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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00327
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 12-28-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00330

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Friday, December 28, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 52 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Looking back, 2012 in Deer eld Beach was a year of accomplishment with little controversyBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach 2012 brought a new sense of amicability to the city commission and an apparent ef ciency in government which led to fewer commission meetings in the last quarter of the year. Residents also saw the completion of a major upgrade to the city, the new amenities at the shing pier. 2012 is notable because achievement trumped acrimony and, midway through, commissioners tamped down their criticism of each other and the staff. When it comes to the years successes, the ongoing improvements See DEERFIELD RETRO on page 16Robotics competition fun for students, good for societyBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The battle for more science, math and engineering graduates is won in the classroom. And robotics instructor David Ellich knows fun activities and competitions are what help turn a love of those elds into lifelong careers that bene t students and society. On Dec. 15, some of those careers may have started as over 200 elementary and middle school students from across Broward County descended on Crystal Lake Middle School to test their robotics skills in the FIRST LEGO League Robotics Tournament. This is how we get em hooked early, said Ellich, a robotics instructor at Atlantic Technical resident who teaches at Atlantic Technical Center in Coconut See ROBOTICS on page 19This city was happy with the dust, the cranes and contracts in 2012By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The redevelopment programs, referred to as the Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] were center stage for 2012. Mayor Lamar Fisher says the work of the CRA, both east and west, had a signi cant impact on the city in 2012, and it was hard to nd those who disagreed. Says Fisher, Projects include the Atlantic Boulevard streetscape/ utilities improvements, Pompano Beach Boulevard streetscape/beach improvements, Harbor Village parking lot and faade improvements and the Pelican Retro Issue A look back at 2012 Politics stirred the pot as 2012 began its runBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point 2012 may be most remembered because two long-time commissioners lost their seats and voters may have been in uenced by an unlikely force. Tom Hasis and Susie Gordon, both veteran politicians here, lost their seats in March to newcomers Becky Lysengen Wilton Manors focus on economic development to extend beyond 2012By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Of cials here spent much of 2012 focused on improving the citys economic situation for 2013, 2014 and beyond. In a series of moves that included buying land for more parking along See WILTON MANORS RETRO on page 18 See POMPANO RETRO on page 5 Jordan Latson, 11, [left] and Deandre Ferguson, 12, watch as their robot knocks down some miniature bowling pins at the FIRST LEGO League Robotics Tournament on Dec. 15 at Crystal Lake Middle School in Pompano Beach. Latson and Ferguson, students at Silver Lakes Middle School in North Lauderdale, joined other students at the tournament, which is seen by teachers and school of cials as a way to foster interest in math, science and engineering. [Photo by Michael dOliveira] See LIGHTHOUSE RETRO on page 26

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2 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Art, Music & Entertainment12-28 The State Ballet Theater of Russia presents: Cinderella at 7:30 p.m. at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, 2855 Coral Springs Drive. Tickets are $27 to $47. Visit www. coralspringscenterforthearts. com. 12-30 Rick and Carla perform at 8 p.m. at The Manor, 2345 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Rick plays piano as Carla sings of a wide range of popular songs. Visit www.themanorcomplex.com. 1-9 Legends of Doo Wop perform at 7:30 p.m. at Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Doors open Lodge, 240 W. Prospect Road, Oakland Park. Cost is $8 at the door. Cash bar. 954564-2357. 1-6 Pianist Al Guastaeste performs at 4 p.m. at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $20 for members in advance and $25 for nonmembers at the door. Visit www.bocaraton. steinwaydealer.com. 1-6 American Songbook Series featuring Marshall Turkins Classic Jazz Ensemble at 4 p.m. at Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Held in the Keith C. & Elaine Johnson World Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $75 to $160. Visit www.lynn.tix. com. 1-6 The Music and Times of Irving Berlin at 4 p.m. at Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Held in the Keith C. & Elaine Johnson World Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $25 to $30. Visit www.lynn.tix. com. 1-13 Sunday Matinee Music at Boca Raton Library. Jim Kovalcik Trio, featuring Jim Kovalcik on ute, Jason Hanley on guitar and Steve Jernigan on bass. 3 p.m. at the Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd. 561-239-1536.Auction/Sales1-7 Charity auction at Java Boys, 2230 Wilton Drive, Wilt on Manors, at See SIGHTINGS on page 15at 6:30 p.m. Admission is $14 per person. 954-786-4111. 12-31 Salute to Vienna at 8 p.m. at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, 2855 Coral Springs Drive. Performances by The Strauss Symphony of America; Andrs Dek, conductor; Marcela Cerno, soprano; Eduardo Aladrn, tenor. Tickets are $44 to $64. Visit www. coralspringscenterforthearts. com. 1-6 Big Band Dance from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Elks Pompano Citi Centre was the setting last month for a classic car show featuring antiques, classics and vintage automobiles. To a backdrop of oldies tunes, car buffs and shoppers enjoyed the show, which was held to honor the men and women who serve in the military. Pictured is a supercharged roadster [foreground] and 1940 two-toned Ford pickup. [Photo by Judy Vik]

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The Pelican 3 Friday, December 28, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach In this beachfront town, the sea comes calling frequently and when it does it takes away sand, lots of it. So in 2012 beach erosion remained a big concern, heightened by a study released in March that promised no solution for the scouring that routinely occurs on the north beach. Vice Mayor Claire Schubert took the lead by contacting of cials at the Song of the sea continued to plague Hillsboro Beach in 2012Department of Environmental Protection and setting up meetings with administrators in Boca Raton to discuss a joint beach nourishment project. Later in the year, funds were approved for a new study of the Boca Inlet shoal, a source of sand for down drift beaches. And communication between the two cities, for the rst time, seems to be productive. The Pelican s news story in May that the towns north beach appears doomed unless constantly renourished, attracted Beachgreen LLC, A Greenbeach scientist explains erosion control plan to Vice Mayor Claire Schubert. a group of scientists and business people who believe they have a product that will adjust the chemistry of beaches and halt sand loss. After Hillsboros beach consultant had no viable plan for erosion control, two Beachgreen principals came to town and met with Schubert to discuss their product and examine the shoreline. While they could point to successes in Cape Cod and New Jersey, they See HILLSBORO RETRO on page 15

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4 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The prize home and museum in this city has nally opened its historic doors to residents and tourists. Farmer Neal Sample built the house in 1916, and this month children from local schools helped dress the Sample-McDougald House for the holidays. Pompano Beach Elementary students with their teacher Claire Dellerson made New holiday tree at Sample-McDougald House gets retro lookornaments from pine cones and created red cardinals. Pompano Beach Middle School students offered handpainted ornaments with their teacher, Nadine Williams. Students at Pompano Beach High School created their own clay ornaments red from the kiln at school. Lee Waldo, curator at the house, calls the tree glorious. Two more trees add to the festive scheme at the house, a large tree in the living room is decorated with vintage bubble lights and the foyer tree is wrapped with antique lights from the 1930s. The Sample-McDougald House, 450 NE 10 St., dates back to the pioneer era of northern Broward County. The Sample family arrived in South Florida soon after the turn of the century. John M. Sample, the rst to settle in the Pompano area, purchased land from the Florida East Coast Railway prior to 1910. To view the holiday trees and other decorations, the Sample-McDougald House is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays. For information on public tours and facility rentals, email SMHevents@ yahoo.com or call 954 6915686.Decked with bubbles, baubles and birds, the trees at McDougald House are welcoming visitors.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, December 28, 2012 public/private partnerships highlighting the new Publix as the signature project. Also city, Fisher points out more CRA work that will be an engine starter for the citys economy. Says Fisher, Projects include the 731 MLK Building consisting of over 4,000 sq. ft. which will house our local businesses, the new The citys parks are also getting a big star with a newly designed Greg Norman Signature Golf Course at Municipal Park. Delays have only built anticipation. City Commissioner Woody Poitier also cast his vote for the CRA as having Pompano RetroContinued from page 1 See POMPANO RETRO on page 7 stay tuned for the upcoming Pier development which includes 40,000 sq. ft. of retail/restaurants/tourist destination and, further north, a four star beachfront Marriott Resort and Hotel at Northeast 13 Street. Residents and visitors alike had no problem lining up with shiny grocery carts at the new Atlantic Boulevard Publix. But shop-keepers just east of Publix still struggle to keep their doors open as the dust ies over the Harbor Village Shops. That dust wont settle until the parking area has been lighted and landscaped. New facades will add to the glimmer of this new go-to spot. On the west side of the Broward County Transit Station, the redevelopment of the Ali Building in conjunction with a cultural activity center, the CRA Business Resource Center which provided over $900,000 in small business loans, faade programs in our Old Pompano and MLK corridors, the Bailey Hotel which will an integral part of our Arts District, our successful Green Market and the second Saturdays festivals at the Annie Gillis Park. Also stay tuned for our city hall civic campus to include a regional library and cultural arts facility and nalizing a Collier City master plan focusing on the expansion of our parks. a major impact on this city. And signi cantly on the west, Poitiers district. The major impact here, says Poitier, was getting the TOC approved which will open the door to other projects. The TOC [Transit Oriented Corridor] allows for changes in land-use that offer exibility in housing and attracts public transportation. Says Poitier, Developers have already picked up interest in the TOC for projects along Martin Luther King Boulevard. Pompano Beach is the place to be in 2013.The new Atlantic Boulevard terminus will be people-friendly with plenty of shade, landscaping and public art.

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6 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 52 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & LettersDeveloper must make sure library is updated, parking is public To the editor, I have deep concerns about the way the Pompano Beach City Commission is handling the East CRA project. They are in the process of nalizing a contract with a developer who wants to develop the public parking area directly across from the pier. While I am in favor of having appropriate retail establishments come to our beach front to enhance the experience for tourists and residents, such as restaurants, cafes and boutique shops, what this developer wants is to rezone a large portion of public park land to build a hotel. There are already plenty of hotels, large and small along the A1A corridor, and they had to pay top dollar for their land. The residents dont need a hotel; they need quality retailers, and ample, low cost, easily accessible parking. So, as the contract reads, this developer needs a land-use change and rezoning to enable him to build a hotel. However, he is not obligated to build a parking garage for the residents. Why in the world would city commissioners accept a contract that doesnt require that the developer build a parking garage with space equal to what existed previous to their developing our public land regardless of whether the proposed hotel parcel is actually rezoned? The developer should also be required to replace the library with an updated media/community/welcome center. These should be the prerequisites for any developer who wants the privilege of building on this prime location. The fact that our commissioners are even considering this contract, despite its serious shortcomings for the citizens who own this property, sounds pretty shy to me. Donna Torrey Pompano BeachCitizen wants sheriff to reconsider Wieners removal To the Editor, I am writing as a citizen of Pompano Beach who loves my community. My wife Alicia and I moved to East Pompano from Weston in January 2007. It was our choice to be close to an oceanfront community as we are avid speed boaters. I volunteer my marketing expertise for the citys Unity in the Community event and have served on its board. I am just one of a dedicated group of citizens that volunteer many many hours to this event. I am also very active in maintaining the area where I live. When we moved into our neighborhood we had drug and prostitution issues and I met Capt. Mick Wiener in Spring of 2007 and asked what we could do to combat these problems. Capt. Wiener gave me his cell, e-mail address and asked me to report such instances to him and that he would elevate patrols. I did just that and in time, we cleaned up the area. My calls never went to voicemail jail. I am writing to express my sadness and sense of loss of a wonderful police of cer, Capt. Wiener. I can understand that a newly elected sheriff will want a command structure loyal to him. It happens. But at the community street level, to an of cer that was very committed to the community that he actually lives in, is a grave injustice and shows no concern for the citizens of Pompano Beach. Capt. Wiener did nothing wrong and served Lamberti, his sheriff at the time. He has told me that he was willing to put the same loyalty and dedication to [Sheriff-elect Scott] Israel. I think you all can agree Capt. Wiener was a strong friend of the city. I urge all of you to contact your city commissioners so with a collective voice they can ask the new sheriff to consider re-hiring Capt. Wiener. Paul A. Laya Pompano Beach The publics safety is topic for special DB meetingDeer eld Beach City commissioners will meet in special session Wednesday, Jan. 3, 6:3 p.m. to consider establishing an of ce of public safety. Of cial con rmation of the agenda could not be obtained by press time due to city hall being closed for Christmas, but Commissioner Joe Miller said after he broached the subject of safety in Deer eld Beach schools, Mayor Peggy Noland called the meeting. Noland could not be reached for comment. According to Miller the agenda includes discussion of emergency management and infrastructure security. Last week, newly-elected sheriff Scott Israel announced that he is terminating Deer elds police chief Pete Sudler. Sudler is one of 28 highranking BSO employees being red by Israel who takes command Jan. 8.By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors This Christmas, over 100 boys and girls served by Kids In Distress [KID] will be getting a new set of wheels. Earlier this month, Courtyard Caf owners Nick Berry and Shawn Bombard and their supporters donated 103 shiny, brand-new bicycles to Kids In Distress. We easily doubled what we donated last year, said Berry, who has been organizing the bike drive for the last four years. The community loves my business and I love giving back. Said Bombard, Were going to have to do even better next year. With its main campus located in Wilton Manors, Kids In Distress goal is to help children, from newborns to the age of 15, who are abused or neglected. The campus houses up to 24 children at a time. And along with the bikes, there also helmets, locks and other Christmas presents. For several of the children we serve, this will be the rst bike Over 100 brand new bicycles wait in Nick Berrys backyard to be delivered to children on Christmas. Christmas donation to Kids In Distress tops 100 bicycles theyve ever received, said Brittany Soule, marketing manager for Kids In Distress. They now have something to open up on Christmas morning and theyll have a bike to call their very own. Donating the majority of bicycles were Tony Dee, owner of Wilton Manors Tropics Restaurant; Lauderdale-By-The-Sea residents John and Cheryl McCully; Marsha Milot and Jim Sutton and Terry Syrcle, Berrys former business partner. Others, including Mark Malmstrom, Bob Gagnon and Timmy Coyne, helped assemble the bikes and get them ready to ride. Cheryl McCully said, in light of the tragedy in Connecticut, this years donation is even more special. Its people like this that make the bene t so worthwhile, said Berry. It just gives you that drive. Syrcle, who used to co-host the toy drive with Berry, said Kids In Distress has always been the bene ciary. To realize that there are kids that have no family or come from an abusive family, it tears at the heart. Weve been so blessed. We need to give back, said Syrcle.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, December 28, 2012 CRA co-directors, Kim Briesemister and Chris Brown, had no problem picking up the pulse of this citys residents [they are party monsters.] Pre-construction activities often included a food truck, music, art or food event to assist locals in beating a path to a soon-to-be new destination part of the city. It did not take long for the denizens to nd the new location of the Green Market, partly because it cannot be avoided on the corner of Cypress and East Atlantic. The move tripled the markets size and allure. Commissioner Barry Dockswell, whose district has been the focus of the CRA, expressed elation at what he calls the rebirth and re-awakening of Pompano Beach. Says Dockswell, You Pompano RetroContinued from page 5can see it in the projects now beginning to come to fruition in the East CRA. You can see it in the projects now being designed and developed in the West CRA. You can see it in the capital improvements and economic development efforts in several parts of town. You can see it in the citys new logo and branding efforts. You can see it in the citys beginning efforts to focus on tourism. You can see it in the citys dramatically improving ratings on delivery of services as measured by surveys of residents. And as others have equally proclaimed, Dockswell gives credit to a city commission which is dedicated to the re-vitalization of our city. We have a city manager who has led substantial reorganizations and visible improvements at city hall. And we have a community redevelopment team providing highly effective economic development expertise and leadership. Commissioner Charlotte Burrie cast her vote for the CRA, but in her district, she had more lauds. Thanks to community policing and a strong BSO, we had safer neighborhoods. The city also passed a new law regarding rental homes, something I had worked on for months. Now rental homes must be licensed and must be up to code. Burrie added that after new sewer lines are completed in the Highlands, beauti cation projects can begin. But joy was absent in the West CRA rendering of historic downtown.hearts of many who felt they had lost a good friend when Sheriff-elect Scott Israel announced that BSO Captain Milton Wiener would no longer serve the city. And there were mixed emotions when news hit that Major William Knowles would also leave. Israel announced he was to be promoted and would be working at BSO headquarters in Fort Lauderdale. In March, the mayors seat will be open for election along with Commissioners Burrie and Poitier. The normal two-year terms for the commissioners will be cut short in November 2014 when the city will change local elections to coincide with the national elections. Pompano Beach had a ne year as a city on the rise. Property values continued to move in the right direction, and with the winter season here shopkeepers are happy.

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8 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Tree giveawayOakland Park Two free trees will be given out per Oakland Park household on Saturday, Jan. 26 starting at 9 a.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Supplies are limited and trees will be given away as long as supplies last. Residents can choose from up to six tree species. To qualify, proof of Oakland Park residency must be provided. The young trees will be in three-gallon containers for easy transport and planting. Call 954-6304511.Tennis tournamentWilton Manors The Annual Island City Open takes place on Saturday, Jan. 26 starting at 8 a.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. The tournament consists of mens and womens categories and participants can compete as singles, doubles or mixed doubles at A, B and C skill levels. Cost is $25 per person, $30 per team and includes a shirt, awards, refreshments and a barbeque. Call Donna Kocyba at 954-390-2132 to register.Tour of Deer eld IslandDeer eld Beach A tour of Deer eld Island takes place Sunday, Jan. 27 at 10 a.m. The tour will focus on the islands colorful history. The 53.4-acre island, which wasnt an actual island until 1961, was previously know as Capones Island even though famous gangster Al Capone never owned it. Space is limited and preregistration is required. The boat to the island leaves from Sullivan Park, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. Cost is $3 per person. Call 954-357-5100. Briefs Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Business outlookBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFAthena By The Sea boasts new look, new menu itemsAthena By The Sea brings with it some hot new menu items and a couple of really cool features. After months of being closed for renovations, the LauderdaleBy-The-Sea The grand re-opening of Greek restaurant 13-year-old Athena By The Sea held its grand reopening on Tuesday. We completely redesigned the whole restaurant and added some new menu items. It was just time to redo the restaurant, said owner Louis Marchelos, who imported Greek stone to incorporate into the new look. We relocated our kitchen to the back of the restaurant and put the bar in the front [making it an open air restaurant], said Marchelos. And the bar is where the cool new features can be found. We have a frost rail system on the bar and it keeps the customers cocktails cold, said Marchelos. And for those looking for a cold glass of liquor or other spirits, the shot vodka system keeps liquors at zero degrees. We offer our customers the coldest martini in all of South Florida, Marchelos said. Along with new menu items like BBQ ribs, prime pork rib eye and oysters, the wine selection has increased to 40 selections and nightly entertainment is coming after the commencement of the new year. We have our Greek wines and wines throughout the world, said Marchelos. Call 954-771-2900.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Toby Smith is knowledgeable, articulate and clearly very enthusiastic about his own business. He says, When you buy a Bobcat you can be your own boss. He explains his claim. With its hundreds of attachments a Bobcat Skid Steer Loader can turn a person into an excavating contractor, a plumber, an electrician, landscaper, tree farmer, demolition contractor and much more. The manager and part owner of Bobcat of Broward, located at 1108 Hammondville Road in Pompano Beach, says Ive known some of our customers since I was 12 years old. My dad, Donald Smith, bought a Bobcat dealership in Palm Beach in 1978. That dealership, Smith Brothers Contracting Equipment, Inc. Bobcat of Broward the destination for landscapers, construction companies and those who do it themselves is now known to the public as Bobcat of Broward and Bobcat of Palm Beach. Were still family owned and run by my mother Lucy Smith, brother Simon Smith and me. Weve grown into two very large, Bobcat super stores where customers can buy, sell, rent equipment and parts, large and small. And we service that equipment. He continues. Thousands of Bobcats are in use in Broward and Palm Beach Counties by our local Toby Smith [Right] is very proud of the 33-year-old family business which he says offers equipment solutions for every landscape job, large or small. Bobcat of Broward is a dealer destination to buy, sell, rent or service equipment and parts. [Left] Equipment for major or small jobs is available for on location use. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger]See BOBCAT on page 14

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The Pelican 9 Friday, December 28, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Residents and business owners will begin to see the results of months of Groundwork was laid in 2012 for a new image in Lauderdale-By-The-Seaplanning as major projects get under way on Commercial Boulevard, both east and west of A1A, in the spring of the new year. Design work is nearly complete for streetscape and drainage projects on Commercial Boulevard east of A1A and for the area west of A1A from Seagrape Drive to the Intracoastal Waterway bridge. The eastern project is aimed at transforming the commercial district into an inviting public space with wider sidewalks, plazas, shade trees and a clear view of the ocean. The project eliminates parking on Commercial east of El Mar Drive but allows vehicle access to the pier and Arubas. After years of having professional studies and master plans produced, only to sit and collect dust, the town has begun to execute and implement on those strategies [for downtown redevelopment], Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said. He said it has been a complete team effort with many hours put in by the town administration and staff to be able to accomplish so much this year.Teamwork and harmonyThe single biggest achievement is the continuation of teamwork and harmony that has resulted in the commission and staff working together to make important decisions that will affect the future of the town, Commissioner Stuart Dodd says. There is a great sense of fairness and the desire to get things done. He points to the hours of discussion over sewer rates so that charges re ect the costs and the hard negotiations over redevelopment plans for the downtown. Among otherSee LBTS RETRO on page 25

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10 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park The decisions city commissioners made to hire a consulting rm and listen to their recommendations resulted in visible progress in redeveloping and reinvigorating the downtown. In February, they approved hiring Redevelopment Management Associates [RMA] to provide a marketing and business attraction program for the downtown and implement a culinary brand for the city. Earlier, the commission hired RMA to provide services to develop Oakland Station, the former Sears warehouse, as the culinary anchor; to attract proposals to develop property at the south gateway to Main Street; and consult with Broward County on their Redevelopment Capital Program [RCP] funding and provide ongoing redevelopment advice. When we brought in RMA, we gave them a big job to do with a relatively small amount of money, Mayor Anne Sallee said. Already a new parking lot has been created, just north of city hall, where an eyesore building stood. Groundbreaking took place recently for a downtown plaza and Funky Buddha Brewery at the Oakland Station building. The brewery is expected to open by the end of February. When RMA of cials rst talked about a vision of the area as a culinary center, Sallee said, it all made sense. When they listed what we already had and the areas available, it was like all of the puzzles fell into place. They came in with a new set of eyes. Oakland Park Station is at the north end of Main Street. Now two culinary schools are interested in the south end, in a building once owned by the Catholic archdiocese. She says its exciting now when the city holds meetings, and people they havent seen before are coming and saying theyre thinking of locating their business in Oakland Park. What were doing for redevelopment is an enormous step forward, says Vice Mayor John Adornato. Bringing on RMA, reinvigorating Main Street and getting serious about bringing new development into the city is a major accomplishment. We made a decision to move forward with the culinary arts theme and to put our money where our mouth is and make things happen. We have community and business support, and nothing is more important than that, Adornato said. Engaging RMA and implementing their Culinary Arts District theme -will prove to be one of the most signi cant acts taken by Oakland Park, said Commissioner Shari McCartney. The commission secured funding to get the project started and RMA and [Oakland Park] Main Street have worked together to attract culinary-related merchants and industries. In July, commissioners authorized an agreement with RMA to complete a general review of the citys Community Redevelopment Agency plan, the Redevelopment RCP and develop a strategic plan for the next ve years. In September, commissioners approved a contract with RMA for $254,615 to market the new culinary district. And it calls for another $150,000 for incentives.City buys two propertiesIn May, commissioners agreed to purchase the Schnell property at 1229 NE 37 St., just north of city hall, for $320,000. The building will be kept as is until its needed for parking or future development. Commissioners also approved purchasing the Perez property at 1110 NE 34 Court for $767,500. The Perez property, at Northeast 34 Court and Dixie Highway, will be demolished during the rst quarter of the new year and replaced with a plaza area with seating and landscaping to re ect the look of Northeast 12 Avenue and carry it across Dixie Highway, Sallee said. Railway intersection improvements will be made at that same intersection with Oakland Park preps for its culinary arts districtSee OAKLAND RETRO on page 21Of cials celebrate a ground-breaking in the culinary arts district.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, December 28, 2012 SPECIAL TO THE PELICANThe story of Sailors Valentines evokes romance majestic sailing ships and long sea voyages, adventures in the new world, and daydreams of loved ones across wide oceans. In the early 1800s British Seamen traveled the world, gathering goods to bring back to England. Along with whale oil, spices, silks, sugar and other goods, ships would bring back seashells from the Paci c. The English ladies of that era bought these shells, making fancy tables and knick-knacks with them. Thus, in England the Sailors Valentine rst was conceived, with octagonal boxes created to house the fancy creations. The octagonal shape, lending itself to even partitions and symmetry of design, was adopted for the valentines. From England, the making of the Valentines moved to Barbados via an enterprising B. H. Belgrave. He and his brother migrated from England and began a sea curio shop on the island with crafts from the local ladies. He had cases made and patterns to be copied. He also sold specimen shells, crabs, preserved local sh and other Sailors Valentines at Broward Shell Show coming in January sea creatures. Sailors, gone for a long time and knowing Barbados was one of the ports on their way home, often bought these Valentines as souvenirs. The typical valentines of today have speci c criteria. There are single Valentines and double valentines and if one is to win an award, no empty space can show on the bottom of the Valentine. The center is rounded with a theme of hearts, owers or a love saying. Flowers made from shells or other natural sea objects are made and inserted and colored foil paper is shaped to form partitions on the bottom of the case. As breathtaking as the beauty of these Valentines are, one is hard pressed to actually describe them. Today, antique and reproduced Sailors Valentines are sought for their beauty and uniqueness. The Valentines of today had a revival in the 1960s. This revival has increased in interest and artistry since then particularly on Floridas West Coast, some Valentines selling for upwards of $20,000. David Rhyne is the recipient of two 2012 Broward Shell Show for Sailors Valentine along with other awards. His creations are collected by people from around the world. David attended The Ringling School of Art, majoring in illustration. After moving to New York City in 1981, he and his wife, Victoria, started their own design business creating shoe Shell magic Patience and an eye for detail make these shell valentines unique. [Right] Marie Antoinette, dressed in ne shells is the centerpiece for this valetine. [Photos courtesy of the Broward Shell Club]See SHELL SHOW on page 15

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12 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Hillsboro RetroContinued from page 3went away unsure of how to x the problem here. The story also spurred a group of citizens to form an ad hoc committee to investigate erosion control methods and their research continues. When Tropical Storm Sandy passed by, the north beach again suffered huge sand losses. In March, the Barefoot Mailman statue at the Hillsboro Inlet Lighthouse was re-dedicated after being restored by its sculptor Frank Varga and the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society hosted a birthday party for the lighthouse, its 105th. The lighthouse generated more news when conservationists, concerned that its beam was a hazard for sea turtles, asked that the light be dimmed. Boaters reacted swiftly saying the beam, reportedly the strongest anywhere and casting its light 28 miles to sea, was necessary for navigation. The Hillsboro Inlet is surrounded by coral reefs and known for its tricky currents. Although the Coast Guard announced no of cial decision, the beam remains turned on. Another idea that so far has not caught on was broached by developer John Kennelly, owner of 11 acres on the ocean and Intracoastal Waterway. In the past Kennelly has presented plans for both a townhome community and single-family residences and marina, going so far as to plan a pedestrian tunnel under A1A to connect his two properties. This time, his representatives sent letters to homeowners suggesting there could be interest in building a boutique, 5star hotel on the site if commissioners would grant the necessary variances. The idea drew a mixed response from the public and has not yet resurfaced. Using county funds awarded for recycling, the town held its rst Earth Day in April built around a beach cleanup and barbecue at town hall. Despite nasty weather, lots of refuse was removed from the beaches and A1A right of way. Still unresolved is the matter of the Island House Bridge which needs repairs. The bridge which crosses a slough separating the condominium from A1A was deeded to the town in 1966. Because it is used primarily by the residents of Island House, city commissioners were reluctant to charge the taxpayers for its repair. On several occasions they tried to convince the condo board that the work could be done cheaper and faster by the residents. The condo board says the city should have maintained a fund for the repairs. An agreement of sorts was reached with the city offering to put up $160,000. So far, no word from the Island House Board. Late in the year, the town was noti ed it was being sued for its open records policy. A Lakeland man led suit after he requested copies of all the emails sent to the mayor in April and was told by the town clerk to use a request form provided by the town. The lawsuit contends that neither the Florida Constitution nor the Florida Public Records Act require a form to be led. The lawsuit is one of dozens led by a Joel Chandler, or his associates, contesting public record laws. In most instances, he has been successful. The town did win one court case. Police of cer Jim Woolsey had led an age discrimination law suit in federal court claiming he was denied a promotion because of his age. Woolsey who is now 54 was demoted from his rank of captain by Chief Tom Nagy, but the judge dismissed Woolseys complaint saying it showed insuf cient grounds. Woolsey is appealing the ruling in appellate court. In July, the town rejected its longstanding solid waste collector Waste Management and negotiated a contract with Choice Engineering at what appears to be a considerable saving. The commission is actively encouraging residents to recycle, an initiative that began earlier this year.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, December 28, 2012

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14 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 governments, industry and private contractors. Bobcat of Broward offers its clients a showroom which is a treasure of parts and needs such as tires, engines, attachments and small engine parts for lawn and garden tools and behind the retail front is a huge yard lled with large excavating equipment to buy new or used or to rent. We are known for our anchor product, Bobcat skid-steer loader which was invented in 1958. With its home base in North Dakota, the Bobcat is the number one brand of compact equipment sold worldwide. Our huge yard in back offers many models plus an array of attachments. We also carry Bob-Cat mowers which come with a two-year commercial or a ve-year consumer warranty. Theres a lifetime warranty on pro decks. We stock Stihl power and hand tools from Germany. The Stihl chain saw is manufactured in Virginia. We have trimmers, hedgers, blowers, Bandit tree chippers and stump grinders. In our large back yard we have loaders, excavators, and construction equipment to buy or rent. The large selection of tire options for heavy duty applications includes severe duty, super oat, turf and sand up to 12-ply rating. Our tires are ureathane lled, says Toby. He adds, We do a big business on small engine parts for all major brands. Kawasaki Gas engines are the preferred 4-cycle power for your mower. They come with a two-year commercial warranty. Of course we are authorized to service them. We not only offer our customers rentals, repairs, and sales of new and used equipment, but we also buy used equipment, trucks, trailers and we accept tradeins. Bobcat is the place for Doosan/Ingersoll Rand Air Compressors, generators and light towers. One of Tobys favorite attachments is the Forest Cutter which he uses to clear land. He describes it as a seven-foot wide stump grinder that practically eats whole trees. We have three for rent and they are always kept busy. There are hundreds of attachments and options available. Our top sellers are Pallet Forks, concrete/asphalt platers, hydraulic breaker, hammers, rock drilling augers and trenchers. They all run on Bobcat Diesel Engines. The Pelican spoke with a few long time customers of Bobcat. They were too busy working their equipment for long conversations, but their satisfaction was clearly stated. Mario Cocuzzo, Marios Bobcat & Son, said, Ive been doing business with Bobcat of Broward and Palm Beach for over 18 years. Their service is good. Theyre always available when you need them. Ive found them to be very much responsible people who deliver whats promised. Edgar Goodrum owns a Bobcat S130. Hes been a customer for 15 years and says, Theyre good people and the only people Ill deal with because I have found them to be both honest and fair. Open Monday to Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Stop in or call 954-763-9880 or visit the web site at www.bobcatofbroward. comBobcatContinued from page 8 Call to artistsLighthouse Point Artists of all mediums are invited to attend the Call to New Artists for acceptance into the 19th Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition set for March 10 at the Lighthouse Point Yacht & Racquet Club. Artists are invited to take samples of their works to the Yacht Club Jan. 24 from 2 to 5 p.m. The committee will determine what goes in the the show. Call Becky Cerino-Days at 954-408-6410 or Nancy Cohen at 954-806-4749.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, December 28, 2012 At a winter antiques show in New York City, David saw his rst Sailors Valentine and decided to try the art of valentine making. His love of shells and beautiful objects made creating Sailors Valentines a perfect marriage for him. Since entering the 2002 Sanibel Shell Show as a rst-time exhibitor, David has won many blue ribbons and best in show awards at the Sanibel, Philadelphia and Sarasota Shell Shows and Martha Stewart featured him on her show at the 2007 Sanibel Shell Show. David now lives in Sarasota, Florida and works in his studio creating beautiful works of art. His work can be seen at www. davidrhyne.com The Broward shell Show will be exhibiting and selling sailors valentines and shell art at the 48th Annual Broward Shell Show. January 19-20, 2013 Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St, Pompano Beach. Admission and parking are free. Call 305-4674412 or visit.www. browardshellclub.orgShell showContinued from page 117 p.m. Antiques, artwork, paintings, sculptures, furniture and other items will be available. Proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Email ajcrossconsulting@gmail. com. 1-12 Yard sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Vendors wanted. 954-390-2115 or 954-3902130. 1-26 & 1-27 Nautical Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St. Admission is $5. Children 12 and under are free. Visit www.nautical eamarket.com.Books & Lectures1-6 Book discussion on chapters one and two of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Color Blindness by Michelle Alexander at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 954531-1928 1-9 Readers at Sundown at 6 p.m at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. This months title: The House at Riverton by Kate Morton. 954-9466398. 1-13 What would Martin Luther King do? discussion at 11 a.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park, 33309. Free lunch. 954-5311928. 1-14 Annual meeting of the Friends of the Century Plaza Leon Slatin Library at 10:30 a.m. at the library, 1856A W Hillsboro Blvd, Deer eld Beach. 954-3577740.Children12-28 Showing of Arthur Christmas at sundown at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000, N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. 954-6304500. SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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16 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 made by the Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] take center stage. The $5 million construction of the shing pier entrance, restaurant, restroom, bait shop and observation deck was completed earlier this month. This CRA project encountered a few snags and went over its original budget, but the result is public oceanfront space that cant be matched along this coast. Securing a vendor for the restaurant, however, proved to be complicated. After the bid proposal was reworked, the potential vendors had their bids opened and rated. Two led protests, and when that was settled, the commission deadlocked on the lease holder. Another meeting resolved that question, but the vendor not chosen led a protest which was denied last week by the commission. Presumably, contract negotiations will now go forward and what promises to be rst class food service will be available in a few months. In the meantime, the T at the end of the pier suffered damage in Tropical Storm Sandy and awaits repairs which may be months in coming. But most of the piers 935 feet are operational. The CRA put the nishes touches to the parking lot upgrades in The Cove Shopping Center and turned its attention to developing Sullivan Park into a recreational area with a marine theme. The project is being jump started to take advantage of a grant from the Florida Inland Navigational District and will be nanced by a $4 million bond issue. Also ready to go are infrastructure improvements paving, drainage, lighting in the residential area known as Cove Gardens between the shopping center and the Publix Shopping Center. This too is a CRA project. One initiative that did not succeed was upgrades to the main beach parking lot. While staff thought a small amphitheatre and some permanent seating would enhance the areas value as a performance venue, the public wasnt so sure and those plans have been shelved. Similarly an enhancement to Constitution Park, a small stage for performances, was shot down by the board that controls the Deer Creek Homeowners Association. The commission spent considerable time early in the year redrawing the zoning rules for industrial acreage in the citys NW sector. The result pleased residents who live in Independence Bay and The Waterways because certain land uses such as junk yards, metal shredding operations and biomedical waste facilities were eliminated from the code. An issue that found wide support this year was the All In recycling program which provided homeowners with rolling bins for their recyclables as well as bonus points, redeemable at local businesses. In the good guys department, the Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club, See DEERFIELD RETRO on page 17 Ocean views, refreshments and shade made the new pier a favorite spot to enjoy Deer eld retroContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, December 28, 2012 Deer eld retroContinued from page 16collaborating with Scholastic Books, Inc., agreed to fund a reading room at Deer eld Park Elementary School, the rst of its kind in the country. The Broward Sheriffs Department did its share of good work too. In October it held its rst banquet recognizing dozens of community heroes whose volunteer efforts make this city a better place to live. And using money from the Law Enforcement Trust Fund, the local BSO partnering with FAU, endowed full scholarships to the university for three worthy Deer eld Beach students. The concept was lauded by FAU President Dr. Mary Jane Saunders for being a rst. Sheriff Al Lamberti came to town in November to announce the arrest of nine youth football coaches on gambling charges. Although one local coach was among those being held, the city was lauded for initiating Level2 back ground checks for volunteers working with kids on public property which took questionable people off the elds. The city tightened its regulations making it much more dif cult for for-pro t organizations to operate here. On a positive note, in April this city completed its stimulus project, construction of the Dixie Highway Flyover built with $40 million in federal funds. This improvement to Dixie Highway came after 25 years of planning and replanning by state road department of cials stymied each time by lack of money. In May, the citys housing authority board of directors lled a vacancy created when longtime director Pam Davis left the city in January to work in Gainesville. Daviss replacement, Nadine Jarmon, who came here from New Orleans, has kept the agency out of the headlines. As Father Time tears the last page from the 2012 calendar, the New Year Babe has politics on its mind. With the national election and all its SNAFUs in Florida still a vivid memory, voters here will return to the polls in March to decide on two commissioners and a mayor. One seat, District 3, serving Crystal Lake and Century Village, is vacant due to term limits, leading to speculation as to who will run there. Both the mayor and the District 4 commissioner have said they will seek re-election.

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18 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Wilton Drive, the creation of an economic development coordinator position and a bid to develop the Hagen Park/City Hall parking lot, of cials have planted a lot of seeds they hope will bear economic fruit well after this year ends. Weve started some things and planned some things but theres still a lot that has to be done, said Commissioner Tom Green. Giving all credit where credit is due, I think it was very dif cult [for the city to get economic development going in previous years] because of the economy, said Krishan Manners, president/ CEO of the Wilton Manors Development Alliance [WMDA]. One of the rst moves was the addition of Randy Welker, economic development coordinator. The city has also decided to hire an outside rm to market its parks and recreation facilities and attract more attention to events like the annual Stonewall street festival, which brings tens of thousands of visitors to the city each June. I think theyve made a good start this year, especially hiring Randy. Im already working with him on a few things, said Manners. One project Manners and Welker are working on is wooing a major new employer into the city. Manners declined to say which company is interested but he estimates that it could mean at least 40 high-paying jobs. And helping to fund Welkers job and the marketing position, or at least make it easier to fund them, was an increase in the citys taxable values. The 3.63 percent jump in values led to an additional Wilton Manors retroContinued from page 1$140,000 in revenue. And after four years of decline, Mayor Gary Resnick called the increase a marked turnaround. Its all general fund money but lets just say it adds to the stability of the city with planning and moving forward with some projects. Its always better than having to cut, he said. I fully expect 2013 to be a good year, said Manners. And that could mean a good year in 2014 if the residential development, proposed for the Hagen Park/City Hall site, is good for the city and commissioners vote in favor of it. Earlier this month, the citys request for bids to develop its four-acre Hagen Park/City Hall parking lot drew one interested party, IBI Group, a Pompano Beach architecture and engineering rm. Although of cials were hoping for a hotel, IBI has proposed a mixed-use residential and commercial development. If approved, it could be nished by the end of 2014 and have a positive impact on Wilton Drives merchants by placing possibly hundreds of new customers within walking distance of their businesses. Other developers say they intend to develop the Center for Spiritual Living site at 1550 NE 26 St. and the former trailer park property on Northeast 24 Street. But although Wilton Drive has received much of the citys attention, of cials say theyre still working on the citys other major commercial corridors, including Dixie Highway, which recently received a $1 million grant from the Florida Department of Transportation for sidewalk, lighting and landscaping improvements. Resnick told The Pelican he also wants to focus on some of the citys western neighborhoods, improve Mickel Field and get a stalled apartment building project on Powerline Road nished and lled with tenants. The building, owned by the county, is supposed to become a lowincome housing development See WILTON MANORS RETRO on page 20Students from Wilton Manors Elementary School walked down Northeast 21 Court during the schools annual Walk for Peace in November. The walk is part of the schools Passport to Peace program which teaches students to adopt a positive attitude and character traits, including respect and tolerance.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, December 28, 2012 RoboticsContinued from page 1Creek who advises the schools award-winning robotics team. We need more engineers, scientists and mathematicians. This years tournament focused on how technology can serve humanity, particularly seniors. Past tournaments have dealt with the environment, transportation and nanotechnology. The course, which had miniaturized tasks constructed of LEGOs, revolved around challenges and activities seniors often encounter in their daily lives. Each team, using a small computer and LEGOs, had to build and program its own robot. And each robot had to be able to perform tasks including, fixing a chair, planting a garden, bowling, making a quilt, turning on a television, turning off an oven and choosing the right medicine bottle. Theyre all related to the tasks senior citizens have to deal with, said Victor Coto, a mechanical engineering student at University of Central Florida who served as head referee. The students interviewed senior citizens with an ailments to search for innovative way to help them function. Baresi Morse, a 5th grader at Silver Lakes Middle School in North Lauderdale, seems to already be thinking about engineering in relation to lifes challenges. Ive always liked engineering . I want to build stuff to make life easier. The competition, said McCrary, also develops each students collaboration, communication and research skills. Theyre programming robots, building robots and theyre also building their research skills. To get their robot to work, each team must master circumferences, fractions, gears, torque, ratios, computer engineering and other concepts and disciplines. Lascelles Reece, technology education teacher at Silver Lakes, says its a way to show students that those math, science and engineering concepts arent just found in books but also exist in the real world. Evan Learn, a 5th grader from American Heritage School in Plantation, says Its kind of cool to see your robot go into action. When it doesnt work youre a little disappointed. But it doesnt matter because you know you can fix it.

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20 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Open regular hours New Years Eve and New Years Day 954-427-7754 but city of cials are frustrated over the countys lack of progress. To help, Resnick said he will be giving tours of the city to newly elected Congresswoman Lois Frankel and State Senator Maria Sachs. Hopefully theyll be in positions to help, he said. The city has begun work on creating two Business Improvement Districts [BIDs] along Wilton Drive and Andrews Avenue. A BID, if approved by property owners within the BID boundaries, would allow the city to levy additional taxes on them. Right now, of cials see a BID as a way to fund sidewalk and lighting improvements on Andrews Avenue. A Wilton Drive BID could provide funds for the city to take control over Wilton Drive [from the state] and make it into a two-lane road similar to Las Olas Boulevard. With only two lanes, instead of four, being used by motorists, proponents of the takeover say a lot more parking spaces could be added along the street. But, with a takeover far from certain, this year commissioners voted to buy two properties on Northeast 8 Terrace to provide more parking on the north end of Wilton Drive. They purchased the land using part of the $1.1 million the city borrowed to create more parking. The total cost of buying the properties and paving them is $650,000. Those properties and a deal to use a third adjacent lot owned by Kids In Distress will allow the city to create a new parking lot with about 40 spaces. Newton said the lots should help alleviate some of the parking problems on that part of Wilton Drive. The other business-related problem on Wilton Drive is a shortage of diversity too many bars and restaurants, say of cials, and not enough businesses selling retail items like clothing and shoes. As an incentive, the city reduced its parking requirements for new and existing retail shops along Wilton Drive. Commissioner Ted Galatis said the city, like the rest of the country, is still struggling. But with property values up, developers showing interest in the city and most of the businesses still in business at the end of another year, Galatis added that things are headed in the right direction. Id say were still holding our own.Wilton Manors retroContinued from page 18

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The Pelican 21 Friday, December 28, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad the idea of a future rail station in mind.New recycling carts approvedIn June, the city was allocated $703,451 by the county Resource Recovery Board, or RRB, to be used for improvements in curbside recycling. Commissioners approved changes to the curbside program and authorized budget amendments to procure recycling carts. In order to obtain residents input into a future program, city staff implemented a recycling cart pilot program Oakland retroContinued from page 10with 55 residents taking part in an eight-week period. Overall residents favored carts over bins. Sixty-eight percent of respondents recommended the 65-gallon cart over the 95-gallon cart for recycling. Vice Mayor John Adornato and Commissioner Shari McCartney said they were ecstatic about the proposed cart recycling, and McCartney said she liked the pretty blue cart. Commissioners agreed on an option using 65-gallon blue carts for collecting residential curbside recyclables and continuing the current weekly collection schedule. As an optional service, residents could have 95-gallon recycling carts on request. Staff anticipated implementing the revised recycling program in January 2013, after securing the equipment and providing signi cant outreach.Millage rate raisedIn September, commissioners approved a millage rate of 6.3142, up 5 percent from the previous year. Use of fund balance was reduced from $3 million to $2.4 million or 23 percent of operating expenditures. Commissioners approved an increase in re assessment fee for residential units to $196 from $167. Solid waste and stormwater assessments remained the same at $255 and $72 per residence. With this budget we have stopped tapping reserves and implemented, as policy, that future budgets will be balanced without use of reserves, McCartney said. We were able to provide pay increases to city employees for the rst time in at least three years. I think we did a very good job of balancing the residents and citys needs and wants with the responsibility to be scally prudent. Commissioners also addressed pension reform. With an eye toward a solvent and economically sustainable future for the city, some changes have been made in municipal union members compensation and bene ts, McCartney said. For example, we offered a contract to our re ghters [at a recent See OAKLAND RETRO on page 24

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22 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 BOCA RATON SALON WANTED Hair Stylist Manicurist Pedicurist Facialist Massage. Salary Commission Or Rent 1 Month FREE. 954-415-4937. 12-28 SEEKING EXPERIENCED DECKHAND ON CHARTER BOAT. CALL 954-832-0890. 12-28 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTRELIABLE BILINGUAL LADY Seeks Position As Pet Sitter / Dog Walker (Responsible Animal LOVER) Pompano / E Ft Lauderdale Area. Giselle 954-942-8111. 1-4 HOME HEALTH AIDE Seeking Employment Alzheimers Tube Feeding Errands. References. More Information 954-226-2089. 12-28SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-11 CROWN MODING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 1-11 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954818-9538. 1-11 MIKE THE GARDENER The All American Yardman Yard And Garden Care Get Te Best For Less! Call 561-5436337. 1-18 MOORE PLUMBINGPLUMBING SERVICES-Big Jobs-Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 12-28 A N A S CLEAN (RESIDENTIAL) CLEANING In Pompano Lighthouse Point Deer eld. Dependable Thorough Experienced. References. Good Work For A Good Price. Please Call Ana 954-692-4691. 12-7 SANTAS HELPER NOT ENOUGH Time To Decorate Or Last Minute Cleaning For That Special Occasion Shop Wrap Or Pick-up Gifts Etc. Dont Stress Out!! Call Me Elf Ruth & Ill Be On My Way In My Sleigh. 954-8618856. 12-28 XPERTS CLEANING SERVICE Residential & Commercial. 10 Years Experience. References Honest Dependable. More Information Call 954-3760524. 1-4 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATIONPickup & Drop-Off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-234-0617. 1-4 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 12-28 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 1-1 1 ROOMS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH OFF Powerline & Hillsboro B lvd. $500 Per Month Includes Utilities. Non-Smoker. No Drugs. 1st/Last/Ref/ Background Check To Movein. NEGOTIABLE! 754-2148131. 12-28 SEASONAL RENTALLAUD BY THE SEA 55+. BEAUTIFUL 2/2 Furnished. Walk To Beach, Shops, Restaurants. Large Pool Nice Grounds. 3-5 Month Rental. 413-244-2807. 12-28 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38 x 13. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 12-28 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO CHARMING 2/1 Home. Asking $975 Per Month. 611 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 12-28 POMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,100 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-28

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The Pelican 23 Friday, December 28, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com or 954-7838700! Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO 2 / 1 1 Car Garage. Central Air Screened Porch. Double Shed With Sundeck. $124,900. Barbara Balistreri Realty 954-2637129. 12-28 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE / DEERFIELD Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny w/Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furnished. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $63,900. 561-372-9837. 1-4 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 1-4 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 1-11 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 1-4 POMPANO / MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 Avenue 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 12-28 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 Apt With Screened Room Available In Residential Neighborhood. $1,000 Month Yearly Lease. Call 609-638-1291. 1-4 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 NW NE 2/1 New $9752/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 12-28 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-28 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-7833723. 12-28 POMPANO DIXIE & COPANS WAREHOUSE For Rent. 2 Units 1-1640 Sq Ft 1 2080 Sq Ft With A/C Of ces Zoned 3M. Both With Overhead Doors. No Reasonable Offers Refused. 716-316-3690. 12-28

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24 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point As I sip a glass of eggnog mixed with a little special sauce, I think about all of the great fishing trips I had this year. The Texas swordfish trip stands alone in my mind. We set the record for the most swordfish ever caught on rod and reel in one day, 21. Than there was the bluefin tuna trip to Nova Scotia where we caught several fish over 1,000 lbs. I also returned to Costa Rica after a 20-year layoff. Its such a different country now; lots of Americans and plenty of fast food restaurants. I guess I would have loved it if I had not remembered that I had been there years What a great year it was for shingago, when nobody else was there. I think about all of the big swordfish that we caught locally and the people who got a chance to catch their first one. The elation and the smiles on their faces makes it all worth while. And than there were some great reef trips and even a few awesome snook trips on the Intracoastal. It has always been a goal of mine to fish one more day every year than the previous year. I havent counted it up but I think Ive accomplished my task or gotten pretty close. I have always been a goaloriented person. I generally set yearly goals for all aspects of my life, not just fishing. As for 2013, it should be very interesting and exciting. My first trip will be to Panama in January. Everybody goes there for the tunas and billfish. I am going there to try and catch a world record swordfish. Nobody goes there to catch swords, so I figured Id give it a shot. But world record or not, Im very lucky to be able to do all of the great things that I do. God has truly blessed me and I am going to get as much out of every day as I possibly can. As we get older and deal with the struggles in life, it is important to take time to connect with Mother Nature. The ocean has a funny way of making everything okay, if only for a while. When that rod bends over and the line starts peeling off the reel there is no way you can think about anything else, I guarantee it. Dont waste your life working so hard that you dont enjoy the roses. Make it a New Years resolution to fish at least twice a month. Good luck, tight lines and Happy New Year! impasse hearing] that signi cantly reduced future pension payment liabilities for the city while maintaining the status quo in bene ts for re ghters who are within seven years of retirement. I think this is another example of balance in our decision-making. Another major accomplishment was addressing water supply issues on the west side of the city, Sallee said. Old four-inch water lines were replaced in the Rock Island area, and work in Lakeside and Royal Palm Acres is nearing completion. Oakland retroContinued from page 21 1-2 Family Storytime at 6 p.m. at Wilton Manors Public Library, 500 NE 26 St. Children ages three and up are welcome. 954-390-2195. 1-5 Outdoor garden program for children at 10:30 a.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-786-2181. 1-5 Bird watch and walk at 8 a.m. at Deer eld Island Park. Boat to island leaves from Sullivan Park, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $3 per person. 954-357-5100.Sightings Continued from page 15

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The Pelican 25 Friday, December 28, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@yahoo. com LBTS retroContinued from page 9accomplishments during the year, a beautification project for North A1A was completed with enhanced landscape, decorative pavement and wider sidewalks and in some areas, the addition of street furniture and crosswalks. This project, Sasser points out, was funded almost entirely with state grant money. Mayor Roseanne Minnet also mentions streetscape improvements now under way on Bougainvilla just west of town hall as another major accomplishment. The drainage and streetscape project includes redoing the roadway and adding landscape island areas and drainage improvements from Pine Avenue south to the fire station. I would have liked to reclaim some of the swale area, but the residents spoke that they needed parking, Minnet said. Overall, the project is progressing as well as could be expected.Lower millage rateCommissioner Mark Brown noted that LBTS was one of the few municipalities in Broward County to lower its millage rate in 2012. The town also cut the water tax in half and lowered sewer rates by 10 percent. We now have the fourth lowest millage rate and the fourth lowest fire assessment in the county. Im proud that we are keeping the towns finances in order, Brown said. The beach is our last line of defense in town. It supports our tourism industry and is the last line of defense to protect properties from storm surge. We have an opportunity to get more sand on the beach, and Im pleased that we will be taking advantage of that opportunity, he said.Outsourcing evaluatedIn her recent report to commissioners, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann noted progress in several areas in improving government efficiency. She said that hiring Calvin Giordano for code enforcement has been very successful, and the minor savings projected have been achieved. Savings on a parking services contract were less than originally projected because the commission deferred a decision on the contract from December to March and decided to pay COBRA insurance coverage and a salary differential for town employees who transitioned to the contractor. Performance of the parking services contractor [Standard Parking] has been acceptable, Hoffmann wrote. Regarding parking, Sasser notes, We expanded our use of parking pay stations and added credit card acceptance, which generated $500,000 more in parking revenues while issuing significantly fewer parking tickets. Those funds are being used to expand parking facilities in 2013 at no cost to LBTS taxpayers. The town negotiated an extension to its contract with Choice Engineering for garbage collection and recycling at great advantage to the town in terms of service and cost, Hoffmann wrote. And they renegotiated a contract with AMR, the emergency medical services provider, and avoided automatic annual price escalations. Hoffmann credited Bud Bentley, assistant town manager, and Tony Bryan, finance director, for their work on contract negotiations. Dodd notes that significant changes are being seen in the towns recycling efforts. Wheelie bins rather than plastic tubs should have a dramatic effect in the tonnage that goes to the landfill and tonnage that gets recycled,he said. The commission also created a new brand image for the town with a pelican on an Adirondack chair and the tag line, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. RelaxYoure Here. Approving the brand was a major accomplishment, Minnet said. Shes also pleased with programs the town instituted to help hotels and businesses improve their properties. Plans and projects completed this year couldnt have happened without the tireless dedication of town management, staff and the support and input of our residents, Sasser said. There is excitement in the air in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea for all the right reasons, he says. We are implementing our plans while maintaining those core values we all hold dear and in common. We want to remain differentiated while improving our quality of life.

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26 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Lighthouse retroContinued from page 1and Earl Maucker. Coming into play the weekend before the voting was a mailing by the Broward Republican Executive Committee suggesting Lysengen was linked to union bosses, and Maucker, was an independent liberal. The mailing may have back red. Hasis, who said he had no knowledge of it, said his campaign had been highjacked. Vice Mayor Sandy Johnson, herself a Republican, said it was muckraking. Once the election furor died down, however, it became business as usual here and this quiet town produced few headlines. In May, Christy Keyes of cially became the citys librarian replacing Doreen Gauthier who retired in late 2011. Keyes, 41, is a resident of LHP and had been acting director for six months and before that, the youth librarian. She came to the job with a background in education and staf ng. Gauthier was further honored for her 33 years building the library into a rst-class institution at the 12th annual Keepers Days in February. She shared the spotlight with Mike McDace who was named a keeper posthumously after 34 years serving in police and code departments. LHP lost another uniformed of cer this year when re ghter Kevin Horkheimer died after 37 years of service. Taking honors as Community Advocate of the Year was Michelle Greene so named by the Childrens Home Society at a banquet that raised $120,000 for the agency and celebrated its 110th year. Greene is the well-known local businesswoman who founded the LHP Chamber of Commerce. Police Chief Ross Licata reported an uptick in arrests due to the addition of License Plate Recognition Cameras at the towns major intersections. The cameras pick up on stolen license tags and alert the police department. A number of arrests were made and stolen property recovered. Licata went on record to urge residents to be on the lookout for any suspicious activity or strangers in their neighborhoods. He especially warned residents not to open their doors to solicitors saying he rarely grants a permit for door to door salespersons. An unfamiliar face at the door often means someone is casing the house, the chief said. A sad note for many was the day the Fifth Avenue Grill closed. A popular eating and drinking spot since 1998, it fell victim to competition and hard times a family spokesperson said. The property was sold to a funeral home which will open shortly. Earlier, the commission followed a trend being established in other South Florida cities and lifted the pre-noon ban on the Sunday sale of alcohol. Restaurants can now serve alcohol on Sunday beginning at 10 a.m.

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Friday, December 28, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 52 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Looking back, 2012 in Deer eld Beach was a year of accomplishment with little controversyBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – 2012 brought a new sense of amicability to the city commission and an apparent ef ciency in government which led to fewer commission meetings in the last quarter of the year. Residents also saw the completion of a major upgrade to the city, the new amenities at the shing pier. 2012 is notable because achievement trumped acrimony and, midway through, commissioners tamped down their criticism of each other and the staff. When it comes to the year’s successes, the ongoing improvements See DEERFIELD RETRO on page 16Robotics competition fun for students, good for societyBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The battle for more science, math and engineering graduates is won in the classroom. And robotics instructor David Ellich knows fun activities and competitions are what help turn a love of those elds into lifelong careers that bene t students and society. On Dec. 15, some of those careers may have started as over 200 elementary and middle school students from across Broward County descended on Crystal Lake Middle School to test their robotics skills in the FIRST LEGO League Robotics Tournament. “This is how we get ‘em hooked early,” said Ellich, a robotics instructor at Atlantic Technical resident who teaches at Atlantic Technical Center in Coconut See ROBOTICS on page 19This city was happy with the dust, the cranes and contracts in 2012By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The redevelopment programs, referred to as the Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] were center stage for 2012. Mayor Lamar Fisher says the work of the CRA, both east and west, had a signi cant impact on the city in 2012, and it was hard to nd those who disagreed. Says Fisher, “Projects include the Atlantic Boulevard streetscape/ utilities improvements, Pompano Beach Boulevard streetscape/beach improvements, Harbor Village parking lot and faade improvements and the Pelican Retro Issue A look back at 2012 Politics stirred the pot as 2012 began its runBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point 2012 may be most remembered because two long-time commissioners lost their seats and voters may have been in uenced by an unlikely force. Tom Hasis and Susie Gordon, both veteran politicians here, lost their seats in March to newcomers Becky Lysengen Wilton Manors’ focus on economic development to extend beyond 2012By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Of cials here spent much of 2012 focused on improving the city’s economic situation for 2013, 2014 and beyond. In a series of moves that included buying land for more parking along See WILTON MANORS RETRO on page 18 See POMPANO RETRO on page 5 Jordan Latson, 11, [left] and Deandre Ferguson, 12, watch as their robot knocks down some miniature bowling pins at the FIRST LEGO League Robotics Tournament on Dec. 15 at Crystal Lake Middle School in Pompano Beach. Latson and Ferguson, students at Silver Lakes Middle School in North Lauderdale, joined other students at the tournament, which is seen by teachers and school of cials as a way to foster interest in math, science and engineering. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira] See LIGHTHOUSE RETRO on page 26

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2 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Art, Music & Entertainment12-28 – The State Ballet Theater of Russia presents: Cinderella at 7:30 p.m. at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, 2855 Coral Springs Drive. Tickets are $27 to $47. Visit www. coralspringscenterforthearts. com. 12-30 – Rick and Carla perform at 8 p.m. at The Manor, 2345 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Rick plays piano as Carla sings of a wide range of popular songs. Visit www.themanorcomplex.com. 1-9 – Legends of Doo Wop perform at 7:30 p.m. at Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Doors open Lodge, 240 W. Prospect Road, Oakland Park. Cost is $8 at the door. Cash bar. 954564-2357. 1-6 – Pianist Al Guastaeste performs at 4 p.m. at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $20 for members in advance and $25 for nonmembers at the door. Visit www.bocaraton. steinwaydealer.com. 1-6 – American Songbook Series featuring Marshall Turkin’s Classic Jazz Ensemble at 4 p.m. at Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Held in the Keith C. & Elaine Johnson World Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $75 to $160. Visit www.lynn.tix. com. 1-6 – The Music and Times of Irving Berlin at 4 p.m. at Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Held in the Keith C. & Elaine Johnson World Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $25 to $30. Visit www.lynn.tix. com. 1-13 – Sunday Matinee Music at Boca Raton Library. Jim Kovalcik Trio, featuring Jim Kovalcik on ute, Jason Hanley on guitar and Steve Jernigan on bass. 3 p.m. at the Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd. 561-239-1536.Auction/Sales1-7 – Charity auction at Java Boys, 2230 Wilton Drive Wilt o n Manors, at See SIGHTINGS on page 15at 6:30 p.m. Admission is $14 per person. 954-786-4111. 12-31 – Salute to Vienna at 8 p.m. at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, 2855 Coral Springs Drive. Performances by The Strauss Symphony of America; Andrs Dek, conductor; Marcela Cerno, soprano; Eduardo Aladrn, tenor. Tickets are $44 to $64. Visit www. coralspringscenterforthearts. com. 1-6 – Big Band Dance from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Elks Pompano Citi Centre was the setting last month for a classic car show featuring antiques, classics and vintage automobiles. To a backdrop of oldies tunes, car buffs and shoppers enjoyed the show, which was held to honor the men and women who serve in the military. Pictured is a supercharged roadster [foreground] and 1940 two-toned Ford pickup. [Photo by Judy Vik]

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The Pelican 3 Friday, December 28, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – In this beachfront town, the sea comes calling frequently and when it does it takes away sand, lots of it. So in 2012 beach erosion remained a big concern, heightened by a study released in March that promised no solution for the scouring that routinely occurs on the north beach. Vice Mayor Claire Schubert took the lead by contacting of cials at the Song of the sea continued to plague Hillsboro Beach in 2012Department of Environmental Protection and setting up meetings with administrators in Boca Raton to discuss a joint beach nourishment project. Later in the year, funds were approved for a new study of the Boca Inlet shoal, a source of sand for down drift beaches. And communication between the two cities, for the rst time, seems to be productive. The Pelican ’s news story in May that the town’s north beach appears doomed unless constantly renourished, attracted Beachgreen LLC, A Greenbeach scientist explains erosion control plan to Vice Mayor Claire Schubert. a group of scientists and business people who believe they have a product that will adjust the chemistry of beaches and halt sand loss. After Hillsboro’s beach consultant had no viable plan for erosion control, two Beachgreen principals came to town and met with Schubert to discuss their product and examine the shoreline. While they could point to successes in Cape Cod and New Jersey, they See HILLSBORO RETRO on page 15

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4 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The prize home and museum in this city has nally opened its historic doors to residents and tourists. Farmer Neal Sample built the house in 1916, and this month children from local schools helped dress the Sample-McDougald House for the holidays. Pompano Beach Elementary students with their teacher Claire Dellerson made New holiday tree at Sample-McDougald House gets retro lookornaments from pine cones and created red cardinals. Pompano Beach Middle School students offered handpainted ornaments with their teacher, Nadine Williams. Students at Pompano Beach High School created their own clay ornaments red from the kiln at school. Lee Waldo, curator at the house, calls the tree “glorious.” Two more trees add to the festive scheme at the house, a large tree in the living room is decorated with vintage bubble lights and the foyer tree is wrapped with antique lights from the 1930s. The Sample-McDougald House, 450 NE 10 St., dates back to the pioneer era of northern Broward County. The Sample family arrived in South Florida soon after the turn of the century. John M. Sample, the rst to settle in the Pompano area, purchased land from the Florida East Coast Railway prior to 1910. To view the holiday trees and other decorations, the Sample-McDougald House is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays. For information on public tours and facility rentals, email SMHevents@ yahoo.com or call 954 6915686.Decked with bubbles, baubles and birds, the trees at McDougald House are welcoming visitors.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, December 28, 2012 public/private partnerships highlighting the new Publix as the signature project. Also city, Fisher points out more CRA work that will be an engine starter for the city’s economy. Says Fisher, “Projects include the 731 MLK Building consisting of over 4,000 sq. ft. which will house our local businesses, the new The city’s parks are also getting a big star with a newly designed Greg Norman Signature Golf Course at Municipal Park. Delays have only built anticipation. City Commissioner Woody Poitier also cast his vote for the CRA as having Pompano RetroContinued from page 1 See POMPANO RETRO on page 7 stay tuned for the upcoming Pier development which includes 40,000 sq. ft. of retail/restaurants/tourist destination and, further north, a four star beachfront Marriott Resort and Hotel at Northeast 13 Street.” Residents and visitors alike had no problem lining up with shiny grocery carts at the new Atlantic Boulevard Publix. But shop-keepers just east of Publix still struggle to keep their doors open as the dust ies over the Harbor Village Shops. That dust won’t settle until the parking area has been lighted and landscaped. New facades will add to the glimmer of this new “go-to” spot. On the west side of the Broward County Transit Station, the redevelopment of the Ali Building in conjunction with a cultural activity center, the CRA Business Resource Center which provided over $900,000 in small business loans, faade programs in our Old Pompano and MLK corridors, the Bailey Hotel which will an integral part of our “Arts District,” our successful Green Market and the second Saturday’s festivals at the Annie Gillis Park. Also stay tuned for our city hall civic campus to include a regional library and cultural arts facility and nalizing a Collier City master plan focusing on the expansion of our parks.” a major impact on this city. And signi cantly on the west, Poitier’s district. “The major impact here,” says Poitier, “was getting the TOC approved which will open the door to other projects.” The TOC [Transit Oriented Corridor] allows for changes in land-use that offer exibility in housing and attracts public transportation. Says Poitier, “Developers have already picked up interest in the TOC for projects along Martin Luther King Boulevard. Pompano Beach is the place to be in 2013.”The new Atlantic Boulevard terminus will be people-friendly with plenty of shade, landscaping and public art.

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6 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 52 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & LettersDeveloper must make sure library is updated, parking is public To the editor, I have deep concerns about the way the Pompano Beach City Commission is handling the East CRA project. They are in the process of nalizing a contract with a developer who wants to develop the public parking area directly across from the pier. While I am in favor of having appropriate retail establishments come to our beach front to enhance the experience for tourists and residents, such as restaurants, cafes and boutique shops, what this developer wants is to rezone a large portion of public park land to build a hotel. There are already plenty of hotels, large and small along the A1A corridor, and they had to pay top dollar for their land. The residents don’t need a hotel; they need quality retailers, and ample, low cost, easily accessible parking. So, as the contract reads, this developer needs a land-use change and rezoning to enable him to build a hotel. However, he is not obligated to build a parking garage for the residents. Why in the world would city commissioners accept a contract that doesn’t require that the developer build a parking garage with space equal to what existed previous to their developing our public land regardless of whether the proposed hotel parcel is actually rezoned? The developer should also be required to replace the library with an updated media/community/welcome center. These should be the prerequisites for any developer who wants the privilege of building on this prime location. The fact that our commissioners are even considering this contract, despite its serious shortcomings for the citizens who own this property, sounds pretty shy to me. Donna Torrey Pompano BeachCitizen wants sheriff to reconsider Wiener’s removal To the Editor, I am writing as a citizen of Pompano Beach who loves my community. My wife Alicia and I moved to East Pompano from Weston in January 2007. It was our choice to be close to an oceanfront community as we are avid speed boaters. I volunteer my marketing expertise for the city’s Unity in the Community event and have served on its board. I am just one of a dedicated group of citizens that volunteer many many hours to this event. I am also very active in maintaining the area where I live. When we moved into our neighborhood we had drug and prostitution issues and I met Capt. Mick Wiener in Spring of 2007 and asked what we could do to combat these problems. Capt. Wiener gave me his cell, e-mail address and asked me to report such instances to him and that he would elevate patrols. I did just that and in time, we cleaned up the area. My calls never went to voicemail jail. I am writing to express my sadness and sense of loss of a wonderful police of cer, Capt. Wiener. I can understand that a newly elected sheriff will want a command structure loyal to him. It happens. But at the community “street level,” to an of cer that was very committed to the community that he actually lives in, is a grave injustice and shows no concern for the citizens of Pompano Beach. Capt. Wiener did nothing wrong and served Lamberti, his sheriff at the time. He has told me that he was willing to put the same loyalty and dedication to [Sheriff-elect Scott] Israel. I think you all can agree Capt. Wiener was a strong friend of the city. I urge all of you to contact your city commissioners so with a collective voice they can ask the new sheriff to consider re-hiring Capt. Wiener. Paul A. Laya Pompano Beach The public’s safety is topic for special DB meetingDeer eld Beach – City commissioners will meet in special session Wednesday, Jan. 3, 6:3 p.m. to consider establishing an of ce of public safety. Of cial con rmation of the agenda could not be obtained by press time due to city hall being closed for Christmas, but Commissioner Joe Miller said after he broached the subject of safety in Deer eld Beach schools, Mayor Peggy Noland called the meeting. Noland could not be reached for comment. According to Miller the agenda includes discussion of emergency management and infrastructure security. Last week, newly-elected sheriff Scott Israel announced that he is terminating Deer eld’s police chief Pete Sudler. Sudler is one of 28 highranking BSO employees being red by Israel who takes command Jan. 8.By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – This Christmas, over 100 boys and girls served by Kids In Distress [KID] will be getting a new set of wheels. Earlier this month, Courtyard Caf owners Nick Berry and Shawn Bombard and their supporters donated 103 shiny, brand-new bicycles to Kids In Distress. “We easily doubled what we donated last year,” said Berry, who has been organizing the bike drive for the last four years. “The community loves my business and I love giving back.” Said Bombard, “We’re going to have to do even better next year.” With its main campus located in Wilton Manors, Kids In Distress’ goal is to help children, from newborns to the age of 15, who are abused or neglected. The campus houses up to 24 children at a time. And along with the bikes, there also helmets, locks and other Christmas presents. “For several of the children we serve, this will be the rst bike Over 100 brand new bicycles wait in Nick Berry’s backyard to be delivered to children on Christmas. Christmas donation to Kids In Distress tops 100 bicycles they’ve ever received,” said Brittany Soule, marketing manager for Kids In Distress. “They now have something to open up on Christmas morning and they’ll have a bike to call their very own.” Donating the majority of bicycles were Tony Dee, owner of Wilton Manors’ Tropics Restaurant; Lauderdale-By-The-Sea residents John and Cheryl McCully; Marsha Milot and Jim Sutton and Terry Syrcle, Berry’s former business partner. Others, including Mark Malmstrom, Bob Gagnon and Timmy Coyne, helped assemble the bikes and get them ready to ride. Cheryl McCully said, in light of the tragedy in Connecticut, this year’s donation is even more special. “It’s people like this that make the bene t so worthwhile,” said Berry. “It just gives you that drive.” Syrcle, who used to co-host the toy drive with Berry, said Kids In Distress has always been the bene ciary. “To realize that there are kids that have no family or come from an abusive family, it tears at the heart. We’ve been so blessed. We need to give back,” said Syrcle.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, December 28, 2012 CRA co-directors, Kim Briesemister and Chris Brown, had no problem picking up the pulse of this city’s residents [they are party monsters.] Pre-construction activities often included a food truck, music, art or food event to assist locals in beating a path to a soon-to-be new destination part of the city. It did not take long for the denizens to nd the new location of the Green Market, partly because it cannot be avoided on the corner of Cypress and East Atlantic. The move tripled the market’s size and allure. Commissioner Barry Dockswell, whose district has been the focus of the CRA, expressed elation at what he calls the “rebirth and re-awakening of Pompano Beach.” Says Dockswell, “You Pompano RetroContinued from page 5can see it in the projects now beginning to come to fruition in the East CRA. You can see it in the projects now being designed and developed in the West CRA. You can see it in the capital improvements and economic development efforts in several parts of town. You can see it in the city’s new logo and branding efforts. You can see it in the city’s beginning efforts to focus on tourism. You can see it in the city’s dramatically improving ratings on delivery of services as measured by surveys of residents.” And as others have equally proclaimed, Dockswell gives credit to “a city commission which is dedicated to the re-vitalization of our city. We have a city manager who has led substantial reorganizations and visible improvements at city hall. And we have a community redevelopment team providing highly effective economic development expertise and leadership.” Commissioner Charlotte Burrie cast her vote for the CRA, but in her district, she had more lauds. “Thanks to community policing and a strong BSO, we had safer neighborhoods. The city also passed a new law regarding rental homes, something I had worked on for months. Now rental homes must be licensed and must be up to code.” Burrie added that after new sewer lines are completed in the Highlands, beauti cation projects can begin.” But joy was absent in the West CRA rendering of historic downtown.hearts of many who felt they had lost a good friend when Sheriff-elect Scott Israel announced that BSO Captain Milton Wiener would no longer serve the city. And there were mixed emotions when news hit that Major William Knowles would also leave. Israel announced he was to be promoted and would be working at BSO headquarters in Fort Lauderdale. In March, the mayor’s seat will be open for election along with Commissioners Burrie and Poitier. The normal two-year terms for the commissioners will be cut short in November 2014 when the city will change local elections to coincide with the national elections. Pompano Beach had a ne year as a city on the rise. Property values continued to move in the right direction, and with the winter season here shopkeepers are happy.

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8 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Tree giveawayOakland Park – Two free trees will be given out per Oakland Park household on Saturday, Jan. 26 starting at 9 a.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Supplies are limited and trees will be given away as long as supplies last. Residents can choose from up to six tree species. To qualify, proof of Oakland Park residency must be provided. The young trees will be in three-gallon containers for easy transport and planting. Call 954-6304511.Tennis tournamentWilton Manors – The Annual Island City Open takes place on Saturday, Jan. 26 starting at 8 a.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. The tournament consists of men’s and women’s categories and participants can compete as singles, doubles or mixed doubles at A, B and C skill levels. Cost is $25 per person, $30 per team and includes a shirt, awards, refreshments and a barbeque. Call Donna Kocyba at 954-390-2132 to register.Tour of Deer eld IslandDeer eld Beach – A tour of Deer eld Island takes place Sunday, Jan. 27 at 10 a.m. The tour will focus on the island’s colorful history. The 53.4-acre island, which wasn’t an actual island until 1961, was previously know as “Capone’s Island” even though famous gangster Al Capone never owned it. Space is limited and preregistration is required. The boat to the island leaves from Sullivan Park, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. Cost is $3 per person. Call 954-357-5100. Briefs Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Business outlookBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFAthena By The Sea boasts new look, new menu itemsAthena By The Sea brings with it some hot new menu items and a couple of really cool features. After months of being closed for renovations, the LauderdaleBy-The-Sea – The grand re-opening of Greek restaurant 13-year-old Athena By The Sea held its grand reopening on Tuesday. “We completely redesigned the whole restaurant and added some new menu items. It was just time to redo the restaurant,” said owner Louis Marchelos, who imported Greek stone to incorporate into the new look. “We relocated our kitchen to the back of the restaurant and put the bar in the front [making it an open air restaurant],” said Marchelos. And the bar is where the cool new features can be found. “We have a frost rail system on the bar and it keeps the customers’ cocktails cold,” said Marchelos. And for those looking for a cold glass of liquor or other spirits, the shot vodka system keeps liquors at zero degrees. “We offer our customers the coldest martini in all of South Florida,” Marchelos said. Along with new menu items like BBQ ribs, prime pork rib eye and oysters, the wine selection has increased to 40 selections and nightly entertainment is coming after the commencement of the new year. “We have our Greek wines and wines throughout the world,” said Marchelos. Call 954-771-2900.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Toby Smith is knowledgeable, articulate and clearly very enthusiastic about his own business. He says, “When you buy a Bobcat you can be your own boss.” He explains his claim. “With its hundreds of attachments a Bobcat Skid Steer Loader can turn a person into an excavating contractor, a plumber, an electrician, landscaper, tree farmer, demolition contractor and much more.” The manager and part owner of Bobcat of Broward, located at 1108 Hammondville Road in Pompano Beach, says “I’ve known some of our customers since I was 12 years old. My dad, Donald Smith, bought a Bobcat dealership in Palm Beach in 1978. That dealership, Smith Brothers Contracting Equipment, Inc. Bobcat of Broward the destination for landscapers, construction companies and those who do it themselves is now known to the public as Bobcat of Broward and Bobcat of Palm Beach. We’re still family owned and run by my mother Lucy Smith, brother Simon Smith and me. We’ve grown into two very large, Bobcat super stores where customers can buy, sell, rent equipment and parts, large and small. And we service that equipment. He continues. “Thousands of Bobcats are in use in Broward and Palm Beach Counties by our local Toby Smith [Right] is very proud of the 33-year-old family business which he says offers equipment solutions for every landscape job, large or small. Bobcat of Broward is a dealer destination to buy, sell, rent or service equipment and parts. [Left] Equipment for major or small jobs is available for on location use. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger]See BOBCAT on page 14

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The Pelican 9 Friday, December 28, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – Residents and business owners will begin to see the results of months of Groundwork was laid in 2012 for a new image in Lauderdale-By-The-Seaplanning as major projects get under way on Commercial Boulevard, both east and west of A1A, in the spring of the new year. Design work is nearly complete for streetscape and drainage projects on Commercial Boulevard east of A1A and for the area west of A1A from Seagrape Drive to the Intracoastal Waterway bridge. The eastern project is aimed at transforming the commercial district into an inviting public space with wider sidewalks, plazas, shade trees and a clear view of the ocean. The project eliminates parking on Commercial east of El Mar Drive but allows vehicle access to the pier and Aruba’s. “After years of having professional studies and master plans produced, only to sit and collect dust, the town has begun to execute and implement on those strategies [for downtown redevelopment],” Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said. He said it has been “a complete team effort with many hours put in by the town administration and staff to be able to accomplish so much this year.”Teamwork and harmony“The single biggest achievement is the continuation of teamwork and harmony that has resulted in the commission and staff working together to make important decisions that will affect the future of the town,” Commissioner Stuart Dodd says. “There is a great sense of “fairness” and the desire to get things done. He points to the hours of discussion over sewer rates so that charges re ect the costs and the hard negotiations over redevelopment plans for the downtown. Among otherSee LBTS RETRO on page 25

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10 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park – The decisions city commissioners made to hire a consulting rm and listen to their recommendations resulted in visible progress in redeveloping and reinvigorating the downtown. In February, they approved hiring Redevelopment Management Associates [RMA] to provide a marketing and business attraction program for the downtown and implement a culinary brand for the city. Earlier, the commission hired RMA to provide services to develop Oakland Station, the former Sears warehouse, as the culinary anchor; to attract proposals to develop property at the south gateway to Main Street; and consult with Broward County on their Redevelopment Capital Program [RCP] funding and provide ongoing redevelopment advice. “When we brought in RMA, we gave them a big job to do with a relatively small amount of money,” Mayor Anne Sallee said. “Already a new parking lot has been created,” just north of city hall, “where an eyesore building stood.” Groundbreaking took place recently for a downtown plaza and Funky Buddha Brewery at the Oakland Station building. The brewery is expected to open by the end of February. When RMA of cials rst talked about a vision of the area as a culinary center, Sallee said, “it all made sense. When they listed what we already had and the areas available, it was like all of the puzzles fell into place. They came in with a new set of eyes.” Oakland Park Station is at the north end of Main Street. Now two culinary schools are interested in the south end, in a building once owned by the Catholic archdiocese. She says it’s exciting now when the city holds meetings, and people they haven’t seen before are coming and saying they’re thinking of locating their business in Oakland Park. “What we’re doing for redevelopment is an enormous step forward,” says Vice Mayor John Adornato. “Bringing on RMA, reinvigorating Main Street and getting serious about bringing new development into the city” is a major accomplishment. “We made a decision to move forward with the culinary arts theme and to put our money where our mouth is and make things happen. We have community and business support, and nothing is more important than that,” Adornato said. “Engaging RMA and implementing their Culinary Arts District theme -will prove to be one of the most signi cant acts taken by Oakland Park,” said Commissioner Shari McCartney. The commission secured funding to get the project started and RMA and [Oakland Park] Main Street have worked together to attract culinary-related merchants and industries.” In July, commissioners authorized an agreement with RMA to complete a general review of the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency plan, the Redevelopment RCP and develop a strategic plan for the next ve years. In September, commissioners approved a contract with RMA for $254,615 to market the new culinary district. And it calls for another $150,000 for incentives.City buys two propertiesIn May, commissioners agreed to purchase the Schnell property at 1229 NE 37 St., just north of city hall, for $320,000. The building will be kept as is until it’s needed for parking or future development. Commissioners also approved purchasing the Perez property at 1110 NE 34 Court for $767,500. The Perez property, at Northeast 34 Court and Dixie Highway, will be demolished during the rst quarter of the new year and replaced with a plaza area with seating and landscaping “to re ect the look of Northeast 12 Avenue and carry it across Dixie Highway,” Sallee said. Railway intersection improvements will be made at that same intersection with Oakland Park preps for its culinary arts districtSee OAKLAND RETRO on page 21Of cials celebrate a ground-breaking in the culinary arts district.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, December 28, 2012 SPECIAL TO THE PELICANThe story of Sailor’s Valentines evokes romance majestic sailing ships and long sea voyages, adventures in the new world, and daydreams of loved ones across wide oceans. In the early 1800s British Seamen traveled the world, gathering goods to bring back to England. Along with whale oil, spices, silks, sugar and other goods, ships would bring back seashells from the Paci c. The English ladies of that era bought these shells, making fancy tables and knick-knacks with them. Thus, in England the Sailor’s Valentine rst was conceived, with octagonal boxes created to house the fancy creations. The octagonal shape, lending itself to even partitions and symmetry of design, was adopted for the valentines. From England, the making of the Valentines moved to Barbados via an enterprising B. H. Belgrave. He and his brother migrated from England and began a sea curio shop on the island with crafts from the local ladies. He had cases made and patterns to be copied. He also sold specimen shells, crabs, preserved local sh and other Sailor’s Valentines at Broward Shell Show coming in January sea creatures. Sailors, gone for a long time and knowing Barbados was one of the ports on their way home, often bought these Valentines as souvenirs. The typical valentines of today have speci c criteria. There are single Valentines and double valentines and if one is to win an award, no empty space can show on the bottom of the Valentine. The center is rounded with a theme of hearts, owers or a love saying. Flowers made from shells or other natural sea objects are made and inserted and colored foil paper is shaped to form partitions on the bottom of the case. As breathtaking as the beauty of these Valentines are, one is hard pressed to actually describe them. Today, antique and reproduced “Sailor’s Valentines” are sought for their beauty and uniqueness. The Valentines of today had a revival in the 1960s. This revival has increased in interest and artistry since then particularly on Florida’s West Coast, some Valentines selling for upwards of $20,000. David Rhyne is the recipient of two 2012 Broward Shell Show for Sailor’s Valentine along with other awards. His creations are collected by people from around the world. David attended The Ringling School of Art, majoring in illustration. After moving to New York City in 1981, he and his wife, Victoria, started their own design business creating shoe Shell magic Patience and an eye for detail make these shell valentines unique. [Right] Marie Antoinette, dressed in ne shells is the centerpiece for this valetine. [Photos courtesy of the Broward Shell Club]See SHELL SHOW on page 15

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12 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Hillsboro RetroContinued from page 3went away unsure of how to x the problem here. The story also spurred a group of citizens to form an ad hoc committee to investigate erosion control methods and their research continues. When Tropical Storm Sandy passed by, the north beach again suffered huge sand losses. In March, the Barefoot Mailman statue at the Hillsboro Inlet Lighthouse was re-dedicated after being restored by its sculptor Frank Varga and the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society hosted a birthday party for the lighthouse, its 105th. The lighthouse generated more news when conservationists, concerned that its beam was a hazard for sea turtles, asked that the light be dimmed. Boaters reacted swiftly saying the beam, reportedly the strongest anywhere and casting its light 28 miles to sea, was necessary for navigation. The Hillsboro Inlet is surrounded by coral reefs and known for its tricky currents. Although the Coast Guard announced no of cial decision, the beam remains turned on. Another idea that so far has not caught on was broached by developer John Kennelly, owner of 11 acres on the ocean and Intracoastal Waterway. In the past Kennelly has presented plans for both a townhome community and single-family residences and marina, going so far as to plan a pedestrian tunnel under A1A to connect his two properties. This time, his representatives sent letters to homeowners suggesting there could be interest in building a boutique, 5star hotel on the site if commissioners would grant the necessary variances. The idea drew a mixed response from the public and has not yet resurfaced. Using county funds awarded for recycling, the town held its rst Earth Day in April built around a beach cleanup and barbecue at town hall. Despite nasty weather, lots of refuse was removed from the beaches and A1A right of way. Still unresolved is the matter of the Island House Bridge which needs repairs. The bridge which crosses a slough separating the condominium from A1A was deeded to the town in 1966. Because it is used primarily by the residents of Island House, city commissioners were reluctant to charge the taxpayers for its repair. On several occasions they tried to convince the condo board that the work could be done cheaper and faster by the residents. The condo board says the city should have maintained a fund for the repairs. An agreement of sorts was reached with the city offering to put up $160,000. So far, no word from the Island House Board. Late in the year, the town was noti ed it was being sued for its open records policy. A Lakeland man led suit after he requested copies of all the emails sent to the mayor in April and was told by the town clerk to use a request form provided by the town. The lawsuit contends that neither the Florida Constitution nor the Florida Public Records Act require a form to be led. The lawsuit is one of dozens led by a Joel Chandler, or his associates, contesting public record laws. In most instances, he has been successful. The town did win one court case. Police of cer Jim Woolsey had led an age discrimination law suit in federal court claiming he was denied a promotion because of his age. Woolsey who is now 54 was demoted from his rank of captain by Chief Tom Nagy, but the judge dismissed Woolsey’s complaint saying it showed insuf cient grounds. Woolsey is appealing the ruling in appellate court. In July, the town rejected its longstanding solid waste collector Waste Management and negotiated a contract with Choice Engineering at what appears to be a considerable saving. The commission is actively encouraging residents to recycle, an initiative that began earlier this year.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, December 28, 2012

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14 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 governments, industry and private contractors.” Bobcat of Broward offers its clients a showroom which is a treasure of parts and needs such as tires, engines, attachments and small engine parts for lawn and garden tools and behind the retail front is a huge yard lled with large excavating equipment to buy new or used or to rent.” “We are known for our anchor product, Bobcat skid-steer loader which was invented in 1958. With its home base in North Dakota, the Bobcat is the number one brand of compact equipment sold worldwide. Our huge yard in back offers many models plus an array of attachments. We also carry Bob-Cat mowers which come with a two-year commercial or a ve-year consumer warranty. There’s a lifetime warranty on pro decks. We stock Stihl power and hand tools from Germany. The Stihl chain saw is manufactured in Virginia. We have trimmers, hedgers, blowers, Bandit tree chippers and stump grinders. In our large back yard we have loaders, excavators, and construction equipment to buy or rent.” The large selection of tire options for heavy duty applications includes severe duty, super oat, turf and sand up to 12-ply rating. “Our tires are ureathane lled,” says Toby. He adds, “We do a big business on small engine parts for all major brands. Kawasaki Gas engines are the preferred 4-cycle power for your mower. They come with a two-year commercial warranty. Of course we are authorized to service them. We not only offer our customers rentals, repairs, and sales of new and used equipment, but we also buy used equipment, trucks, trailers and we accept tradeins.” Bobcat is the place for Doosan/Ingersoll Rand Air Compressors, generators and light towers.” One of Toby’s favorite attachments is the Forest Cutter which he uses to clear land. He describes it as “ a seven-foot wide stump grinder that practically eats whole trees. We have three for rent and they are always kept busy. There are hundreds of attachments and options available. Our top sellers are Pallet Forks, concrete/asphalt platers, hydraulic breaker, hammers, rock drilling augers and trenchers. They all run on Bobcat Diesel Engines. The Pelican spoke with a few long time customers of Bobcat. They were too busy working their equipment for long conversations, but their satisfaction was clearly stated. Mario Cocuzzo, Mario’s Bobcat & Son, said, “I’ve been doing business with Bobcat of Broward and Palm Beach for over 18 years. Their service is good. They’re always available when you need them. I’ve found them to be very much responsible people who deliver what’s promised.” Edgar Goodrum owns a Bobcat S130. He’s been a customer for 15 years and says, “They’re good people and the only people I’ll deal with because I have found them to be both honest and fair.” Open Monday to Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Stop in or call 954-763-9880 or visit the web site at www.bobcatofbroward. comBobcatContinued from page 8 Call to artistsLighthouse Point Artists of all mediums are invited to attend the Call to New Artists for acceptance into the 19th Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition set for March 10 at the Lighthouse Point Yacht & Racquet Club. Artists are invited to take samples of their works to the Yacht Club Jan. 24 from 2 to 5 p.m. The committee will determine what goes in the the show. Call Becky Cerino-Days at 954-408-6410 or Nancy Cohen at 954-806-4749.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, December 28, 2012 At a winter antiques show in New York City, David saw his rst Sailor’s Valentine and decided to try the art of valentine making. His love of shells and beautiful objects made creating Sailor’s Valentines a perfect marriage for him. Since entering the 2002 Sanibel Shell Show as a rst-time exhibitor, David has won many blue ribbons and best in show awards at the Sanibel, Philadelphia and Sarasota Shell Shows and Martha Stewart featured him on her show at the 2007 Sanibel Shell Show. David now lives in Sarasota, Florida and works in his studio creating beautiful works of art. His work can be seen at www. davidrhyne.com The Broward shell Show will be exhibiting and selling sailor’s valentines and shell art at the 48th Annual Broward Shell Show. January 19-20, 2013 Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St, Pompano Beach. Admission and parking are free. Call 305-4674412 or visit.www. browardshellclub.orgShell showContinued from page 117 p.m. Antiques, artwork, paintings, sculptures, furniture and other items will be available. Proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Email ajcrossconsulting@gmail. com. 1-12 – Yard sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Vendors wanted. 954-390-2115 or 954-3902130. 1-26 & 1-27 – Nautical Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St. Admission is $5. Children 12 and under are free. Visit www.nautical eamarket.com.Books & Lectures1-6 – Book discussion on chapters one and two of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Color Blindness by Michelle Alexander at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 954531-1928 1-9 – Readers at Sundown at 6 p.m at Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 St. This month’s title: The House at Riverton by Kate Morton. 954-9466398. 1-13 – “What would Martin Luther King do?” discussion at 11 a.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park, 33309. Free lunch. 954-5311928. 1-14 – Annual meeting of the Friends of the Century Plaza Leon Slatin Library at 10:30 a.m. at the library, 1856A W Hillsboro Blvd, Deer eld Beach. 954-3577740.Children12-28 – Showing of “Arthur Christmas” at sundown at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000, N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. 954-6304500. SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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16 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 made by the Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] take center stage. The $5 million construction of the shing pier entrance, restaurant, restroom, bait shop and observation deck was completed earlier this month. This CRA project encountered a few snags and went over its original budget, but the result is public oceanfront space that can’t be matched along this coast. Securing a vendor for the restaurant, however, proved to be complicated. After the bid proposal was reworked, the potential vendors had their bids opened and rated. Two led protests, and when that was settled, the commission deadlocked on the lease holder. Another meeting resolved that question, but the vendor not chosen led a protest which was denied last week by the commission. Presumably, contract negotiations will now go forward and what promises to be rst class food service will be available in a few months. In the meantime, the “T” at the end of the pier suffered damage in Tropical Storm Sandy and awaits repairs which may be months in coming. But most of the pier’s 935 feet are operational. The CRA put the nishes touches to the parking lot upgrades in The Cove Shopping Center and turned its attention to developing Sullivan Park into a recreational area with a marine theme. The project is being jump started to take advantage of a grant from the Florida Inland Navigational District and will be nanced by a $4 million bond issue. Also ready to go are infrastructure improvements – paving, drainage, lighting – in the residential area known as Cove Gardens between the shopping center and the Publix Shopping Center. This too is a CRA project. One initiative that did not succeed was upgrades to the main beach parking lot. While staff thought a small amphitheatre and some permanent seating would enhance the area’s value as a performance venue, the public wasn’t so sure and those plans have been shelved. Similarly an enhancement to Constitution Park, a small stage for performances, was shot down by the board that controls the Deer Creek Homeowners’ Association. The commission spent considerable time early in the year redrawing the zoning rules for industrial acreage in the city’s NW sector. The result pleased residents who live in Independence Bay and The Waterways because certain land uses such as junk yards, metal shredding operations and biomedical waste facilities were eliminated from the code. An issue that found wide support this year was the “All In” recycling program which provided homeowners with rolling bins for their recyclables as well as bonus points, redeemable at local businesses. In the good guys department, the Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club, See DEERFIELD RETRO on page 17 Ocean views, refreshments and shade made the new pier a favorite spot to enjoy Deer eld retroContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, December 28, 2012 Deer eld retroContinued from page 16collaborating with Scholastic Books, Inc., agreed to fund a reading room at Deer eld Park Elementary School, the rst of its kind in the country. The Broward Sheriff’s Department did its share of good work too. In October it held its rst banquet recognizing dozens of “community heroes” whose volunteer efforts make this city a better place to live. And using money from the Law Enforcement Trust Fund, the local BSO partnering with FAU, endowed full scholarships to the university for three worthy Deer eld Beach students. The concept was lauded by FAU President Dr. Mary Jane Saunders for being a rst. Sheriff Al Lamberti came to town in November to announce the arrest of nine youth football coaches on gambling charges. Although one local coach was among those being held, the city was lauded for initiating Level2 back ground checks for volunteers working with kids on public property which took questionable people off the elds. The city tightened its regulations making it much more dif cult for ‘for-pro t’ organizations to operate here. On a positive note, in April this city completed its “stimulus” project, construction of the Dixie Highway Flyover built with $40 million in federal funds. This improvement to Dixie Highway came after 25 years of planning and replanning by state road department of cials stymied each time by lack of money. In May, the city’s housing authority board of directors lled a vacancy created when longtime director Pam Davis left the city in January to work in Gainesville. Davis’s replacement, Nadine Jarmon, who came here from New Orleans, has kept the agency out of the headlines. As Father Time tears the last page from the 2012 calendar, the New Year Babe has politics on its mind. With the national election and all its SNAFUs in Florida still a vivid memory, voters here will return to the polls in March to decide on two commissioners and a mayor. One seat, District 3, serving Crystal Lake and Century Village, is vacant due to term limits, leading to speculation as to who will run there. Both the mayor and the District 4 commissioner have said they will seek re-election.

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18 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Wilton Drive, the creation of an economic development coordinator position and a bid to develop the Hagen Park/City Hall parking lot, of cials have planted a lot of seeds they hope will bear economic fruit well after this year ends. “We’ve started some things and planned some things but there’s still a lot that has to be done,” said Commissioner Tom Green. “Giving all credit where credit is due, I think it was very dif cult [for the city to get economic development going in previous years] because of the economy,” said Krishan Manners, president/ CEO of the Wilton Manors Development Alliance [WMDA]. One of the rst moves was the addition of Randy Welker, economic development coordinator. The city has also decided to hire an outside rm to market its parks and recreation facilities and attract more attention to events like the annual Stonewall street festival, which brings tens of thousands of visitors to the city each June. “I think they’ve made a good start this year, especially hiring Randy. I’m already working with him on a few things,” said Manners. One project Manners and Welker are working on is wooing a major new employer into the city. Manners declined to say which company is interested but he estimates that it could mean at least 40 high-paying jobs. And helping to fund Welker’s job and the marketing position, or at least make it easier to fund them, was an increase in the city’s taxable values. The 3.63 percent jump in values led to an additional Wilton Manors retroContinued from page 1$140,000 in revenue. And after four years of decline, Mayor Gary Resnick called the increase a “marked turnaround.” “It’s all general fund money but lets just say it adds to the stability of the city with planning and moving forward with some projects. It’s always better than having to cut,” he said. “I fully expect 2013 to be a good year,” said Manners. And that could mean a good year in 2014 if the residential development, proposed for the Hagen Park/City Hall site, is good for the city and commissioners vote in favor of it. Earlier this month, the city’s request for bids to develop its four-acre Hagen Park/City Hall parking lot drew one interested party, IBI Group, a Pompano Beach architecture and engineering rm. Although of cials were hoping for a hotel, IBI has proposed a mixed-use residential and commercial development. If approved, it could be nished by the end of 2014 and have a positive impact on Wilton Drive’s merchants by placing possibly hundreds of new customers within walking distance of their businesses. Other developers say they intend to develop the Center for Spiritual Living site at 1550 NE 26 St. and the former trailer park property on Northeast 24 Street. But although Wilton Drive has received much of the city’s attention, of cials say they’re still working on the city’s other major commercial corridors, including Dixie Highway, which recently received a $1 million grant from the Florida Department of Transportation for sidewalk, lighting and landscaping improvements. Resnick told The Pelican he also wants to focus on some of the city’s western neighborhoods, improve Mickel Field and get a stalled apartment building project on Powerline Road nished and lled with tenants. The building, owned by the county, is supposed to become a lowincome housing development See WILTON MANORS RETRO on page 20Students from Wilton Manors Elementary School walked down Northeast 21 Court during the school’s annual Walk for Peace in November. The walk is part of the school’s Passport to Peace program which teaches students to adopt a positive attitude and character traits, including respect and tolerance.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, December 28, 2012 RoboticsContinued from page 1Creek who advises the school’s award-winning robotics team. “We need more engineers, scientists and mathematicians.” This year’s tournament focused on how technology can serve humanity, particularly seniors. Past tournaments have dealt with the environment, transportation and nanotechnology. The course, which had miniaturized tasks constructed of LEGOs, revolved around challenges and activities seniors often encounter in their daily lives. Each team, using a small computer and LEGOs, had to build and program its own robot. And each robot had to be able to perform tasks including, fixing a chair, planting a garden, bowling, making a quilt, turning on a television, turning off an oven and choosing the right medicine bottle. “They’re all related to the tasks senior citizens have to deal with,” said Victor Coto, a mechanical engineering student at University of Central Florida who served as head referee. The students interviewed senior citizens with an ailments to search for innovative way to help them function. Baresi Morse, a 5th grader at Silver Lakes Middle School in North Lauderdale, seems to already be thinking about engineering in relation to life’s challenges. “I’ve always liked engineering . I want to build stuff to make life easier.” The competition, said McCrary, also develops each student’s collaboration, communication and research skills. “They’re programming robots, building robots and they’re also building their research skills.” To get their robot to work, each team must master circumferences, fractions, gears, torque, ratios, computer engineering and other concepts and disciplines. Lascelles Reece, technology education teacher at Silver Lakes, says it’s a way to show students that those math, science and engineering concepts aren’t just found in books but also exist in the real world. Evan Learn, a 5th grader from American Heritage School in Plantation, says “It’s kind of cool to see your robot go into action. When it doesn’t work you’re a little disappointed. But it doesn’t matter because you know you can fix it.”

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20 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Open regular hours New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day 954-427-7754 but city of cials are frustrated over the county’s lack of progress. To help, Resnick said he will be giving tours of the city to newly elected Congresswoman Lois Frankel and State Senator Maria Sachs. “Hopefully they’ll be in positions to help,” he said. The city has begun work on creating two Business Improvement Districts [BIDs] along Wilton Drive and Andrews Avenue. A BID, if approved by property owners within the BID boundaries, would allow the city to levy additional taxes on them. Right now, of cials see a BID as a way to fund sidewalk and lighting improvements on Andrews Avenue. A Wilton Drive BID could provide funds for the city to take control over Wilton Drive [from the state] and make it into a two-lane road similar to Las Olas Boulevard. With only two lanes, instead of four, being used by motorists, proponents of the takeover say a lot more parking spaces could be added along the street. But, with a takeover far from certain, this year commissioners voted to buy two properties on Northeast 8 Terrace to provide more parking on the north end of Wilton Drive. They purchased the land using part of the $1.1 million the city borrowed to create more parking. The total cost of buying the properties and paving them is $650,000. Those properties and a deal to use a third adjacent lot owned by Kids In Distress will allow the city to create a new parking lot with about 40 spaces. Newton said the lots should help alleviate some of the parking problems on that part of Wilton Drive. The other business-related problem on Wilton Drive is a shortage of diversity – too many bars and restaurants, say of cials, and not enough businesses selling retail items like clothing and shoes. As an incentive, the city reduced its parking requirements for new and existing retail shops along Wilton Drive. Commissioner Ted Galatis said the city, like the rest of the country, is still struggling. But with property values up, developers showing interest in the city and most of the businesses still in business at the end of another year, Galatis added that things are headed in the right direction. “I’d say we’re still holding our own.”Wilton Manors retroContinued from page 18

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The Pelican 21 Friday, December 28, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad the idea of a future rail station in mind.New recycling carts approvedIn June, the city was allocated $703,451 by the county Resource Recovery Board, or RRB, to be used for improvements in curbside recycling. Commissioners approved changes to the curbside program and authorized budget amendments to procure recycling carts. In order to obtain residents’ input into a future program, city staff implemented a recycling cart pilot program Oakland retroContinued from page 10with 55 residents taking part in an eight-week period. Overall residents favored carts over bins. Sixty-eight percent of respondents recommended the 65-gallon cart over the 95-gallon cart for recycling. Vice Mayor John Adornato and Commissioner Shari McCartney said they were ecstatic about the proposed cart recycling, and McCartney said she liked the “pretty blue cart.” Commissioners agreed on an option using 65-gallon blue carts for collecting residential curbside recyclables and continuing the current weekly collection schedule. As an optional service, residents could have 95-gallon recycling carts on request. Staff anticipated implementing the revised recycling program in January 2013, after securing the equipment and providing signi cant outreach.Millage rate raisedIn September, commissioners approved a millage rate of 6.3142, up 5 percent from the previous year. Use of fund balance was reduced from $3 million to $2.4 million or 23 percent of operating expenditures. Commissioners approved an increase in re assessment fee for residential units to $196 from $167. Solid waste and stormwater assessments remained the same at $255 and $72 per residence. “With this budget we have stopped tapping reserves and implemented, as policy, that future budgets will be balanced without use of reserves,” McCartney said. “We were able to provide pay increases to city employees for the rst time in at least three years. I think we did a very good job of balancing the residents’ and city’s needs and wants with the responsibility to be scally prudent.” Commissioners also addressed pension reform. “With an eye toward a solvent and economically sustainable future for the city, some changes have been made in municipal union members’ compensation and bene ts,” McCartney said. “For example, we offered a contract to our re ghters [at a recent See OAKLAND RETRO on page 24

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22 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 BOCA RATON SALON WANTED – Hair Stylist – Manicurist – Pedicurist – Facialist – Massage. Salary – Commission Or Rent 1 Month FREE. 954-415-4937. 12-28 SEEKING EXPERIENCED DECKHAND ON CHARTER BOAT. CALL 954-832-0890. 12-28 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTRELIABLE BILINGUAL LADY Seeks Position As Pet Sitter / Dog Walker (Responsible Animal LOVER) Pompano / E Ft Lauderdale Area. Giselle 954-942-8111. 1-4 HOME HEALTH AIDE – Seeking Employment – Alzheimer’s Tube Feeding – Errands. References. More Information 954-226-2089. 12-28SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-11 CROWN MODING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 1-11 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954818-9538. 1-11 MIKE THE GARDENER “The All American Yardman” Yard And Garden Care – Get Te Best For Less! Call 561-5436337. 1-18 MOORE PLUMBINGPLUMBING SERVICES-Big Jobs-Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 12-28 A N A’ S CLEAN (RESIDENTIAL) CLEANING In Pompano – Lighthouse Point – Deer eld. Dependable – Thorough – Experienced. References. Good Work For A Good Price. Please Call Ana 954-692-4691. 12-7 SANTA’S HELPER – NOT ENOUGH Time To Decorate Or Last Minute Cleaning For That Special Occasion – Shop – Wrap Or Pick-up Gifts – Etc. Don’t Stress Out!! Call Me – Elf Ruth & I’ll Be On My Way In My Sleigh. 954-8618856. 12-28 XPERTS CLEANING SERVICE – Residential & Commercial. 10 Years Experience. References – Honest – Dependable. More Information Call 954-3760524. 1-4 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATIONPickup & Drop-Off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-234-0617. 1-4 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 12-28 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 1-11 ROOMS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH OFF Powerline & Hillsboro B lvd. $500 Per Month – Includes Utilities. Non-Smoker. No Drugs. 1st/Last/Ref/ Background Check To Movein. NEGOTIABLE! 754-2148131. 12-28 SEASONAL RENTALLAUD BY THE SEA – 55+. BEAUTIFUL 2/2 Furnished. Walk To Beach, Shops, Restaurants. Large Pool – Nice Grounds. 3-5 Month Rental. 413-244-2807. 12-28 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH – Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38’ x 13’. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 12-28 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO CHARMING 2/1 Home. Asking $975 Per Month. 611 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 12-28 POMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,100 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-28

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The Pelican 23 Friday, December 28, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com or 954-7838700! Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO 2 / 1 – 1 Car Garage. Central Air – Screened Porch. Double Shed With Sundeck. $124,900. Barbara Balistreri Realty – 954-2637129. 12-28 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE / DEERFIELD – Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny w/Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furnished. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $63,900. 561-372-9837. 1-4 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 1-4 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 1-11 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 1-4 POMPANO / MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 Avenue – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 12-28 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 Apt With Screened Room Available In Residential Neighborhood. $1,000 Month Yearly Lease. Call 609-638-1291. 1-4 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – NW – NE 2/1 New $9752/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 12-28 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-28 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-7833723. 12-28 POMPANO DIXIE & COPANS WAREHOUSE For Rent. 2 Units – 1-1640 Sq Ft – 1 – 2080 Sq Ft With A/C Of ces Zoned 3M. Both With Overhead Doors. No Reasonable Offers Refused. 716-316-3690. 12-28

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24 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700! Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point – As I sip a glass of eggnog mixed with a little special sauce, I think about all of the great fishing trips I had this year. The Texas swordfish trip stands alone in my mind. We set the record for the most swordfish ever caught on rod and reel in one day, 21. Than there was the bluefin tuna trip to Nova Scotia where we caught several fish over 1,000 lbs. I also returned to Costa Rica after a 20-year layoff. It’s such a different country now; lots of Americans and plenty of fast food restaurants. I guess I would have loved it if I had not remembered that I had been there years What a great year it was for shingago, when nobody else was there. I think about all of the big swordfish that we caught locally and the people who got a chance to catch their first one. The elation and the smiles on their faces makes it all worth while. And than there were some great reef trips and even a few awesome snook trips on the Intracoastal. It has always been a goal of mine to fish one more day every year than the previous year. I haven’t counted it up but I think I’ve accomplished my task or gotten pretty close. I have always been a goaloriented person. I generally set yearly goals for all aspects of my life, not just fishing. As for 2013, it should be very interesting and exciting. My first trip will be to Panama in January. Everybody goes there for the tunas and billfish. I am going there to try and catch a world record swordfish. Nobody goes there to catch swords, so I figured I’d give it a shot. But world record or not, I’m very lucky to be able to do all of the great things that I do. God has truly blessed me and I am going to get as much out of every day as I possibly can. As we get older and deal with the struggles in life, it is important to take time to connect with Mother Nature. The ocean has a funny way of making everything okay, if only for a while. When that rod bends over and the line starts peeling off the reel there is no way you can think about anything else, I guarantee it. Don’t waste your life working so hard that you don’t enjoy the roses. Make it a New Year’s resolution to fish at least twice a month. Good luck, tight lines and Happy New Year! impasse hearing] that signi cantly reduced future pension payment liabilities for the city while maintaining the status quo in bene ts for re ghters who are within seven years of retirement. I think this is another example of balance in our decision-making.” Another major accomplishment was addressing water supply issues on the west side of the city, Sallee said. Old four-inch water lines were replaced in the Rock Island area, and work in Lakeside and Royal Palm Acres is nearing completion. Oakland retroContinued from page 21 1-2 – Family Storytime at 6 p.m. at Wilton Manors Public Library, 500 NE 26 St. Children ages three and up are welcome. 954-390-2195. 1-5 – Outdoor garden program for children at 10:30 a.m. at Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954-786-2181. 1-5 – Bird watch and walk at 8 a.m at Deer eld Island Park. Boat to island leaves from Sullivan Park, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $3 per person. 954-357-5100.Sightings Continued from page 15

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The Pelican 25 Friday, December 28, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@yahoo. com LBTS retroContinued from page 9accomplishments during the year, a beautification project for North A1A was completed with enhanced landscape, decorative pavement and wider sidewalks and in some areas, the addition of street furniture and crosswalks. This project, Sasser points out, was funded almost entirely with state grant money. Mayor Roseanne Minnet also mentions streetscape improvements now under way on Bougainvilla just west of town hall as another major accomplishment. The drainage and streetscape project includes redoing the roadway and adding landscape island areas and drainage improvements from Pine Avenue south to the fire station. “I would have liked to reclaim some of the swale area, but the residents spoke that they needed parking,” Minnet said. “Overall, the project is progressing as well as could be expected.”Lower millage rateCommissioner Mark Brown noted that LBTS was one of the few municipalities in Broward County to lower its millage rate in 2012. The town also cut the water tax in half and lowered sewer rates by 10 percent. “We now have the fourth lowest millage rate and the fourth lowest fire assessment in the county. I’m proud that we are keeping the town’s finances in order,” Brown said. “The beach is our last line of defense in town. It supports our tourism industry and is the last line of defense to protect properties from storm surge. We have an opportunity to get more sand on the beach, and I’m pleased that we will be taking advantage of that opportunity,” he said.Outsourcing evaluatedIn her recent report to commissioners, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann noted progress in several areas in improving government efficiency. She said that hiring Calvin Giordano for code enforcement has been very successful, and the minor savings projected have been achieved. Savings on a parking services contract were less than originally projected because the commission deferred a decision on the contract from December to March and decided to pay COBRA insurance coverage and a salary differential for town employees who transitioned to the contractor. “Performance of the parking services contractor [Standard Parking] has been acceptable,” Hoffmann wrote. Regarding parking, Sasser notes, “We expanded our use of parking pay stations and added credit card acceptance, which generated $500,000 more in parking revenues while issuing significantly fewer parking tickets. Those funds are being used to expand parking facilities in 2013 at no cost to LBTS taxpayers.” The town negotiated an extension to its contract with Choice Engineering for garbage collection and recycling at great advantage to the town in terms of service and cost, Hoffmann wrote. And they renegotiated a contract with AMR, the emergency medical services provider, and avoided automatic annual price escalations. Hoffmann credited Bud Bentley, assistant town manager, and Tony Bryan, finance director, for their work on contract negotiations. Dodd notes that significant changes are being seen in the town’s recycling efforts. “Wheelie bins rather than plastic tubs should have a dramatic effect in the tonnage that goes to the landfill and tonnage that gets recycled,”he said. The commission also created a new brand image for the town with a pelican on an Adirondack chair and the tag line, “Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Relax…You’re Here.” Approving the brand was a major accomplishment, Minnet said. She’s also pleased with programs the town instituted to help hotels and businesses improve their properties. Plans and projects completed this year couldn’t have happened “without the tireless dedication of town management, staff and the support and input of our residents,” Sasser said. “There is excitement in the air in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea for all the right reasons,” he says. “We are implementing our plans while maintaining those core values we all hold dear and in common. We want to remain differentiated while improving our quality of life.”

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26 The Pelican Friday, December 28, 2012 Lighthouse retroContinued from page 1and Earl Maucker. Coming into play the weekend before the voting was a mailing by the Broward Republican Executive Committee suggesting Lysengen was linked to “union bosses,” and Maucker, was “an independent liberal.” The mailing may have back red. Hasis, who said he had no knowledge of it, said his campaign had been “highjacked.” Vice Mayor Sandy Johnson, herself a Republican, said it was “muckraking.” Once the election furor died down, however, it became business as usual here and this quiet town produced few headlines. In May, Christy Keyes of cially became the city’s librarian replacing Doreen Gauthier who retired in late 2011. Keyes, 41, is a resident of LHP and had been acting director for six months and before that, the youth librarian. She came to the job with a background in education and staf ng. Gauthier was further honored for her 33 years building the library into a rst-class institution at the 12th annual Keepers Days in February. She shared the spotlight with Mike McDace who was named a “keeper” posthumously after 34 years serving in police and code departments. LHP lost another uniformed of cer this year when re ghter Kevin Horkheimer died after 37 years of service. Taking honors as Community Advocate of the Year was Michelle Greene so named by the Children’s Home Society at a banquet that raised $120,000 for the agency and celebrated its 110th year. Greene is the well-known local businesswoman who founded the LHP Chamber of Commerce. Police Chief Ross Licata reported an uptick in arrests due to the addition of License Plate Recognition Cameras at the town’s major intersections. The cameras pick up on stolen license tags and alert the police department. A number of arrests were made and stolen property recovered. Licata went on record to urge residents to be on the lookout for any suspicious activity or strangers in their neighborhoods. He especially warned residents not to open their doors to solicitors saying he rarely grants a permit for door to door salespersons. An unfamiliar face at the door often means someone is casing the house, the chief said. A sad note for many was the day the Fifth Avenue Grill closed. A popular eating and drinking spot since 1998, it fell victim to competition and hard times a family spokesperson said. The property was sold to a funeral home which will open shortly. Earlier, the commission followed a trend being established in other South Florida cities and lifted the pre-noon ban on the Sunday sale of alcohol. Restaurants can now serve alcohol on Sunday beginning at 10 a.m.

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