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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00327
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 01-04-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00331

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Friday, January 4, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 1 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Five years after encouraging his neighbors to make improvements to their island community, Mark Dreyer can point with pride to some accomplishments. Garbage cans and bulk refuse that had littered the landscape have disappeared behind hedges and walls, an active Crime Watch program is in place, some potholes have been lled, the pocket park at SE 10 Street has been landscaped, doggie stations Island Association is all about raising the bar to make things better See BEACH ISLAND on page 29 Mark Dreyer leads his island community to a higher level through communication, education and the power of community pride. [Photo by Judy Wilson] Plaques give local history a boostBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Five structures were recently added to the city’s Local Register of Historic Places. At a recent city commission meeting, Mayor Lamar Fisher presented bronze plaques recognizing the historic designation to be placed at The Blanche Ely House, Pioneer Monument, Kester Cottages #1 and #2 and the Sample McDougald House. Fisher thanked members of the volunteer Historic Preservation Committee for their efforts, noting, “Because of the success of the committee you made the local registry a reality. We’re truly saving our history and saving these community structures that have gone through the process to be [declared] historic.” Dirk DeJong, president of the Sample-McDougald House See HISTORIC HOMES on page 13 City elections draw six hopefulsBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – City Commission Seats 1, 4 and 5 are up for election on March 12. Voters will also consider six referenda questions. Filing, which started Wednesday, runs through next Wednesday, Jan. 9. At The Pelican ’s deadline, six residents had quali ed for those seats. Seat 1: Sara Guevrekian and Ruben Jean have quali ed. Incumbent, Mayor Anne Sallee, elected in 2009, has not yet led.See HOPEFULS on page 11 Urban farm seems likely in 2013 adding another angle to culinary districtBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – An urban farm that brings Oakland Park back to its agricultural roots, but with a new urban look could be sprouting soon. City staff is close to nal negotiations with Jon Albee of the Urban Farm Institute who has submitted a proposal for a farm north of Jaco Pastorius Park. The item will come before the commission this month. “This will be another phase of our culinary arts district,” said Mayor Anne Sallee. “His could be the farm that grows the lemon grass for a special beer brewed by Funky Buddha,” [the brewery coming soon to Oakland Park Station,] she said. Residents here have requested community gardens but Sallee said See URBAN FARM on page 3Bill Thompson checks his Civil War period Gatling Gun which will be on display at the Military Artifact Show on Jan. 18 and 19 at the Pompano Beach Elks Club. See story on page 15.

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2 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Sandy Paws will host “Walk for the Animals” on March 2 to raise funds for the Broward Humane Society. Over the past 10 years, the walk has raised more than $22,000 to support homeless animals. The 1.5 mile walk on Las Olas includes a free breakfast at IHop. Call Cindy Geesey at 954-776-5974. Art, Music & Entertainment1-4 – Empire Stage and Island City Stage present “Pig Tale An Urban Faerie Story” at Empire Stage, 1140 N Flagler Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Play runs through Feb. 2. Show times are Thursdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 5 p.m. Tickets are $30. Visit www.smarttix.com or call 954-678-1496. 1-5 – Notre Dame University Band performs at Cardinal Gibbons High School, 2900 NE 47 St., Fort Lauderdale, at 10 a.m. 954491-2900 ext: 143. 1-5 & 6 – Auditions for the 2013 Florida Renaissance Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at One Studio, 800 NW 57 Place, Fort. Lauderdale. Renaissance Festival will be held at Quiet Waters Park in Deer eld Beach Feb. 9 through March 17. Visit www.ren-fest.com or call 954-776-1642. 1-6 – Big Band Dance from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, 240 W. Prospect Road, Oakland Park. Cost is $8 at the door. Cash bar. 954564-2357. 1-9 – Legends of Doo Wop perform at 7:30 p.m. at Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Admission is $14 per person. 954-786-4111. 1-11 – Women in Art; Mercedes Cisneros, Gloria Sesana and Federica Zavanella, from 6 to 9 p.m. Galleria Ca’D’Oro at the Village of Merrick Park, 358 San Lorenzo Ave., Coral Gables. 305-442-9157. 1-11 – Miami City Ballet, Ziff Ballet Opera House at 8 p.m. at Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami. Featured performances of the works of Balanchine, Mozart, Balanchine, Stravinsky, Don Quixote Pas de Deux. Tickets range from $20 to $175. 305949-6722. 1-13 – Sunday Matinee Music at 3 p.m. at Boca Raton Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd. Jim Kovalcik Trio, featuring Jim Kovalcik on ute, Jason Hanley on guitar and Steve Jernigan on bass. 561-2391536. 1-13 – Goldberg Variations performed at 5 p.m. by Simone Dinnerstein, Knight Concert Hall at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami. 305949-6722See SIGHTINGS on page 3

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The Pelican 3 Friday, January 4, 2013 those are dif cult. “But with the urban farm, restaurant owners and residents will be able to buy produce grown in our downtown center,” she said. “We’ll be able to offer a fresh, local product that we haven’t had in a long time.” Albee proposes an urban farm, green market and community garden with the city as a partner. The site is vacant farmland off Dixie Highway. The idea is to make locally-grown food more available and to help people grow it themselves. By paying a monthly fee, participants become part of Community Supported Agriculture [CSA] and share in the food raised. As the word spreads about the culinary arts district, Sallee said the city is getting more inquiries and interest from businesses. Additional development will be coming. Sallee’s seat on the city commission is one of three up in the March 12 election. She was elected in March 2009. Asked if she is running for re-election, she said, “I don’t have to make that decision until the qualifying period in January.” Two residents have led for her seat. City residents will vote on several proposed charter amendments, including one that would move city elections from March to November. “It will be a busy year. It will be anything but boring,” Sallee said.Urban farmContinued from page 1perform Corelli, Gershwin, Chopin and more. Requested donation $15. 561-278-6003. 1-20 – Annie Moses Band performs at 4 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church “The Pink Church,” 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. The band is known for its fusion of jazz, classical, country, bluegrass and pop. Suggested donation is $10 for adults, $5 for students and children 12 and under are free. Visit www.pinkpres.org or call 954-941-2308.Auctions & Sales1-12 – Yard sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Vendors wanted. 954-390-2115. 1-12 & 13 – Tropical Postcard Show and Sale at the Pompano Beach Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $3. Free appraisals. 305-6660219. 1-26 & 27 – Nautical Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St. Admission is $5 per person. Children 12 and under are free. Visit www. nautical eamarket.com. SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 5 1-13 – Music at St. Paul 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach at 3 p.m. Mei Mei Luo and Daphne Spottiswoode

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4 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – A seasoned on-air news reporter has been hired as the city’s public information of cer. Reportedly, there were 150 applications for the $75,000 a year job. Rebecca Medina comes to the city with 10 years experience in broadcasting, Television anchor hired to ll public information position in Deer eld Beachanchoring local news for network af liates in El Paso, Memphis and Tampa. Her rst day on the job here was Dec. 19, the day Police Chief Pete Sudler learned he was being red by incoming sheriff Scott Israel. The graduate of FIU said she weathered her rst attempt at crises control by advising all concerned to keep low pro les. She returned to Southeast Florida to become a communications executive with Pace Americas, a provider of digital TV technology, choosing a behind-the-scenes job rather than be in front of the cameras. “I was ready to go behind the camera,” she said. “But I will always be a journalist at heart.” Medina will handle public relations and marketing duties here and act as the city’s liaison with the media, the commission, the public and city departments. “What drew me to Deer eld Beach was the passion I see in the mayor, Peggy Noland, and her love for the city. I am really excited to work for her,” Medina said. Medina currently lives in Delray Beach but said, “I am also excited about Deer eld Beach becoming my home.”The new Deer eld Beach spokesperson will become the voice and the face of this city’s information.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, January 4, 2013 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Issues always arise when a person dies or is terminally ill. Beyond decisions about funerals or hospice arrangements, most people have additional wishes. On Monday, those who want to move ahead and make those decisions now can get expert advice.Forum focuses on end of life issuesThe public is invited to join a conversation to help them make their decisions before another person does if for them. “Final Wishes Forum” will be held on Monday, Jan. 7 at 6 p.m. at St. Stephen’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 2500 NE 14 Street Causeway. The forum’s panel will consist of Stephanie Schneider, elder law attorney; Gavin Malcolm, case management director of North Broward Medical Center; David King, business development coordinator at Hospice of Broward County and Ken Stolar, seminar specialist with Dignity Memorial Kraeer Funeral Homes. St. Stephen’s Pastor David Potter said he’s seen instances where tragedies became more complicated without this information. “When I was the pastor of another congregation a young couple got into a car accident [and left behind two children]. The wife was killed and the husband was in a coma. No one knew what do to for him in that process,” said Potter. “This preparation allows families and friends to “focus on their feelings and their faith.” Call 954-942-4473. SPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach’s signature historical structure, the 1916 Sample-McDougald House, is looking for individuals who are interested in our past and enjoy interacting with others to become volunteer tour guides. The Sample-McDougald House is the only Pompano Beach property listed in the National Register of Historic Place, and is one of the oldest homes in the area that has been preserved in its original con guration. Following its 2.5 million dollar restoration and site development, the house and grounds are open to the public and for special Docent training for SampleMcDougald House begins this monthevents. Volunteers are provided with training sessions that will cover the history of the house and the general community, as well as information on the landscape, interacting with visitors and safety procedures. The rst session will take place on Jan. 12, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the SampleMcDougald House, 450 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. A second session will be held on Jan. 26. Call 954-691-5686. Books & Lectures1-6 – Book discussion on chapters one and two of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Color Blindness by Michelle Alexander at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 954531-1928. 1-9 – Readers at Sundown at 6 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Join other readers to discuss this month’s title: The House at Riverton by Kate Morton. 954-946-6398. 1-14 – Annual meeting of the Friends of the Century Plaza Leon Slatin Library at 10:30 a.m. at the library, 1856A W Hillsboro Blvd, Deer eld Beach. 954-3577740.Children & Family1-5 – Outdoor garden program for children at 10:30 a.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic SightingsContinued from page 3 See SIGHTINGS on page 12

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6 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 1 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & Letters The Dec. 14, 2012 edition of the Pelican featured an article by Malcolm McClintock titled, Beach Fish Market serves up wealth of fresh seafood by Intracoastal. In said article, Terry Craft, owner of Beach Fish Market, was quoted as follows: ‘ … [I] found out Mr. Fish was going to close its doors … so I decided to buy it!” Through discussions with legal counsel for Mr. Fish Seafood, The Pelican became aware that Terry Craft did not buy Mr. Fish Seafood. Mr. Fish Seafood went out of business in the spring of 2012 following the death of its owner, Michael Montella. In July of 2012, Beach Fish Market assumed Mr. Fish Seafood’s lease on the premises. Mr. Fish Seafood received no compensation from Terry Craft or Beach Market. Mr. Fish Seafood is not af liated with Beach Fish Market or the owners/of cers of Beach Fish Market. The Pelican regrets the error. Correction & clari cationAdjusting to loss of friends won’t be easy, but good guys move onBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERIn Pompano Beach, things won’t be the same at community events with Capt. Mick Wiener no longer part of the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce. Friends of BSO Captain Mick Wiener could always spot the captain somewhere above the crowd. He was that tall, easy to nd. Capt. Wiener had the effect of making each person feel like he was one of his or her close friends. Most of us were anticipating Capt. Wiener to be promoted, very possibly to be Pompano Beach’s chief. Capt. Wiener seems to have been a man born to be a cop. He has cop written all over him. No problem was too small or too large to get his full attention. When news came recently that Sheriff-elect Scott Israel had Capt. Wiener on his “ re” list, the news was so startling, some thought it was a joke. Friends had asked Capt. Wiener how he felt about the recent election where his boss, Sheriff Al Lamberti, came in second. I wanted to know myself. Here’s what Capt. Wiener said. “I’ve worked for four bosses already. You just keep doing what you do.” And along with Capt. Wiener’s years with the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, he has continued his education beyond a master’s degree. Now he is studying for his PhD. It might have been a kick to call him Doctor Captain. But it would have been more fun to see a young man so dedicated to police work, his education and his community, to remain on the job. The ring was also a surprise left-hook to Capt. Wiener as well since he was six months away from his retirement. This Pompano Beach resident has been in service for 24 years and six months. Ironically he has enough sick time and vacation leave to earn those six months to retire, but the new sheriff had no interest in allowing that to happen. When cops retire, they get to wear a badge of retirement. Not Capt. Wiener. That might concern some of us who will have to work with the new sheriff when he comes on board of cially Jan. 9. Wiener was not alone in this so-called blood bath; 28 other deputies were on the list. We understand the “to the victor go the spoils,” but that’s not a long-lasting victory. For Capt. Wiener, we wish Godspeed to even greater things that come from good service to the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce and to the good people you have served so well for nearly 25 years. Those are the things that still await you and others who simply continue to try to be and do the best they can. What Pompano Beach loses, some other city will gain. And as for our new sheriff, we’d better all mind our P’s and Q’s.Go SOLAR Fest, Jan. 25, 26 at Broward Convention CenterThe right people will be in place to answer the most dif cult question participants will have at the SOLAR Fest this month. The two-day event will cover solar challenges and solutions to accessing thte sun’s energy to use for homes, pools and more. That include nancing options for rooftop PV solar systems installation that will reduce electric bills. Registration is $50 for Jan. 25. Attendance on Saturday, Jan. 26 is free. To nd out more, Call 954-519-1260. The Interview by Faye Sholiton is now playing at the The Willow Theatre The play is produced by The Women’s Theatre Project and directed by Genie Croft. Reviewers have called Sholiton’s work a “deeply moving memory play about the legacy of human suffering, courage and humanity, mothers and daughters, and forgiving and being forgiven, The Interview is at once a powerful documentation of a horri c historical event and one artist’s deeplyfelt response to it. Written with clarity and feeling, it resonates on all levels. Sholiton drew inspiration for her play from her real-life experiences as a longstanding journalist and interviewer of Holocaust survivors. With Harriet Oser, Patti Gardner, Irene Adjan and Christopher Mitchell Performances: Jan. 4 through Jan. 20; Thursday through Saturday 8 p.m. Saturday-Sunday 2 p.m. The Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park 300 S Military Trail, Boca Raton Box Of ce: 561-347-3948.Recommended Review Check this outOn Jan. 13, Luciano Saber along with Compact Production, Inc. screens Edge of Salvation at Muvico Broward 18, 2315 N. Fed. Hwy., Pompano Beach. The lm takes a social-economic look at what our country is faced with today as seen through the eyes of a 14-year-old boy and a family that loses everything due to a down economy, pride, greed and ultimately “man’s inhumanity to man.” The message of the lm is never to give up no matter how dif cult life may seem. Adapt and overcome. Let The Pelican know how you review this lm.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, January 4, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – After a 1-1/2-hour discussion, city commissioners unanimously agreed to table the issue of creating a new public safety department and schedule a workshop to hear from the public. Commissioners said they needed more information and time to hear from constituents before taking a vote. No date was set for the workshop. Their next scheduled meeting is Jan. 15. Residents packed city hall for the special meeting Wednesday but were not allowed to speak despite an attempt by Vice Mayor Bill Ganz to allow public comment. Many residents were upset at newly elected Broward Sheriff Scott Israel’s abrupt termination of the city’s popular police chief Pete Sudler. City Manager Burgess Hanson tried to assure the audience and commission that “tonight isn’t about Chief Sudler or the sheriff’s command staff. It is about public safety and how we approach it and to ensure that programs we have developed over the past two to three years remain intact.” A proposed ordinance would create a new Department of Public Safety and Emergency Management and create a position of director. The director would advise the city manager and commission on contractual obligations with BSO, oversee code enforcement and review performance of parking enforcement. Hanson said Deer eld Beach differs from other cities. “Three years ago we had issues with youth violence,” he said, noting the cases of Josie Ratley and Michael Brewer, which drew national negative attention to Deer eld Beach. After those incidents, the city wanted more involvement by police in reaching out to neighborhood schools and the community to develop proactive programs, especially for youth, Hanson said. The director of public safety would oversee the Police Athletic League, manage programs with homeowners’ groups and Neighborhood Watch and interact with the Citizen Observer Patrol to coordinate special events. The director also would develop an emergency management plan, including public safety plans for parks, facilities and infrastructure, such as water plants and water and sewer lines. And the director would develop a security plan for city facilities and parks. “Nothing in this is set in stone,” Hanson assured commissioners. “It can be modi ed or completely discarded. “There’s a lot of misinformation out there, that this is just a move against Sheriff-elect Israel for terminating Chief Sudler,” Hanson said. “No, It’s not. This is not about that at all. This is about the future of how we approach public safety and about programs we’ve established that are outside the norm.” Hanson said he was presenting a concept. No job offers had been made and no salary set. “It’s up to the commission how they want to move forward with it.” Mayor Peggy Noland said that rather than open the meeting to public comment, she preferred that people absorb what Hanson had said and call commissioners or the city manager. “This is just informative. This is highly sensitive,” she said. Noland suggested that people who want to address the commission sign up with Residents pack city hall to make sure safety programs remain intact Commissioners ask residents to hold off comments until next city meeting See SAFETY PROGRAMS on page 16

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8 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWhatever the need, Brighter Days Nursing agency can assist with home health care for clients and their family members who want to remain in their own homes. This agency, located at 1001 W. Cypress Creek Rd., suite 400H in Fort Lauderdale is owned by Louise Harvey, RN, and Michael Prisciantelli, who handles the of ce, billing and all nancial matters. “We are that extra pair of hands that can do the things that are dif cult for our clients like reaching the top shelf, driving to the doctor, changing the bed, organizing medicines. We can provide every level of care to help our clients stay in their own homes and keep their independence. Brighter Days range of help includes RNs, LPNs. CNAs. home health aids and companions,” explains Harvey. “Our service is geared to those who want to stay out of nursing facilities, but need assistance to remain Brighter Days offers extra hands to help clients and their loved ones keep their independenceat home. I was that extra pair of hands myself for 20 years. I recognized how important this service is to both the needy parent and the family who is searching for a way to keep mom or dad in familiar surroundings.” Harvey went on to say, “So many clients asked me if I knew of someone like me, to help a friend, that I got the courage to start my own specialized placement service for quali ed people. I’m licensed and insured. All of our employees have passed the required level two background checks and are bonded.” Although she interviews prospective employees and clients in her of ce, she says it is in the client’s best interest to go to the home involved to assess the kind of help needed. “The evaluation is always done by an RN or me,” she says. Our employees are all trained in their respective elds. They must pass a Florida State Board or the equivalent and be licensed. That includes every level of help offered by Brighter Days.” Clients have many varied needs. Each case is individual and is evaluated with this in mind. RNs do the assessments Louise Harvey, co-owner of Brighter Days, is shown here doing an assessment of a client’s needs. This client who walks with a walker needs help with certain tasks that she can no longer do. Harvey will help her work out what support she needs and how often the help will be needed. [Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]See BRIGHTER DAYS on page 23 Town clerk position opens in LauderdaleBy-The-SeaThe Town of LauderdaleBy-The-Sea is advertising for a town clerk to replace June White, who is retiring this month. She has been town clerk since July 2007. According to a notice on the town’s website, the job requires competency in records management and retention; knowledge of Florida elections and public records laws and procedures; a high degree of accuracy and attention to detail in work; excellent word processing, organizational and communications skills. Other requirements include ve years of experience in progressively responsible administrative work in municipal government. A bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or related eld is preferred. A Certi ed Municipal City Clerk with Florida experience is preferred. Hiring salary range is $50,000 to $65,000. More information about the position is available at www.lbts .org.By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Residents living here today can help preserve what was left behind by the residents of yesterday – during the Wilton Manors Scavenger Hunt. Scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 26 from 1 to 3 p.m., the Scavenger Hunt is part fundraiser and part tour guide. The hunt begins at Hagen Scavenger hunt showcases, preserve city’s historyPark, 2020 Wilton Drive. Along with showcasing many of the city’s historical sites and businesses, the money that is raised will be donated to help restore the Carriage House at Richardson Park and the Children’s Art Project located at Jaycee Park. Right now, the Carriage House is being utilized for storage – the same use for which it was used in its early days for horses and carriages. The Children’s Art Project, only partially complete, also needs funding. The Wilton Manors Development Alliance, which is spearheading the project, plans to add new decorative walls, benches, landscaping, lighting and brick pavers to complement the tile mosaic already in place. The mosaic is a rendering of “The Towers,” two medievallooking castle-like structures, formerly at Five Points, built by developer E.J. Willingham to attract people to the city in the 1920s. The Historical Society isn’t sure exactly when the Carriage House was built, the estimate is 1926 or earlier, but it knows what it wants the future of the structure to be. Mary Ulm, vice president of the Historical Society, See HUNT on page 9

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The Pelican 9 Friday, January 4, 2013 bw Children’s choir now being formedPompano Beach Children from ages six to 16 are invited to sign up for Children’s Choir of Pompano Beach, a school to train voices for performance. Classes begin on Jan. 17. Auditions take place Jan. 7 from 4:30 to 9 p.m. at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. Concerts will take place at the church. Cost is $35 for registration and $15 per class. Call 561-317-3866.Coney Island Baby duo at SkolnickPompano Beach The Baby Boomers’ music opens Jan. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave. in Palm Aire. Coney Island Baby is a husband and wife duo from Brooklyn, New York whose nostalgia themed performances bring back memories of those “good old days.” Tickets are $12. Call 954-786-4590. said the hope is that it can be converted into a space where food and drinks can be prepared and served. “In order to preserve the building, we needed to help the city make it functional,” said Ulm. The Historical Society would also like to see a permanent canopy added next to the Carriage House in order to enhance the outdoor gathering area at Richardson. “I think it would be a very nice addition to the park and would probably increase the city’s revenue,” said Ulm. Adrienne Foland, the event’s creator and membership director of the Wilton Manors Historical Society, said she came up with the idea of a scavenger hunt in San Francisco during Chinese New Year celebrations last February. “I just thought it would be fun to do that here,” she said. And those who participate in the Wilton Manors Scavenger Hunt will have to know or learn a thing or two about the history of the city if they want to win. “We have pictures of the business from like the 50s and 60s and they have to gure out what’s in its place today,” said Foland about one part of the event. The scavenger hunt will consist of teams of three to four people each. The cost to enter is $10 for one ticket or two tickets for $15. Children 12 and under are free if they are with an adult. Participants aren’t allowed to get help outside their team during the event, but a “Hint Station” will be located at Iberia Bank, 2465 Wilton Drive. One hint will be given per team. The winners will be chosen based on the number of correct answers “It’s really not about speed, it’s about brains,” said Foland. If two teams are tied with the same number of correct answers the team with the best time will win. The rst place team gets a $100 gift certi cate to Rosie’s Bar & Grill, second place winners receive a gift certi cate worth $50 at To The Moon and the third place prize is a $25 to Pinche Taqueria. Visit www.scavengerhunt. developwm.org or call Adrienne Foland at 954-2056594 for more information.What was Hagen’s rst name? So you think you know the answer?Then take your team to the place of proof, like a statue, pull out you camera and take the picture to verify your source. Your cell phone or camera will be critical for the nal proof.HuntContinued from page 8Garden Club of Lighthouse Point Lighthouse Point The Garden Club of Lighthouse Point hosts its “Membership Coffee” drive on Thursday, Jan. 10 at 11 a.m. at St. Paul’s Education Hall, 2700 NE 36 St. The day’s program will be “Stipular Secrets & Piquant Pyrenes, A Fantastic Cruise Through Rubiaceae: The Coffee Family.” The guest will be John J. Pipoly III, Ph.D., Broward County extension agent. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-942-9310 or visit www.lhpgc.org.

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10 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThis story began with an email from Jennifer Gibson-Castillo, a teacher and partnership volunteer coordinator at Charles Drew Family Resource Center. She wrote, “ Our Center has been blessed with a very generous new partner who deserves to be recognized. Home Depot, at 1151 W. Copans Rd. and its employees are doing wonderful things over here.” The Pelican contacted Carnel White, store manager at Home Depot, to set up an interview to get the rest of this story. White is a pleasant unassuming young man, dressed in the same Home Depot uniform that his 170 employees wear. Though his store is as busy as a beehive, Home Depot in Pompano Beach becomes a year ‘round Santa to Charles Drew Family Resource Centerhe willingly took the time to talk about this Home Depot store and its involvement with Charles Drew. “My employees and I decided to adopt a family in need and give that family a good Christmas, so we researched several places. We learned a little about Charles Drew, visited the school and quickly realized how much this school does for the immediate community. So, instead of adopting one family, we took this wonderful opportunity to help the school and give back to the community ourselves.” Home Depot donated a decorated Christmas tree to the school, and the employees lled bags with toys, games, books and more until they had enough gifts for 200 children. But that turns out to be just the beginning of what’s in the works for 2013. White explains. “Since we decided to adopt the school, we’re going to do a big project for the school every three months. Our rst project is to redo the entrance landscaping. We hope to plant owers, add plants, paint the benches and put mulch around the trees. We’re going to use pavers to create an area where teachers can take a break in a pleasant, outdoor setting.” And every three months, volunteer employees will have a school workshop to teach the youngsters how to complete do-it-yourself projects.” White was anxious to point out that all of the labor in these projects will be done by employees who are off the clock and working in their own free time. He says, “Home Depot is very generous to good causes and it embraces the idea of contributing to the community around us. And our employees are all enthusiastic about doing community service. We just completed one home in our area for a veteran and his family. We did landscaping, painting, improved the light xtures, remodeled the bathrooms, and the deck. Everything was done by 20 to 30 employee volunteers who worked beside me. Each district with a Home Depot store took on its own project of a home for a veteran.” Asked why they do all of this good work, White responded, “We do it because we feel we should support the community which supports us and our store. We build good relationships and that’s important.” Home Depot is very responsive to the community and its needs. Any organization or school can stop by the store for help in lling out the application for Carnel White, store manager of Home Depot, 1151 W Copans Rd. in Pompano Beach is partnering with Charles Drew Family Resource Center. Starting with a decorated Christmas tree and gifts for 200 children, Team Depot plans to beautify the school entrance, have workshops for children, and improve several other school areas that are in need of rescuing. [Photo courtesy of Courtesy Carnel White, Home Depot] See HOME DEPOT on page 11Car show and auctionFort Lauderdale – The Fort Lauderdale Beach Car Show & Auction will be held Friday, Jan. 4 through Sunday, Jan. 6 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St. Over 350 cars will be available for auction and display, including several automobiles from the 1930s. Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. Auctions start at noon on Friday and 10 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Visit www.ftlauderdaleauction. com.Coral Ridge Green marketFort Lauderdale Every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Coral Ridge Green Market is held at 3000 N. Federal Hwy., just south of the southeast cornet of Oakland Park Boulevard and Federal Highway. Vendors sell fresh, local and organic produce, herbs, pasta, baked goods, spices and teas, olive oils, orchids, bromides, stone crabs and more, call 954-4268436.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, January 4, 2013 a grant to complete a needed project. If approved, Home Depot makes it happen thru’ its Team Depot program which combines company funds and volunteer labor. Being in charge of 170 employees is a challenge, but White says, “I love what I do so it’s not a hard job. It’s a great job.” The Pelican salutes this generous company and its volunteer employees for being perfect examples of community support and involvement. Home DepotContinued from page 10Guevrekian, 46, is an of cer in a metal building construction company. Her responsibilities include contract management, accounting and human resources administration. She previously worked for Marriott International. A community activist, she lives in the Royal Palm Isles neighborhood. Jean, 40, has lived in Oakland Park since 2005. He is self-employed as operations manager for D&S Protection Corp. He is a member of the volunteer Citizens Observer Patrol. Seat 4: Incumbent Jed Shank and Robert T. Muise. Shank, 34, was elected in August 2010 to ll the seat held by Anthony Niedwiecki, who resigned to move to Chicago. Shank is a lifelong area resident and certi ed public accountant with private and government auditing experience. He is employed by the Broward County Of ce of County Auditor and is a past president of the Twin Lakes Neighborhood Organization. Muise is the owner of a food truck. At press time, The Pelican had been unable to reach Muise. Seat 5: Tim Lonergan and former mayor and commissioner Layne Dallett Walls. Longtime commissioner and former mayor Suzanne Boisvenue is term limited. Lonergan, 50, is a 14-year resident of Oakland Park, born and raised in Milwaukee, Wis. He is project manager for bene t operations with UnitedHealth Group and a community activist. Walls, 57, last served in 2010 when the commission unanimously appointed her to an interim position from June 1 through Aug. 24 to serve out the term of Anthony Niedwiecki. Term limits prevented her from running then. Previously, she served on the commission from 1993 to 1997 and again from 2001 to 2009. She is an owner/ partner with her brother in Aerko International, an aerosol packaging company in Oakland Park. She is a 22year resident of Oakland Park and previously lived in North Andrews Gardens before it was annexed into Oakland Park. Since leaving of ce, Walls has served on the city’s school advisory board, charter review committee and the city’s census committee in 20092010. Referendum questions include an ordinance to change municipal election dates from March in odd numbered years to November in even numbered years to coincide with the general election cycle. HopefulsContinued from page 1 Another proposed change would eliminate numbered commission seats, and candidates would continue to run at large. The top vote getters would be elected. Other questions include an ordinance to establish a procedure to ll a vacancy in the position of vice mayor; modernizing charter language; establishing a procedure for commissioners with a voting con ict to disclose the con ict before voting; and an ordinance to amend the city manager’s power and duties. Pompano Beach ArtHall returnsPompano Beach – This month marks the return of ArtHall, which combines networking opportunities and the works of local artists. The rst event is on Wednesday, Jan. 16 at 5:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. Each month, a new artist will be featured from January through October. Refreshments will be served. Visit www.pompanobeachcra. com or call 954-586-1111 or go to the ArtHall Facebook page.

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12 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Blvd. 954-786-2181. 1-11 – Tiny Tots Story Time at 10:30 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Ages 18months to three-years with adult caregiver. 954-9466398.Charity1-7 – Charity auction at Java Boys, 2230 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, at 7 p.m. Antiques, artwork, paintings, sculptures, furniture and other items will be available. Proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Email ajcrossconsulting@gmail. com.Clubs and Social Organizations1-14 – Pompano Beach Garden Club meets at 12:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Open to the public. The program “Planting for Song Birds” will be presented by Ann Wiley, member of the Audubon Society. Refreshments will be served. 954-943-0029. 1-15 – Oakland Park Garden Club meets at 6:30 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. 954-6304511.Education & Self Development1-7 – Italian II at 2 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library 2200 NE 38 St. 954946-6398. 1-7 – Retired Educators Social Club meeting at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca Raton. Meeting is free and open to the public. The topic will be “Slimming down: super foods and supplements.” 954-255-6360 or 561-4835445. 1-8 – Property tax exemption ling assistance at 11:30 a.m. at Oakland Park City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. 954-357-5579. 1-8 – Introduction to iPad at 10 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Bring your iPad and learn basic iPad functions and features. Registration required. 954-946-6398. 1-9 – Knitting and crocheting class at 12 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Learn beginner to advanced needlework from a lifelong yarn artist. 954-946-6398 1-11 – Spanish I class at 2 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954SightingsContinued from page 5 See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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The Pelican 13 Friday, January 4, 2013 Pelican 954-783-8700 Preservation Society, accepted its plaque and thanked the community “who worked so diligently for 11 years to make the Sample-McDougald House what it is today. We’re thankful to have this beautiful monument to the city and its residents and look forward to years of continued preservation and activities,” he said. Sample-McDougald House, at 450 NE 10 St., is a 17-room Georgian Colonial home constructed by Albert Neal in 1916 on Dixie Highway. In 2001 was moved to its current location. The home served as the base for Sample’s farming operations that stretched from Lighthouse Point west to Powerline Road Sample funded and constructed a road in 1917 for reaching his cropland. He died at age 74 in 1941. William D. and Sarah McDougald purchased the home in 1943. William was a Deer eld City Commissioner, chief of police and Broward County Deputy Sheriff, as well as a farmer. The McDougald children inherited the house, and in keeping with their mother’s desire, placed it on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. In 1999, volunteers created the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society, Inc. The house was moved off its original site in May 2001 a seven-hour journey down Dixie Highway viewed by hundreds.Work was undertaken to restore the house’s exterior and then the interior. On Oct. 25, 2005, Hurricane Wilma caused signi cant damage to the house. Extensive repairs were made to “re-restore the house.” Finally, late this year, the house opened for public tours and for special events and social functions.Blanche Ely HouseWillie Hopkins, assistant city manager, accepted the plaque for The Blanche Ely House at 1500 NW Sixth Ave. The building was the home of Blanche and Joseph Ely, educational and civic pioneers in Pompano Beach’s black community. The building houses the Ely Educational Museum featuring artifacts and documents relating to the Elys and education in the black community.Pioneer MonumentFisher introduced Don Downie to accept the bronze plaque for the Pioneer Monument, consisting of plaques and benches at the Emma Lou Olson Center at 1801 NE Sixth St. “You are a pioneer, my friend,” Fisher said, noting that Downie has dedicated a major part of his adult life to preserving the history of Pompano Beach, including creation of a map of historic sites hanging in City Hall. Downie said he was one of ve pioneers who collected funds for creation of the Pioneer Monument.Kester cottagesPeter Williams, president of the Pompano Beach Historical Society, accepted the plaque for the Kester cottages. Built in 1937, they were recently remodeled and are open for tours at Founders Park. Williams said that for 30 years the Historical Society has tried to preserve the heritage of the cottages, which have recently undergone extensive restoration. “Our goal is to keep them up, keep them going, show them off and be proud of them,” he said. Williams presented an original oil painting of the Kester cottages by Charlie Lewis to the city to be hung in City Hall. “Kudos to our Historic Preservation Committee and to Jennifer Gomez from our city staff” for making these presentations possible, Fisher said. Historic homesContinued from page 1 Two Kester Cottages are open to the public on special occasions or by appointment for tours. These stalwart Dade Pine homes represent the early architecture of the 30s and 40s. [Photo courtesy of the Pompano Beach Historical Society]

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14 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 On Saturday, Jan. 5 and 19, earlTrio, a South Florida band of local musicians will perform classic rock favorites from the Eagles, the Allman Brothers and The Beatles and pop favorites from Jimmy Buffett, Zac Brown and Paul Simon from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Boca Raton GreenMarket is held every Saturday at Royal Palm Place, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the intersection of South Federal Highway and Southeast Mizner Blvd. For additional information, please call 561-299-8684 or visit www.royalpalmplace.com/news-event earlTrio at Boca Raton GreenMarket SPECIAL TO THE PELICANBroward Sheriff’s Of ce homicide detectives have arrested the woman wanted in connection with the homicide of Jeffrey Blaugrund, 70, inside his Pompano Beach apartment. On Thursday, Dec. 20, a grand jury issued an indictment for Danielle Sachs, 33, for her role in the Oct. 15 death. Through her attorney, Sachs had arranged to turn herself in to deputies on Dec. 21, but she never showed. This week detectives caught up to her in the 1700 block of East Sunrise Boulevard in Ft. Lauderdale and took her into Two arrested in Pompano Beach murder SightingsContinued from page 12 Federica Zavanella, artist, will be among the artists showing their works at Women in Art on Jan. 11. See page 2 in Sightings for more information.custody without incident. In the early morning hours of Oct. 15, Blaugrund picked up Jonathan Forster, 27, and Sachs from a Wendy’s restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale and offered them a place to stay for the night. No one heard from or saw the victim until deputies responded to his residence Nov. 1. That afternoon, deputies were called to Blaugrund’s home after neighbors complained of a strong odor emanating from his apartment. After knocking on the door with no response, they solicited the management 946-6398. 1-13 – “What would Martin Luther King do?” discussion at 11 a.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park, 33309. Free lunch. 954-5311928. 1-15 – Class on tax updates for 2013 at 6 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954-9466398.Games and Activities1-10 – Bingo at 1 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954-9466398.Health & Fitness1 -7 – Yoga class at 10:30 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Bring a towel and bottle of water. 954-946-6398. 1-7 & 11 – Chair yoga at 3 p.m. at Lisa’s Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. $10 per class. 954-782-6564. See SIGHTINGS on page 15 See MURDER on page 21 Jonathan Forster, 27 Danielle Nicole Sachs, 33

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The Pelican 15 Friday, January 4, 2013 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Military operations from the time of the early man with clubs to the latest in weaponry have changed the course of nations. On Jan. 18 and 19, many of those items will be on display at the Elks Club, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach at the city’s rst Military artifact Show.Military artifact show opens at Elks Club, Jan. 18Vehicles and artifacts from the Revolution era will be on display. Curator of the show, Pat Regis, explains that most of the items are antiques and today’s weapons are not part of the show. Shawn Mazzarella is co-producer of the show. Viewers will see a Civil War encampment display with original posters, weapons, uniforms and other artifacts. The famous Gatling Gun of the Civil War will also be available for participants to re. For $25, a person can shoot seven rounds. The gun is owned by Bill Thompson, an historian who will be on hand at the show. Dealers of antique posters from early U.S. elections will be on hand. Those seeking free appraisals of privatelyowned antiques are welcome to bring them to the show. The Naval Air Museum, located at the Fort Lauderdale/ Hollywood Airport will have historical displays and persons on hand to discuss the early days of this airport. Regis, a Marine Veteran [1967-68], adds that proceeds from the show will bene t disabled veterans at Post 133 in Deer eld Beach. Vendors will be placed outside and inside the club. Elks members will offer refreshment and food for sale during the event. The show runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on both days. Admission is $7. Parking is free. For more information, call 954-2942526.SightingsContinued from page 14 Sports & Outdoors1-5 – Bird watch and walk at 8 a.m. at Deer eld Island Park. Boat to island leaves from Sullivan Park, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $3 per person. 954-357-5100. 1-12 & 19 – Northeast Little League baseball signup from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wimberly Field batting cage, 4000 NE 3 Ave., Oakland Park. League is boys and girls ages 5 to 18. Jan. 26 is the last day to register. Volunteer and sponsorship opportunities available. Email davemcleod33@aol. com or 954-793-2348.FridaysThe Island City Art Walk is held every third Friday from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Many businesses along the street host an artist and serve up free appetizers and spirits. Visit www. islandcityartwalk.com for more information. Pompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232.See SIGHTINGS on page 19

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16 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 the city clerk for the Jan. 15 meeting. Ganz said he has lots of questions. “I don’t see a price tag on this anywhere. Without a price tag, how can anyone have an educated opinion?” he asked. Commissioner Ben Preston said the commission should listen to the public before making decisions and always act in a scally responsible manner. “[The people’s] money is precious to us. Before we spend it, we have to have all the facts on the table,” Preston said. Hanson responded that when the commission determines what it wants, he can put a pricetag on the new position. Ganz said the proposal was “an outstanding job description, but I’m not sure it’s a full-time position in Deer eld Beach.” And without a pricetag, he said he couldn’t make a decision. “I don’t want our disgust with what happened with Chief Sudler to outweigh our nancial decision. I think we will lead with our hearts rather than our heads, and I don’t want to do that,” Ganz said. Preston questioned whether the good in the proposal outweighs the negativity it will create. “This proposal would hinder open communication with BSO and create an adversarial relationship that could last four years, possibly for the next eight years,” Preston said. He questioned whether the proposed new department would result in a duplication of efforts and duplication of salaries. Preston noted that last year 106 city employees lost their jobs. “Now you can nd money for this,” he said to audience applause. “Hold on. That is unfair and almost offensive,” Hanson responded. He said the city faced a $17 million de cit, and the commission priorities were clear. He said the proposed new department isn’t redundancies. “It’s a complementary service.” Noland said the city needs a public safety director to keep community programs running and make them stronger. “We need resource of cers in our schools. The School Board isn’t going to pay for them.” Ganz countered that the new position won’t have any authority over schools, noting that the School Board doesn’t fund resource of cers in Deer eld Beach. “The JM Family Foundation funds elementary school of cers, and the city funds middle school and high school positions,” he said. Ganz asked if the city could achieve the same things without creating this new position. Could they hire a consultant? Are there positions that could be eliminated to fund this? “How to pay for it is the biggest question,” he said. He said he looks at it as more of an advisory position than full time. Preston suggested inviting the new sheriff to a town hall meeting in Deer eld Beach, where he could articulate his vision. “Give his plan a chance to work. We may nd he would take care of a lot of things (on the list of duties for the new public safety director.) Ganz said Israel told him he has no problem with the city creating the department and position. But Israel also has said, “This person will have no say in BSO, won’t be working in BSO, and BSO won’t answer to them.” Ganz pressed the city manager for a cost of the position. Hanson again said he could price the position when commissioners told him what they want. Commissioner Marty Popelsky said they should have a workshop, invite the sheriff and hear from the public. “Then we can come up with a price. You can’t put the cart before the horse. We’re already getting lots of emails and calls. People are calling me names and hanging up,” Popelsky said. Commissioners agreed to schedule a workshop before their next regular meeting. Asked her reaction to what had just transpired as she left the hall, former city commissioner Pam Militello, said, “The timing is a little suspect. We all loved Chief Sudler, but we have to make sure this position is something we need. Let’s get more input so they can make a good decision.” “No, we don’t need this position,” said community activist Terry Scott. He said the public should have been allowed to speak. Safety meetingContinued from page 7

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The Pelican 17 Friday, January 4, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – After months spent laying the groundwork, this town is moving forward in the new year with streetscape improvements on Commercial Boulevard east and west of A1A. Mayor Roseann Minnet says she’s excited to see the projects come to fruition. Work will get under way in a few months, resulting in disruptions for businesses, residents and tourists. “This is a lot for this community to handle,” Minnet said, urging everyone to “keep a calm attitude. Relax and this will get done. There is an end in sight. There will be a beautiful east and west commercial district,” she says. To help ease with loss of parking in the downtown, town staff is negotiating with Minto to temporarily convert an empty lot east of town hall into a parking lot. Minnet credits Commissioner Mark Brown with that idea. Additional parking also is being created in the median on South Bougainvilla Drive and through reconfiguring the A1A parking lot to add 12 spaces. To make the downtown more pedestrian-friendly, Minnet said the town also is trying to get the OK from the Florida Department of Transportation [FDOT] to change traffic signals to stop traffic in all directions at A1A at Commercial Boulevard. Commissioners recently passed a resolution urging the governor and FDOT to quickly develop criteria for such signalization, so the request can be processed in conjunction with the Commercial Boulevard streetscape project. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann wrote recently, “The town has demonstrated through traffic and pedestrian counts that the intersection of State Roads A1A and Commercial Boulevard has extremely high pedestrian volume, regular conflicts between vehicular traffic and pedestrians, and that the signalization does not allow pedestrians sufficient time to cross.” The town has made this information available to the District 4 FDOT office. Officials there acknowledge the intersection is a good candidate for an exclusive pedestrian signalization phase, In May, commissioners approved participation in a Broward County plan for beach renourishment. The project is proposed to provide beach nourishment from the Hillsboro Inlet to Port Everglades. Two fill areas are proposed for nourishment: northern LBTS and Pompano Beach and southern LBTS and Fort Lauderdale. Cost for LBTS is estimated at $356,000. Said Minnet, “It’s about more than replenishing sand. “It’s about the sea level rise. We need to address this holistically and take action.” She doesn’t see the beach renourishment project happening this year since it can’t be done during turtle nesting season. Minnet also mentions the communications services tax. The state legislature may limit the amount local communities receive from that tax, which would impact the town considerably. She said LBTS gets about $320,000. Pensions also will continue to be an issue throughout the state. “What will be happening in Tallahassee affects us day to day,” she said. Minnet is now serving her third two-year term as mayor. Her term is up in March 2014, and she is term limited. She says she has no plans to run for anything else. Mayor looks forward to new look, but asks all to ‘stay calm’ during work Minnet

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18 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 ‘ By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – City commissioners gave initial approval Wednesday to allow sale of alcoholic beverages starting at 7 a.m. on Sundays. The vote was unanimous. The change makes the hours consistent with other days of the week, according to Rick Buckeye, senior planner. The additional hours would be limited to hotels, restaurants and nightclubs where beverages are consumed on the premises. Commissioner Shari McCartney said she brought the issue forward after hearing from pub owners whose customers watch European football. “Our city was losing business to other cities” that have eased the rules, she said. “If changed, this would mirror Fort Lauderdale and enhance our culinary district now being developed.” Fort Lauderdale amended its ordinance last year to lift restrictions on Sunday morning alcohol sales at hotels, bars and restaurants. “It’s interesting how times change,” Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said. “In the past, people were in church (on Sunday morning) celebrating religious things.” She said she supported the change, noting the regulations have been “unduly harsh.” Christopher Brennan of the Fox & Hound Pub thanked commissioners for moving so quickly on changing the Sunday Blue Laws. He urged them to review regulations calling for a $2,000 annual permit for bars open past midnight, calling the fee “an exorbitant tax.” “Review that and make it a slightly more modest fee. That would be good for the city,” he said. Currently, about 30 businesses have permits to be open and sell alcoholic beverages past midnight, Buckeye said. Debbie Blakely of the Big Dog Station also applauded the commission for easing the regulations, although she wasn’t sure she would open at 7 a.m. on Sunday.Variances granted for bankIn other business, commissioners approved an application by PNC Bank for four variances from landscape buffer requirements to allow redevelopment of Alcohol OK for Sunday sales putting outdated Blue laws to rest in Oakland Park “In the past, people were in church (on Sunday morning) celebrating religious things.” Boisvenue See VARIANCE on page 19

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The Pelican 19 Friday, January 4, 2013 a gasoline service station site for a bank with drivethrough on property at 999 E. Commercial Blvd. The vote was 4-1, Commissioner Boisvenue dissenting. The applicant proposes to build a 2,800-square foot bank at the northwest corner of East Commercial Boulevard and North Dixie Highway, replacing a nonconforming gasoline service station in blighted condition. “This will be a visually pleasing development,” Chrisopher Gratz, senior planner, said in presenting the request. He said minor reductions to landscaping requirements would make it possible. VarianceContinued from page 18By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – City commissioners tabled a vote on a pollworker agreement with the Broward County Supervisor of Elections [SOE], for the March 12, 2013 municipal election so city staff can negotiate for better terms. The proposed agreement authorizes the supervisor to hire and train required Cost of municipal elections needs to be veri ed, Oakland Park commissioners saypollworkers for 24 precincts. Costs for hiring and training pollworkers for the last city election was $23,000, and the SOE anticipates costs to be similar in the next election. Commissioner Shari McCartney strongly urged the commission to postpone approving the agreement and asked for an audit. She also asked about other expenses besides pollworkers. “We need some sort of audit of what we are paying for. A resident brought forward the fact that we have already paid for this (election) equipment, and now we’re being extorted to pay for it again,” McCartney said. “We’re giving up (authority) with absolute discretion to the supervisor of elections. We’ve talked about consolidating precincts. There may be statutory issues with that. This is an abdication of our financial responsibility. “Who says we need these clerks, assistant clerks, inspectors and super clerks, whatever they are [all positions outlined by Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes]?” McCartney asked. “I don’t know that we need these. Maybe we do. We don’t know if we could do it better or cheaper ourselves.” Costs of running municipal elections have totaled $30,000 to $50,000, McCartney said. “We don’t know if those are the actual costs.” She suggested the item be tabled until the city staff can investigate. Vice Mayor John Adornato See ELECTION COSTS on page 21 SightingsContinued from page 15 See SIGHTINGS on page 22The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.

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20 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFFish Shack 2862 NE 17th Ave Pompano Beach 954-586-4105 Open Daily 11:00 am – 9:00 pm Closed Sundays Harder to nd than the mythical city of Atlantis, the incredibly popular Fish Shack Restaurant continues its meteoric rise to the top of the North Broward culinary scene. Owners Mike and Elisa Focarazzo have built the County’s smallest gastronomic juggernaut centered on one single, overarching philosophy – offer the freshest seafood at the lowest price. They have been so successful at implementing this approach that the Fish Shack has developed a serious cult following. Locals adore the unpretentious vibe of this quaint little eatery while tourists ock from all over the world in the hopes of discovering the maritime treasures hidden within. In fact, the perfectly cooked food, superlative service and wallet-friendly pricing have vaulted the Fish Shack to the top of Trip Advisor’s restaurant rankings for the Pompano Beach area! In barely a year and a half of operation, this postagesized trattoria has garnered the approbation and adulation of foodies of all stripes. Even New Englanders reluctantly admit that the clam chowder rivals the best they have ever had at home. By the way, another mouthwatering Ranked the #1 seafood restaurant in Pompano Beach, the Fish Shack continues to impress with the freshest ocean delights in town Succulent Blue Point oysters on the half-shell will thrill raw bar enthusiasts.The irresistible blackened red snapper llet with crispy fries is a must-try at the Fish Shack. soup option is the impossibly velvety lobster bisque bursting with deep avors and toothsome chunks of everyone’s favorite crustacean. For additional seductive starters, the conch salad, homemade sh dip and fried Ipswich clams are simply sublime. “Fresh sh, oysters, clams and cracked conch are our most popular dishes,” says Elisa as she greets an unending stream of famished guests who are willing to wait, rain or shine, for a seat at one of 4 tables or at the cozy bar. “Obviously, we do a lot of take-out service as our seating space is quite limited,” she adds with a smile. Delivered at 11 a.m. See FISH SHACK on page 24

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The Pelican 21 Friday, January 4, 2013 said he worked at the polls during the last election, and four precincts voted at the Collins Center. “Do we need each one of these people [at each precinct]?” he asked. “It seems excessive and at enormous cost.” City Clerk Renee Shrout said a letter was sent to the SOE asking to reduce the number of pollworkers. She noted that qualifying for the municipal election is Jan. 2 to 9, with “the election approaching rather quickly.” She said she would do all she can to make the reduction happen. City Manager John Stunson said the clerk’s office is down one person, and he worries about a misstep. I would hate for answer to the commission’s requests be ‘Go hire your own pollworkers,’” he said. Commissioner Jed Shank said while he “very much agrees with the concerns Commissioner McCartney has raised,” he supports approving the agreement because of the time issue. Shank said the SOE divides the total cost of municipal elections by the number of municipalities holding elections. He has concerns about how those costs are allocated, concerns about whether the city is getting over-allocated a percentage of costs and also has issues about the total costs. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said the commission has to address these issues if it could save the city thousands of dollars. She suggested a special meeting, if necessary. The issue will be reconsidered at the next commission meeting Jan. 16. The commission budgeted $67,000 in the FY 2013 budget for costs associated with the election, including staffing of precincts. Election costsContinued from page 19MurderContinued from page 14of ce to open the door. Deputies found the apartment ransacked and discovered Blaugrund’s body inside. Investigators believe the victim was killed during the commission of a robbery. The Broward County Medical Examiner’s Of ce determined Blaugrund died of asphyxia and ruled the case a homicide. Both, Forster and Sachs, face one count of rst degree murder.

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22 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Lighthouse Chamber unveils loyalty discount card with fanfare Lighthouse Point – With its new loyalty card program ready to go, the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce held its 3rd Annual Shop the Point event at The Shoppes of Beacon Light last month. The “Shop the Point” discount card program, which gives Lighthouse Point residents discounts at participating businesses and restaurants in and out of the city, was premiered at the event along with the usual music, entertainment, drawings and tastings. For a list of participating businesses, visit www.lhpchamber.com. Call 954-946-6610 to become a participating business. [Photos courtesy of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce]David and Shannon DiPierro of Lighthouse Point Fitness. Linda Bourguet shows off her festive handmade Christmas wreaths. Ashley Zito and Ashley Burns of Orange Fitness with Natalia Bigio, right, of 31 Gifts.SightingsContinued from page 19 Sports & OutdoorsPompano Beach GreenMarket is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. 954292-8040. Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. Pony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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The Pelican 23 Friday, January 4, 2013 and organization of medications. LPNs and CNSs are suggested when everyday issues including driving, doctor visits, bathing, light cooking and cleaning are involved. Some clients simply need companionship and support for everyday tasks. Harvey feels her career is a direct result of her upbringing. She says, “I was raised by my grandmother who was a midwife. When I was born, grandmother was already retired, but she had delivered every one of my mother’s children. There were 17 of us and I am number 16. Grandma was unique. She was a midwife and a school teacher—a true role model for me.” Harvey lived with her grandmother from age seven on. “Watching her pointed me to my own career. She spent her life taking care of everyone including her husband, a wounded veteran of WWI. When my agency can afford to do so, I hope to give caregivers free respite care so that these overworked folks can have a few hours away from their very demanding lives. “ Brighter Days offers livein, daily, weekly, hourly and 24/7 care to assist with medication, doctor appointments, cooking, cleaning, laundry, showering, feeding, dressing, and companionship. Private pay and major insurance accepted. Here’s what a few satis ed clients had to say: Margaret Hatab lives independently even though she is a full time wheelchair person. She says, “I need someone here ve days a week and count on Brighter Days to send over aids to help with everything including cooking, cleaning, laundry and more. I also wear a Lifeline button so that I am covered when I am alone at night.” Susie Hess says, “I’ve known Louise for a long time. She took care of my grandmother’s friend for a long time and we were very pleased with her and the people she sent, once she opened her own agency.” Call 954-765-6534 to arrange a consultation. Brighter DaysContinued from page 8 Pompano Beach – To help get his tenants in the Christmas spirit each year, Don Larson, who manages Deauville Plaza Apartments on Southeast 11 Avenue in Pompano Beach, holds a Christmas lighting contest. Larson has been the city’s of cial Santa in its annual Yultide parade for 15 years. So it’s no surprise that “Santa” decided to trim the street where he lives. Besides having bragging rights all year long, winners received rolls of quarters to use in the apartment’s laundry room. This year’s top decorators were: 1st – Joey Bernhardt 2nd – Omar Williams, Chrysanne Rogers 3rd Place – Brian Bila and Jennifer Jallos 4th Place – George and Cyndy Treitler Decorating contest stir sup holiday cheer in Pompano Beach 1st Place winner Joey Bernhardt [Above] and 3rd Place winners Brian Bila and Jennifer Jallos [Below]. 2nd Place winners Omar Williams, Chrysanne Rogers and Leila Rogers [Above] and 4th Place winners George and Cyndy Treitler as Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus [Left].

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24 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad every morning, the fresh sh includes tasty varieties such as grouper, mahi-mahi, red snapper, yellow n tuna and Tripple tail. Guests often enjoy these favorites: fried, grilled, blackened, served as a platter with rice or simply in sandwich form with crispy fries. As for the oysters, they are the briny, perfectly-sized Blue Point variety that are fabulous on the half-shell with just a few drops of lemon, a dollop of cocktail sauce or a touch of horseradish. The wild caught middle neck clams can also be enjoyed in this fashion even though some patrons opt for “steamers” with drawn butter or the deep-fried approach. The cracked conch is crispy, avorful and astoundingly tender. Even better, it comes with a creamy and zesty homemade “conch sauce” remoulade that furiously titillates the senses. “We sell at least 80 pounds of conch every week!” says Mike with genuine astonishment. When asked how they are able to make the notoriously chewy meat so tender, his wife Elisa simply responds: “We beat the hell out of it!” Shrimp a cionados will revel in a cornucopia of delectable preparations. Grilled, steamed and fried with garlic butter or Cajun spices, the large shrimp can also be part of a healthy Caesar lettuce wrap or sprinkled on top of a garden salad. “Our customers have been so loyal to us since we opened, we couldn’t have done it without them,” says Mike. “I also owe a lot of our success to our amazing staff. It takes a real team effort to pull it off the way we do.” And what they do is borderline miraculous. Thanks to some well-placed family connections, this nauticallythemed restaurant nets the best catches of the day and serves them up at dockside prices. “We get customers from all over but especially Boca Raton and Lighthouse Point,” says Mike who notes that many boat captains, famous athletes, local celebrities and city of cials also make frequent visits. “You never know who you will bump into when you are here. People from all walks of life come for the fresh seafood.” Other noteworthy specialties include the classic order of sh & chips, the always intriguing shrimp & scallop burger as well as the thick and avorful tuna steak. “I come speci cally for the tuna but generally end up getting a second meal as well,” says area resident Nicolas Tamayo. “I just love the food here. Everywhere else is far more expensive, far less friendly and de nitely less satisfying.” For land lubbers, the Fish shack serves up juicy halfpound Black Angus beef burgers and crunchy, hand battered chicken wings with choice of dipping sauce. A dozen oysters or middle neck clams cost $9.95. Fisherman’s platters, sh specials, burgers, wraps, sandwiches and salads are all between $7 Fish ShackContinued from page 20 and $15. Large wine glasses are $3.95, draft beer $1.50. Daily specials are presented An enormous grilled Tuna steak with rice and homemade coleslaw is a great option for tuna lovers. on the big board outside. Enjoy!

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The Pelican 25 Friday, January 4, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park – City commissioners have approved four applications the Community Development Block Grant [CDBG] Program totaling $60,000. The city has $175,000 in CDBG funds for this fiscal year.Non-pro ts receive $15,000 in CDBG fundsIf approved by Broward County, Broward Meals on Wheels, Kids in Distress, Florida Singing Sons Boychoir and Light of the World Clinic will each receive $15,000. Rejected by the city commission was a $20,000 request from the Marriage Institute, Inc. To be approved, nonprofit organizations must be certified as a 501(3) and have projects which fall within the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development mandated guidelines by providing social services to at least 51 percent low or moderate income clientele. The vote was 4-0. Mayor Anne Sallee abstained from voting because she has a contractual relationship with one of the applicants. Mark Adler, associate director of Broward Meals on Wheels, said the agency has served 30 seniors in Oakland Park for more than six years. “It’s not the $38,000 we requested, but we will take it graciously, so people can age in place,” he said. Helen LaForge, executive director of Florida Singing Songs Boychoir, said the funds in the past have helped 40 boys who otherwise couldn’t have participated. “It’s about the whole boy, the whole family, not just about singing,” she said. Commissioner Jed Shank said his preference would See FUNDS on page 31

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26 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26SEEKING EMPLOYMENTRELIABLE BILINGUAL LADY Seeks Position As Pet Sitter / Dog Walker (Responsible Animal LOVER) Pompano / E Ft Lauderdale Area. Giselle 954-942-8111. 1-4 CERTIFIED CNA – Honest, Reliable, Seeking Position To Take Care Of Your Loved Ones. Live In Or Out. Excellent References. 954-682-1198. 1-4 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-11 CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 1-11 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954818-9538. 1-11 MIKE THE GARDENER “The All American Yardman” Yard And Garden Care – Get Te Best For Less! Call 561-5436337. 1-18 VISION ELECTRIC INCLicensed/Insured. Electrical Service & Installation. No Job Too Small. #EC13002184 – Call 954-274-4513. 1-25 HEAVENLY CLEANING! Service Out Of This World. 10 Years Experience. Excellent References. Not An Agency. Pet Friendly. Call Nina At 954-6016141. 1-4 PERSONAL ASSISTANT – Will Shop – Run Errands, Transport To Appointments, Airport, Etc. Also Light Duty Housecleaning, House – Pet Sitting, Etc. 906-450-5951. 1-4 A N A’ S CLEAN (RESIDENTIAL) CLEANING In Pompano – Lighthouse Point – Deer eld. Dependable – Thorough – Experienced. References. Good Work For A Good Price. Please Call Ana 954-692-4691. 12-7 XPERTS CLEANING SERVICE – Residential & Commercial. 10 Years Experience. References – Honest – Dependable. More Information Call 954-3760524. 1-4 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATIONPickup & Drop-Off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-234-0617. 1-4 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1-4 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 1-25 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 1-11 BARBER/ BEAUTY EQUIPMENT BARBER & BEAUTY Equipment For Sale! Chairs, Stations, Nail Tables. Lots Of Misc. Equipment Also For Sale. LOW LOW PRICES! Nick 954-415-4937. 1-4 SEASONAL RENTALLAUD BY THE SEA – 55+. BEAUTIFUL 2/2 Furnished. Walk To Beach, Shops, Restaurants. Large Pool – Nice Grounds. 3-5 Month Rental. 413-244-2807. 12-28 REAL ESTATE SERVICESSELLING OR BUYING Choose Someone You Can Trust – 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen. YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 1-4 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH – Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38’ x 13’. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 1-11 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO CHARMING 2/1 Home. Asking $975 Per Month. 611 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 1-25 POMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,200 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 27 Friday, January 4, 2013 Pelican Classi eds mean business! 954-7838700!Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com or 954-7838700!Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 POMPANO BEACH Leisureville. 3/2 – 1 Car Garage,. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease – Utilities Not Included. Available February 1st. 954649-8867. HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO 2 / 1 – 1 Car Garage. Central Air – Screened Porch. Double Shed With Sundeck. $124,900. Barbara Balistreri Realty – 954-2637129. 1-4 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE / DEERFIELD – Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny w/Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furnished. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $63,900. 561-372-9837. 1-4 POMPANO PARLIAMENT HOUSE – 1/1.5 In The Heart Of The East CRA. Across From The Beach. Open & Airy. $149K. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. 954-8034174. 1-4 POMPANO BEACH 2 /2 Fabulous Ocean & Intracoastal Views From SE Corner 15th Floor! Reduced! $249,900. Carole Stephan – Greater Broward Realty. 954-6955937. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 1-4CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 1-4 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 1-11 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 1-4 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 Apt With Screened Room Available In Residential Neighborhood. $1,000 Month Yearly Lease. Call 609-638-1291. 1-4 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – NW – NE 2/1 New $9752/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 1-25 CHURCH FOR RENT! Pompano Beach. Well Furnished. Great Sound System Available. Seats 20. Must Rent! Only $275/Month. Please Call For Availability. 954-588-4985 – 754-281-0922. 1-4 POMPANO DIXIE & COPANS WAREHOUSE For Rent. 2 Units – 1-1640 Sq Ft – 1 – 2080 Sq Ft With A/C Of ces Zoned 3M. Both With Overhead Doors. Starting At $850. Call 716-316-3690. 1-11

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28 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Most people are not aware of the many benefits available through veterans health care, state veterans homes, home renovation grants (HISA Grants), or from two disability income programs called Compensation and Pension. One particular program called Veterans Pension, or more commonly known as the Veterans “Aid and Attendance Benefit”, can provide money to help offset longterm care costs in home. The reason for using “aid and attendance” to refer to Pension is that many veterans or their single surviving spouses can become eligible if they have a regular need for the aid or attendance of a caregiver or if they are housebound. Evidence of this need for care must be certified by VA as a “rating.” With a rating, certain veterans or their surviving spouses can now qualify for Pension. Pension is also available to low income veteran households without a rating, but it is a lesser dollar amount. Roughly 1 out of 4 seniors in the U.S. could qualify for the aid and attendance benefit under the right conditions. Only about 5 percent of U.S. seniors are receiving this benefit. What is the Veterans Aid and Attendance Pension bene t? A veteran is eligible for up to $1,704 per month, while a surviving spouse is eligible for up to $1,094 per month. A veteran with a spouse is eligible for up to $2,020 per month and a veteran with a sick spouse is eligible for up to $1,338 per month.Eligibility Rules for PensionTo receive Pension, a veteran must have served on active duty, at least 90 days, during a period of war. The veteran must be discharged under other than dishonorable conditions. Single surviving spouses of such veterans are also eligible. If younger than 65, the veteran must be totally disabled. If age 65 and older, there is no requirement for disability. There is no disability requirement for a single surviving spouse.Periods of WarWorld War II: Dec. 7, 1941, through Dec. 31, 1946 Korean Conflict: June 27, 1950, through Jan.31, 1955 Vietnam Era: Feb. 28, 1961, through May 7, 1975, inclusive, in the case of a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period. The period beginning on August 5, 1964, and ending on May 7, 1975, inclusive, in all other cases. Gulf War: August 2, 1990, through date to be prescribed by Presidential proclamation or law.About the NCPCThe National Care Planning Council, Senior Helpers of Florida and its affiliated members are dedicated to helping families recognize the need for long term care planning and to helping implement that planning. Integrity, honesty, and a genuine concern for those who are in need of (or may need) long term care are at the heart of our services. Information about Veterans Benefits Available to Senior Veterans and Their Surviving Spouses. Call 954-707-5030. Advertisement

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The Pelican 29 Friday, January 4, 2013 ‘ installed, and dues from the Deer eld Beach Island Community Association [DBICA] brought Thanksgiving and Christmas to less fortunate families. Now, with 200 paying members and some money to spend, the DBICA is looking for a beauti cation project east of the Intracoastal Waterway. Possible projects will be the topic of the Jan. 17 DBICA meeting at the Community Presbyterian Church. Dreyer and his wife Dolly moved here from Plantation Acres in 2009, choosing a townhome one block from the beach. They had considered both Boca Raton and Delray Beach when they moved east but chose Deer eld Beach for its “village feel” and its diversity. ”You can’t beat the location and we’ve got characters out here. We’ve got surfers, and we’ve got early birds and everyone in between,” Dreyer said. Almost immediately Dreyer set out to increase his neighbors’ awareness of some obvious problems: garbage cans left for days in the swales, exposed dumpsters. Most things were resolved through better enforcement of the codes, but changing the code to require garbage cans and bulk pickups be stored out of sight has created a huge improvement. Working with Sgt. Floyd Baker who heads up code enforcement here has been very effective, Dreyer said. “We live in a beautiful community [and] enforce the codes. Success breeds more success and educating residents about the rules is an important part of the process,” Dreyer said. Approaching problems with the backing of an association rather than an individual is also more effective, Dreyer believes. “An association has more clout in its relationship with the city.” He thinks other neighborhoods would prosper if they had a community organization to “reset expectations, raise the bar,” he says of attempts to make improvements. There are 2,000 residences on the “Island,” the area between the Intracoastal and the ocean. A commercial real estate broker and manager, Dreyer has worked up the pro le of his neighborhood: half are full-time residents, half are snowbirds. Of the snowbirds, half of them come not from out of state, but from western Broward County. More snowbirds are members of the Community Island Association than full-time residents, a fact that surprised Dreyer until he realized that the association offers these part time citizens representation they would not have otherwise. Dreyer acknowledges the huge contribution of the Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] which has nanced improvements to the beach area: drainage, sidewalk pavers, turtle lighting, the Hillsboro Blvd. streetscape, pedestrian crosswalks and most recently the refurbished shing pier. He contributed to the CRA’s development plan, acting as a consultant and identifying potential real estate buys. Despite the progress that has come to his beach community in the last few years, Dreyer knows there is still much to be done especially in the area north of Northeast Second Street where older, rental units proliferate. A beauti cation project outside the scope of the association but one close to his heart is to see several old houses on north A1A rehabbed, perhaps as art galleries. “It’s time to step it up there,” he said. Everyone living on the Island is welcome to the DBICA meetings. City staff, including City Manager Burgess Hanson, will attend the Jan. 17 meeting. On Feb. 21, the topic will be sea turtle conservation. Expert Richard Whitecloud is the speaker. On Mar. 21, diving off shore reefs is the discussion and on Apr. 18, The Rev. Dennis Andrews of Community Presbyterian Church will be the speaker. The association is not just about serious matters. It is about fun, too. The Dreyers hosted a holiday party in their tropical backyard last month and in April, members will gather for the annual picnic. And for those who love country music, Dreyer has put his own words to Toby Keith’s song, “I Love This Bar.” “I love this town,” he says. For more information on the DBICA, and all the words to the song, visit the website DBICA.com.Beach IslandContinued from page 1We live in a beautiful community [and] enforce the codes. Success breeds more success. Dreyer

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30 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Lighthouse Point – This week, the wahoo are biting. “Whether you’re in the Bahamas or in South Florida, the wahoo shing has been off the chain for the last week,” said RJ Boyle of RJ Boyle Studios in Lighthouse Point. “Double digits have been recorded in the Bahamas every week and quite a few have been caught off the Hillsboro Inlet.” According to Boyle, the crew of the Rebound caught ve wahoo on Wednesday alone. Wahoo are biting from here to the Bahamas Lou Tomisello, out of Boca Raton, caught two wahoos weighing a total of 50 lbs. Boyle said most of the wahoo are being caught via trolling with lures at 8 to 12 knots. “The best of the action seems to be from 175 to 300 ft.,” said Boyle. Boyle added that dolphin have been nicky lately but those seeking to catch a few should use live pilchards as bait. “Live pilchards will do the trick,” he said.By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach – The Two Georges at The Cove serves plenty of seafood to its customers, but once a year it encourages people to go out and catch their own. On Saturday, Jan. 19 from 8 to 4 p.m., Two Georges, 1754 SE 3 Court., will host its 3rd Annual Two Georges at The Cove Billfish Tournament. The event, a continuation of the tournament that was started by the restaurant’s previous owners when it was known as The Cove Marina & Restaurant, will benefit the Jim & Jan Moran Club of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Deer eld’s Two Georges hosts Bill sh Tournament Broward County. Denise Buzzelli, tournament coordinator, estimates that 10 to 20 boats and about 150 anglers participate every year. And space is still open for this year’s tournament. “We’d like to get as many boats as possible,” she said. The cost is $600 per boat with each additional angler allowed to compete for $150. Entry includes dinner and drinks. Extra dinner tickets are $30 each. Angler RJ Boyle, owner of RJ Boyle Studio in Lighthouse Point, which sells, bait, tackle and marine See BILLFISH on page 31SightingsContinued from page 22Safe Boating CourseThe U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will host its “About Boating Safety” on Jan. 19 at Imperial Point Medical Center, 6401 N. Fed. Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. The one-day program begins at 8 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m. All materials and lunch are provided. Cost is $50. Contact Richard Leys at 954-942-8108. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.SundaysDeer eld Beach Green Market is held from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Cove Shopping See SIGHTINGS on page 31

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The Pelican 31 Friday, January 4, 2013 FundsContinued from page 25equipment and merchandise, said those who want to make their entry fee count should keep in mind a few tricks and strategies. “Having the freshest bait that you can is huge,” said Boyle. And, he added, having as many types of bait also increases the chances of grabbing a tournamentwinning fish. “Some guys will have all four baits – goggle eyed, herring, tinker mackerel, pilchards – because sometimes [billfish] will target just one type of bait that day.” Boyle also touts pre-fishing and research as big ways for anglers improve their chances. “A lot of the guys who compete in those tournaments and do well, they pre-fish maybe two days before a tournament. They’ll also network with friends up and down the coast to find out what the best conditions for billfish are.” Weigh-ins will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. on Jan. 19 with cocktail hour from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. The awards banquet is from 7:30 to 10 p.m. Raffle and auction items will also be part of the festivities. The kick-off party, sponsored by 99.9 Kiss Country, will be held on Thursday, Jan. 17 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Two Georges. A captains/observer meeting will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. To register or become a sponsor, call Denise Buzzelli at 954-427-0353.Bill shContinued from page 30be to approve all five and let them ensure compliance with the county. But he said he agreed with the concern that the Marriage Institute is a start-up entity. Vice Mayor John Adornato said the institute is not registered as a non-profit with the state of Florida. He questioned their goals and said the commission needed to “pay attention when we’re using public money for religious organizations. I don’t feel they’re a worthy entity given the lack of information about them,” The commission agreed to apply the municipal portion of CDBG funds available, $115,000 for the purchase of the Perez building at NE 34 Court and Dixie Highway, demolition and the future construction of a plaza.SightingsContinued from page 30 Center, Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal, every Sunday until April 28. Vendors are welcome. Call 561239-1536 or 561-299-8684.MondaysThe Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the rst and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Oakland Park. 954-782-9951.TuesdaysYoga every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $7 per class. Classes are also held Saturday mornings from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. 954-6073520. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. Cost is $7. 305607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesdays at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta works to advance women. 561-392-2223.

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32 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013



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Friday, January 4, 2013 Vol. XXI, Issue 1 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Five years after encouraging his neighbors to make improvements to their island community, Mark Dreyer can point with pride to some accomplishments. Garbage cans and bulk refuse that had littered the landscape have disappeared behind hedges and walls, an active Crime Watch program is in place, some potholes have been lled, the pocket park at SE 10 Street has been landscaped, doggie stations Island Association is all about raising the bar to make things better See BEACH ISLAND on page 29 Mark Dreyer leads his island community to a higher level through communication, education and the power of community pride. [Photo by Judy Wilson] Plaques give local history a boostBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Five structures were recently added to the citys Local Register of Historic Places. At a recent city commission meeting, Mayor Lamar Fisher presented bronze plaques recognizing the historic designation to be placed at The Blanche Ely House, Pioneer Monument, Kester Cottages #1 and #2 and the Sample McDougald House. Fisher thanked members of the volunteer Historic Preservation Committee for their efforts, noting, Because of the success of the committee you made the local registry a reality. Were truly saving our history and saving these community structures that have gone through the process to be [declared] historic. Dirk DeJong, president of the Sample-McDougald House See HISTORIC HOMES on page 13 City elections draw six hopefulsBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City Commission Seats 1, 4 and 5 are up for election on March 12. Voters will also consider six referenda questions. Filing, which started Wednesday, runs through next Wednesday, Jan. 9. At The Pelican s deadline, six residents had quali ed for those seats. Seat 1: Sara Guevrekian and Ruben Jean have quali ed. Incumbent, Mayor Anne Sallee, elected in 2009, has not yet led.See HOPEFULS on page 11 Urban farm seems likely in 2013 adding another angle to culinary districtBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park An urban farm that brings Oakland Park back to its agricultural roots, but with a new urban look could be sprouting soon. City staff is close to nal negotiations with Jon Albee of the Urban Farm Institute who has submitted a proposal for a farm north of Jaco Pastorius Park. The item will come before the commission this month. This will be another phase of our culinary arts district, said Mayor Anne Sallee. His could be the farm that grows the lemon grass for a special beer brewed by Funky Buddha, [the brewery coming soon to Oakland Park Station,] she said. Residents here have requested community gardens but Sallee said See URBAN FARM on page 3Bill Thompson checks his Civil War period Gatling Gun which will be on display at the Military Artifact Show on Jan. 18 and 19 at the Pompano Beach Elks Club. See story on page 15.

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2 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Sandy Paws will host Walk for the Animals on March 2 to raise funds for the Broward Humane Society. Over the past 10 years, the walk has raised more than $22,000 to support homeless animals. The 1.5 mile walk on Las Olas includes a free breakfast at IHop. Call Cindy Geesey at 954-776-5974. Art, Music & Entertainment1-4 Empire Stage and Island City Stage present Pig Tale An Urban Faerie Story at Empire Stage, 1140 N Flagler Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Play runs through Feb. 2. Show times are Thursdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 5 p.m. Tickets are $30. Visit www.smarttix.com or call 954-678-1496. 1-5 Notre Dame University Band performs at Cardinal Gibbons High School, 2900 NE 47 St., Fort Lauderdale, at 10 a.m. 954491-2900 ext: 143. 1-5 & 6 Auditions for the 2013 Florida Renaissance Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at One Studio, 800 NW 57 Place, Fort. Lauderdale. Renaissance Festival will be held at Quiet Waters Park in Deer eld Beach Feb. 9 through March 17. Visit www.ren-fest.com or call 954-776-1642. 1-6 Big Band Dance from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, 240 W. Prospect Road, Oakland Park. Cost is $8 at the door. Cash bar. 954564-2357. 1-9 Legends of Doo Wop perform at 7:30 p.m. at Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Admission is $14 per person. 954-786-4111. 1-11 Women in Art; Mercedes Cisneros, Gloria Sesana and Federica Zavanella, from 6 to 9 p.m. Galleria CaDOro at the Village of Merrick Park, 358 San Lorenzo Ave., Coral Gables. 305-442-9157. 1-11 Miami City Ballet, Ziff Ballet Opera House at 8 p.m. at Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami. Featured performances of the works of Balanchine, Mozart, Balanchine, Stravinsky, Don Quixote Pas de Deux. Tickets range from $20 to $175. 305949-6722. 1-13 Sunday Matinee Music at 3 p.m. at Boca Raton Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd. Jim Kovalcik Trio, featuring Jim Kovalcik on ute, Jason Hanley on guitar and Steve Jernigan on bass. 561-2391536. 1-13 Goldberg Variations performed at 5 p.m. by Simone Dinnerstein, Knight Concert Hall at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami. 305949-6722See SIGHTINGS on page 3

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The Pelican 3 Friday, January 4, 2013 those are dif cult. But with the urban farm, restaurant owners and residents will be able to buy produce grown in our downtown center, she said. Well be able to offer a fresh, local product that we havent had in a long time. Albee proposes an urban farm, green market and community garden with the city as a partner. The site is vacant farmland off Dixie Highway. The idea is to make locally-grown food more available and to help people grow it themselves. By paying a monthly fee, participants become part of Community Supported Agriculture [CSA] and share in the food raised. As the word spreads about the culinary arts district, Sallee said the city is getting more inquiries and interest from businesses. Additional development will be coming. Sallees seat on the city commission is one of three up in the March 12 election. She was elected in March 2009. Asked if she is running for re-election, she said, I dont have to make that decision until the qualifying period in January. Two residents have led for her seat. City residents will vote on several proposed charter amendments, including one that would move city elections from March to November. It will be a busy year. It will be anything but boring, Sallee said.Urban farmContinued from page 1perform Corelli, Gershwin, Chopin and more. Requested donation $15. 561-278-6003. 1-20 Annie Moses Band performs at 4 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church The Pink Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. The band is known for its fusion of jazz, classical, country, bluegrass and pop. Suggested donation is $10 for adults, $5 for students and children 12 and under are free. Visit www.pinkpres.org or call 954-941-2308.Auctions & Sales1-12 Yard sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Vendors wanted. 954-390-2115. 1-12 & 13 Tropical Postcard Show and Sale at the Pompano Beach Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $3. Free appraisals. 305-6660219. 1-26 & 27 Nautical Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St. Admission is $5 per person. Children 12 and under are free. Visit www. nautical eamarket.com. SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 5 1-13 Music at St. Paul, 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach at 3 p.m. Mei Mei Luo and Daphne Spottiswoode

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4 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach A seasoned on-air news reporter has been hired as the citys public information of cer. Reportedly, there were 150 applications for the $75,000 a year job. Rebecca Medina comes to the city with 10 years experience in broadcasting, Television anchor hired to ll public information position in Deer eld Beachanchoring local news for network af liates in El Paso, Memphis and Tampa. Her rst day on the job here was Dec. 19, the day Police Chief Pete Sudler learned he was being red by incoming sheriff Scott Israel. The graduate of FIU said she weathered her rst attempt at crises control by advising all concerned to keep low pro les. She returned to Southeast Florida to become a communications executive with Pace Americas, a provider of digital TV technology, choosing a behind-the-scenes job rather than be in front of the cameras. I was ready to go behind the camera, she said. But I will always be a journalist at heart. Medina will handle public relations and marketing duties here and act as the citys liaison with the media, the commission, the public and city departments. What drew me to Deer eld Beach was the passion I see in the mayor, Peggy Noland, and her love for the city. I am really excited to work for her, Medina said. Medina currently lives in Delray Beach but said, I am also excited about Deer eld Beach becoming my home.The new Deer eld Beach spokesperson will become the voice and the face of this citys information.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, January 4, 2013 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Issues always arise when a person dies or is terminally ill. Beyond decisions about funerals or hospice arrangements, most people have additional wishes. On Monday, those who want to move ahead and make those decisions now can get expert advice.Forum focuses on end of life issuesThe public is invited to join a conversation to help them make their decisions before another person does if for them. Final Wishes Forum will be held on Monday, Jan. 7 at 6 p.m. at St. Stephens Evangelical Lutheran Church, 2500 NE 14 Street Causeway. The forums panel will consist of Stephanie Schneider, elder law attorney; Gavin Malcolm, case management director of North Broward Medical Center; David King, business development coordinator at Hospice of Broward County and Ken Stolar, seminar specialist with Dignity Memorial Kraeer Funeral Homes. St. Stephens Pastor David Potter said hes seen instances where tragedies became more complicated without this information. When I was the pastor of another congregation a young couple got into a car accident [and left behind two children]. The wife was killed and the husband was in a coma. No one knew what do to for him in that process, said Potter. This preparation allows families and friends to focus on their feelings and their faith. Call 954-942-4473. SPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beachs signature historical structure, the 1916 Sample-McDougald House, is looking for individuals who are interested in our past and enjoy interacting with others to become volunteer tour guides. The Sample-McDougald House is the only Pompano Beach property listed in the National Register of Historic Place, and is one of the oldest homes in the area that has been preserved in its original con guration. Following its 2.5 million dollar restoration and site development, the house and grounds are open to the public and for special Docent training for SampleMcDougald House begins this monthevents. Volunteers are provided with training sessions that will cover the history of the house and the general community, as well as information on the landscape, interacting with visitors and safety procedures. The rst session will take place on Jan. 12, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the SampleMcDougald House, 450 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. A second session will be held on Jan. 26. Call 954-691-5686. Books & Lectures1-6 Book discussion on chapters one and two of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Color Blindness by Michelle Alexander at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 954531-1928. 1-9 Readers at Sundown at 6 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Join other readers to discuss this months title: The House at Riverton by Kate Morton. 954-946-6398. 1-14 Annual meeting of the Friends of the Century Plaza Leon Slatin Library at 10:30 a.m. at the library, 1856A W Hillsboro Blvd, Deer eld Beach. 954-3577740.Children & Family1-5 Outdoor garden program for children at 10:30 a.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic SightingsContinued from page 3 See SIGHTINGS on page 12

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6 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 1 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & Letters The Dec. 14, 2012 edition of the Pelican featured an article by Malcolm McClintock titled, Beach Fish Market serves up wealth of fresh seafood by Intracoastal. In said article, Terry Craft, owner of Beach Fish Market, was quoted as follows: [I] found out Mr. Fish was going to close its doors so I decided to buy it! Through discussions with legal counsel for Mr. Fish Seafood, The Pelican became aware that Terry Craft did not buy Mr. Fish Seafood. Mr. Fish Seafood went out of business in the spring of 2012 following the death of its owner, Michael Montella. In July of 2012, Beach Fish Market assumed Mr. Fish Seafoods lease on the premises. Mr. Fish Seafood received no compensation from Terry Craft or Beach Market. Mr. Fish Seafood is not af liated with Beach Fish Market or the owners/of cers of Beach Fish Market. The Pelican regrets the error. Correction & clari cationAdjusting to loss of friends wont be easy, but good guys move onBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERIn Pompano Beach, things wont be the same at community events with Capt. Mick Wiener no longer part of the Broward Sheriffs Of ce. Friends of BSO Captain Mick Wiener could always spot the captain somewhere above the crowd. He was that tall, easy to nd. Capt. Wiener had the effect of making each person feel like he was one of his or her close friends. Most of us were anticipating Capt. Wiener to be promoted, very possibly to be Pompano Beachs chief. Capt. Wiener seems to have been a man born to be a cop. He has cop written all over him. No problem was too small or too large to get his full attention. When news came recently that Sheriff-elect Scott Israel had Capt. Wiener on his re list, the news was so startling, some thought it was a joke. Friends had asked Capt. Wiener how he felt about the recent election where his boss, Sheriff Al Lamberti, came in second. I wanted to know myself. Heres what Capt. Wiener said. Ive worked for four bosses already. You just keep doing what you do. And along with Capt. Wieners years with the Broward Sheriffs Of ce, he has continued his education beyond a masters degree. Now he is studying for his PhD. It might have been a kick to call him Doctor Captain. But it would have been more fun to see a young man so dedicated to police work, his education and his community, to remain on the job. The ring was also a surprise left-hook to Capt. Wiener as well since he was six months away from his retirement. This Pompano Beach resident has been in service for 24 years and six months. Ironically he has enough sick time and vacation leave to earn those six months to retire, but the new sheriff had no interest in allowing that to happen. When cops retire, they get to wear a badge of retirement. Not Capt. Wiener. That might concern some of us who will have to work with the new sheriff when he comes on board of cially Jan. 9. Wiener was not alone in this so-called blood bath; 28 other deputies were on the list. We understand the to the victor go the spoils, but thats not a long-lasting victory. For Capt. Wiener, we wish Godspeed to even greater things that come from good service to the Broward Sheriffs Of ce and to the good people you have served so well for nearly 25 years. Those are the things that still await you and others who simply continue to try to be and do the best they can. What Pompano Beach loses, some other city will gain. And as for our new sheriff, wed better all mind our Ps and Qs.Go SOLAR Fest, Jan. 25, 26 at Broward Convention CenterThe right people will be in place to answer the most dif cult question participants will have at the SOLAR Fest this month. The two-day event will cover solar challenges and solutions to accessing thte suns energy to use for homes, pools and more. That include nancing options for rooftop PV solar systems installation that will reduce electric bills. Registration is $50 for Jan. 25. Attendance on Saturday, Jan. 26 is free. To nd out more, Call 954-519-1260. The Interview by Faye Sholiton is now playing at the The Willow Theatre The play is produced by The Womens Theatre Project and directed by Genie Croft. Reviewers have called Sholitons work a deeply moving memory play about the legacy of human suffering, courage and humanity, mothers and daughters, and forgiving and being forgiven, The Interview is at once a powerful documentation of a horri c historical event and one artists deeplyfelt response to it. Written with clarity and feeling, it resonates on all levels. Sholiton drew inspiration for her play from her real-life experiences as a longstanding journalist and interviewer of Holocaust survivors. With Harriet Oser, Patti Gardner, Irene Adjan and Christopher Mitchell Performances: Jan. 4 through Jan. 20; Thursday through Saturday 8 p.m. Saturday-Sunday 2 p.m. The Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park 300 S Military Trail, Boca Raton Box Of ce: 561-347-3948.Recommended Review Check this outOn Jan. 13, Luciano Saber along with Compact Production, Inc. screens Edge of Salvation at Muvico Broward 18, 2315 N. Fed. Hwy., Pompano Beach. The lm takes a social-economic look at what our country is faced with today as seen through the eyes of a 14-year-old boy and a family that loses everything due to a down economy, pride, greed and ultimately mans inhumanity to man. The message of the lm is never to give up no matter how dif cult life may seem. Adapt and overcome. Let The Pelican know how you review this lm.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, January 4, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach After a 1-1/2-hour discussion, city commissioners unanimously agreed to table the issue of creating a new public safety department and schedule a workshop to hear from the public. Commissioners said they needed more information and time to hear from constituents before taking a vote. No date was set for the workshop. Their next scheduled meeting is Jan. 15. Residents packed city hall for the special meeting Wednesday but were not allowed to speak despite an attempt by Vice Mayor Bill Ganz to allow public comment. Many residents were upset at newly elected Broward Sheriff Scott Israels abrupt termination of the citys popular police chief Pete Sudler. City Manager Burgess Hanson tried to assure the audience and commission that tonight isnt about Chief Sudler or the sheriffs command staff. It is about public safety and how we approach it and to ensure that programs we have developed over the past two to three years remain intact. A proposed ordinance would create a new Department of Public Safety and Emergency Management and create a position of director. The director would advise the city manager and commission on contractual obligations with BSO, oversee code enforcement and review performance of parking enforcement. Hanson said Deer eld Beach differs from other cities. Three years ago we had issues with youth violence, he said, noting the cases of Josie Ratley and Michael Brewer, which drew national negative attention to Deer eld Beach. After those incidents, the city wanted more involvement by police in reaching out to neighborhood schools and the community to develop proactive programs, especially for youth, Hanson said. The director of public safety would oversee the Police Athletic League, manage programs with homeowners groups and Neighborhood Watch and interact with the Citizen Observer Patrol to coordinate special events. The director also would develop an emergency management plan, including public safety plans for parks, facilities and infrastructure, such as water plants and water and sewer lines. And the director would develop a security plan for city facilities and parks. Nothing in this is set in stone, Hanson assured commissioners. It can be modi ed or completely discarded. Theres a lot of misinformation out there, that this is just a move against Sheriff-elect Israel for terminating Chief Sudler, Hanson said. No, Its not. This is not about that at all. This is about the future of how we approach public safety and about programs weve established that are outside the norm. Hanson said he was presenting a concept. No job offers had been made and no salary set. Its up to the commission how they want to move forward with it. Mayor Peggy Noland said that rather than open the meeting to public comment, she preferred that people absorb what Hanson had said and call commissioners or the city manager. This is just informative. This is highly sensitive, she said. Noland suggested that people who want to address the commission sign up with Residents pack city hall to make sure safety programs remain intact Commissioners ask residents to hold off comments until next city meeting See SAFETY PROGRAMS on page 16

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8 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWhatever the need, Brighter Days Nursing agency can assist with home health care for clients and their family members who want to remain in their own homes. This agency, located at 1001 W. Cypress Creek Rd., suite 400H in Fort Lauderdale is owned by Louise Harvey, RN, and Michael Prisciantelli, who handles the of ce, billing and all nancial matters. We are that extra pair of hands that can do the things that are dif cult for our clients like reaching the top shelf, driving to the doctor, changing the bed, organizing medicines. We can provide every level of care to help our clients stay in their own homes and keep their independence. Brighter Days range of help includes RNs, LPNs. CNAs. home health aids and companions, explains Harvey. Our service is geared to those who want to stay out of nursing facilities, but need assistance to remain Brighter Days offers extra hands to help clients and their loved ones keep their independenceat home. I was that extra pair of hands myself for 20 years. I recognized how important this service is to both the needy parent and the family who is searching for a way to keep mom or dad in familiar surroundings. Harvey went on to say, So many clients asked me if I knew of someone like me, to help a friend, that I got the courage to start my own specialized placement service for quali ed people. Im licensed and insured. All of our employees have passed the required level two background checks and are bonded. Although she interviews prospective employees and clients in her of ce, she says it is in the clients best interest to go to the home involved to assess the kind of help needed. The evaluation is always done by an RN or me, she says. Our employees are all trained in their respective elds. They must pass a Florida State Board or the equivalent and be licensed. That includes every level of help offered by Brighter Days. Clients have many varied needs. Each case is individual and is evaluated with this in mind. RNs do the assessments Louise Harvey, co-owner of Brighter Days, is shown here doing an assessment of a clients needs. This client who walks with a walker needs help with certain tasks that she can no longer do. Harvey will help her work out what support she needs and how often the help will be needed. [Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]See BRIGHTER DAYS on page 23 Town clerk position opens in LauderdaleBy-The-SeaThe Town of LauderdaleBy-The-Sea is advertising for a town clerk to replace June White, who is retiring this month. She has been town clerk since July 2007. According to a notice on the towns website, the job requires competency in records management and retention; knowledge of Florida elections and public records laws and procedures; a high degree of accuracy and attention to detail in work; excellent word processing, organizational and communications skills. Other requirements include ve years of experience in progressively responsible administrative work in municipal government. A bachelors degree in public or business administration or related eld is preferred. A Certi ed Municipal City Clerk with Florida experience is preferred. Hiring salary range is $50,000 to $65,000. More information about the position is available at www.lbts.org.By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Residents living here today can help preserve what was left behind by the residents of yesterday during the Wilton Manors Scavenger Hunt. Scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 26 from 1 to 3 p.m., the Scavenger Hunt is part fundraiser and part tour guide. The hunt begins at Hagen Scavenger hunt showcases, preserve citys historyPark, 2020 Wilton Drive. Along with showcasing many of the citys historical sites and businesses, the money that is raised will be donated to help restore the Carriage House at Richardson Park and the Childrens Art Project located at Jaycee Park. Right now, the Carriage House is being utilized for storage the same use for which it was used in its early days for horses and carriages. The Childrens Art Project, only partially complete, also needs funding. The Wilton Manors Development Alliance, which is spearheading the project, plans to add new decorative walls, benches, landscaping, lighting and brick pavers to complement the tile mosaic already in place. The mosaic is a rendering of The Towers, two medievallooking castle-like structures, formerly at Five Points, built by developer E.J. Willingham to attract people to the city in the 1920s. The Historical Society isnt sure exactly when the Carriage House was built, the estimate is 1926 or earlier, but it knows what it wants the future of the structure to be. Mary Ulm, vice president of the Historical Society, See HUNT on page 9

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The Pelican 9 Friday, January 4, 2013 bw Childrens choir now being formedPompano Beach Children from ages six to 16 are invited to sign up for Childrens Choir of Pompano Beach, a school to train voices for performance. Classes begin on Jan. 17. Auditions take place Jan. 7 from 4:30 to 9 p.m. at St. Martins Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach. Concerts will take place at the church. Cost is $35 for registration and $15 per class. Call 561-317-3866.Coney Island Baby duo at SkolnickPompano Beach The Baby Boomers music opens Jan. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave. in Palm Aire. Coney Island Baby is a husband and wife duo from Brooklyn, New York whose nostalgia themed performances bring back memories of those good old days. Tickets are $12. Call 954-786-4590. said the hope is that it can be converted into a space where food and drinks can be prepared and served. In order to preserve the building, we needed to help the city make it functional, said Ulm. The Historical Society would also like to see a permanent canopy added next to the Carriage House in order to enhance the outdoor gathering area at Richardson. I think it would be a very nice addition to the park and would probably increase the citys revenue, said Ulm. Adrienne Foland, the events creator and membership director of the Wilton Manors Historical Society, said she came up with the idea of a scavenger hunt in San Francisco during Chinese New Year celebrations last February. I just thought it would be fun to do that here, she said. And those who participate in the Wilton Manors Scavenger Hunt will have to know or learn a thing or two about the history of the city if they want to win. We have pictures of the business from like the 50s and 60s and they have to gure out whats in its place today, said Foland about one part of the event. The scavenger hunt will consist of teams of three to four people each. The cost to enter is $10 for one ticket or two tickets for $15. Children 12 and under are free if they are with an adult. Participants arent allowed to get help outside their team during the event, but a Hint Station will be located at Iberia Bank, 2465 Wilton Drive. One hint will be given per team. The winners will be chosen based on the number of correct answers Its really not about speed, its about brains, said Foland. If two teams are tied with the same number of correct answers the team with the best time will win. The rst place team gets a $100 gift certi cate to Rosies Bar & Grill, second place winners receive a gift certi cate worth $50 at To The Moon and the third place prize is a $25 to Pinche Taqueria. Visit www.scavengerhunt. developwm.org or call Adrienne Foland at 954-2056594 for more information.What was Hagens rst name? So you think you know the answer?Then take your team to the place of proof, like a statue, pull out you camera and take the picture to verify your source. Your cell phone or camera will be critical for the nal proof.HuntContinued from page 8Garden Club of Lighthouse Point Lighthouse Point The Garden Club of Lighthouse Point hosts its Membership Coffee drive on Thursday, Jan. 10 at 11 a.m. at St. Pauls Education Hall, 2700 NE 36 St. The days program will be Stipular Secrets & Piquant Pyrenes, A Fantastic Cruise Through Rubiaceae: The Coffee Family. The guest will be John J. Pipoly III, Ph.D., Broward County extension agent. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-942-9310 or visit www.lhpgc.org.

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10 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThis story began with an email from Jennifer Gibson-Castillo, a teacher and partnership volunteer coordinator at Charles Drew Family Resource Center. She wrote, Our Center has been blessed with a very generous new partner who deserves to be recognized. Home Depot, at 1151 W. Copans Rd. and its employees are doing wonderful things over here. The Pelican contacted Carnel White, store manager at Home Depot, to set up an interview to get the rest of this story. White is a pleasant unassuming young man, dressed in the same Home Depot uniform that his 170 employees wear. Though his store is as busy as a beehive, Home Depot in Pompano Beach becomes a year round Santa to Charles Drew Family Resource Centerhe willingly took the time to talk about this Home Depot store and its involvement with Charles Drew. My employees and I decided to adopt a family in need and give that family a good Christmas, so we researched several places. We learned a little about Charles Drew, visited the school and quickly realized how much this school does for the immediate community. So, instead of adopting one family, we took this wonderful opportunity to help the school and give back to the community ourselves. Home Depot donated a decorated Christmas tree to the school, and the employees lled bags with toys, games, books and more until they had enough gifts for 200 children. But that turns out to be just the beginning of whats in the works for 2013. White explains. Since we decided to adopt the school, were going to do a big project for the school every three months. Our rst project is to redo the entrance landscaping. We hope to plant owers, add plants, paint the benches and put mulch around the trees. Were going to use pavers to create an area where teachers can take a break in a pleasant, outdoor setting. And every three months, volunteer employees will have a school workshop to teach the youngsters how to complete do-it-yourself projects. White was anxious to point out that all of the labor in these projects will be done by employees who are off the clock and working in their own free time. He says, Home Depot is very generous to good causes and it embraces the idea of contributing to the community around us. And our employees are all enthusiastic about doing community service. We just completed one home in our area for a veteran and his family. We did landscaping, painting, improved the light xtures, remodeled the bathrooms, and the deck. Everything was done by 20 to 30 employee volunteers who worked beside me. Each district with a Home Depot store took on its own project of a home for a veteran. Asked why they do all of this good work, White responded, We do it because we feel we should support the community which supports us and our store. We build good relationships and thats important. Home Depot is very responsive to the community and its needs. Any organization or school can stop by the store for help in lling out the application for Carnel White, store manager of Home Depot, 1151 W Copans Rd. in Pompano Beach is partnering with Charles Drew Family Resource Center. Starting with a decorated Christmas tree and gifts for 200 children, Team Depot plans to beautify the school entrance, have workshops for children, and improve several other school areas that are in need of rescuing. [Photo courtesy of Courtesy Carnel White, Home Depot] See HOME DEPOT on page 11Car show and auctionFort Lauderdale The Fort Lauderdale Beach Car Show & Auction will be held Friday, Jan. 4 through Sunday, Jan. 6 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St. Over 350 cars will be available for auction and display, including several automobiles from the 1930s. Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. Auctions start at noon on Friday and 10 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Visit www.ftlauderdaleauction. com.Coral Ridge Green marketFort Lauderdale Every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Coral Ridge Green Market is held at 3000 N. Federal Hwy., just south of the southeast cornet of Oakland Park Boulevard and Federal Highway. Vendors sell fresh, local and organic produce, herbs, pasta, baked goods, spices and teas, olive oils, orchids, bromides, stone crabs and more, call 954-4268436.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, January 4, 2013 a grant to complete a needed project. If approved, Home Depot makes it happen thru its Team Depot program which combines company funds and volunteer labor. Being in charge of 170 employees is a challenge, but White says, I love what I do so its not a hard job. Its a great job. The Pelican salutes this generous company and its volunteer employees for being perfect examples of community support and involvement. Home DepotContinued from page 10Guevrekian, 46, is an of cer in a metal building construction company. Her responsibilities include contract management, accounting and human resources administration. She previously worked for Marriott International. A community activist, she lives in the Royal Palm Isles neighborhood. Jean, 40, has lived in Oakland Park since 2005. He is self-employed as operations manager for D&S Protection Corp. He is a member of the volunteer Citizens Observer Patrol. Seat 4: Incumbent Jed Shank and Robert T. Muise. Shank, 34, was elected in August 2010 to ll the seat held by Anthony Niedwiecki, who resigned to move to Chicago. Shank is a lifelong area resident and certi ed public accountant with private and government auditing experience. He is employed by the Broward County Of ce of County Auditor and is a past president of the Twin Lakes Neighborhood Organization. Muise is the owner of a food truck. At press time, The Pelican had been unable to reach Muise. Seat 5: Tim Lonergan and former mayor and commissioner Layne Dallett Walls. Longtime commissioner and former mayor Suzanne Boisvenue is term limited. Lonergan, 50, is a 14-year resident of Oakland Park, born and raised in Milwaukee, Wis. He is project manager for bene t operations with UnitedHealth Group and a community activist. Walls, 57, last served in 2010 when the commission unanimously appointed her to an interim position from June 1 through Aug. 24 to serve out the term of Anthony Niedwiecki. Term limits prevented her from running then. Previously, she served on the commission from 1993 to 1997 and again from 2001 to 2009. She is an owner/ partner with her brother in Aerko International, an aerosol packaging company in Oakland Park. She is a 22year resident of Oakland Park and previously lived in North Andrews Gardens before it was annexed into Oakland Park. Since leaving of ce, Walls has served on the citys school advisory board, charter review committee and the citys census committee in 20092010. Referendum questions include an ordinance to change municipal election dates from March in odd numbered years to November in even numbered years to coincide with the general election cycle. HopefulsContinued from page 1 Another proposed change would eliminate numbered commission seats, and candidates would continue to run at large. The top vote getters would be elected. Other questions include an ordinance to establish a procedure to ll a vacancy in the position of vice mayor; modernizing charter language; establishing a procedure for commissioners with a voting con ict to disclose the con ict before voting; and an ordinance to amend the city managers power and duties. Pompano Beach ArtHall returnsPompano Beach This month marks the return of ArtHall, which combines networking opportunities and the works of local artists. The rst event is on Wednesday, Jan. 16 at 5:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. Each month, a new artist will be featured from January through October. Refreshments will be served. Visit www.pompanobeachcra. com or call 954-586-1111 or go to the ArtHall Facebook page.

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12 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Blvd. 954-786-2181. 1-11 Tiny Tots Story Time at 10:30 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Ages 18months to three-years with adult caregiver. 954-9466398.Charity1-7 Charity auction at Java Boys, 2230 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, at 7 p.m. Antiques, artwork, paintings, sculptures, furniture and other items will be available. Proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Email ajcrossconsulting@gmail. com.Clubs and Social Organizations1-14 Pompano Beach Garden Club meets at 12:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Open to the public. The program Planting for Song Birds will be presented by Ann Wiley, member of the Audubon Society. Refreshments will be served. 954-943-0029. 1-15 Oakland Park Garden Club meets at 6:30 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. 954-6304511.Education & Self Development1-7 Italian II at 2 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954946-6398. 1-7 Retired Educators Social Club meeting at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca Raton. Meeting is free and open to the public. The topic will be Slimming down: super foods and supplements. 954-255-6360 or 561-4835445. 1-8 Property tax exemption ling assistance at 11:30 a.m. at Oakland Park City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. 954-357-5579. 1-8 Introduction to iPad at 10 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Bring your iPad and learn basic iPad functions and features. Registration required. 954-946-6398. 1-9 Knitting and crocheting class at 12 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Learn beginner to advanced needlework from a lifelong yarn artist. 954-946-6398 1-11 Spanish I class at 2 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954SightingsContinued from page 5 See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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The Pelican 13 Friday, January 4, 2013 Pelican 954-783-8700 Preservation Society, accepted its plaque and thanked the community who worked so diligently for 11 years to make the Sample-McDougald House what it is today. Were thankful to have this beautiful monument to the city and its residents and look forward to years of continued preservation and activities, he said. Sample-McDougald House, at 450 NE 10 St., is a 17-room Georgian Colonial home constructed by Albert Neal in 1916 on Dixie Highway. In 2001 was moved to its current location. The home served as the base for Samples farming operations that stretched from Lighthouse Point west to Powerline Road Sample funded and constructed a road in 1917 for reaching his cropland. He died at age 74 in 1941. William D. and Sarah McDougald purchased the home in 1943. William was a Deer eld City Commissioner, chief of police and Broward County Deputy Sheriff, as well as a farmer. The McDougald children inherited the house, and in keeping with their mothers desire, placed it on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. In 1999, volunteers created the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society, Inc. The house was moved off its original site in May 2001 a seven-hour journey down Dixie Highway viewed by hundreds.Work was undertaken to restore the houses exterior and then the interior. On Oct. 25, 2005, Hurricane Wilma caused signi cant damage to the house. Extensive repairs were made to re-restore the house. Finally, late this year, the house opened for public tours and for special events and social functions.Blanche Ely HouseWillie Hopkins, assistant city manager, accepted the plaque for The Blanche Ely House at 1500 NW Sixth Ave. The building was the home of Blanche and Joseph Ely, educational and civic pioneers in Pompano Beachs black community. The building houses the Ely Educational Museum featuring artifacts and documents relating to the Elys and education in the black community.Pioneer MonumentFisher introduced Don Downie to accept the bronze plaque for the Pioneer Monument, consisting of plaques and benches at the Emma Lou Olson Center at 1801 NE Sixth St. You are a pioneer, my friend, Fisher said, noting that Downie has dedicated a major part of his adult life to preserving the history of Pompano Beach, including creation of a map of historic sites hanging in City Hall. Downie said he was one of ve pioneers who collected funds for creation of the Pioneer Monument.Kester cottagesPeter Williams, president of the Pompano Beach Historical Society, accepted the plaque for the Kester cottages. Built in 1937, they were recently remodeled and are open for tours at Founders Park. Williams said that for 30 years the Historical Society has tried to preserve the heritage of the cottages, which have recently undergone extensive restoration. Our goal is to keep them up, keep them going, show them off and be proud of them, he said. Williams presented an original oil painting of the Kester cottages by Charlie Lewis to the city to be hung in City Hall. Kudos to our Historic Preservation Committee and to Jennifer Gomez from our city staff for making these presentations possible, Fisher said. Historic homesContinued from page 1 Two Kester Cottages are open to the public on special occasions or by appointment for tours. These stalwart Dade Pine homes represent the early architecture of the 30s and 40s. [Photo courtesy of the Pompano Beach Historical Society]

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14 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 On Saturday, Jan. 5 and 19, earlTrio, a South Florida band of local musicians will perform classic rock favorites from the Eagles, the Allman Brothers and The Beatles and pop favorites from Jimmy Buffett, Zac Brown and Paul Simon from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Boca Raton GreenMarket is held every Saturday at Royal Palm Place, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the intersection of South Federal Highway and Southeast Mizner Blvd. For additional information, please call 561-299-8684 or visit www.royalpalmplace.com/news-eventearlTrio at Boca Raton GreenMarket SPECIAL TO THE PELICANBroward Sheriffs Of ce homicide detectives have arrested the woman wanted in connection with the homicide of Jeffrey Blaugrund, 70, inside his Pompano Beach apartment. On Thursday, Dec. 20, a grand jury issued an indictment for Danielle Sachs, 33, for her role in the Oct. 15 death. Through her attorney, Sachs had arranged to turn herself in to deputies on Dec. 21, but she never showed. This week detectives caught up to her in the 1700 block of East Sunrise Boulevard in Ft. Lauderdale and took her into Two arrested in Pompano Beach murder SightingsContinued from page 12 Federica Zavanella, artist, will be among the artists showing their works at Women in Art on Jan. 11. See page 2 in Sightings for more information.custody without incident. In the early morning hours of Oct. 15, Blaugrund picked up Jonathan Forster, 27, and Sachs from a Wendys restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale and offered them a place to stay for the night. No one heard from or saw the victim until deputies responded to his residence Nov. 1. That afternoon, deputies were called to Blaugrunds home after neighbors complained of a strong odor emanating from his apartment. After knocking on the door with no response, they solicited the management 946-6398. 1-13 What would Martin Luther King do? discussion at 11 a.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park, 33309. Free lunch. 954-5311928. 1-15 Class on tax updates for 2013 at 6 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954-9466398.Games and Activities1-10 Bingo at 1 p.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. 954-9466398.Health & Fitness1-7 Yoga class at 10:30 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. Bring a towel and bottle of water. 954-946-6398. 1-7 & 11 Chair yoga at 3 p.m. at Lisas Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. $10 per class. 954-782-6564. See SIGHTINGS on page 15 See MURDER on page 21 Jonathan Forster, 27 Danielle Nicole Sachs, 33

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The Pelican 15 Friday, January 4, 2013 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Military operations from the time of the early man with clubs to the latest in weaponry have changed the course of nations. On Jan. 18 and 19, many of those items will be on display at the Elks Club, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach at the citys rst Military artifact Show.Military artifact show opens at Elks Club, Jan. 18Vehicles and artifacts from the Revolution era will be on display. Curator of the show, Pat Regis, explains that most of the items are antiques and todays weapons are not part of the show. Shawn Mazzarella is co-producer of the show. Viewers will see a Civil War encampment display with original posters, weapons, uniforms and other artifacts. The famous Gatling Gun of the Civil War will also be available for participants to re. For $25, a person can shoot seven rounds. The gun is owned by Bill Thompson, an historian who will be on hand at the show. Dealers of antique posters from early U.S. elections will be on hand. Those seeking free appraisals of privatelyowned antiques are welcome to bring them to the show. The Naval Air Museum, located at the Fort Lauderdale/ Hollywood Airport will have historical displays and persons on hand to discuss the early days of this airport. Regis, a Marine Veteran [1967-68], adds that proceeds from the show will bene t disabled veterans at Post 133 in Deer eld Beach. Vendors will be placed outside and inside the club. Elks members will offer refreshment and food for sale during the event. The show runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on both days. Admission is $7. Parking is free. For more information, call 954-2942526.SightingsContinued from page 14 Sports & Outdoors1-5 Bird watch and walk at 8 a.m. at Deer eld Island Park. Boat to island leaves from Sullivan Park, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $3 per person. 954-357-5100. 1-12 & 19 Northeast Little League baseball signup from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wimberly Field batting cage, 4000 NE 3 Ave., Oakland Park. League is boys and girls ages 5 to 18. Jan. 26 is the last day to register. Volunteer and sponsorship opportunities available. Email davemcleod33@aol. com or 954-793-2348.FridaysThe Island City Art Walk is held every third Friday from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Many businesses along the street host an artist and serve up free appetizers and spirits. Visit www. islandcityartwalk.com for more information. Pompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232.See SIGHTINGS on page 19

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16 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 the city clerk for the Jan. 15 meeting. Ganz said he has lots of questions. I dont see a price tag on this anywhere. Without a price tag, how can anyone have an educated opinion? he asked. Commissioner Ben Preston said the commission should listen to the public before making decisions and always act in a scally responsible manner. [The peoples] money is precious to us. Before we spend it, we have to have all the facts on the table, Preston said. Hanson responded that when the commission determines what it wants, he can put a pricetag on the new position. Ganz said the proposal was an outstanding job description, but Im not sure its a full-time position in Deer eld Beach. And without a pricetag, he said he couldnt make a decision. I dont want our disgust with what happened with Chief Sudler to outweigh our nancial decision. I think we will lead with our hearts rather than our heads, and I dont want to do that, Ganz said. Preston questioned whether the good in the proposal outweighs the negativity it will create. This proposal would hinder open communication with BSO and create an adversarial relationship that could last four years, possibly for the next eight years, Preston said. He questioned whether the proposed new department would result in a duplication of efforts and duplication of salaries. Preston noted that last year 106 city employees lost their jobs. Now you can nd money for this, he said to audience applause. Hold on. That is unfair and almost offensive, Hanson responded. He said the city faced a $17 million de cit, and the commission priorities were clear. He said the proposed new department isnt redundancies. Its a complementary service. Noland said the city needs a public safety director to keep community programs running and make them stronger. We need resource of cers in our schools. The School Board isnt going to pay for them. Ganz countered that the new position wont have any authority over schools, noting that the School Board doesnt fund resource of cers in Deer eld Beach. The JM Family Foundation funds elementary school of cers, and the city funds middle school and high school positions, he said. Ganz asked if the city could achieve the same things without creating this new position. Could they hire a consultant? Are there positions that could be eliminated to fund this? How to pay for it is the biggest question, he said. He said he looks at it as more of an advisory position than full time. Preston suggested inviting the new sheriff to a town hall meeting in Deer eld Beach, where he could articulate his vision. Give his plan a chance to work. We may nd he would take care of a lot of things (on the list of duties for the new public safety director.) Ganz said Israel told him he has no problem with the city creating the department and position. But Israel also has said, This person will have no say in BSO, wont be working in BSO, and BSO wont answer to them. Ganz pressed the city manager for a cost of the position. Hanson again said he could price the position when commissioners told him what they want. Commissioner Marty Popelsky said they should have a workshop, invite the sheriff and hear from the public. Then we can come up with a price. You cant put the cart before the horse. Were already getting lots of emails and calls. People are calling me names and hanging up, Popelsky said. Commissioners agreed to schedule a workshop before their next regular meeting. Asked her reaction to what had just transpired as she left the hall, former city commissioner Pam Militello, said, The timing is a little suspect. We all loved Chief Sudler, but we have to make sure this position is something we need. Lets get more input so they can make a good decision. No, we dont need this position, said community activist Terry Scott. He said the public should have been allowed to speak. Safety meetingContinued from page 7

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The Pelican 17 Friday, January 4, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea After months spent laying the groundwork, this town is moving forward in the new year with streetscape improvements on Commercial Boulevard east and west of A1A. Mayor Roseann Minnet says shes excited to see the projects come to fruition. Work will get under way in a few months, resulting in disruptions for businesses, residents and tourists. This is a lot for this community to handle, Minnet said, urging everyone to keep a calm attitude. Relax and this will get done. There is an end in sight. There will be a beautiful east and west commercial district, she says. To help ease with loss of parking in the downtown, town staff is negotiating with Minto to temporarily convert an empty lot east of town hall into a parking lot. Minnet credits Commissioner Mark Brown with that idea. Additional parking also is being created in the median on South Bougainvilla Drive and through reconfiguring the A1A parking lot to add 12 spaces. To make the downtown more pedestrian-friendly, Minnet said the town also is trying to get the OK from the Florida Department of Transportation [FDOT] to change traffic signals to stop traffic in all directions at A1A at Commercial Boulevard. Commissioners recently passed a resolution urging the governor and FDOT to quickly develop criteria for such signalization, so the request can be processed in conjunction with the Commercial Boulevard streetscape project. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann wrote recently, The town has demonstrated through traffic and pedestrian counts that the intersection of State Roads A1A and Commercial Boulevard has extremely high pedestrian volume, regular conflicts between vehicular traffic and pedestrians, and that the signalization does not allow pedestrians sufficient time to cross. The town has made this information available to the District 4 FDOT office. Officials there acknowledge the intersection is a good candidate for an exclusive pedestrian signalization phase, In May, commissioners approved participation in a Broward County plan for beach renourishment. The project is proposed to provide beach nourishment from the Hillsboro Inlet to Port Everglades. Two fill areas are proposed for nourishment: northern LBTS and Pompano Beach and southern LBTS and Fort Lauderdale. Cost for LBTS is estimated at $356,000. Said Minnet, Its about more than replenishing sand. Its about the sea level rise. We need to address this holistically and take action. She doesnt see the beach renourishment project happening this year since it cant be done during turtle nesting season. Minnet also mentions the communications services tax. The state legislature may limit the amount local communities receive from that tax, which would impact the town considerably. She said LBTS gets about $320,000. Pensions also will continue to be an issue throughout the state. What will be happening in Tallahassee affects us day to day, she said. Minnet is now serving her third two-year term as mayor. Her term is up in March 2014, and she is term limited. She says she has no plans to run for anything else. Mayor looks forward to new look, but asks all to stay calm during work Minnet

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18 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City commissioners gave initial approval Wednesday to allow sale of alcoholic beverages starting at 7 a.m. on Sundays. The vote was unanimous. The change makes the hours consistent with other days of the week, according to Rick Buckeye, senior planner. The additional hours would be limited to hotels, restaurants and nightclubs where beverages are consumed on the premises. Commissioner Shari McCartney said she brought the issue forward after hearing from pub owners whose customers watch European football. Our city was losing business to other cities that have eased the rules, she said. If changed, this would mirror Fort Lauderdale and enhance our culinary district now being developed. Fort Lauderdale amended its ordinance last year to lift restrictions on Sunday morning alcohol sales at hotels, bars and restaurants. Its interesting how times change, Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said. In the past, people were in church (on Sunday morning) celebrating religious things. She said she supported the change, noting the regulations have been unduly harsh. Christopher Brennan of the Fox & Hound Pub thanked commissioners for moving so quickly on changing the Sunday Blue Laws. He urged them to review regulations calling for a $2,000 annual permit for bars open past midnight, calling the fee an exorbitant tax. Review that and make it a slightly more modest fee. That would be good for the city, he said. Currently, about 30 businesses have permits to be open and sell alcoholic beverages past midnight, Buckeye said. Debbie Blakely of the Big Dog Station also applauded the commission for easing the regulations, although she wasnt sure she would open at 7 a.m. on Sunday.Variances granted for bankIn other business, commissioners approved an application by PNC Bank for four variances from landscape buffer requirements to allow redevelopment of Alcohol OK for Sunday sales putting outdated Blue laws to rest in Oakland Park In the past, people were in church (on Sunday morning) celebrating religious things. Boisvenue See VARIANCE on page 19

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The Pelican 19 Friday, January 4, 2013 a gasoline service station site for a bank with drivethrough on property at 999 E. Commercial Blvd. The vote was 4-1, Commissioner Boisvenue dissenting. The applicant proposes to build a 2,800-square foot bank at the northwest corner of East Commercial Boulevard and North Dixie Highway, replacing a nonconforming gasoline service station in blighted condition. This will be a visually pleasing development, Chrisopher Gratz, senior planner, said in presenting the request. He said minor reductions to landscaping requirements would make it possible. VarianceContinued from page 18By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City commissioners tabled a vote on a pollworker agreement with the Broward County Supervisor of Elections [SOE], for the March 12, 2013 municipal election so city staff can negotiate for better terms. The proposed agreement authorizes the supervisor to hire and train required Cost of municipal elections needs to be veri ed, Oakland Park commissioners saypollworkers for 24 precincts. Costs for hiring and training pollworkers for the last city election was $23,000, and the SOE anticipates costs to be similar in the next election. Commissioner Shari McCartney strongly urged the commission to postpone approving the agreement and asked for an audit. She also asked about other expenses besides pollworkers. We need some sort of audit of what we are paying for. A resident brought forward the fact that we have already paid for this (election) equipment, and now were being extorted to pay for it again, McCartney said. Were giving up (authority) with absolute discretion to the supervisor of elections. Weve talked about consolidating precincts. There may be statutory issues with that. This is an abdication of our financial responsibility. Who says we need these clerks, assistant clerks, inspectors and super clerks, whatever they are [all positions outlined by Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes]? McCartney asked. I dont know that we need these. Maybe we do. We dont know if we could do it better or cheaper ourselves. Costs of running municipal elections have totaled $30,000 to $50,000, McCartney said. We dont know if those are the actual costs. She suggested the item be tabled until the city staff can investigate. Vice Mayor John Adornato See ELECTION COSTS on page 21 SightingsContinued from page 15 See SIGHTINGS on page 22The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.

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20 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFFish Shack 2862 NE 17th Ave Pompano Beach 954-586-4105 Open Daily 11:00 am 9:00 pm Closed Sundays Harder to nd than the mythical city of Atlantis, the incredibly popular Fish Shack Restaurant continues its meteoric rise to the top of the North Broward culinary scene. Owners Mike and Elisa Focarazzo have built the Countys smallest gastronomic juggernaut centered on one single, overarching philosophy offer the freshest seafood at the lowest price. They have been so successful at implementing this approach that the Fish Shack has developed a serious cult following. Locals adore the unpretentious vibe of this quaint little eatery while tourists ock from all over the world in the hopes of discovering the maritime treasures hidden within. In fact, the perfectly cooked food, superlative service and wallet-friendly pricing have vaulted the Fish Shack to the top of Trip Advisors restaurant rankings for the Pompano Beach area! In barely a year and a half of operation, this postagesized trattoria has garnered the approbation and adulation of foodies of all stripes. Even New Englanders reluctantly admit that the clam chowder rivals the best they have ever had at home. By the way, another mouthwatering Ranked the #1 seafood restaurant in Pompano Beach, the Fish Shack continues to impress with the freshest ocean delights in town Succulent Blue Point oysters on the half-shell will thrill raw bar enthusiasts. The irresistible blackened red snapper llet with crispy fries is a must-try at the Fish Shack. soup option is the impossibly velvety lobster bisque bursting with deep avors and toothsome chunks of everyones favorite crustacean. For additional seductive starters, the conch salad, homemade sh dip and fried Ipswich clams are simply sublime. Fresh sh, oysters, clams and cracked conch are our most popular dishes, says Elisa as she greets an unending stream of famished guests who are willing to wait, rain or shine, for a seat at one of 4 tables or at the cozy bar. Obviously, we do a lot of take-out service as our seating space is quite limited, she adds with a smile. Delivered at 11 a.m. See FISH SHACK on page 24

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The Pelican 21 Friday, January 4, 2013 said he worked at the polls during the last election, and four precincts voted at the Collins Center. Do we need each one of these people [at each precinct]? he asked. It seems excessive and at enormous cost. City Clerk Renee Shrout said a letter was sent to the SOE asking to reduce the number of pollworkers. She noted that qualifying for the municipal election is Jan. 2 to 9, with the election approaching rather quickly. She said she would do all she can to make the reduction happen. City Manager John Stunson said the clerks office is down one person, and he worries about a misstep. I would hate for answer to the commissions requests be Go hire your own pollworkers, he said. Commissioner Jed Shank said while he very much agrees with the concerns Commissioner McCartney has raised, he supports approving the agreement because of the time issue. Shank said the SOE divides the total cost of municipal elections by the number of municipalities holding elections. He has concerns about how those costs are allocated, concerns about whether the city is getting over-allocated a percentage of costs and also has issues about the total costs. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said the commission has to address these issues if it could save the city thousands of dollars. She suggested a special meeting, if necessary. The issue will be reconsidered at the next commission meeting Jan. 16. The commission budgeted $67,000 in the FY 2013 budget for costs associated with the election, including staffing of precincts. Election costsContinued from page 19MurderContinued from page 14of ce to open the door. Deputies found the apartment ransacked and discovered Blaugrunds body inside. Investigators believe the victim was killed during the commission of a robbery. The Broward County Medical Examiners Of ce determined Blaugrund died of asphyxia and ruled the case a homicide. Both, Forster and Sachs, face one count of rst degree murder.

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22 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Lighthouse Chamber unveils loyalty discount card with fanfare Lighthouse Point With its new loyalty card program ready to go, the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce held its 3rd Annual Shop the Point event at The Shoppes of Beacon Light last month. The Shop the Point discount card program, which gives Lighthouse Point residents discounts at participating businesses and restaurants in and out of the city, was premiered at the event along with the usual music, entertainment, drawings and tastings. For a list of participating businesses, visit www.lhpchamber.com. Call 954-946-6610 to become a participating business. [Photos courtesy of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce]David and Shannon DiPierro of Lighthouse Point Fitness. Linda Bourguet shows off her festive handmade Christmas wreaths. Ashley Zito and Ashley Burns of Orange Fitness with Natalia Bigio, right, of 31 Gifts.SightingsContinued from page 19 Sports & OutdoorsPompano Beach GreenMarket is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. 954292-8040. Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. Pony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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The Pelican 23 Friday, January 4, 2013 and organization of medications. LPNs and CNSs are suggested when everyday issues including driving, doctor visits, bathing, light cooking and cleaning are involved. Some clients simply need companionship and support for everyday tasks. Harvey feels her career is a direct result of her upbringing. She says, I was raised by my grandmother who was a midwife. When I was born, grandmother was already retired, but she had delivered every one of my mothers children. There were 17 of us and I am number 16. Grandma was unique. She was a midwife and a school teachera true role model for me. Harvey lived with her grandmother from age seven on. Watching her pointed me to my own career. She spent her life taking care of everyone including her husband, a wounded veteran of WWI. When my agency can afford to do so, I hope to give caregivers free respite care so that these overworked folks can have a few hours away from their very demanding lives. Brighter Days offers livein, daily, weekly, hourly and 24/7 care to assist with medication, doctor appointments, cooking, cleaning, laundry, showering, feeding, dressing, and companionship. Private pay and major insurance accepted. Heres what a few satised clients had to say: Margaret Hatab lives independently even though she is a full time wheelchair person. She says, I need someone here ve days a week and count on Brighter Days to send over aids to help with everything including cooking, cleaning, laundry and more. I also wear a Lifeline button so that I am covered when I am alone at night. Susie Hess says, Ive known Louise for a long time. She took care of my grandmothers friend for a long time and we were very pleased with her and the people she sent, once she opened her own agency. Call 954-765-6534 to arrange a consultation. Brighter DaysContinued from page 8 Pompano Beach To help get his tenants in the Christmas spirit each year, Don Larson, who manages Deauville Plaza Apartments on Southeast 11 Avenue in Pompano Beach, holds a Christmas lighting contest. Larson has been the citys of cial Santa in its annual Yultide parade for 15 years. So its no surprise that Santa decided to trim the street where he lives. Besides having bragging rights all year long, winners received rolls of quarters to use in the apartments laundry room. This years top decorators were: 1st Joey Bernhardt 2nd Omar Williams, Chrysanne Rogers 3rd Place Brian Bila and Jennifer Jallos 4th Place George and Cyndy Treitler Decorating contest stir sup holiday cheer in Pompano Beach 1st Place winner Joey Bernhardt [Above] and 3rd Place winners Brian Bila and Jennifer Jallos [Below]. 2nd Place winners Omar Williams, Chrysanne Rogers and Leila Rogers [Above] and 4th Place winners George and Cyndy Treitler as Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus [Left].

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24 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad every morning, the fresh sh includes tasty varieties such as grouper, mahi-mahi, red snapper, yellow n tuna and Tripple tail. Guests often enjoy these favorites: fried, grilled, blackened, served as a platter with rice or simply in sandwich form with crispy fries. As for the oysters, they are the briny, perfectly-sized Blue Point variety that are fabulous on the half-shell with just a few drops of lemon, a dollop of cocktail sauce or a touch of horseradish. The wild caught middle neck clams can also be enjoyed in this fashion even though some patrons opt for steamers with drawn butter or the deep-fried approach. The cracked conch is crispy, avorful and astoundingly tender. Even better, it comes with a creamy and zesty homemade conch sauce remoulade that furiously titillates the senses. We sell at least 80 pounds of conch every week! says Mike with genuine astonishment. When asked how they are able to make the notoriously chewy meat so tender, his wife Elisa simply responds: We beat the hell out of it! Shrimp a cionados will revel in a cornucopia of delectable preparations. Grilled, steamed and fried with garlic butter or Cajun spices, the large shrimp can also be part of a healthy Caesar lettuce wrap or sprinkled on top of a garden salad. Our customers have been so loyal to us since we opened, we couldnt have done it without them, says Mike. I also owe a lot of our success to our amazing staff. It takes a real team effort to pull it off the way we do. And what they do is borderline miraculous. Thanks to some well-placed family connections, this nauticallythemed restaurant nets the best catches of the day and serves them up at dockside prices. We get customers from all over but especially Boca Raton and Lighthouse Point, says Mike who notes that many boat captains, famous athletes, local celebrities and city of cials also make frequent visits. You never know who you will bump into when you are here. People from all walks of life come for the fresh seafood. Other noteworthy specialties include the classic order of sh & chips, the always intriguing shrimp & scallop burger as well as the thick and avorful tuna steak. I come speci cally for the tuna but generally end up getting a second meal as well, says area resident Nicolas Tamayo. I just love the food here. Everywhere else is far more expensive, far less friendly and de nitely less satisfying. For land lubbers, the Fish shack serves up juicy halfpound Black Angus beef burgers and crunchy, hand battered chicken wings with choice of dipping sauce. A dozen oysters or middle neck clams cost $9.95. Fishermans platters, sh specials, burgers, wraps, sandwiches and salads are all between $7 Fish ShackContinued from page 20 and $15. Large wine glasses are $3.95, draft beer $1.50. Daily specials are presented An enormous grilled Tuna steak with rice and homemade coleslaw is a great option for tuna lovers. on the big board outside. Enjoy!

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The Pelican 25 Friday, January 4, 2013 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park City commissioners have approved four applications the Community Development Block Grant [CDBG] Program totaling $60,000. The city has $175,000 in CDBG funds for this fiscal year.Non-pro ts receive $15,000 in CDBG fundsIf approved by Broward County, Broward Meals on Wheels, Kids in Distress, Florida Singing Sons Boychoir and Light of the World Clinic will each receive $15,000. Rejected by the city commission was a $20,000 request from the Marriage Institute, Inc. To be approved, nonprofit organizations must be certified as a 501(3) and have projects which fall within the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development mandated guidelines by providing social services to at least 51 percent low or moderate income clientele. The vote was 4-0. Mayor Anne Sallee abstained from voting because she has a contractual relationship with one of the applicants. Mark Adler, associate director of Broward Meals on Wheels, said the agency has served 30 seniors in Oakland Park for more than six years. Its not the $38,000 we requested, but we will take it graciously, so people can age in place, he said. Helen LaForge, executive director of Florida Singing Songs Boychoir, said the funds in the past have helped 40 boys who otherwise couldnt have participated. Its about the whole boy, the whole family, not just about singing, she said. Commissioner Jed Shank said his preference would See FUNDS on page 31

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26 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26SEEKING EMPLOYMENTRELIABLE BILINGUAL LADY Seeks Position As Pet Sitter / Dog Walker (Responsible Animal LOVER) Pompano / E Ft Lauderdale Area. Giselle 954-942-8111. 1-4 CERTIFIED CNA Honest, Reliable, Seeking Position To Take Care Of Your Loved Ones. Live In Or Out. Excellent References. 954-682-1198. 1-4 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-11 CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 1-11 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954818-9538. 1-11 MIKE THE GARDENER The All American Yardman Yard And Garden Care Get Te Best For Less! Call 561-5436337. 1-18 VISION ELECTRIC INCLicensed/Insured. Electrical Service & Installation. No Job Too Small. #EC13002184 Call 954-274-4513. 1-25 HEAVENLY CLEANING! Service Out Of This World. 10 Years Experience. Excellent References. Not An Agency. Pet Friendly. Call Nina At 954-6016141. 1-4 PERSONAL ASSISTANT Will Shop Run Errands, Transport To Appointments, Airport, Etc. Also Light Duty Housecleaning, House Pet Sitting, Etc. 906-450-5951. 1-4 A N A S CLEAN (RESIDENTIAL) CLEANING In Pompano Lighthouse Point Deer eld. Dependable Thorough Experienced. References. Good Work For A Good Price. Please Call Ana 954-692-4691. 12-7 XPERTS CLEANING SERVICE Residential & Commercial. 10 Years Experience. References Honest Dependable. More Information Call 954-3760524. 1-4 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATIONPickup & Drop-Off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-234-0617. 1-4 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1-4 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 1-25 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 1-1 1 BARBER/ BEAUTY EQUIPMENT BARBER & BEAUTY Equipment For Sale! Chairs, Stations, Nail Tables. Lots Of Misc. Equipment Also For Sale. LOW LOW PRICES! Nick 954-415-4937. 1-4 SEASONAL RENTALLAUD BY THE SEA 55+. BEAUTIFUL 2/2 Furnished. Walk To Beach, Shops, Restaurants. Large Pool Nice Grounds. 3-5 Month Rental. 413-244-2807. 12-28 REAL ESTATE SERVICESSELLING OR BUYING Choose Someone You Can Trust 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen. YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 1-4 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38 x 13. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 1-11 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO CHARMING 2/1 Home. Asking $975 Per Month. 611 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 1-25 POMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,200 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 27 Friday, January 4, 2013 Pelican Classi eds mean business! 954-7838700!Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com or 954-7838700!Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 POMPANO BEACH Leisureville. 3/2 1 Car Garage,. $1,200 Month Yearly Lease Utilities Not Included. Available February 1st. 954649-8867. HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO 2 / 1 1 Car Garage. Central Air Screened Porch. Double Shed With Sundeck. $124,900. Barbara Balistreri Realty 954-2637129. 1-4 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE / DEERFIELD Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny w/Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furnished. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $63,900. 561-372-9837. 1-4 POMPANO PARLIAMENT HOUSE 1/1.5 In The Heart Of The East CRA. Across From The Beach. Open & Airy. $149K. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. 954-8034174. 1-4 POMPANO BEACH 2 /2 Fabulous Ocean & Intracoastal Views From SE Corner 15th Floor! Reduced! $249,900. Carole Stephan Greater Broward Realty. 954-6955937. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 1-4CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 1-4 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 1-11 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 1-4 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 Apt With Screened Room Available In Residential Neighborhood. $1,000 Month Yearly Lease. Call 609-638-1291. 1-4 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 NW NE 2/1 New $9752/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-25 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 1-25 CHURCH FOR RENT! Pompano Beach. Well Furnished. Great Sound System Available. Seats 20. Must Rent! Only $275/Month. Please Call For Availability. 954-588-4985 754-281-0922. 1-4 POMPANO DIXIE & COPANS WAREHOUSE For Rent. 2 Units 1-1640 Sq Ft 1 2080 Sq Ft With A/C Of ces Zoned 3M. Both With Overhead Doors. Starting At $850. Call 716-316-3690. 1-11

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28 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Most people are not aware of the many benefits available through veterans health care, state veterans homes, home renovation grants (HISA Grants), or from two disability income programs called Compensation and Pension. One particular program called Veterans Pension, or more commonly known as the Veterans Aid and Attendance Benefit, can provide money to help offset longterm care costs in home. The reason for using aid and attendance to refer to Pension is that many veterans or their single surviving spouses can become eligible if they have a regular need for the aid or attendance of a caregiver or if they are housebound. Evidence of this need for care must be certified by VA as a rating. With a rating, certain veterans or their surviving spouses can now qualify for Pension. Pension is also available to low income veteran households without a rating, but it is a lesser dollar amount. Roughly 1 out of 4 seniors in the U.S. could qualify for the aid and attendance benefit under the right conditions. Only about 5 percent of U.S. seniors are receiving this benefit. What is the Veterans Aid and Attendance Pension bene t? A veteran is eligible for up to $1,704 per month, while a surviving spouse is eligible for up to $1,094 per month. A veteran with a spouse is eligible for up to $2,020 per month and a veteran with a sick spouse is eligible for up to $1,338 per month.Eligibility Rules for PensionTo receive Pension, a veteran must have served on active duty, at least 90 days, during a period of war. The veteran must be discharged under other than dishonorable conditions. Single surviving spouses of such veterans are also eligible. If younger than 65, the veteran must be totally disabled. If age 65 and older, there is no requirement for disability. There is no disability requirement for a single surviving spouse.Periods of WarWorld War II: Dec. 7, 1941, through Dec. 31, 1946 Korean Conflict: June 27, 1950, through Jan.31, 1955 Vietnam Era: Feb. 28, 1961, through May 7, 1975, inclusive, in the case of a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period. The period beginning on August 5, 1964, and ending on May 7, 1975, inclusive, in all other cases. Gulf War: August 2, 1990, through date to be prescribed by Presidential proclamation or law.About the NCPCThe National Care Planning Council, Senior Helpers of Florida and its affiliated members are dedicated to helping families recognize the need for long term care planning and to helping implement that planning. Integrity, honesty, and a genuine concern for those who are in need of (or may need) long term care are at the heart of our services. Information about Veterans Benefits Available to Senior Veterans and Their Surviving Spouses. Call 954-707-5030. Advertisement

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The Pelican 29 Friday, January 4, 2013 installed, and dues from the Deer eld Beach Island Community Association [DBICA] brought Thanksgiving and Christmas to less fortunate families. Now, with 200 paying members and some money to spend, the DBICA is looking for a beauti cation project east of the Intracoastal Waterway. Possible projects will be the topic of the Jan. 17 DBICA meeting at the Community Presbyterian Church. Dreyer and his wife Dolly moved here from Plantation Acres in 2009, choosing a townhome one block from the beach. They had considered both Boca Raton and Delray Beach when they moved east but chose Deer eld Beach for its village feel and its diversity. You cant beat the location and weve got characters out here. Weve got surfers, and weve got early birds and everyone in between, Dreyer said. Almost immediately Dreyer set out to increase his neighbors awareness of some obvious problems: garbage cans left for days in the swales, exposed dumpsters. Most things were resolved through better enforcement of the codes, but changing the code to require garbage cans and bulk pickups be stored out of sight has created a huge improvement. Working with Sgt. Floyd Baker who heads up code enforcement here has been very effective, Dreyer said. We live in a beautiful community [and] enforce the codes. Success breeds more success and educating residents about the rules is an important part of the process, Dreyer said. Approaching problems with the backing of an association rather than an individual is also more effective, Dreyer believes. An association has more clout in its relationship with the city. He thinks other neighborhoods would prosper if they had a community organization to reset expectations, raise the bar, he says of attempts to make improvements. There are 2,000 residences on the Island, the area between the Intracoastal and the ocean. A commercial real estate broker and manager, Dreyer has worked up the prole of his neighborhood: half are full-time residents, half are snowbirds. Of the snowbirds, half of them come not from out of state, but from western Broward County. More snowbirds are members of the Community Island Association than full-time residents, a fact that surprised Dreyer until he realized that the association offers these part time citizens representation they would not have otherwise. Dreyer acknowledges the huge contribution of the Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] which has nanced improvements to the beach area: drainage, sidewalk pavers, turtle lighting, the Hillsboro Blvd. streetscape, pedestrian crosswalks and most recently the refurbished shing pier. He contributed to the CRAs development plan, acting as a consultant and identifying potential real estate buys. Despite the progress that has come to his beach community in the last few years, Dreyer knows there is still much to be done especially in the area north of Northeast Second Street where older, rental units proliferate. A beauti cation project outside the scope of the association but one close to his heart is to see several old houses on north A1A rehabbed, perhaps as art galleries. Its time to step it up there, he said. Everyone living on the Island is welcome to the DBICA meetings. City staff, including City Manager Burgess Hanson, will attend the Jan. 17 meeting. On Feb. 21, the topic will be sea turtle conservation. Expert Richard Whitecloud is the speaker. On Mar. 21, diving off shore reefs is the discussion and on Apr. 18, The Rev. Dennis Andrews of Community Presbyterian Church will be the speaker. The association is not just about serious matters. It is about fun, too. The Dreyers hosted a holiday party in their tropical backyard last month and in April, members will gather for the annual picnic. And for those who love country music, Dreyer has put his own words to Toby Keiths song, I Love This Bar. I love this town, he says. For more information on the DBICA, and all the words to the song, visit the website DBICA.com.Beach IslandContinued from page 1We live in a beautiful community [and] enforce the codes. Success breeds more success. Dreyer

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30 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Lighthouse Point This week, the wahoo are biting. Whether youre in the Bahamas or in South Florida, the wahoo shing has been off the chain for the last week, said RJ Boyle of RJ Boyle Studios in Lighthouse Point. Double digits have been recorded in the Bahamas every week and quite a few have been caught off the Hillsboro Inlet. According to Boyle, the crew of the Rebound caught ve wahoo on Wednesday alone. Wahoo are biting from here to the Bahamas Lou Tomisello, out of Boca Raton, caught two wahoos weighing a total of 50 lbs. Boyle said most of the wahoo are being caught via trolling with lures at 8 to 12 knots. The best of the action seems to be from 175 to 300 ft., said Boyle. Boyle added that dolphin have been nicky lately but those seeking to catch a few should use live pilchards as bait. Live pilchards will do the trick, he said.By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach The Two Georges at The Cove serves plenty of seafood to its customers, but once a year it encourages people to go out and catch their own. On Saturday, Jan. 19 from 8 to 4 p.m., Two Georges, 1754 SE 3 Court., will host its 3rd Annual Two Georges at The Cove Billfish Tournament. The event, a continuation of the tournament that was started by the restaurants previous owners when it was known as The Cove Marina & Restaurant, will benefit the Jim & Jan Moran Club of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Deer elds Two Georges hosts Bill sh Tournament Broward County. Denise Buzzelli, tournament coordinator, estimates that 10 to 20 boats and about 150 anglers participate every year. And space is still open for this years tournament. Wed like to get as many boats as possible, she said. The cost is $600 per boat with each additional angler allowed to compete for $150. Entry includes dinner and drinks. Extra dinner tickets are $30 each. Angler RJ Boyle, owner of RJ Boyle Studio in Lighthouse Point, which sells, bait, tackle and marine See BILLFISH on page 31SightingsContinued from page 22Safe Boating CourseThe U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will host its About Boating Safety on Jan. 19 at Imperial Point Medical Center, 6401 N. Fed. Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. The one-day program begins at 8 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m. All materials and lunch are provided. Cost is $50. Contact Richard Leys at 954-942-8108. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.SundaysDeer eld Beach Green Market is held from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Cove Shopping See SIGHTINGS on page 31

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The Pelican 31 Friday, January 4, 2013 FundsContinued from page 25equipment and merchandise, said those who want to make their entry fee count should keep in mind a few tricks and strategies. Having the freshest bait that you can is huge, said Boyle. And, he added, having as many types of bait also increases the chances of grabbing a tournamentwinning fish. Some guys will have all four baits goggle eyed, herring, tinker mackerel, pilchards because sometimes [billfish] will target just one type of bait that day. Boyle also touts pre-fishing and research as big ways for anglers improve their chances. A lot of the guys who compete in those tournaments and do well, they pre-fish maybe two days before a tournament. Theyll also network with friends up and down the coast to find out what the best conditions for billfish are. Weigh-ins will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. on Jan. 19 with cocktail hour from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. The awards banquet is from 7:30 to 10 p.m. Raffle and auction items will also be part of the festivities. The kick-off party, sponsored by 99.9 Kiss Country, will be held on Thursday, Jan. 17 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Two Georges. A captains/observer meeting will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. To register or become a sponsor, call Denise Buzzelli at 954-427-0353.Bill shContinued from page 30be to approve all five and let them ensure compliance with the county. But he said he agreed with the concern that the Marriage Institute is a start-up entity. Vice Mayor John Adornato said the institute is not registered as a non-profit with the state of Florida. He questioned their goals and said the commission needed to pay attention when were using public money for religious organizations. I dont feel theyre a worthy entity given the lack of information about them, The commission agreed to apply the municipal portion of CDBG funds available, $115,000 for the purchase of the Perez building at NE 34 Court and Dixie Highway, demolition and the future construction of a plaza.SightingsContinued from page 30 Center, Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal, every Sunday until April 28. Vendors are welcome. Call 561239-1536 or 561-299-8684.MondaysThe Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the rst and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Oakland Park. 954-782-9951.TuesdaysYoga every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $7 per class. Classes are also held Saturday mornings from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. 954-6073520. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. Cost is $7. 305607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesdays at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta works to advance women. 561-392-2223.

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32 The Pelican Friday, January 4, 2013