnished. Great Sound System Available. Seats 20. Must Rent! Only $275/Month. Please Call For Availability. 954-588-4985 754-281-0922. POMPANO DIXIE & COPANS WAREHOUSE For Rent. 2 Units 1-1640 Sq Ft 1 2080 Sq Ft With A/C Of ces Zoned 3M. Both With Overhead Doors. Starting At $850. Call 716-316-3690. 1-11

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28 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 SPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach Do you love seashells and shell collecting? If so, theres a family-style weekend event coming up, the 48th Annual Broward Shell Show held Jan. 19 to 20; the only event of its kind in South Florida. Hours: Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hosted by the non-pro t Broward Shell Club at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., the Broward Shell Show offers an opportunity for shell-loving enthusiasts to enjoy an exciting weekend immersed in the wonderful world of shells. Thousands of beautiful and unusual shells from around the world will be on display and for sale. Weekend Attractions include: Competitive displays by dozens of collectors; Shell Artists showcasing their designs; International Shell Market featuring shells, shell 48th Broward Shell ShowCollectors will bring shells of all sizes.craft, jewelry and educational shell books; a Shell ID Station where beginners or advanced shell collectors can bring their seashells for identi cation; raf e items and door prizes. Five educational programs will be presented during the show. Visit our Facebook page or website for additional information regarding the guest speakers. The Broward Shell show takes place at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Saturday, Jan. 19 and Jan. 20. Call 305-467-4412 or email nancygaldo@gmail.com or visit www.browardshellclub.org, www.facebook.com/ groups/BrowardShellClub/

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The Pelican 29 Friday, January 11, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com BBQ called Tandoori. We make all our Tandoori items, including Naan bread, using the traditional clay pot, says Chopra of the millennia old cooking method which employs an old-fashioned, cylindrical Tandoor clay oven designed to produce fiery convection heating. Shrimp, poultry, Mahi-Mahi and the exquisite lamb chops are all offered in this format. For example, Tandoori chicken is a roasted delicacy that originated in TajContinued from page 19 The outrageously avorful Tandoori lamb chops are marinated in cream, yogurt and fresh spices before being barbequed in the traditional tandoor clay pot oven. Here they are served potatoes, Biryani rice and mango chutney.northwestern India. The chicken is marinated in a yogurt seasoned with garam masala, garlic, ginger, cumin, cayenne pepper, and other spices depending on the recipe. In more piquant iterations, the dish features cayenne pepper and red chili powder that produce the iconic red hue. The visual effect induces Pavlovian salivation responses and the flavors are mouthwateringly explosive. This is definitely a great introduction for those who may not be overly familiar with Indian cooking. Other noteworthy offerings include leg of lamb Korma in cream sauce, shrimp vindaloo with potatoes in curry sauce, fried cheese Saag Paneer, vegetable rice Biryani with saffron and Channa Masala chickpeas flavored with aromatic spices. Our butter chicken, Tandoori Mahi, lamb chops and vegetarian Jhalfrazy [mixed veggies masala] are very popular. All dishes come with Basmati rice and everything can be prepared as spicy as desired, says Chopra who has garnered quite a loyal following over the years. Our customers truly appreciate the authenticity of our food. By the way, guests are always greeted with a free serving of crisp, lightly spiced lentil wafers known as Papadum accompanied by onion chutney. I have been coming here since it opened. My children just love the truly excellent food, says Kim Copelin, a Boca Raton resident who was on hand with her husband and two young children. This is by far the best Indian restaurant anywhere and Anoop is a wonderful Chef. Curry lovers can indulge in mutton, beef, salmon or chicken versions that showcase the full breadth of flavors extracted from turmeric, cumin, black and green cardamom, mace, garlic, ginger, tomatoes and coriander powder to name but a few. I really like the fish Tikka, says friendly waiter Victor, whose family lives in Mumbai [Bombay]. Another popular option is the chicken Tikka Masala overflowing with boneless pieces of poultry marinated and roasted in the tandoor then sauted in spices and served with a rich, exotic Masala style sauce. By the way, there is nothing more refreshing that a Kingfisher or Taj Mahal beer to go along with any flavorsome plate. The Taj also offers a wealth of reasonably priced red and white wines from every corner of the globe. The all-you-can-eat lunch buffet is $12 during the week and $13 on weekends. The dinner buffets are $5 more but include lamb and shrimp specialties. Taj also does a brisk take-out service and is happy to provide catering for up to 75 people. Enjoy! Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. Captions: Pic #5496 The eyecatching buffet features

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30 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Send your fishing news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Think nautical nowPompano Beach The Annual Nautical Flea Market opens Jan. 26 for a weekend of deals for boaters, divers, anglers and everyone else with an eye for a deal. Vendors will fill the grounds of Community Park with food, crafts, art, books and all things nautical. The event is a shared project between Pompano Beach and Lighthouse Point. Cost to attend is $5 per day. For vendor information, call 954-786-4111 or visit www. nauticalfleamarket.com.RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSSea conditions are looking choppy for the weekend as of now. I may just stay on land and fish from the new pier. There have been lots of spanish mackerel and bluefish to catch. As long as you eat them while they are still fresh they are excellent. I will be bringing a long casting rod with me so I can put a bait way out. I am pretty sure that right now I can catch a cobia. The cobia swim in shallow water following the sting rays. They feed on the crabs that are stirred up by the rays wings. I will fish either a live blue runner or a eight inch whole squid. Make sure to have at least 12 ounces of lead to keep your bait down. Cobia [also known as Ling] make for some awesome eating. The Deer eld Pier may be your best bet this weekend Call the Deerfield Pier at 954-426-9206 or call us if you have any questions at 954420-5001. Good luck out there! Theatre & Film1-11 The lm Oklahoma will be shown at 6:30 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Drive, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. A lm will be shown the second Friday of every month. Tickets are $1. Attendees are encouraged to dress up in costume. Best dressed wins a prize. 954-5908658. 1-13 Pinkalicious at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. at the Aventura Arts & Cultural Center, 3385 NE 188 Street, Aventura. Tickets are $3 for children and $15 for adults. 305-466-8002. 1-13 Edge of Salvation plays at 2 and 8 p.m. at Muvico 2315 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Movie is the story of a 14-year-old boy and his struggles caused by a down economy, pride, greed and ultimately mans inhumanity to man. 954-946-SightingsContinued from page 218416. 1-15 Agatha Christies the BBC Murders at 8 p.m. at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are $26.50 to $66.50. Runs through Feb. 3. 954-4620222. 1-20 Play Reading Series Back Stage Story at 7:30 p.m. at Lynn Universitys Keith C. & Elaine Johnson World Performing Arts Centre, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets are $10. 561-237-9000. 1-27 Kiss Me Kate at 2 p.m. at the Sunrise Civic Center Theater, Sunrise Civic Center Theatre, 10610 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise. Tickets are $25 for adults and $10 for children. 954-7474646. 2-1 Side Show plays at 8 p.m. at West Boca Performing Arts Theatre, 12811 West Glades Road, Boca Raton. Runs until Feb. 10. 866-811-4111.

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The Pelican 31 Friday, January 11, 2013 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! ScoreboardPompano Beach Womens Golf Assn.. Jan. 8 A ClassKim Heath . . 80 Debbie Brown . 68 B Class Janet Stuart . . 83 Patti VanZandt . 85 C Class Nancy Cutler . 98 D Class Elaine Schoengood . 106 Lil Cody . 74 Pompano Beach 9 Hole Womens League Jan. 8Class A: (tie) 1st Place, Cathy Olson, Almut Davis . 47 2nd Place: Susan Dimond . 48 Class B: 1st Place Jill Goldfarb . 55 2nd Place Maureen Zolubos . 57 3rd Place Jan Murphy, Joanne Price . 58Pompano Beach Mens Golf Assn. Wed. Jan. 9 1st place . Ed Gormley, Bill Bradford, Sam Chuck . 69 2nd place Bill Stiehm, Lynn Spizz George Zarekas . 69 3rd place Roger Chapman, Scott Feinman. John Pihl, Don Ingram . 70 4th place Bernie Kelley. John Kapoukakis, George Hussey, Wayne Joy . 70 Closest to the pin, Pines #7, John Kapoukakis Casino tripDeerfield Beach St. Ambrose Mens Club will host a trip to the Seminole Hardrock Casino, Jan. 18. Participants must be at the parking lot, 380 S. Federal Hwy., Deerfield Beach, at 11 a.m. The bus departs at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $26 which includes transportation and a $5 food coupon. The event is open to the public, but reservations are required. Call 954-856-6062.

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Friday, January 11, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 2 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican With her father, Dale Gibson joining in prayer at the Annual Dr. Martin Luther King prayer breakfast, Jade, 5, appears to cont emplate the event and its meaning. The Interfaith Breakfast took place at the E. Pat Larkins Civic Center in Pompano Beach. The event was sponsored by t he MLK committee and Pompano Christian Clergy Council. The Rev. James Smith, senior pastor at New Jerusalem Baptist Church was the keynote speak er.Open seat draws three candidates; mayor is opposedBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Three candidates are vying for the District 3 city commission seat. Mayor Peggy Noland faces a challenge from longtime political rival Jean Robb, and Dist. 4 Commissioner Bill Ganz drew no opposition and is re-elected. The activity in District 3, comprised of Century Village East and Crystal Lake, is spurred by incumbent commissioner Marty Popelsky being ineligible to run due to term limits. Two candidates, Caryl Berner and Donna Capoblanco, have run before; the other, Richard Rosenzweig, is a newcomer to local politics. Signs of the times reveal community service still active, important to manyBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – When visitors and residents drive down Federal Highway near the municipal golf course here, the city’s service organizations are prominently on display. “It’s been a work in progress for about six years and was completed two or three months ago,” said Al Siefert, past president of the Rotary Club of Pompano Beach. Rotary took the lead in constructing the monument which exhibits the logos of seven service organizations and has room for seven more. “There are some clubs in the process of getting their signs put up right now,” he said. Rotary, the Exchange Club and the Pompano Beach Garden Club, along with a $10,000 contribution from the City Of Pompano Beach, funded the sign. “And contributions are still welcome,” said Joanne Nelson, Rotary’s executive secretary. Siefert said the former logos were on an old chain-link fence that was rusty and needed replacing. It really looked bad. I’m glad the new one’s done,” said Siefert. “Now, it shows a See SIGNS on page 14 See DEERFIELD CANDIDATES on page 16 We Can Help Logos of civic clubs in Pompano Beach nd a new home on Federal Highway, thanks to the city and the Pompano Beach Rotary Club. Now the city waits for other clubs to take up the rest of the space. [Staff photo by Mike D’Oliveira] Eight vie for mayor, commission seats in PompanoBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The race to occupy the mayor’s seat and commission seats in Districts 2 and 4 has brought out eight candidates. Challenging incumbent Mayor Lamar Fisher in the March 12 election are Marcus McDougale and David Baumwald. Opposing incumbent Dist. 2 See POMPANO ELECTIONS on page 24

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2 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Jeffrey Sneed, public works employee, and his family enjoyed the MLK breakfast at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center last Saturday. He is pictured with his wife, Regina, and daughters Jessica, 16 and Natalie, 17. [Staff photo]Art 1-11 – Juried art exhibition from 8 to 10 p.m. at Rossetti Fine Art Gallery, 132 McNab Road, Pompano Beach. 954247-9580. 1-12 – Watercolor classes by Henriette Arnold from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 Ave., Pompano. Cost is $15. Extra help available at 9 a.m. 954-920-4574. 1-12 – Wrap it in Plaster from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Coral Springs Museum of Art, 2855 Coral Springs Drive Coral Springs. Cost is $4 per person. 954-340-5000. 1-16 – “Spin Art” and “Knot Art” from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. 954-594-0444. 1-17 – Life drawing class from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Rossetti Fine Art Gallery, 132 McNab Road, Pompano Beach. Class is held Thursdays. 954-247-9580. 1-18 – Island City Art Walk from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Businesses along the street host an artist and serve up free appetizers and refreshments. Visit islandcityartwalk.com. 1-18 – Fort Lauderdale Orchid Show at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 Ne 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Show runs until Jan. 20; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are $5 for advance purchase, $10 at the door. Children 12 and under are free when accompanied by an adult. Visit www. os.org or 954-828-5380.Auctions & Sales1-12 – Yard sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Vendors wanted. 954-390-2115 or 954-3902130. 1-12 & 13 – Tropical Postcard Show and Sale at the Pompano Beach Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $3. Free appraisals. 305-666-0219. 1-19 – Yard sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954630-4511. 1-26 & 27 – Nautical Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St. Admission is $5 per person. Children 12 and under are free. Visit www. nautical eamarket.com.See SIGHTINGS on page 13

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The Pelican 3 Friday, January 11, 2013 By Steven WolfSPECIAL TO THE PELICANHand Me Silver, a standardbred race horse who performed the Hot to Trot reworks show at Pompano Park, has died of natural causes. He was 27 years old. A magni cent looking chestnut gelding with a blonde mane and tail and four white-stocking feet, Hand Me Silver was foaled in Australia on Oct. 26, 1985. Sired by Under A Cloud from the Silver’s Colt mare Silver’s Chariot, Hand Me Silver Hand Me Silver, reworks stunt show horse, dies at 27 was not that great a racing horse, but under the tutelage of trainer/driver and master stuntman, Vincent Silvestro of New South Wales, Australia, the horse became a star. With Silvestro standing on the shafts of his race sulky, the reins in his teeth and 10,000 candle power marine ares in each hand, Hand Me Silver would race around a dark track pulling a platform attached to the back of the sulky while Silvestro would ignite more than 2,000 rounds of pyrotechnic explosives set to music in one of the wildest Vincent Silvestro and Hand Me Silver perform the Hot To Trot Fireworks Stunt Show at Pompano Park, Pompano Beach on Feb. 3, 2007. [Lap Time Photo by Skip Smith] displays of horsemanship ever seen. “Of all the horses I trained and worked with over the years for the Hot To Trot shows, Hand Me Silver was the best.” Silvestro said. “And there will never be another one like him. He was extra special. Not only was he good looking but he was the smartest horse I ever saw. He loved the applause he would get when we would return to the winner’s circle after a show. He looked forward to it, See HAND ME SILVER on page 17

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4 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – Newly-elected Broward Sheriff Scott Israel promoted the two top-ranking BSO of cials in this town. Both will be moved to other positions within the agency. District Chief Oscar Llerena was promoted to major and Lt. Angelo Cedeno, executive of cer, was promoted to captain. “I am proud that Sheriff Scott Israel has selected me to lead the Youth Intervention & Enforcement Division, which is tasked with addressing juvenile justice issues, including efforts to combat juvenile recidivism and keeping our kids out of jail,” Llerena said Wednesday. “This is one of the most important issues he will address as sheriff.” Cedeno has been assigned Sheriff promotes two BSO of cersto BSO Internal Affairs Division. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann reported the promotions to town commissioners this week. She said Cedeno “has been recognized for his talent and ability and transferred out to a downtown job.” “We all have a deep affection for Angie Cedeno,” she said. “He will be doing good things for Broward County.” “We have been informed there will be a change in command in almost every city” that BSO serves, Hoffmann said. A large number of BSO employees retired, and 30 employees were let go with the election of a new sheriff. “Many positions opened, and there were many opportunities for promotions,” she said. “We’ve always said we didn’t want to lose Oscar or Angie. They t so well here,” Hoffmann said. “The only way we would want that [would be] if they were promoted.” Llerena said he won’t be leaving until a new district chief is in place. The town’s contract with BSO requires that they propose three candidates for chief if Llerena is moving out. Hoffmann said she and Llerena will nd Cedeno’s replacement within the ranks. A reception for Llerena and Cedeno will be planned.By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Unhappy with the cost of dispatch services from the county, city commissioners have paid the $113,000 they were billed but “under protest” and with an eye towards nding an alternative. The bill comes from the City of Fort Lauderdale and is what of cials there say is Wilton Manors’ share of the costs incurred from the county. “I would like to know City seeks alternative to dispatch services more details because that’s where the devil is – in the details. [Let’s] pay them under protest and demand an accounting going forward,” said Commissioner Ted Galatis. Vice Mayor Julie Carson voted no because she said she wanted more information rst. “I would have preferred to wait two weeks and have the city attorney determine some of the facts surrounding the case.” When an emergency call See WILTON MANORS on page 23

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The Pelican 5 Friday, January 11, 2013 Pompano’s Pioneer Families: The CheshiresOne of the Pompano Beach Historical Society’s most popular program topics is “pioneer families,”and on Jan. 16, the organization will take a look at one family that has had a signi cant in uence on the community’s political, economic and civic development. First arriving here in the early 1920s from northern Florida, the extended family, over the years, became owners of one of the largest acreage of agricultural land in the region. Members of the family were also active in business enterprises and political endeavors. A panel of Cheshire family members will discuss their memories of the rst generation of Cheshires to arrive in Pompano, their accomplishments and personalities. Scheduled panelists include Newana Cheshire Bowman, Bebe Cheshire Delk, and Gwen Cheshire Collier with other family members invited to join in. There will also be some “voices from the past.” The free program begins at 7 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Historical Society, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach) and is open to the public. There is plenty of free parking available and light refreshments will follow the program. For more information, call 954 292-8040. By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – Many years ago Mike McClain went to a food tasting event in New York City’s Central Park. He was so impressed by the experience he vowed to bring something similar to this city one day. Nine years ago, he had the chance. The edging LHP Chamber of Commerce needed to establish a fundraising and McLain was asked to come up with a plan. His idea became the hugely successful Taste of Lighthouse Point, an event With champagne utes and silent auction prizes in hand, members of the Taste of LHP committee are nalizing plans for this year’s event. From leftDiane Jurcik, Lou Patrone, Patty Miranda, Penny Morris, Mike McClain, Kimberly Bean, Charlie Spalma, Charlie Davis. [Photo by Jeff Graves]Annual Chamber “Tasting” event returns Jan. 20that had a slow start but today tends to be a sellout. This year, 20 local restaurants will participate Jan. 22 at the Lighthouse Point Yacht and Tennis Club. McClain estimates 400 to 450 people, most of them residents or business owners in the city, will attend. McClain headed up the event for three years and then turned it over to other Chamber presidents, noteably Michelle Greene who held the reins for many years. This year, Kimberly Bean heads up the silent auction donations and is assembling spa treatments, tness gifts, a $500 tooth whitening procedure and the most sought after, a vacation in a Vail condominium. The lineup of food vendors will offer tastes of everything from appetizers to desserts. Wine and water are included in the cost of the ticket, $50. Participating See TASTE on page 11

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6 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XXI, Issue 2 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & Letters Pompano Beach – Want to help two great local charities and at the same time promote your business and have more fun than a barrel of monkeys? Then sign up ASAP to be a sponsor and compete in the Unity In The Community Bounce Horse Derby that will take place on Saturday, February 2, 2013 as part of the day long Unity In The Community activities at the Pompano Community Park at 2001 NE 10 ST Pompano Beach, Fl. between 11:00 am and 3 p.m. The two charities running the bounce horse derby are Pompano Has Heart, Inc. which is the city’s disaster relief charity that raises money and commodities to help those in need both locally and abroad and the host charity is Unity In The Community of Pompano Beach, Inc. Both charities are 501(c-3) not for pro t groups. For a $200 donation sponsors will get to have their “jockey” compete in the 40 foot grueling stretch course that will be on the turf (grass) in front Grab a good horse to ride at the Bounce Horse Derby on Feb. 2 of the Community Stage next to the Pompano Amphitheater. First place prize for the winning sponsor of the bounce horse derby is the coveted Derby Trophy Cup and the bragging rights for all South Florida for one year. There will also be wagering for prizes on the bounce horse derby. The bounce horse derby will take place rain or shine and if more than six sponsors enter the race there will be elimination heats held before the nale. Everything is free to the public for Unity In The Community Day. That includes parking, admission, free food and beverages, live music, display booths, children’s activities, cultural groups and special demonstrations by the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce. This event is organized by Pompano Beach citizens to bring people of every culture and religion together to foster “Unity”. For more information call 954-6543757. That John Wayne feeling hits these riders as they saddle up to raise funds for charity. Riders are still needed for the upcoming Unity in the Community event. Thieves rob organization of materials, but not resolveTo the Editor, Community organizations are often about giving. Mt. Bethel Human Services is such an organization. For Thanksgiving we distributed over 75 baskets to the needy, enough clothes to supply a community and other household items to those in need at our quarterly “Free Market.” At Christmas time we provided over 100 families with toys so that kids in a blighted area of the county could experience the same joy on Christmas Day as others in af uent neighborhoods. Those are the types of services Mt. Bethel has provided Broward County families for the past 19 years. The mission of the organization, however, is not only about giving but about building families. It is our belief that as the family goes, so goes society. This is the reason for the 3rd Annual 33311 Walk on January 26 in partnership with Broward AWARE! Protecting OUR Children and other committed organizations. Unfortunately, while working to meet the needs of a distressed community we ourselves became the target of willful destruction. On New Year’s Day, the administrative of ce of Mt. Bethel was burglarized. Several computers and other items of value were stolen. This in itself set the agency back tremendously. As if it weren’t enough, two days later the thieves visited our of ces again; this time targeting a counselor’s of ce and that of the executive director. Again, computers and other important electronic devices were taken. Be be that as it may, the break-ins have only strengthened our resolve to continue “Building Families, Changing Lives!” Mt. Bethel now needs the community’s support to replace the items taken by thieves. Please consider a tax deductible donation by sending your check to Mount Bethel Human Services, 1021 NW 6th Street, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311 or contribute on-line at www.mountbethel.org and designate your gift for Human Services. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Please help us as we continue to help those considered the least, the lost and the left out! May this New Year shower blessings upon you! Rosby L. Glover Executive Director Mt. Bethel Human Services CorporationChildren’s Piano Competition needs support for February eventBy Anne SirenPUBLISHEROn Feb. 23, about 150 children from the tri-county area will arrive at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, holding on to their music. They will play their pieces before esteemed pianists from throughout the state who will judge their talent. These are the children who rarely make the newspapers. They are too busy with their studies, their music, their sports and families. They are easy to ignore and forget when it comes to donations. But we think differently. We believe community support is needed for all children, whether they are in need of aid or if they are simply trying to do the right thing: practice, study and take part in their families. We believe that children get a special message when they are recognized and supported by the members of their community. The piano competition here in Pompano Beach has been recognizing these children for more than 19 years. On Feb. 23, they will be honored for their performances with critiques, performing at the winners’ recital and taking home the trophies. Please support this year’s event with your support of any kind at all. A check for $10 tells us you are out there and this performance is important to you as well. All of us are volunteers. The event is overseen by members of the Music Teachers Association of Broward County. This event needs new patrons to continue. If you read this, and you can help, please mail your check to: The City of Pompano Beach, 100 West Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, Florida 33060. The winners’ recital takes place on Feb. 23 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. at 7 p.m. It is free and open to the public.N.E. Focal Point fashion show fundraiserLighthouse Point – The N.E. Focal Point Auxiliary hosts the 15th Annual Fashion Show Luncheon, “Elegance of America,” Jan. 30 at 11:30 a.m. at the Lighthouse Point Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42 St. The afternoon will include lunch, fashion show, entertainment and door prizes. Ticket donations are $50 each. Limited seating is available. Fashions by Sondro at the Cove include casual, cruise and evening wear. Proceeds from this annual fundraiser bene t the N.E. Focal Point in Deer eld Beach. For tickets or sponsorship information, call 954-480-4460.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, January 11, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-TheSea -Town commissioners recognized two Fountainhead condominium employees Tuesday “for their exceptional display of bravery and courage resulting in saving the life of another.” Commissioners proclaimed “Mario and Howie Ochoa Day” in honor of the brothers, who jumped in the ocean fully clothed to pull out and save a drowning man on Nov. 1. The Ochoas were at the scene working to repair damages after Tropical Storm Sandy blew through the area and ruined some of the condo’s property. They were digging and removing sand when they saw a man walking on a sandbar, built up from the damage.Maintenance team at Fountainhead lauded for their life-saving actions Mario and Howie Ochoa“It’s by God’s graces we were watching him,” Mario said. “We turned our heads, and he ended up going under water. We saw him oating on top of the water, and we knew something was wrong. “He was blue, not breathing. We ran to him, fully clothed,” Mario said. “The water was over our heads. We had to struggle. It took both of us to get him out. We dragged him out onto the beach. My brother started pumping him and giving CPR and reviving him.” The victim had swallowed a lot of water. As Howie performed CPR, the man foamed at the mouth, and water spewed out. They turned him on his side so he would release more water. As they ran to help the man, Mario said he screamed out to co-workers to call 911. When paramedics arrived, the man had started breathing again. Paramedics transported him to a hospital, where he was treated for several days. The Ochoas received American Red Cross training in CPR at the Fountainhead. “If not, we wouldn’t have known what to do,” Mario said. Mario, 27, a six-year employee, is the maintenance manager and chief engineer at the condominium. Howie, 26, a three-year employee, is a security guard who was helping with beach clean-up that day. The victim was a Canadian staying at the Galt Towers condominium a few blocks south of the Fountainhead. He came later to thank them and express how fortunate he was to be able to go back to Canada to see his grandkids. “It was a touching moment,” Mario said. “We’re very grateful we could be there to help. We were in the right place at the right time,” Mario said. “We’d do the same for anybody.” “We’re very proud of them,” said Carrie Donnelly, assistant property manager. At the commission meeting, Dr. Robert Kramer, a Fountainhead board member, said the Ochoas are valued employees. He said any building on the beach should ensure their staff is CPRtrained, as the Fountainhead does. “One drowning is one too many. “They’ve given a powerful example of the best in human nature. Thank you gentlemen. We salute you,” he said. “This is overwhelming for us,” Mario said of the honors. “We’re very grateful everyone is doing this. It’s amazing,” Howie added.

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8 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 BriefsBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFSitting down with Jim Barry, owner of Aloha Air Conditioning Service and Sales is like visiting with an old friend. A modest man, Barry says, “My dad is gone, but I still live by his philosophy which is ‘It’s all about the customer.’ I apprenticed with my father in Washington D.C. where I was raised. When he moved to Florida, I followed him, and we became partners. That was in 1982. We started with one truck, and Aloha now has 20 trucks on the road. They are manned by experienced technicians who are licensed and factory trained. Every technician has a computer and an iPhone which means we have instant communication, allowing us to elevate our service and lower costs to our customers. Most of my team have been with me for many years. They and I return to school regularly to be kept abreast of the newest technology.” Aloha service trucks are equipped to service, maintain, and install air conditioners from one-ton to 200-tons. The company also sells the newest models from Rheem, Carrier, American Standard, Mitsubishi and more. Business has changed a great deal since Barry opened his rst company. He says, “The new conditioners use about one third of the electricity that the early models used. They remove the humidity much more Aloha service technicians are just a phone call away from solving your air conditioning problems effectively than they did, and in Florida that’s important. It’s the humidity, not the temperature that makes us so uncomfortable. This is a very important new improvement.” “In fact,” he advises, “a new air conditioner is almost like an investment because it pays you back every month in Jim Barry [left], president of Aloha A/C is proud of his eet of 20 trucks. One truck, named “Cooling for a Cure,” is a pink Susan Coman truck which promotes the cure for cancer theme. [Photos courtesy of Aloha Air Conditioning]See ALOHA on page 9Model Train Swap MeetDeer eld Beach – The Grand Re-Opening and Model Train Swap Meet will be held on Saturday, Jan. 26 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the historic Amtrak/Tri-Rail Station, 1300 West Hillsboro Blvd. The event is presented by the South Florida Railway Museum of Deer eld Beach and features three operating model train layouts and museum displays of railroad memorabilia. There will be vendor tables for model trains and accessories. Admission and parking are free. For more information, visit www.sfrm. org or call 954-448-8935. Pet Expo at Citi CentrePompano Beach – Citi Centre, located at the corner of Federal Highway and Copans Road, will hold its annual Pet Expo on Saturday, Jan. 26 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be a bestdressed pet contest, product samplings, pet training demonstrations, animal CPR instruction and more. Admission is free for all ages. Vendors who want to participate should call 954-943-4683. For more information on upcoming events at Citi Centre, visit www.facebook.com/ PompanoCitiCentre or www. pompanociticentre.com.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, January 11, 2013 savings and those savings are tax free. Florida Power and Light will help you make the investment with their rebate program. Old air conditioners are expensive to run just like old gas guzzling cars are expensive to run. The units we sell come with a 10-year factory warranty on parts.” Dennis Nadeau, owner of Card Geniuses in Pompano Beach, is a 15-year client who has taken Barry’s advice. He says, “If an air conditioner is over ve years old, you would be smart to have a new one installed. We did and the amount of money we saved on our monthly bill was amazing. On top of that we got a credit from FPL. Aloha has always given us great advice. The techs are professionals who know exactly how to solve problems with conditioners.” Catherine Merlo, owner of Family Rentals and Guest Services in Boca/Delray, has been a client for way over 20 years. She says, “Aloha is a wonderful company. They service both my business and my home. The technicians are all courteous and knowledgeable. They treat you like family and truly do care about their customers. They never leave until the customer is completely satis ed.” Asked how he came to name his company Aloha, Barry says, “ I wanted a name that re ects my pleasure in doing business in a paradise like South Florida. I wanted the name to be a friendly greeting. We service our clients six days a week and do not charge more on Saturdays. It doesn’t seem fair to penalize a client who works and can’t be home until Saturday. We’re also bi-lingual and can send a Spanish speaking technician when requested. Our web site allows visitors to learn about us in English and in Spanish. It’s all about satisfying the customer.| One of Aloha’s 20 trucks is a pink Susan Komen truck which promotes the cure for cancer theme. It’s called ‘Cooling for a Cure’ and it’s a permanent part of the service eet. This is just one of the major charities supported by Aloha. Call 855-922-5642 or visit the web site at alohaac.com. AlohaContinued from page 8

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10 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Juried art show exhibitWilton Manors – The winners of Art Gallery 21’s Juried Art Show will be presented on Friday, Jan. 18 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Art Gallery 21, 600 NE 21 Court. For more information, visit www.CANAWM.org or call 954-661-4740.Rabies clinicBroward County Animal Care and Adoption will host a Rabies Clinic on Saturday, Jan. 12 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Colohatchee Park, 1975 N.E. 15 Ave. Pet owners can have their dog or cat vaccinated against rabies and receive a Broward County pet registration tag. Cost for a one-year rabies vaccination and registration tag is $15 per pet. Only cash payments will be accepted. To qualify, pet owners must provide proof of Broward County residency such as a valid Florida driver’s license or a current utility bill. No appointment is necessary and customers are taken on a rst-come, rstserved basis. All dogs must be on leashes and all cats must be in carriers. Call 954-3591313 or 954-359-1010 for more information.Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. SampleMcDougald House Hosts Car Show On Saturday, Jan. 18, the Sample-McDougald House at Centennial Park, 450 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach, will host an antique and classic automobile show on the grounds of the historic structure. As many as 50 cars will be on display, ranging from a Model T Ford to 1960s muscle cars. The City of Pompano Beach’s 1926 re engine will also be at the show. The antique and classic cars will participate through the Antique Automobile Club of America, Fort Lauderdale Chapter. The 1916 SampleMcDougald House will be open for tours during the automobile show. Admission to the car show and the historic house is $5 per person. Children under 12 are free. The car show and house tours will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on January 19th. Call Jerry Bowman at 954 298-0854 Contestant Roger Mazzeo Contestant Ed ZakoContestant Trish Michael Contestant Karen Arlene Lefand Contestant Judy SnearyBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRemembering the success of the television show, The Dating Game back in the 60s and 70s, Broward Health North decided to launch a take off of the show for seniors. It’s all part of the medical center’s year ‘round campaign to help the health of the community, and in this case, the senior community. Behind this fun event is Dr. H. Murray Todd, neurologist and medical director of the Center’s Neurologic Institute. Todd is a rm believer in exercising the mind and body to repel the traditional ailments of aging. He’s made his point with many successful programs such as Senior Dance Competition, Seniors Got Talent, and soon, SeniorStyle Dating Game. Dr. Todd will be hand to introduce the dating game, even as he stresses the importance of Senior Dating Game comes to Broward Health North on Wednesday, Jan. 23 from 3 to 5 p.m.socialization to the senior community. Turning Dr. Todd’s game plan into a reality is Lyn Clark, regional manager in charge of marketing and community relations. On Monday, Jan. 7, auditions for players of the dating game were held and almost 100 men and women responded to the casting call which was held in the conference center. On hand to re questions at the contestants and judge those auditioning were: Connie Doyle Loewenthal, senior account executive with Clear Channel Media, who was on the actual The Dating Game in the 70s, Amber Statler, president of Statler Media Inc. and this Pelican reporter. Loewenthal was a winning contestant on the actual Dating Game in 1978. Asked about the experience, she giggled as she recalled what happened over 30 years ago. “I do remember drawing a blank when it was time to choose one of the three men. I chose a man who owned a garage and he turned out to be a good choice, though I recall hoping he would not have grease under his ngernails. My date and I won a ski trip to New Mexico. We had a great time, but I don’t think we ever saw each other again.” Some of the criteria, used to determine future players of Senior Dating Game, were rst impressions, originality and charisma, energy and See SENIOR DATING on page 11

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The Pelican 11 Friday, January 11, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! In Lighthouse PointOfferdahl’s, 2400 N. Federal Hwy. Lighthouse Point Marina, 2831 Marina Circle Red Fox Diner, 3640 N. Federal Hwy. Lighthouse Point Police Dept., 3701 NE 22nd Ave. Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St. Bone sh Mac’s, 2002 E. Sample Rd. Packy’s 4480 N. Federal Hwy pizzazz, and communication skills. There was a lot of laughter and clapping during the interviewing of candidates. Clark and her staff will tabulate all of the judges comments and choose the rst four contestants who will play the Senior Dating Game. The winners will receive a gift certi cate to a local restaurant and a free dessert at Cold Stone Creamery. The winning couple can choose to go out together, or separately. As this judge was about to depart, she found out that two of the contestants who had hung around to listen to the competition had gravitated to each other. The result was a real date made between the CPA who wanted to become a stand up comedian and the travel buff who claimed to be a psychic. Join the fun on Jan. 23 when the winning contestants meet at the Senior Dating Game. What: Free Senior Dating Game Where: Broward Health North—Conference Center, 201 E. Sample Road, Deer eld Beach When: Wednesday, Jan. 23 from 3 to 5 p.m. The event is free, but seating is limited to the rst 150 guests. Watch the game . Senior dating Continued from page 10 Children’s choir now being formedPompano Beach Children from ages six to 16 are invited to sign up for Children’s Choir of Pompano Beach, a school to train voices for performance. Auditions take place Jan. 17 from 4:30 to 9 p.m. at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. Concerts will take place at the church. Cost is $35 for registration and $15 per class. Call 561-317-3866.Tropical Postcard show, Jan. 12, 13 at Pompano Center Postcards from the past have their own tales, some with messages and some with photos of days gone by. Vendors of antique and new postcards will be on hand at the Emma Lou Olson Civic center, 1801 NE 6 St., Jan. 12 and 13 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free appraisals and buyers will be present. Dealer booths are still available. Entrance is $3. The event is open to the public. Call 305666-0219 TasteContinued from page 5restaurants include Bobby Rubino’s, Bone sh Mac, Cap’sPlace, Costco, de Campo Osteria, Duffy’s, Edible Arrangements, CFS Market place, Hot Tomato, J. Mark’s,La Mimosa, LHP Yacht Club, Lito’s Turf & Surf, The Nauti Dawg Marina Caf, Oceans 234, Olympic Flame Diner, Packy’s Sports Grill, Publix, Red Fox Diner and Sicilian Oven. Purchase tickets at taste@ LHPCHmaber.com, or at 3640 N. Federal Highway. For more, call 954-946-6610.

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12 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach – When Cecil Asher spoke to this commission on Tuesday, he was sick with the u. But he so frustrated, he felt the trip was necessary. Asher loves golf. He plays three times a week and is often the rst in line to tee off. Prior to this year, Asher paid annual dues of $800 to play on either of the city’s courses, The Pines or The Palms. But last year, the city spent $3 million to redesign the Pines course. They chose Greg Norman Golf Course Design to modernize the course and give the city a championship course. And the price to play has changed. Asher says that during the construction, some holes on the Palms course were closed, turning an 18-hole game into 17 holes. Closures were due to equipment parked on the Palms course to accommodate the Pines work. The Pines course surrounds the Palms course. Says Asher, “I understood that. I stayed with the city because I was excited about the Greg Norman design.” But other players weren’t as understanding. Membership dropped by nearly half. Asher stayed for another reason. The new Greg Golfers handicapped by construction want city to compensate for lossNorman course was expected to open in November, and members had free play there for the remainder of the year. November came and went, but the golf course remained under construction. “I didn’t get the value of my membership,” says Asher, referring to the numerous times one or two holes were closed on the Palms course. The Greg Norman course opened in December. In January membership fees rose to $1,400 to play both courses. “And golf cart fees went up,” he adds. On Tuesday, Asher admonished the commission for not compensating the players who stayed with the city during construction. Asked what he wants, he says “both courses for one year at the $800 fee.” “They offered me a few free plays,” he adds, “but that’s not what I want.” Commissioner Rex Hardin agrees. “I understand his feelings of not receiving the value he paid for.” But then Hardin says it’s something that the city staff has to resolve. “He [Asher] should be compensated for this year. But what? A check? Additional playing privileges? Others will have different choices.” Hardin said he thought that issue had been resolved in December. “We had given direction to make the loyal members happy. We were all caught at-footed [when the problem arose again on Tiuesday.]” Greg Martzolf, golf course general manager, said, “It’s See GOLF on page 13 Grand opening of Greg Norman coursePompano Beach – After almost a year of being closed, the Pines Course at the Municipal Golf Course is ready for its grand reopening. The city will be celebrating the nished product with a ceremony on Wednesday, Jan. 16 at 10 a.m. at the course, 1101 N. Federal Hwy. Of cials said the goal of the revamped course was to bring in more golfers, golfers who might patronize local businesses before or after they play a round and increase economic activity in the area. To set up a tee time or get information about a membership, call 954-781-0426.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, January 11, 2013 a conversation now. I will be seeking the direction of the commission and the city manager.” The Greg Norman Golf Course will have its grand opening on Jan. 16, 1101 N. Federal Hwy. at 10 a.m. The event is free and open to the public.Books & Lectures1-16 – “King: Look beyond the Dream to discover the man” from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library, 2800 NW 9 Court, Pompano Beach. 954357-7670. 1-21 – Marjory Lyons, Ph. D., will give a talk and review of the book Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson at 10 a.m. at All Saints Episcopal Church, at 6 p.m. at Water Mill Flowers, 5600 NW 12 Ave., #304, Fort Lauderdale. 954772-0200. 1-16 – Ribbon cutting at Heart of the Olive, 816 N. Federal Highway, Pompano Beach, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Free samples of oil and balsamic dips and spreads. 754-222-8071. 1-17 – Grand re-opening of Checkers Old Munchen, 2209 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Beer tastings and menu samplings. 954-785-7565. 1-24 – Wilton Manors Business Association meeting at 12 p.m. at Primanti Brothers, 516 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Wilton Manors. 954565-7100.Children & Family1-12 –Outdoor garden from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Bvld., Pompano Beach. For children ve and older. 954-357-7595.Clubs & Civic Organizations1-11 – The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Group meets every Friday. 954-786-3274. 1-14 – Pompano Beach Garden Club meets at 12:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Open to the public. The program “Planting for Song Birds” will be presented by Ann Wiley, member of the Audubon Society. Refreshments will be served. 954-943-0029. 1-15 – Oakland Park Garden Club meets at 6:30 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. 954-6304511. 1-15 – Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. 1-15 – Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-972-7178.SightingsContinued from page 2 333 Tarpon Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $10. 954205-3552. 1-23 – Beach Readers Book Club from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Beach Branch Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954357-7830.Business1-11 – Ribbon cutting at Beach Grille, 3414 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, from 5 to 7 p.m. Free samples of their signature items such as funnel fries and Philly cheese steaks. 954-946-6000. 1-14 – Wilton Manors Business Association meeting LYONS See SIGHTINGS on page 15 GolfContinued from page 12

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14 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 person coming into the city that we have these civic clubs available. And lets people know when and where to meet,” he added. Here are some of the clubs The Pelican reached this week. Rotary Club of Pompano Beach Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Galuppis, 1103 N Federal Hwy, Pompano Beach 954-786-3274 The reach of the Rotary Club of Pompano Beach is near and far. In the Philippines, Rotary has funded over 100 cleft palate surgeries for children who could not afford the procedure on their own. In Guatemala, the club paid for the purchase of two dirt bikes to help doctors deliver polio vaccinations to children. “We originally started with donating a generator for a dental boat [in Guatemala],” said Ian McCarver, chair of Rotary Foundation and scholarship chair. The goal of Rotary International is to eliminate polio worldwide. “It’s a great program. We’re down to three countries – Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria. India was just certi ed as polio free,” said McCarver. Closer to home, the group funds scholarships for students at Blanche Ely High School and Pompano Beach High School. It also helps the Boys & Grils Club and Woodhouse [a facility that helps adults who are disabled], most recently with the building of a new fence, and “In the past we’ve done Rebuilding Together, which is similar to Habitat for Humanity where you can go in an refurbish homes. We give anywhere from $15,000 to $35,000 a year to charities,” said McCarver. Exchange Club of Pompano Beach Wednesdays at 12 p.m. LHP Yacht and Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42 St. 954-783-6694 The Exchange Club’s mission is one focused on the needs of children. “Basically, we raise money for underprivileged or underserved children,” said President Robert Friedman. “It’s about child abuse prevention. That’s what we do. It’s sort of like a Rotary Club with a different slant.” Two of the biggest recipients of the nancial help given by Exchange are the Broward Children’s Center and the Children’s Healing Institute. “We give money to other places but those are our two biggest recipients and we only give money out locally,” said Friedman. Exchange also assists Habitat For Humanity, various youth projects, partners with alumni from the National Football League and donates scholarship money through essay contests. The Garden Club of Pompano Beach Second Monday at 12:30 p.m. Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. 954-731-4510 The Garden Club of Pompano Beach is dedicated to promoting and encouraging horticulture-related activities in the city and beyond. “Mainly we do a lot of SignsContinued from page 1 See SIGNS on page 15

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The Pelican 15 Friday, January 11, 2013 activities aimed towards raising money for groups that we support,” said Gloria Scroggin, president of the Garden Club. A portion of the money they raise funds camperships at Wekiva Youth Camp in Apopka. There, campers go through a program, sponsored by the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs, that teaches them to appreciate nature in Florida and “to get the kids interested in our world.” The Garden Club also assists the Youth Garden Club at Pompano Beach Elementary School, awards scholarships for students studying ecology and plants trees for Habitat For Humanity and the SampleMcDougald House. “The things we do in Pompano Beach are important,” said Scroggin. Soroptomist Meets second Wednesdays of the month at 5:30 p.m. Lighthouse Point Yacht and Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42 St. 954-234-5339 “Soroptomist means ‘Best for Women,’” said Sandy Johnson, president of the Soroptomist in Pompano Beach. But, as Johnson puts it, her Soroptomist club isn’t just about helping women. “We’re a bit of a renegade [group].” While the organization supports causes like education for women in Afghanistan and gives college scholarships to women, it also focuses on helping other groups of people, especially children. The Soroptomists’ scholarships go to help women “so they’ll be better able to support their family in the future.” “From the very beginning we’ve worked to help Woodhouse. We also work to raise funds for Broward Children’s Center and also the Children’s Health Institute. “We try to keep everything here right here in the local area,” said Johnson. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club Tuesdays at 7:30 a.m. Galuppis, 1103 N Federal Hwy. 954-972-7178 A lot of the focus of the Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club is on education. “Our main project is dictionaries for third graders,” said Bill Zobus, secretary. “We started with just one school and the project was accepted so well that we added more schools that year. Each year since then we have added a few more schools.” Now, the organization passes out 2,664 dictionaries to 126 classrooms in 18 public schools in Pompano Beach, Coconut Creek, North Lauderdale and West Park.” Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club also assists those living at the SOS Children’s Village with gift cards from Target. Monetary donations to the Boys & Girls Clubs and Tomorrow’s Rainbow, an organization that helps children deal with the death of a family member. But their charity isn’t con ned to children. Members also donated help to tornado victims in Joplin, Mo as well as paralyzed veterans. “We’re always looking for things to do,” said Zobus.SignsContinued from page 14 1-16 – Exchange Club of Pompano Beach meets at 12 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Yacht and Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42 St. Group meets every Wednesday. 954-7836694. 1-19 – Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-7828096.1-22 – Card party from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Cost is $4 and includes desert, coffee or tea. Reservations required. 561479-2002. 2-13 – Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets at 10 a.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 Ave., Pompano Beach. Group meets every second Wednesday of the month except April and December. 954-786-3902.Education & Self Development1-13 – “What would Martin Luther King do?” SightingsContinued from page 13 See SIGHTINGS on page 18

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16 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Berner, 64, ran unsuccessfully for mayor four years ago, although she said this week she would have preferred to run for the commission but saw she was up against “hanky panky” in the Village and so switched her race. She is the founder of the Century Village Relay for Life Team and was on the board of Master Management but has given up both to run for of ce. She served for a brief time on the DB Housing Authority. Berner said she would have run even if Popelsky was a candidate citing “injustices” she feels exists in the city. Capoblanco, 62, also ran four years ago seeking the District 3 seat. A 10year resident of CVE, she has held all major positions within the Village including the presidency of Master Management, and a seat on the Century Village board of directors. Capoblanco is currently president of her building and on the recreation committee. Now retired, Capoblanco, was a business consultant for many years and more recently the owner of a memory game which she marketed to assisted living facilities. She said she is running to give residents of the district a choice. Rosenzweig, 74, came here ve years ago from Silver Springs, MD where he was in the wholesale food distribution business and active politically in precinct and county government. Locally, he is a member of the Jewish War Veterans, the Democratic club and a member of Temple Beth Israel. Although he never sought of ce in the past because his area had so many eligible candidates, Rosenzweig said now the time seems right. Among the things that concern him are safety and senior citizen issues. Noland, 61, will go up against former mayor Jean Robb who challenged her four years ago. Robb, 81, has disagreed with the administration on many fronts, most notably opposing the public service tax enacted in 2011. She served as mayor from 1980 to 1993. Noland is seeking her fourth, four-year term on the commission, her second as mayor. She won over a large eld in 2009.No challengers in Hillsboro BeachHillsboro Beach Incumbents Mayor Dan Dodge, Vice Mayor Claire Schubert and Commissioner Javier Garcia drew no opponents and are re-elected. Dodge was rst elected in 2003 and has been mayor for two years. Schubert and Garcia were both elected to two-year terms in 2011. The town passed a law in 2008 limiting commissioners to four, two-year terms. Municipal elections take place March 12. Deer eld candidatesContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, January 11, 2013 bowing his head up and down and saying thank you to the crowds.” Hand Me Silver and Silvestro graced the cover and centerfold of Australia’s People Magazine and was selected by noted author and celebrity George Plimpton in his PBS Series, Fireworks, A History and Celebration, as the best reworks performance in all of Australia/New Zealand. “He was such a tough horse that in January 1997 I raced Hand Me Silver in the rst event at the Tamworth Music Festival in Australia.” Silvestro explained. “And he won. It was his rst and only win as a racehorse. I used that race as his warm-up because later on the card after the fth race I returned with him and did the Hot To Trot show and the people were amazed.” Hand Me Silver left his native Australia to come to the United States in 1997 and performed his rst show ever on North American soil at North eld Park in Cleveland, Ohio on May 31. “On that night Hand Me Silver showed me he was the best horse ever.” Silvestro said. “It was raining so hard they had ood warnings in the area. But 9,000 people had come to the track and we had to do the show. Despite the rain and a sloppy track, Hand Me Silver never missed a beat. Even when some geese from the in eld ew at his head and under his feet he did not blink an eyelid and kept right on pacing away. He was unbelievable.” During the off-season, Hand Me Silver was used for hippo therapy at a local equine center in the mornings, allowing mentally and physically handicapped children to ride him for their therapy session and in the afternoon the riding academy used him for children learning to ride and jump small fences. Performing throughout Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand, Hand Me Silver graced such events at the world renowned Royal Adelaide Music Festival, the Perth Royal Show, The Gold Coast City Show, Auckland Trotting Club, seven straight New Year’s Eve venues in Kalgoorlie and more than 20 shows at the famous Harold Park in Sydney. During his show years in the United States, Hand Me Silver performed nine straight years at Pompano Park. He also did shows at Hawthorne Raceway in Chicago, Pocono Downs (PA), Tioga Downs (NY), Garden State Park (NJ), Rosecroft Raceway (MD), Harrington Raceway (DE), Saratoga Raceway (NY), Ladbroke at the Meadows (PA) and the Zanesville County Blue Ribbon Fair in Ohio. “After his last show at Pompano Park,” Silvestro explained. “We gave Hand Me Silver to a family in southern Florida who had a companion horse. They had cared for him in the past, had plenty of trails to ride on and I knew they would take excellent care of him. I will always have fond memories of Hand Me Silver. There will never be another one like him.” Hand Me SilverContinued from page 3

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18 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 SightingsContinued from page 15discussion at 11 a.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park, 33309. Free lunch. 954-531-1928. 1-15 – Class on tax updates for 2013 at 6 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954-9466398.Health & Fitness1-15 – Knee pain class hosted by Dr. Paul Meli from 4 to 5 p.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E Sample Road, Deer eld Beach. 954-7597400. 1-15 – New Year Health Goals: An Enlightened Women Lecture Series from 6 to 7 p.m. at Broward Health Coral Springs Medical Of ce Complex, 3100 Coral Hills Drive. 954-759-7400. 1-15 – High Tea & Trivia – Eat. Drink. Think. from 3 to 4 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point cafeteria, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Tailored for seniors age 65 and older. Prizes awarded. 954-759-7400. 1-16 – Free quit smoking program from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. at the Wilton Manors Public Library, 500 NE 26 St. 305-942-6378. 1-16 – Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group meets from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, located at 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld Beach. Group is for individuals caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease, memory impairments, dementia, and cognitive limitations. 954480-4463. 1-16 – Suicide Prevention Survivor’s Group from 7 to 8 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Registration required. 954980-9628.Music 1-13 – Sunday Matinee Music at 3 p.m. at Boca Raton Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd. Jim Kovalcik Trio, featuring Jim Kovalcik on ute, Jason Hanley on guitar and Steve Jernigan on bass. 561-239-1536. 1-13 – Goldberg Variations performed at 5 p.m. by Simone Dinnerstein at Knight Concert Hall at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami. 305-949-6722 1-13 – Music at St. Paul, 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach at 3 p.m. Mei Mei Luo and Daphne Spottiswoode perform Corelli, Gershwin, Chopin and more. Requested donation $15. 561-278-6003.See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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The Pelican 19 Friday, January 11, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF Taj restaurant 201 SE 15 Terrace Cove Shopping Center Deer eld Beach 954-427-0423 Lunch buffet Monday to Sunday 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dinner buffet Wednesday and Sunday 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. la carte Monday to Sunday 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. tajindianrestaurant.com“Our food is primarily from the Northern part of India,” says Anoop Chopra, an experienced restaurateur who has owned and operated several Indian restaurants in Florida and Canada over the past three decades. “We do an excellent, extensive lunch Taj restaurant brings all the exotic avors of India to the heart of Deer eld A sampler plate of chicken Tandoori, butter chicken, Basmati rice, Naan bread, chickpeas, potatoes, beef curry and deep-fried onion Bhaji.buffet seven days a week, evening buffet Wednesdays and Sundays, and our la carte menu is available every night.” Now in its ninth year of operation near the intersection of Hillsboro Blvd. and the Intracoastal Waterway, the Taj is essentially the only legitimate game in town for authentic, flavor-laden Indian specialties. Everything is made fresh using a plethora of exotic spices imported directly from the second most populous country in the world. Upon entering this rich, woodsy eatery decorated in a style representative of the ancient Indus Valley civilization on which it is based, the maelstrom of pungent scents and titillating flavors instantly transports patrons to the gastronomic nexus of the Indian subcontinent. The menu is chock-full of all the specialties that make Indian cuisine so desirable. Appetizers such as beef samosas, deep fried onion bhaji morsels, spiced lamb kebabs, potato patties, artisanal unleavened breads and soul-warming lentil soups are a great way to start off the culinary voyage. One of the main attractions is the Indian version of Oodles of Tandoori chicken can be enjoyed for one low price at the all-youcan-eat Taj buffet.See TAJ on page 29

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20 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 If you are considering receiving home care, you may be given advice to hire a private attendant. Due to the cost and the increasing shortage of quality in-home caregivers, many families turn to private individuals rather than working through an agency. While at first glance this may seem reasonable, it can cause numerous problems and create unexpected liabilities for the family, who may become the employer of the independent caregiver. There are a number of very compelling reasons why it is a much wiser decision to utilize an legal agency as the employer of your inhome attendants. Tax Issues. As a private employer, you are required to pay Social Security, unemployment and payroll taxes, and workers compensation insurance. Many private caregivers will represent themselves as independent contractors, ostensibly relieving you of these tax obligations. However, this can be a dangerous misrepresentation of the facts. When a caregiver works in your home privately typically you will be considered the employer. If your worker does not meet his or her payroll tax obligations, this responsibility falls to you as the employer. This can be a serious obligation because it may involve back payroll taxes with interest and penalties, civil fines and the possibility of criminal penalties. If your worker is ever injured while working for you, or files for unemployment insurance when she or he stops working for you, or if your worker becomes unhappy and develops a grievance against you, and decides to report you or file a legal claim or lawsuit, you could be become subject to significant costs and penalties. If you had that worker for a few years, the back taxes, penalties and interest could be enormous. This is not an exaggerated fear.Protection from elder abuse and exploitation Unfortunately, there is the potential for both physical abuse and nancial waste when work is being done on behalf of a frail, functionally limited, and often cognitively impaired older adult. While most individuals who become private caregivers do so out of a desire to help others and to contribute to the community, Elder Issues AdvertisementAgency, or private caregiver?there are predators who seek caregiving jobs with the intention of taking advantage. This becomes especially easy when the attendant and the recipient of care are isolated in a private home with little or no supervision. Families usually do not fail to provide supervision out of malicious neglect. Supervision is often dif cult because of geographic distance, lack of expertise, or a strong emotional dependence of the senior upon the attendant. Furthermore, families often do not have the time or the resources to do criminal background checks, or to contact references, if they even think to ask for references. Sometimes families are so grateful for the care provided by an aide that they are also vulnerable to dependence, then manipulation and exploitation. Even if these crimes are not pre-meditated, they are frequently crimes of opportunity. Next week we will talk about bene ts of agency supervision, some of the responsibilities in hiring private caregiver and cost. We are not providing legal or tax advice. Please consult with your professional advisers before you engage any private caregivers. To hire a licensed, insured, bonded home health agency and to get information on any elder issues call Senior Helpers of Florida at 954-7075030.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, January 11, 2013 Relay team sets fundraiser at Baja CafeHillsboro Beach – For the first time, Hillsboro Beach is participating in the Deerfield Beach/Lighthouse Point Relay for Life, an annual event that benefits the American Cancer Society. Relay Fiesta at the Baja Caf, 1310 S. Federal Highway in Deerfield Beach, will be held uesday, Jan. 15, 5:30 p.m. until closing. Fifteen percent of the revenues from food and drink will go to Relay. Local chair is Vice Mayor Claire Schubert who said, “There will be fabulous food, fantastic raffles and the wonderful feeling of supporting Relay for Life by just eating the best Mexican food ever.” For more, call Schubert at 954-426-4394. 1-17 – Instrumental Collaborative Piano Departmental Recital at 7:30 p.m. at Lynn University’s Keith C. & Elaine Johnson World Performing Arts Centre, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets are $10. 561-2379000. 1-20 – And All That Jazz featuring the Rob Prestor Jazz Trio at 4 p.m. at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $20 for members and $25 for non-members. 561-998-7784. 1-26 – Painting portrait workshop from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Rossetti Fine Art Gallery, 132 McNab Road, Pompano Beach. 954-247-9580. 1-20 – Annie Moses Band performs at 4 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church “The Pink Church,” 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. The band is known for its fusion of jazz, classical, country, bluegrass and pop. Suggested donation is $10 for adults, $5 for students and free for children 12 and under. Visit www.pinkpres.org or 954941-2308.Sports & Activities 1-12 & 19 – Northeast Little League baseball signup from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wimberly Field batting cage, 4000 NE 3 Ave., Oakland Park. League is boys and girls ages 5 to 18. Jan. 26 is the last day to register. Volunteer and sponsorship opportunities available. Email davemcleod33@aol.com or 954793-2348. SightingsContinued from page 18 See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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22 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700! By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach “Imagine if you were taken from your home, put on a train where your parents were saying goodbye,” Nick Winton said to Deerfield Beach Middle School students this week. That’s what happened to the lucky Czechoslovakian children in 1938 just before Hitler invaded Prague. Torn from their families at a young age most of them survived in England and went on to have successful lives, lives they owe to Winton’s 103-year-old father, Sir Nicholas Winton. At the time, Sir Nicholas was a 28-year-old English stockbroker who had no thought of becoming a hero. On a visit to Prague, he saw refugee camps where the Nazi’s were holding Jews, Blacks and intellectuals. “This will end badly,” he thought and so began the task of removing Jewish children from the country. It required getting the House of Commons to approve legislation allowing the children into England, organizing train transportation to that country and finding the children homes and schools. The mission became known as Kindertransport and in the year or so it was allowed, saved the lives of 669 children. “He didn’t go looking for this,” the younger Winton said. “But when he saw an opportunity, he did something. It shows what an enormous difference one person can make. I still get a lump on my throat when I talk about it.” Winton is in the U.S. to promote a documentary about his father’s extraordinary efforts. The movie, “Nicky’s Family,” opens in Florida Jan. 11 at selected venues such at the Living Room Theatre on Nick Winton, at Deer eld Beach Middle School Wednesday, autographed a poster advertising the documentary “Nicky’s Family,” an account of his father’s humanitarian effort that saved the lives of 669 Jewish children before the Germans invaded Czechoslovakia in 1938. Pictured with him are Steve Ben-Canaan and Rebecca Israel. Students learn how one man made a dif ferenceSee DIFFERENCE on page 25

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The Pelican 23 Friday, January 11, 2013 Wilton Manorsmade in Wilton Manors it’s answered by Broward Sheriff’s Of ce [BSO] employees inside the Fort Lauderdale Police Station. According to Deputy Fire Chief William Findlan, 10,872 calls originated from Wilton Manors in 2011 with 189,758 from Fort Lauderdale. Mayor Gary Resnick said the county is double charging residents for dispatch services. “They get $40 million [in cell phone communication tax revenue to fund dispatch services],” he Wilton Manors Police Chief Paul O’Connell suggested possible alternatives, including dispatch services directly from BSO. The city has until April to come up with an alternative. “This is three months before we have to have another plan in place,” said Resnick.City reduces payment in lieu of parking requirementsWilton Manors – Commissioners reduced the amount of money business owners have to pay in lieu of providing parking spaces– from $18,000 per space to $10,000 per space. The move, said City Manager Joseph Gallegos, is designed to encourage more development by easing restrictions on parking and making Wilton Manors more competitive with other cities, some of which charge less – Hollywood charges $5,000 per space, Dania Beach charges $6,500, Fort Lauderdale charges $4,000 for commercial and $12,000 for hotels, motels and time shares and Oakland Park charges $15,000. “I guess I support it because we want to attract visitors to Wilton Manors,” said Mayor Gary Resnick. Commissioners also gave nal approval to regulations that allow vending carts on Wilton Drive and Dixie Highway. Originally, the city allowed food and beverage carts on public and private property. But after objections from business owners who were worried the carts would hurt their business, commissioners revised the regulations. Now, only carts that are set-up on private property with the permission of a business owner are allowed. But so far only one vending cart owner has applied for a permit to operate on Dixie Highway. Commissioner Tom Green said he was disappointed no carts had been set-up on Wilton Drive, something he thinks would enhance the atmosphere along the street. “I hope someone will look at this. If not, I’ll bring it up again,” he said. Fundraisers to bene t Island City Foundation Wilton Manors – The Island City Foundation, the city’s charitable organization, will be the recipient of two upcoming fundraisers – one put on by the Pride Center at Equality Park and one put on by the city itself. An Evening in Paradise will take place on Saturday, Jan. 19 from 7 to 11 p.m. at Richardson Park, 1937 Wilton Drive. It’s estimated that the city will get a minimum of $5,000 from the event or 10 percent of the funds raised, whichever is greater. VIP tickets are $150 and include access to a private bar, lounge and specialty hors d’oeuvres. Regular tickets are $100. Visit www.pridecenter orida.org to buy tickets. To “show off the city,” of cials will close down Wilton Drive on Friday, Feb. 15 for HeArts on the Drive. The street will be closed from the Northeast 4 Avenue Bridge to Five Points from 4 p.m. to midnight while the event will take place from 6 to 10 p.m. The idea is to promote the city and the restaurants that call Wilton Drive home. Restaurants that participate would put out tables and chairs along Wilton Drive and serve their customers right on the street. “It’s also the same time as Art Walk so there’s that energy as well,” said Heidi Shafran, community development services department director. To cover the $3,000 cost of closing down the street, the city is looking for six community sponsors to contribute $500 each. Beyond that, the city is also looking for restaurants to participate. The cost of being part of the event would be based on the size of the establishment – ranging from $100 to $500. To become a sponsor, call Randy Welker, economic development coordinator, at 954-3902187.City applies for marine patrol grantWilton Manors – At the request of Police Chief Paul O’Connell, the city has applied for a $17,000 grant from the Broward County Marine Advisory Committee. If approved, the grant will be used to reimburse the city for expenses related to its marine of cers patrolling the North and South Forks of the Middle River. The grant, which requires no matching funds from the city, would pay for 53 eight-hour patrol shifts and include ve holiday shifts.

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24 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad Commissioner Charlotte Burrie is Thomas Terwilliger while Dist. 4 Commissioner Woodrow Poitier is up against former commissioner Ed Phillips and Joseph Wells.MayorMayor Lamar Fisher, 52, has been in his current elected position since 2007. The owner of Fisher Auction House, Fisher’s family has had roots in Pompano for generations. Fisher cites his Mayor’s Stimulus Package, beach redevelopment, the new bus transit center on Dixie Highway, golf course redevelopment and the planned library and cultural center next to city hall as examples of why voters should re-elect him. “The proof of our success is now being seen throughout the city and I truly serve the people of our city and want to continue for another term. I fought hard for the land use amendment which will enable the redevelopment of the Dixie/MLK Corridor and prepare for the transit oriented corridor,” said Fisher. “We need to focus now on our transit station along the FEC railroad and the quality development around that area.” Challenger Marcus McDougale, 40, a native of Pompano Beach and graduate of Blanche Ely High School, said if elected mayor he will Pompano Beach electionsContinued from page 1focus on childhood obesity, tax incentives for residents and creating a more uni ed community. “I want to see more economic relief to the communities of Pompano.” McDougale said he’s employed as an educator and community advocate but declined to say what company he works for. “Now more than ever, I feel like I could be a part of that process of change. I can de nitely be instrumental and work with some of the other local community gures.” Challenger David Baumwald, 47, a member of the community appearance committee and construction project manager for D And M Home Development, has lived in Pompano for over 30 years and wants to see an improved beach area, more tourism, a better economy and less crime. “The businesses on Federal Highway are going dead. I want to bring jobs and tourism back to our city. And we’re no longer a destination and crime is out of hand. There were 11 A/C units stolen in one day in my neighborhood.” In 1998, Baumwald was arrested and charged with cocaine possession, intent to purchase cocaine, obstruction of a criminal investigation and served 13 months, according to the Florida Department of Corrections. “That was a long time ago. I was in a car with someone who purchased it so we both got charged. I was getting a ride home. Wrong place. Wrong time,” he said. “Had I had a real lawyer I would have walked away from this scot free.”District 2Commissioner Charlotte Burrie, 68, in of ce for six years and a resident of Pompano for 50 years, said voters should re-elect her because of her accomplishments, including the revamped Greg Norman Golf Course and increased community policing. But Burrie, who works as an attorney, also gives less tangible reasons. “I have been working for the residents in the community and I’ve accomplished many things and I will continue to work for my community if re-elected. “I’ve always had an open door and I’m here to serve the community.” Tom Terwilliger, 67, a resident of South Florida for 15 years and Pompano for three years, ran for state senate in Michigan in his early 20s and wants to try again for city commission in Pompano. “Now I’m semi-retired and I’ve got the time to do it. Public service takes a lot more than just a regular 40-hour work week.” With a background in investment banking, Terwilliger said he knows what it takes to work with city budgets. “I know what it is to run a balanced budget,” he said, adding that he also wants to make government more ef cient See POMPANO ELECTIONS on page 25

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The Pelican 25 Friday, January 11, 2013 and protect the civil liberties and rights of Pompano’s citizens.District 4Commissioner Woodrow Poitier, 65, has been in of ce since 2008 when he nished out the term of the late E. Pat Larkins, Commissioner Woodrow Poitier is the owner of L.C. Poitier Funeral Home. “I’m really enjoying the job now a lot more than I did the rst time around. And because of that it’s getting easier to do.” And, he says, “things are happening because of Woody.” Things like improvements to the Northwest Community Redevelopment Area. “I’m into the job and I’m making things happen. I’m getting progress done on Martin Luther King Boulevard and the faade program is being taken advantage of.” Ed Phillips, 62, served as city commissioner from 2000 to 2002 and he’s ready to get back on the dais. The owner of PF Insurance, Phillips has been in Pompano for over 50 years. “I’m running to respond to the needs of Dist. 4. My top priorities will be to listen, to listen, to listen. And then implement.” Asked if he had any speci c plans, “Right now, I just need to listen to what the needs of Dist. 4 are. I may have some ideas but I don’t want to talk about them this early in the campaign.” The Pelican was not able to reach Joseph Wells in time for publication. Pompano electionsContinued from page 24the campus of Florida Atlantic University. His appearance at DBMS was arranged by Steve Ben-Canaan who, with Lynn Wolf, teaches holocaust studies at the school. The presentation was given to only one other Broward County school. “Very few students are getting this chance,” BenCanaan said as he urged the young audience to sign up for a field trip to see the film later in the month. “This is the story of how one man changed the world.” It is estimated there are 6,000 to 7,000 descendents of those Kindertransport children. Almost all the parents who put their children on Sir Winton’s trains died at Auschwitz. One of the “Kindertransport survivors,” Rebecca Israel, made history real for the students by talking about her dad, Ben Abels, who was put on the train at age 14. An adventurous boy, Abels was actually excited to be on his own but then found life to be a challenge, failing at boarding school, returning to Prague only to find it controlled by the Communists, eventually earning a doctorate in physics. And here the story gets more interesting. Abels came to the U.S. where he made his own “survivor” contribution. He invented the thermal electric generator used today to power the Mars Rover. “If this man had not survived, maybe the thermal generator would not have been invented,” Ben-Canaan told the students. “It’s another example of how one person can change the world.” Winton said many of the survivors grew up to be people of great importance. Sir Winton kept his wartime activity secret for more than 50 years until his notes were discovered by his wife. It was then that he began receiving accolades and his story told in interviews and films. Today, there is a movement by 120,000 children in the Czech Republic to award Sir Winton the Nobel Peace Prize. The petitions are available for student signatures at DBMS or online at Change.org/ petitions/Czech-Republicnominate-sir-nicholas-wintonfor-the-nobel-peace-prize DifferenceContinued from page 22

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26 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 NOW HIRING BREAKFAST COOKS!! Part Or Full Time. All Shifts. Open 7 Days. Apply 2211 Wilton Drive Wilton Manors – Courtyard Caf. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. HOME HEALTH AIDE To Care For Alzheimer Patient. Tube Feeding. Run Errands, Light Cooking. Also Airport Trips! Call 954-226-2089. 1-11 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-11 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available – Love To Clean Windows! Refrigerators, Ovens. No Problem. FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 1-11 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954818-9538. 1-11 MIKE THE GARDENER “The All American Yardman” Yard And Garden Care – Get Te Best For Less! Call 561-5436337. 1-18 VISION ELECTRIC INCLicensed/Insured. Electrical Service & Installation. No Job Too Small. #EC13002184 – Call 954-274-4513. 1-25 MARCELA’S CLEANING – Residential Cleaning. Affordable Service You Can Trust! Experienced & GREAT References. 954-376-0524. 2-1 REMODELING – SPECIALTIES – Flooring Wood & Tile – Drywall – Painting – Carpentry. Licensed. Reasonable. Experienced. Patrick & Frank 954-696-8596 Or 954-404-2163. 1-11 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 111 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C SELL YOUR BUSINESS!! Call Russell Cohen 954-646-7651 – www. abiz4sale.comrcohen@ tworld.com Transworld Business Brokers Lic R.E. Broker. 2-1 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CCOLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 1-25 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 1-11 WHITE WICKER DINING ROOM Set – Includes 4 Chairs – 42” Round Table / Glass Top. $125. Lighthouse Point. 954782-0339. 1-11 CO-OP FOR SALEPOMPANO LARGE 1 BEDROOM CO-OP Screened Porch. 55/Over. No Pets. Heated Pool. Near Beach, Golf, Shopping. $65,000 Furnished. 302-690-8285. 1-18 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 27 Friday, January 11, 2013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 In Deer eld BeachWalgreens, 1005 S. Federal Hwy. Walgreens, 1325 N. Military Trail Peking Tokyo, S.E. 10th Street Shopping Center Josephs Italian Pastries, 788 S. Federal Hwy. Hot Tomatoe, 626 S. Federal Hwy. Marlee’s Diner, 699 S. Federal Hwy. One Price Dry Cleaners, 273 S. Federal Hwy. OPEN HOUSESPOMPANO SUNDAY 12-3PM. 999 N RIVERSIDE DR # 2. Directly On The Intracoastal With Million Dollar Water Views As You Enter This 2 /2 – 1st Floor Corner Unit. Monthly Maintenance Only $269 Per Month. W / D In Unit. Camille Hall – Balistreri R.E. 954-254-2085. GARAGE SALEPOMPANO BEACH SATURDAY & SUNDAY 8am. 220 SE 22 Avenue. Moving Sale!!! All MUST GO! Great Bargains. 1-11 REAL ESTATE SERVICESSELLING OR BUYING Choose Someone You Can Trust – 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen. YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 1-11 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH – Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38’ x 13’. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO CHARMING 2/1 Home. Asking $975 Per Month. 611 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 1-25 POMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,200 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 POMPANO BEACH Leisureville. 3/2 – 1 Car Garage,. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease – Utilities Not Included. Available February 1st. 954649-8867. 1-11 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE / DEERFIELD – Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny w/Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furnished. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $56K. 561-372-9837. 1-11 POMPANO AEGEAN Oceanfront Corner 2/2 – Direct Ocean View From Every Room. Huge Wraparound Balcony. W/D In Unit. Garage Park – 2 Cars. Hot Tub – Pool – Exercise Room. Widest Beach In Area. Dynasty R.E. 954-295-2356. POMPANO BEACH 2 /2 Fabulous Ocean & Intracoastal Views From SE Corner 15th Floor! Reduced! $249,900. Carole Stephan – Greater Broward Realty. 954-6955937. POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf-2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 1-11 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 2-1 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 Apt With Screened Room Available In Residential Neighborhood. $1,000 Month Yearly Lease. Call 609-638-1291. 1-18 BEACHY-KEEN! 2 Bedroom 2 Bath1 Block From The Sand In NE Pompano. Annual Lease $1,275 Month. 954-614-8428. POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL. Efficiency $175 Week. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W/D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – NW – NE 2/1 New $9752/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-998-5681. POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 1-25 CHURCH FOR RENT! Pompano Beach. Well Furnished. Great Sound System Available. Seats 20. Must Rent! Only $275/Month. Please Call For Availability. 954-588-4985 – 754-281-0922. POMPANO DIXIE & COPANS WAREHOUSE For Rent. 2 Units – 1-1640 Sq Ft – 1 – 2080 Sq Ft With A/C Of ces Zoned 3M. Both With Overhead Doors. Starting At $850. Call 716-316-3690. 1-11

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28 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 SPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach Do you love seashells and shell collecting? If so, there’s a family-style weekend event coming up, the 48th Annual Broward Shell Show held Jan. 19 to 20; the only event of its kind in South Florida. Hours: Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hosted by the non-pro t Broward Shell Club at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., the Broward Shell Show offers an opportunity for shell-loving enthusiasts to enjoy an exciting weekend immersed in the wonderful world of shells. Thousands of beautiful and unusual shells from around the world will be on display and for sale. Weekend Attractions include: Competitive displays by dozens of collectors; Shell Artists showcasing their designs; International Shell Market featuring shells, shell 48th Broward Shell ShowCollectors will bring shells of all sizes.craft, jewelry and educational shell books; a Shell ID Station where beginners or advanced shell collectors can bring their seashells for identi cation; raf e items and door prizes. Five educational programs will be presented during the show. Visit our Facebook page or website for additional information regarding the guest speakers. The Broward Shell show takes place at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Saturday, Jan. 19 and Jan. 20. Call 305-467-4412 or email nancygaldo@gmail.com or visit www.browardshellclub.org, www.facebook.com/ groups/BrowardShellClub/

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The Pelican 29 Friday, January 11, 2013 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com BBQ called Tandoori. “We make all our Tandoori items, including Naan bread, using the traditional clay pot,” says Chopra of the millennia old cooking method which employs an old-fashioned, cylindrical Tandoor clay oven designed to produce fiery convection heating. Shrimp, poultry, Mahi-Mahi and the exquisite lamb chops are all offered in this format. For example, Tandoori chicken is a roasted delicacy that originated in TajContinued from page 19 The outrageously avorful Tandoori lamb chops are marinated in cream, yogurt and fresh spices before being barbequed in the traditional tandoor clay pot oven. Here they are served potatoes, Biryani rice and mango chutney.northwestern India. The chicken is marinated in a yogurt seasoned with garam masala, garlic, ginger, cumin, cayenne pepper, and other spices depending on the recipe. In more piquant iterations, the dish features cayenne pepper and red chili powder that produce the iconic red hue. The visual effect induces Pavlovian salivation responses and the flavors are mouthwateringly explosive. This is definitely a great introduction for those who may not be overly familiar with Indian cooking. Other noteworthy offerings include leg of lamb Korma in cream sauce, shrimp vindaloo with potatoes in curry sauce, fried cheese Saag Paneer, vegetable rice Biryani with saffron and Channa Masala chickpeas flavored with aromatic spices. “Our butter chicken, Tandoori Mahi, lamb chops and vegetarian Jhalfrazy [mixed veggies masala] are very popular. All dishes come with Basmati rice and everything can be prepared as spicy as desired,” says Chopra who has garnered quite a loyal following over the years. “Our customers truly appreciate the authenticity of our food.” By the way, guests are always greeted with a free serving of crisp, lightly spiced lentil wafers known as Papadum accompanied by onion chutney. “I have been coming here since it opened. My children just love the truly excellent food,” says Kim Copelin, a Boca Raton resident who was on hand with her husband and two young children. “This is by far the best Indian restaurant anywhere and Anoop is a wonderful Chef.” Curry lovers can indulge in mutton, beef, salmon or chicken versions that showcase the full breadth of flavors extracted from turmeric, cumin, black and green cardamom, mace, garlic, ginger, tomatoes and coriander powder to name but a few. “I really like the fish Tikka,” says friendly waiter Victor, whose family lives in Mumbai [Bombay]. Another popular option is the chicken Tikka Masala overflowing with boneless pieces of poultry marinated and roasted in the tandoor then sauted in spices and served with a rich, exotic Masala style sauce. By the way, there is nothing more refreshing that a Kingfisher or Taj Mahal beer to go along with any flavorsome plate. The Taj also offers a wealth of reasonably priced red and white wines from every corner of the globe. The all-you-can-eat lunch buffet is $12 during the week and $13 on weekends. The dinner buffets are $5 more but include lamb and shrimp specialties. Taj also does a brisk take-out service and is happy to provide catering for up to 75 people. Enjoy! Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. Captions: Pic #5496 – The eyecatching buffet features

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30 The Pelican Friday, January 11, 2013 Send your fishing news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Think nautical nowPompano Beach The Annual Nautical Flea Market opens Jan. 26 for a weekend of deals for boaters, divers, anglers and everyone else with an eye for a deal. Vendors will fill the grounds of Community Park with food, crafts, art, books and all things nautical. The event is a shared project between Pompano Beach and Lighthouse Point. Cost to attend is $5 per day. For vendor information, call 954-786-4111 or visit www. nauticalfleamarket.com.RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSSea conditions are looking choppy for the weekend as of now. I may just stay on land and fish from the new pier. There have been lots of spanish mackerel and bluefish to catch. As long as you eat them while they are still fresh they are excellent. I will be bringing a long casting rod with me so I can put a bait way out. I am pretty sure that right now I can catch a cobia. The cobia swim in shallow water following the sting rays. They feed on the crabs that are stirred up by the rays’ wings. I will fish either a live blue runner or a eight inch whole squid. Make sure to have at least 12 ounces of lead to keep your bait down. Cobia [also known as Ling] make for some awesome eating. The Deer eld Pier may be your best bet this weekend Call the Deerfield Pier at 954-426-9206 or call us if you have any questions at 954420-5001. Good luck out there! Theatre & Film1-11 – The lm “Oklahoma” will be shown at 6:30 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Drive, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. A lm will be shown the second Friday of every month. Tickets are $1. Attendees are encouraged to dress up in costume. Best dressed wins a prize. 954-5908658. 1-13 – Pinkalicious at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. at the Aventura Arts & Cultural Center, 3385 NE 188 Street, Aventura. Tickets are $3 for children and $15 for adults. 305-466-8002. 1-13 – “Edge of Salvation” plays at 2 and 8 p.m. at Muvico 2315 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Movie is the story of a 14-year-old boy and his struggles caused by “a down economy, pride, greed and ultimately man’s inhumanity to man.” 954-946-SightingsContinued from page 218416. 1-15 – Agatha Christie’s the BBC Murders at 8 p.m. at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are $26.50 to $66.50. Runs through Feb. 3. 954-4620222. 1-20 – Play Reading Series Back Stage Story at 7:30 p.m. at Lynn University’s Keith C. & Elaine Johnson World Performing Arts Centre, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Tickets are $10. 561-237-9000. 1-27 – Kiss Me Kate at 2 p.m. at the Sunrise Civic Center Theater, Sunrise Civic Center Theatre, 10610 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise. Tickets are $25 for adults and $10 for children. 954-7474646. 2-1 – “Side Show” plays at 8 p.m. at West Boca Performing Arts Theatre, 12811 West Glades Road, Boca Raton. Runs until Feb. 10. 866-811-4111.

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The Pelican 31 Friday, January 11, 2013 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! ScoreboardPompano Beach Women’s Golf Assn.. Jan. 8 A ClassKim Heath . . 80 Debbie Brown . 68 B Class Janet Stuart . . 83 Patti VanZandt . 85 C Class Nancy Cutler . 98 D Class Elaine Schoengood . 106 Lil Cody . 74 Pompano Beach 9 Hole Women’s League Jan. 8Class A: (tie) 1st Place, Cathy Olson, Almut Davis . 47 2nd Place: Susan Dimond . 48 Class B: 1st Place Jill Goldfarb . 55 2nd Place Maureen Zolubos . 57 3rd Place Jan Murphy, Joanne Price . 58Pompano Beach Men’s Golf Assn. Wed. Jan. 9 1st place . Ed Gormley, Bill Bradford, Sam Chuck . 69 2nd place Bill Stiehm, Lynn Spizz George Zarekas . 69 3rd place Roger Chapman, Scott Feinman. John Pihl, Don Ingram . 70 4th place Bernie Kelley. John Kapoukakis, George Hussey, Wayne Joy . 70 Closest to the pin, Pines #7, John Kapoukakis Casino tripDeerfield Beach St. Ambrose Men’s Club will host a trip to the Seminole Hardrock Casino, Jan. 18. Participants must be at the parking lot, 380 S. Federal Hwy., Deerfield Beach, at 11 a.m. The bus departs at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $26 which includes transportation and a $5 food coupon. The event is open to the public, but reservations are required. Call 954-856-6062.

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