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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00327
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 12-21-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00329

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Friday, December 21, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 51 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Price of gold driving chain snatching crimesBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – A signi cant increase in gold chain snatchings has occurred recently in the beach areas of Lauderdale-By-TheSea, Deer eld Beach and Pompano Beach. “We’ve had three in the last two weeks, Broward Sheriff’s Of ce LBTS District Chief Oscar Llerena said at a recent Town Commission meeting.See GOLD on page 14 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach – Students at Crystal Lake Middle School got a special treat last week when a Daytona International Speedway race car made a stop at the school. The 2010 Chevrolet, wrapped with logos, is touring the state through February to promote “Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida.” Crystal Lake and Lauderdale Lakes Middle Schools were the only Broward County schools selected for the visit. Students were invited outside to get an up-close look at the car, but rst they heard from Hope Colle of the Florida Department of Education and John Pickard, who conducts tours of the speedway and brought the car. Colle said Florida schools used to be in the bottom 40th percentile among states in reading. “But now, after implementing some good reading strategies, we have made great gains, and our eighth-graders are eighth in the nation in reading. “We’re celebrating our successes,” Colle said. “We want to be at the head of the race. We want to be the No. 1 state. Now we have other states looking at Florida to see what we’re doing.” Colle said students who read an extra 20 minutes a day after school are better students. “Think about that, and take that extra 20 minutes to read,” she said. Promoting that concept, the state is challenging students to “rev-up” and read for an additional 20 minutes Students rev up for Literacy Week See LITERACY on page 17 Commission upholds its position; Burger loses bid protestBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – City Commissioners were not swayed Tuesday by arguments that they had shown favoritism when selecting the restaurant operator for the shing pier. Attorney Michael Weiner, representing Two Together, LLC doing business as Burger also argued the commission failed to follow procedures set by city code when selecting another vendor, FlashBack Diner. Weiner said the request for proposal [RFP] established the criteria for the bidders, and his client ful lled that criteria. Mayor Peggy Noland’s stated preference for a traditional breakfast menu was her “personal See PROTEST on page 11Pompano Beach – The home of Mark and Patricia Macek, 2700 SE 6 St., shines with signs of the holidays. It’s a massive effort that takes 541 man hours to assemble. The task began early in November and was completed on Thanksgiving. Two boom lifts were used to hang the 131,848 lights. Holding it all together are 20,000 zip ties and 8,635 staples. The themed display contains an animated Santa’s workshop built entirely by hand, Eskimos, penguins and their sled dogs; Santas and snowmen galore, a Nativity Scene, a sled lled with toys, stockings by a re, Christmas trees, wreaths, and new this year, an area decorated in blue lights. It takes 10 days to dismantle the display, which the family has built for the last eight years. Cost of their electric bill this month? It’s a secret only Santa Claus knows, they say. On Saturday, Dec. 22, the Maceks will add music to their gift for the community. Oh! Magic Sight! Neighbors create scenic holiday drive for family car tours Staff photo New sheriff axing popular Deer eld Beach police chiefPompano Beach favorite’s also caught up in ringsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – The ring of Police Chief Pete Sudler by incoming sheriff Scott Israel has left this community reeling. “It is shocking that a town that voted 2 to 1 for the new sheriff could be so hurt by his rst action,” said Sally Potter, a member of the housing authority board. Avis Swenson, president of the local Kiwanis Club said, “This is not politics are usual. This is our city and we are on a roll. Deer eld Beach is coming together as never before. I don’t care if the new chief is the best thing ever, this will set our city back.” Sudler, a 22-year veteran of the department, came here in 2006 as executive of cer and became chief in 2010. He holds degrees in criminal See SHERIFF on page 15

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2 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Pelican 954-783-8700 See SIGHTINGS on page 3By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – City commissioners here hoped to get a hotel proposal to develop the Hagen Park/City Hall parking lot as part of a public/private partnership. Instead, the only rm to submit a bid envisions a residential/commercial development on the four-acre site. IBI, a Pompano Beach architecture and engineering company, has proposed a mixed-use complex that includes residential and commercial space. But city of cials have declined to release IBI’s speci c proposal for public review. State statute 119.071 exempts bids from public requests for up to 30 days after a bid is opened. IBI executives have also declined to discuss the bid. Sole bidder for city land wants residential units but no hotelSee BID on page 16But The Pelican has learned that IBI proposed a minimum of 120 residential units and has named the development “Wilton Village Residences & Commons.” If approved, it could be open as early as the end of 2014. Although a boutique hotel was the city’s preferred plan, the bid request left room for alternative proposals. Mayor Gary Resnick had previously complained that the city’s lack of hotels was hurting efforts to attract tourists. Now, commissioners must approve or reject the bid after talks with IBI. In 2010, the city turned down a bid from Gables Residential to develop the site. Of cials wanted to tie the development to a federal grant that would have allowed the city to take over and transform Wilton Drive into two-lanes. The plan was to have Gables pay the city’s portion of the matching Holiday religious services BaptistHopewell Baptist Church Dec. 25 8 a.m. 890 Northwest 15 Street Pompano Beach 954943-2141CatholicAssumption Catholic Church Dec. 24 – Christmas Eve Vigil, 4 p.m.,

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The Pelican 3 Friday, December 21, 2012 Mia Cliff, 3, of Pompano Beach meets with Santa [AKA Jim Silverstone] at “Christmas-By-The-Sea” in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. About 1,000 people turned out for the celebration, which included classic holiday tradition with Santa, who arrived on a Volunteer Fire Department truck. The town and LBTS Chamber of Commerce teamed up to sponsor the event. [Staff photo by Judy Vik] SightingsContinued from page 25:30 p.m., 11:30 p.m. and Midnight. Dec. 25 – 10:30 a.m. [Christmas Music]; 10:45 a.m. Mass. and 12:15 p.m. Spanish Mass 2001 S. Ocean Blvd. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea 954-941-7647 St. Clement Catholic Church Dec. 24 Services at 5 and 8 p.m. Midnight Mass in Creole at midnight. Dec. 25 7:30, 9 and 11 a.m.; 12:30 and 7 p.m. 2975 N. Andrews Ave. Wilton Manors 954-563-2838 St. Coleman Roman Catholic Church Dec. 24 – Confessions, 11 a.m. to noon; Masses 4:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 8 p.m. and Midnight. Dec. 25 – 7:30 a.m., 9 a. m., 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. 1200 S. Federal Hwy. Pompano Beach 954-942-3533 St. Elizabeth of Hungary Call for information 3331 NE 10 Terrace Pompano Beach 954-941-8117CommunityNorth Star Community Church Dec. 23 at 10:15 a.m. 116 NE 24 St. Wilton Manors 954-564-4374 EpiscopalSt. Martin’s Episcopal Dec. 24 – Family Service 5 p.m.; Concert, 10 p.m. and Candle light Mass 11 p.m. Dec. 25 – 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist with hymns 128 SE 28 Ave. Pompano Beach 954-941-4943 St. Nicholas Episcopal Church Dec. 23 at 5 p.m. Lessons & Carols Dec. 24 at 6 and 11 p.m., Christmas Eve services And Dec. 25 at 10 a.m. service 1111 E. Sample Road Pompano Beach 954-941-4519LutheranSt. Stephen Evangelical Lutheran Christmas Eve Worship 5:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. 2500 NE 14th Street Causeway Pompano Beach 954-942-4473 Zion Lutheran Church Dec. 24, Candlelight Christmas Eve Eucharist at 5:30, 8 and 10:30 p.m. 959 SE 6th Ave Deer eld Beach, 954421-3146 PresbyterianFirst Presbyterian Church Dec. 24 – 3 p.m. Communion [Chapel]; 5 p.m. Family Service [Sanctuary]; 7 p.m. Lessons and Carols [Sanctuary] and 9 p.m., Contemporary service in the chapel. Child care is available for the 7 and 9 p.m. services. 2331 N.E. 26 Ave. Pompano Beach 954-941-2308 New Presbyterian Church Christmas Eve – 4 p.m. 512 NE 26 St. 954-946-4380UnitarianUnity Church of Fort Lauderdale Dec. 24 at 6 and 7:30 p.m. 1501 NE 26 St. 954-463-4359 Christmas Eve at 6 and 7:30 p.m.See SIGHTINGS on page 4

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4 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 One last call for help . Deer eld Beach – A sperm whale’s unfortunate end became known to beach-goers in Pompano Beach and Deer eld Beach on Sunday when the mammal, estimated between 20 and 25 ft., was found dead just offshore in Pompano. The whale drifted north to Deer eld’s International Fishing Pier Monday. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] of cials were unable to perform a necropsy, an autopsy performed on animals, before they had to tow the whale out to sea Monday. “It’s somewhere out in the Gulfstream right now,” said Allison Garrett, spokesperson for NOAA. She added that NOAA of cials are hoping it will wash up again so they will have another chance at a necropsy. [Photo courtesy of Jeff Graves]SightingsContinued from page 312-26 – Rabbi Lipa will host a discussion on the Mystical dimensions of the Torah from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Suggested donation is $10. 954-228-3338. 12-31 – Showboat produced by Stage Door Theater, 8036 W. Sample Road, Coral Springs. 954344-7765. 1-6 – Big Band Dance from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, 240 W. Prospect Road, Oakland Park. Cost is $8 at the door. Cash bar. 954564-2357. 1-7 – Charity auction at Java Boys, 2230 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, at 7 p.m. Antiques, artwork, paintings, sculptures, furniture and other items will be available. Proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Email ajcrossconsulting@gmail. com. 1-7 – Retired Educators Social Club meeting at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca See SIGHTINGS on page 9

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The Pelican 5 Friday, December 21, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – A little girl’s attempt to nd her true self by wearing a variety of shoes is the storyline of Victoria Englehart’s book, “Whose Shoes?” In the book, Alexandra ponders a question her aunt asks her, “Whose shoes will you walk in when you grow up?” It is not a question with a simple answer. It forces Alexandra to try on dozens of shoes, her cousin’s brown moccasins, her dad’s loafers, her mother’s ballet slippers, a pair of cowboy boots, red high heels. Despite her mother’s scolding that she will hurt herself wearing such ill tting footwear, Alexandra persists: someone’s sandals, a pair of reman’s boots. None t right. Some are downright painful. At last, feeling discouraged, she reaches under her bed and pulls out the perfect pair, her own. And Teacher authors book she hopes will put young girls on the right path the message for young girls ages 6 to 10 becomes clear: walk your own path in your own shoes. Englehart, an art instructor at Deer eld Beach High School, has illustrated several children’s books but this is the rst one she has authored. It took her ve years to get it on paper and nd a publisher. Her illustrations were hand drawn then splashed with water color, pastels and colored pencils. The result is a beautiful little book that at the very end includes af rmations about movement: “I jump for joy,” “I am one step closer to my dreams” and “I put my best foot forward.” The idea for her story came about, Englehart believes, because, “I am always saying to my students ‘what is your next step?’ The book evolved from that, but the theme is universal.” Several years ago Englehart’s students created a Peace Labyrinth and in that process learned about creating See WHOSE SHOES on page 26Design for Whose Shoes cover by Englehart

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6 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 51 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & Letters Lighthouse Point – Over 200 people turned out to watch Trinity Church unveil its annual live Nativity scene on Dec. 12. Members sang Christmas carols while Jennifer Becker narrated the story of Jesus’ birth. More than 60 children participated, playing the parts of Mary, Joseph, the Three Wise Men, shepherds and angels. Live animals were also part of the festivities.Trinity Church celebrates the season with its annual Nativity Samuel Holmes as Joseph; Tatiana Maker as Mary; Gianna Alfano as an angel and Angel Ruguian as a shepherd. [Photos courtesy of Trinity Church] [Above] Anthony Ortiz as a shepherd. [Below] Ava Atkins as an angel. Jordan Hricko as an angel. Coral Springs – The non-profit Sawgrass Nature Center & Wildlife Hospital, 3000 Sportsplex Drive, is seeking bird seed, fresh produce, dry pet food, formula, cleaning supplies and other items to help take care of the animals it houses. For more information on how to donate, visit www.sawgrassnaturecenter.org or call 954-752-9453.Send a little holiday cheer to the animal kingdom this season Send a stocking stuffer to exotic animals like Zeke. [Photo courtesy of Sawgrass Nature Center]Beef up security at every school with armed police on every campusBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFThe recent massacre of 26 children and teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut should mandate armed police at every school in this nation. Tougher gun laws and a more robust mental health system are also needed. But laws and social programs can’t prevent every tragedy as this nation witnessed last week. Schools must be ready for the day when someone slips through the cracks. And putting a police of cer in every school is the best way to be ready when that someone isn’t stopped by the system. Response to a crisis call can take several minutes – minutes a killer can use. Sandy Hook has taught us that lesson. On Dec. 14, Sandy Hook taught the world that we need experts who can respond immediately. Someone trained and armed to use deadly force to stop a deadly threat. If all schools were assigned police of cers, these high-body count massacres might not happen. And other things might not happen. We might not see the faces of grieving parents so often that their images are engraved in our minds. We might not hear stories of heroic teachers who sacri ced themselves for their students. This kind of a solution is expensive. Millions of parents drop their children off at school for the purpose of learning and socializing. This massacre has changed that. Let’s demand government do this now. Once the children are safe, we can look at solutions for mental illness and gun control.Heavenly Pizza owner opens door for ChristmasTo the editor, This year, we are making Christmas celebration pizzas with traditional trimmings. The pizzas will be offered to anyone who would like to stop by at 2647 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach. We will hold a 10 a.m. Bible study to start the day. All are welcome to attend. Afterwards, we will serve our special Christmas Celebration pizzas. Anyone who would like to assist or donate, call Phil at 954-943-9271. If we don’t see you, have a blessed Christmas. God Bless! Phil Kassees Letters

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The Pelican 7 Friday, December 21, 2012 US 1 intersection no place for religious symbolsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – If there were ever an argument for “separation of church and state,” the Southwest corner of U.S. 1 and Hillsboro Boulevard makes the point. This time of year, this patch of public property becomes littered with religious and holiday symbols. Observers will see a decrepit manger scene with Mary and the others much worse for wear. The menorah is askew; there are two Santa Claus gures toppled onto one another, lighted reindeer and a tower of beer cans erected by local blogger Chaz Stevens as his honor to “Festivus.” But most prominent of all is a large sign promoting Opinion & Letters No room at the inn in Bethlehem and blighted space on Federal HighwayNativity Scene and Menorah share the corner of U.S. 1 and Hillsboro Blvd. with a sign announcing city paper shredding program.the city’s paper shredding program. Clearly, there is a mixed message here or no message at all. We walked the property on Sunday looking for the peace and joy that is supposed to accompany Christmas and Chanukah. What we found was graf ti on the sidewalk, yellowing grass, and a tropical jungle of dead palm fronds, weeds and vines alongside the coral rock waterfall and empty bottles and cans. Why would anyone want the symbols of their religious holiday in such a setting? Ideally, we think, public property should not be used for religious displays. There are plenty of privately-owned sites for expressions of piety. But that argument goes unresolved. More importantly, this area, for years the city’s of cial entryway is a disaster all year-round. The grass is never green. The landscaping rarely tamed. And the waterfall with its tepid turquoise pool and Bambi-like gure is straight out of the ‘50s. Where are the signs of the progressive, well-managed and maintained city that for the most part Deer eld Beach has become? This prime piece of property is so obviously neglected we can’t help wondering ‘why?’ Two calls to City Manager Burgess Hanson went unanswered by press time Thursday. So the ‘why’ remains a mystery. But it seems strange to us that with all the money being spent by the Community Redevelopment Agency [and this corner is within the bounds of the CRA we believe] that no one has suggested a major redo of the city’s oldest, and potentially most signi cant, portal.

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8 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com Historic Preservation BoardOakland Park The city is seeking ve people to serve on a new historic preservation board. City residents and professionals from the disciplines of architecture, history, architectural history, archaeology, anthropology, conservation, cultural anthropology, cultural geography, folklore, landscape architecture, planning and other related disciplines are encouraged to apply. Board applications are available online at www. oaklandpark .gov or by visiting the city clerk’s of ce. Call 954-630-4300 for more information.Let’s go to the movies at the park Oakland Park – A free showing of the movie, “Arthur Christmas,” is set for sundown Friday, Dec. 28, at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Highway. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. The event is sponsored by the Oakland Park Parks & Leisure Services department. Call 954-630-4500. Season’s greetings . Pompano Beach Julia Schulte, Coach Chris Nowviskie and Konnor Katzmark served as grand marshalls for Pompano Beach’s Yuletide Parade on Dec. 7. Last month, Schulte and Nowviskie competed in the Rescue 2012 World Lifesaving Championships in Australia. Katzmark placed 4th in male youth board rescue and 5th in male youth beach relay. Schulte placed 6th in female youth board rescue, 7th in female youth board race, 10th in female youth beach sprint and 12th in female youth surf race. [Photo by Chris Mullin]

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The Pelican 9 Friday, December 21, 2012 Deer eld Beach – How should our streets look in the future? The ideas of the very young may be among those considered by urban planners. To bring attention to this city’s Complete Streets initiative, students at Quiet Poster contest seeks ideas for streets of the futureWaters Elementary School will create posters showing the elements of what they believe will be safe streets for all users: pedestrians, bicyclists and mass transit. The idea is streets need not be designed solely for automobiles. The public will vote on the art work which will hang in city hall Jan. 7 to 11 and rst, second and third place winners will be given ribbons and certi cates at the Jan. 15 city commission meeting. All the posters will be displayed at the Festival of the Arts, Jan. 26 to 27 in a booth that explains the “complete the streets” program.Pioneer Park boat ramp reopensDeer eld Beach – The boat ramp and adjacent parking lot in Pioneer Park opened Friday, Dec. 15 after being closed for renovations. The $387,000 project was funded by the Florida Inland Navigational District and Broward Better Boating Improvement Program. Although not totally complete, work has been done to improve the launching ramps, roads and lighting. The park is located on Northeast 2 Street east of Dixie Highway. The ramp is popular with boaters because it provides access to the Intracoastal Waterway and two inlets, Boca Raton and Hillsboro. The ramp is now accessible only from Northeast 6 Avenue. The entrance to the park from Dixie Highway has been closed. Raton. Meeting is free and open to the public. The topic will be “Slimming down: super foods and supplements.” 954-255-6360 or 561-4835445. 1-12 & 13 – Tropical Postcard Show and Sale at the Pompano Beach Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $3. Free appraisals. 305-666-0219. 1-13 – Sunday Matinee Music at Boca Raton Library. Jim Kovalcik Trio, featuring Jim Kovalcik on ute, Jason Hanley on guitar and Steve Jernigan on bass. 3 p.m. at the Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd. 561239-1536. 1-12 & 1-19 – Sign-up for Northeast Little League baseball will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wimberly Field batting cage, 4000 NE 3 Ave., Oakland Park. League is boys and girls ages 5 to 18. Jan. 26 is the last day to register. Volunteer and sponsorship opportunities available. Email davemcleod33@aol.com or 954-793-2348. Fridays The Island City Art SightingsContinued from page 4 See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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10 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Deerfield Beach – Angelo’s Station House Grille opened in the Cove Shopping Center this week with a traditional ribbon-cutting ceremony staged by the Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce. The Grille features Italian fare including antipasti, pasta, zuppa, insalata, vitello, pollo, pesche, carne entrees and dolci. Angelo Morinielli is executive chef. David Greenfield is the manager.Chamber welcomes new restaurant owners Among those pictured are Chamber Executive Director Larry DeVille, Commissioner Joe Miller, restaurant owners Silvio and Marian ne Trentalange, Mayor Peggy Noland, assorted Chamber members and friends of the management. By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – If you need to know what kind of olive oil to pair with whatever you’re dining on, Frank Roth is your guy. “We tell you what goes on salads, fish, pastas, all kinds Heart of The Olive makes debut in Pompano Beachof stuff. We teach anyone how to shake this and pour that,” said Roth, who opened Heart of the Olive last month. He plans an official ribbon cutting sometime in mid-January. “We have a whole tasting bar of infused olive oils from Italy and a balsamic tasting bar from Italy.”Bluesfest on Las OlasFort Lauderdale – The 1st Annual Las Olas Bluesfest will be held Jan. 17 through Jan. 20 on the lawn next to the Riverside Hotel, 620 Las Olas Blvd. Join South Florida radio personality and Florida Panther MC, Bill Murphy, and 17 top Blues bands for a “Party on the Lawn” and four days of international food and beer. Held daily from 5 to 10 p.m., general admission is $10 or attendees can buy a fourday pass for $35. For more information, email hn25@aol. com or call 305-776-4048 or 954-530-7043. But Heart of the Olive, 816 N. Federal Hwy., is about much more than just olive oil. Roth has brought in furniture from Indonesia, stocked the shelves with handmade pottery and baskets, jarred food, coffee, tea, spices, rubs, salt, picture frames made from materials salvaged after Hurricane Katrina, books, paintings and salad bowls from Africa. “You come in; you have all these tasting samples and you can also buy gifts. It’s sort of an art tasting experience,” said Roth. Heart of The Olive is opening Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit www.theheartoftheolive.com or call 754-222-8071.LEAD$ Group looks for membersDeer eld Beach – The Deer eld Beach Chamber LEAD$ Group meets the rst and third Wednesday of the month at the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. The group is business-to-business organization that admits one member per business category. Call Larry DeVille at 954-427-1050 or director@ deer eldchamber.com.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, December 21, 2012 preference,” not a criterion of the RFP, Weiner said. The commission, Weiner argued, “strayed from the criteria and distrusted the local committee [recommendation] based on emotion.” He also questioned the fact that Commissioner Marty Popelsky, absent due to illness, had not reviewed the bid materials as required by code if the commission sits as the ranking committee. Any leasing decision made by the commission in regards to the pier restaurant also requires a super majority, 4 out of 5, vote. Under the ranking procedure used by the commission, however, only a vote to accept the top-ranked bidder, FlashBack, was taken and it was unanimous. Weiner asked the commission to place faith in the original selection committee and accept their recommendation in which his client was ranked rst or prepare another RFP which states clearly that breakfast “is everything.” The issue has drawn considerable public comment via email. One resident in particular, John Grassi, has sent commissioners and the press health inspection reports which show FlashBack Diner with a number of violations at its Davie and Hallandale locations. Addressing the matter, Vice Mayor Bill Ganz said he investigated the inspection reports of two other local diner-style restaurants and found violations that exceeded those incurred by FlashBack. Although there were a high number of ‘critical’ violations cited, and on two occasions, a stop-sell order put in on a food item, Ganz said his research showed even more serious complaints from health of cials at the two local diners. Ganz noted some of the infractions incurred by FlashBack were “pretty minute . I don’t believe the state would allow them to operate [if the diner did not meet the standards]. Maybe we don’t see the whole story.” The Burger owners are currently engaged in a lawsuit charging a business partner with operating a criminal enterprise that committed theft, bribery, fraud, thefts and extortion. A fast-growing franchise company, Burger claims it will soon have 250 locations. A new one opened recently in Coral Springs. ProtestContinued from page 1 Christmas concertLauderdale-By-TheSea Jan. 12 at 6:45 p.m., Assumption Catholic Church presents it nal concert including a sing-a-long and refreshments. The concert is free and open to the public. Call 954-941-7647.

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12 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFLois Cangelosi remembers being a little girl with white leather Mary Jane shoes. “I would pull up a rug at grandmother’s house and put on a show. I fell in love with the sound my shoes [without taps] made on her hardwood oor. I’ve been dancing ever since. My love of dance turned into a 40-year career. I was Miss Lois with my own dance studio, which I opened at 18, and ran in East Rockaway, Long Island, New York until we moved to Florida in 1994. She and Carmine, her husband were drawn to Florida for the usual reasons of weather and health. Lois says, “I became a tennis player, but once a dancer, always a dancer. I missed dancing, went on line to see what was around and I found Esther Beardsworth who put me in touch with Cathy Dooley and her Original Florida Follies. Dancing for charitable causes to help children appealed to me and I joined the group nine years ago.” Those dancing feet kept on moving until a balance Lois Cangelosi has danced her way from East Rockaway, New York to Cathy Dooley’s Original Florida Follies Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. issue forced her to step out of the chorus line and resume being a teacher to the dancers and assistant to Dooley. “I was hooked and have worked closely with Cathy ever since. And Carmine is as willing as I am to volunteer for this worthwhile organization. He’s a back stage guy who works on props and sets to get our the shows on the road. We’ve been married for 47 years and he’s been my right hand all my life. And he still is.” Lois describes Cathy Dooley saying, “For her, the Follies is a 24/7, year-round project. She creates such a season. I love what I do as do all of our volunteer dancers and dedicated members of our group. You have to be to work as hard as we do.” Asked about Lois, Cathy Dooley had this to say: “Lois Cangelosi is very special and a tremendous support for me all during rehearsals and especially in preparation for our winter season shows which run from January through March. Every year is a brand new show; therefore new routines, new production numbers, new costumes, new acts which must be continually polished and repolished. I depend on Lois in all of these areas and she is there for me at all times. I thank Lois from the bottom of my heart.” Husband Carmine says, “Lois has the same enthusiasm for this charity as she did for her own business, high bar but we all try to live up to her expectations. We rehearse the dancers two days a week, year ‘round, but I am involved with Cathy all the time. We have a think tank for ideas as we face each new year, and we begin to prepare just a few weeks after we nish the last show of the See FOLLIES on page 13Cathy Dooley [left] and Lois Cangelosi enjoy The Original Florida Follies Christmas Brunch at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club. The event is the annual collection of children’s clothing and diapers for two charities. [Photo courtesy of Cathy Dooley]

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The Pelican 13 Friday, December 21, 2012 and so do I. It’s good for us, and we get a great deal of pleasure from seeing our donations at work in the children’s agencies to whom we contribute.” Lois nods. “At our recent Christmas brunch held at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, we had a lot of fun, but we also all donated what looked like a store full of clothing and diapers to the children’s agencies. Mary Whyte from Family Central came in the van we bought for them last year. When she left it was with her van packed with clothing and diapers. An equal amount went to Dr. Ana Calderon and Stephanie Clayton from Children’s Diagnostic and Treatment Center who were on hand for the party. Every social function we have has a purpose, in addition to having fun, we never quit collecting for needy children. Last year we donated $100,000 dollars to these two worthy charities. And this year we hope to do as well.” In fact, one of the dancing ladies, Hank Phillips, owner of Hanky Panky, collected and donated $500 additional dollars for much needed diapers. Thank you, and all of the Follies volunteers for the good work you do!Catch the Follies at Viva Las Vegas 2013 Sunday, Jan. 20 at the Omni Auditorium, Coconut Creek Call 954-4620222; ext. #3 or visit www. parkerplayhouse.com FolliesContinued from page 12Lois Cangelosi gets into the spirit with her holiday wardrobe.

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14 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 Four teens were arrested after the most recent incident, which started along the beach in LBTS and ended in the Cresthaven section of Pompano Beach. A witness told police he saw a teen and a man ghting in the street in the 1900 block of South Ocean Boulevard [A1A] at about 9:20 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 5. The witness yelled at them to stop ghting, and they did. As the teen walked toward him, the witness told him, “It is too nice of a day to be ghting.” He thought the teen was going to shake his hand, but instead he pushed him violently and grabbed a gold chain and cross from his neck. The witness received abrasions and scratches on his chest but declined medical treatment. The suspect ed the area with three others in a white In niti, which deputies spotted near Northeast 13 Avenue and Northeast 23 Street in Pompano Beach. The teens bailed out of the car, and two ran off. Police set up a perimeter with help from other agencies and used police dogs to track down the eeing suspects. All four were charged with strong-armed robbery. They are Rontavis Holton, 19; and his 17-year-old brother, both of Coral Springs; and Idris Matthews, 18, and Michael Davis, 19, both of Pompano Beach. Matthews also was charged with grand theft/auto. “This has become common and unpredictable,” Llerena said. “This was a loosely organized group.” Other similar incidents occurred in town late last month. On Friday, Nov. 23, LBTS deputies responded to the area of Washingtonia Avenue and North Ocean Drive to reports of a strong-armed robbery. The victim said a suspect snatched a chain from his neck and ed. Due to a delay in reporting the incident, deputies were unable to apprehend the suspect. On Sunday, Nov. 25, LBTS deputies responded to reports of another strongarmed robbery in the 1900 block of North Ocean Drive. The victim said a suspect snatched a gold chain from him and ed the area. Deputies quickly established a perimeter, and with the assistance of aviation and canine units, apprehended the suspect. The investigation is still active, since the suspect is believed to have committed multiple similar incidents along the beach areas of Deer eld Beach and Pompano Beach, in addition to LBTS. Llerena said it’s dif cult for the public to prevent such incidents. “These suspects are mobile. They come to town long enough to commit the crime and leave the area.” Llerena noted the price of gold has “hit the roof,” and shops buying gold are proliferating in the area, though there are none in LBTS. “We’re a small cog in a big wheel,” he said. The shops are regulated as second-hand dealers, similar to pawn shops, he said. He said these cases are being worked at the county level with a lot of covert work being done by police. Similar crimes also are occurring in the Orlando area and in Tampa. GoldContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 15 Friday, December 21, 2012 justice, management, has earned two masters and is a graduate of the FBI school. A spokesperson for Israel’s team, Ron Gunzberger, told local blogger Bett Willett that community leaders and elected of cials had been contacted prior to Sudler’s being told by email that he is being terminated Jan. 8 if he has not resigned. Attempts to reach Mayor Peggy Noland before press time were unsuccessful, but Vice Mayor Bill Ganz said he “absolutely” had not been contacted, “not before, nor since [Sudler’s] termination.” Sudler is one of 26 highranking BSO personnel whose terminations were announced this week. Another on the chopping block is Broward Fire Chief Neal de Jesus who was instrumental in converting Deer eld’s re/rescue service to BSO. Taking his place will be Margate Fire Chief Tony Stravino who was Deer eld Beach Fire Chief for a brief period. Also relieved of her position is Donna Council a former head of purchasing here who is purchasing director at BSO.Pompano Beach changesIn Pompano Beach, Major William Knowles will be promoted to lieutenant colonel. Knowles will no longer serve in Pompano Beach. Another loss to the city will be Captain Milton Wiener, whose name was on the “ re” list. The Pelican was unable to reach Major Knowles to con rm the SheriffContinued from page 1 reports. Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher said he was extremely pleased about Major Knowles’ promotion. “It is well deserved after his many years of dedication to this city. I was also disappointed about the termination of Captain Wiener. He has always been an asset to the city.” The transition of leadership in the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce takes place on Jan. 8. Walk is held every third Friday from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Visit www. islandcityartwalk.com Pompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal SightingsContinued from page 9 See SIGHTNGS on page 16

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16 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! BidContinued from page 2funding included in the grant requirements. But failing to get approval, the city walked away from Gables’ proposal. Because the new proposed development would be on public land, city of cials and IBI will have to work out the details of a partnership that could possibly include the cost and length of IBI’s lease on the property and an agreement on how to share the revenue generated from the parking structure. The required parking structure must have a minimum of 300 spaces for public use. The present number of spaces is 213. The city also requires LEED energy ef ciency and environmental certi cation for the project. The mixeduse project can have up to ve stories or a maximum height of 60 feet. Twenty ve percent of the property must be used for open space. That was a bone of contention for two residents because the bid request allows Hagen Park’s retention area to be considered as part of the development. Former mayor John Fiore and Paul Kuta say the development will ruin access to Hagen. “They’re giving part of the park away so that the developer doesn’t have to provide any open space,” said Fiore. “We’re de cient in park land as it is.” City hall, the police station and Hagen Park’s basketball court are not part of the proposed development area. Randy Welker, economic development coordinator, said a committee would review the bid before it goes to commissioners. “We have a committee we will call together after Christmas, and they will look at the proposal,” Welker said. He estimates the issue will go before the commission sometime in February. Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information. SaturdaysPompano Beach GreenMarket is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. 954-292-8040. SightingsContinued from page 15

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The Pelican 17 Friday, December 21, 2012 read for an additional 20 minutes during the day on Monday, Jan. 14, in a “Million Minute Marathon.” “We will add the minutes up and try to reach our goal of 30 million minutes,” Colle said. Last year the goal of 20 million minutes was exceeded by ve million. Students will be encouraged to read at the same time from a magazine, book, newspaper, a blog post – whatever appeals to them. Then it was Pickard’s turn to emphasize the importance of literacy, but he also had a few words about his race car. He said a lot of planning went into building the car. Like everything else, designs start in the drawing room and move to the building of the chassis to the last detail. “Safety features are built in to protect drivers from getting hurt in a crash,” he said. “The average speed is 200 mph. Some crashes are very horrendous, but [with the safety features] a driver can walk out unscathed.” Pickard explained that the car’s tires are slick for better traction. Windows are all plastic, so they don’t shatter. And the car has two holes in the back window with hoses connected to the brakes and transmission so they can be cooled. If the brakes get hot, they lose their stopping power. Next he quizzed the students with a trick question. “How many miles is the Daytona 500 race?” That would be 500. “And now for a math question: “If driving one lap takes 2-1/2 minutes, how many laps does it take to go 500 miles?” That took a bit more time. Pickard said a really good pit stop takes 12 to 13 seconds. That’s when the crews change all four tires, clean the windshield and add fuel. Crystal Lakes Middle School will take part in Celebrate Literacy Week by participating in the Million Minute Marathon and having a book fair that week and a Family Literacy Night on Jan. 16, according to Tarshe Freeman, reading department chairperson and literacy coach. LiteracyContinued from page 1 Grace Greenwood, language arts teacher, is thrilled with her chance to start the engine on a race car. The car made a stop at Crystal Lakes Middle School last week to promote ‘Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida,’ coming in January.

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18 The Pelican Friday, December 21, 2012 By Carol RomanoPELICAN WRITERI have to admit I was very skeptical about the “raw food diet” that seems to be the next foodie trend. Could such a diet satisfy not only my appetite, but the sensory pleasure and variety of cooked foods? A few of my more dedicated healthy-lifestyle buddies were beginning to delve into recipes and attend classes, so out of curiosity I agreed to meet Asa Paul-Johansson, a certified raw food teacher and coach, at a class she gave in my condominium. A few of my more dedicated healthylifestyle buddies were beginning to delve into recipes and attend classes, so out of curiosity I contacted Asa Paul-Johansson, a certified raw food teacher and coach. Paul-Johansson was born in Sweden but has lived in the United States for the past 34 years. Although trained as an archeologist, she could not continue her career once the family moved to the States, so she spent most of her life as a homemaker, caring for her husband and two children. Always interested in nutrition, she came across an article in her local newspaper which discussed the possibilities of broccoli as a preventative of cancer. That got her thinking about converting the family to a vegetarian diet as a protective measure for the future health of her children. It also led her to the books of Ann Wigmore known as the “Grandmother of Raw Food.” Wigmore’s books intrigued her, but she didn’t yet feel ready to go that route. Instead she slowly transitioned her family into giving up meat and dairy products. She had never allowed processed foods into her kitchen and the switch was not a difficult one. Said Paul-Johansson, “When my children had friends over, I offered fresh fruits or homemade ice cream. I have recipes for many treats that were loved by the children. My ice creams are dairy free.” The family was still enjoying a vegetarian diet when Paul-Johansson began to take the next step on her Why Asa PaulJohansson Wakes Up Happy! [Left] A rich tarte with intense avor and yet very few ingredients. It keeps very well three to four days in the fridge. [Above] Great tasting ”chewy” patties with an “earthy” avor from the mushrooms. Cranberry sauce or Orange Curry sauce goes wonderfully with these mushroom patties.See FOOD on page 21

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The Pelican 19 Friday, December 21, 2012 Northeast Little LeagueOakland Park – The time to sign up for the Northeast Little League is under way. The baseball league welcomes boys and girls ages 5 to 18. Upcoming registration events will be held Jan. 12 and Jan. 19 at the city’s Wimberly Field batting cage, 4000 NE 3 Ave. Last chance registration will be available on Jan. 26 during tryouts at Northeast Field. For volunteer and sponsorship inquires, call 954-793-2348 or email davemcleod33@aol.comCasting call for The Dating Game Senior StyleDeerfield Beach – The TV show The Dating Game is making a comeback, “Senior Style.” Producers are looking for fun-loving singles, age 65 and up, to be a part of a dating game panel. Auditions are Monday, Jan. 7 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E. Sample Rd., classroom 5. The dating panel will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 23 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Broward Health North. During the Jan. 23 panel, Dr. H Murray Todd, neurologist and medical director of the Broward Health North Neurologic Institute, will also give an introduction about socialization and its importance for the senior community. Seating is limited. Call 954-786-5197 to RSVP.

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20 The Pelican Friday, December 21, 2012 Sponsors needed for Unity in the CommunityPompano Beach – Unity in the Community is looking for sponsors for its upcoming event on Feb. 2, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St. The event is open to the public and includes free parking, admission, food and beverages, live music, display booths, children’s activities, cultural groups and special demonstrations by the Broward Sheriff’s Office. Unity was first started last year as a way to help people of every culture, religion and race come together to foster a more unified city. To become a sponsor, call Pompano Has Heart at 954-654-3757, email Pompanohasheart@yahoo. com or call Unity in the Community at 954-586-1123 or 954-709-5894 or email cmannpfs@hotmail.com or orknorris9310@yahoo.com.North Broward Leadership ProgramBroward – Leadership North Broward, which encompasses Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point and the surrounding areas, is an innovative and interactive learning experience designed to develop leadership skills. The next series of classes begins on Thursday, Jan. 17 and is held on the third Thursday of every month. The cost for this six-month program is $395. This year’s program will be comprised of nine full-day seminars. Leadership North Broward provides a comprehensive introduction to the communities it serves. For an application, call Chadia Meroueh at Auto Tech and Body at 954-946-Blood pressure screeningsPompano Beach – The North Broward Senior Citizens Club, a non-profit organization, will meet on Thursday, Jan. 3 at 1 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olsen Center, 1801 NE 6 St., From 12:40 to 12:55 p.m. blood pressure readings will be taken. Refreshments, entertainment after the meeting. All senior citizens are welcome. Call 954-786-4111.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, December 21, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad quest. Six years ago she decided to eat only raw foods for a three month trial. She put away her pots and pans and invested in a dehydrator, which paired with a good food processor, was all she needed to turn out unbelievably delicious meals. Almost at once she felt more energized. She slept less, but more restfully. intense flavor and yet very few ingredients. It keeps very well three to four days in the fridge, so why not make a double batch? Whipped cashew cream is just divine with the date tarte and so are fresh berries. Ingredients 2 cups raisins 2 cups walnuts Optional: 1 tablespoon cacao powder 1 cups dates, pitted Juice from 2 limes Optional serving: fresh berries or kiwi and whipped cashew cream.Preparation1. Place raisins and walnuts in food processor and chop. Run for a long time until the nuts start to release their oil and form into a ball. 2. Place on a serving plate and form to an even crust/ base. Do not make it too thick, half an inch is fine. 3. Mix dates with lime juice in food processor. No need to wash the bowl in between. Add a few drops water only if it will not process the dates. Spread evenly over date crust. 4. Decorate with fresh berries and if you like serve with cashew cream. Although living in Chicago with its brutal winters, PaulJohansson never caught a cold and had the intense feeling that her body was in harmony with her emotional and psychological well being. After three months of 100 percent raw foods, PaulJohansson began the regime she follows today, 90 percent raw and 10 percent cooked vegetables. What was a typical day’s menu at the Paul-Johansson house? “Well,” she says, “I begin my day with a glass of water and lemon juice; then I either have a green vegetable or fresh fruit smoothie, or cereal. I make my cereal by soaking whole oats or buckwheat overnight in water. Then I add apple slices or dates, perhaps banana slices and a touch of honey or agave syrup. “If I have lunch it might be a soup of sundried tomato, pine nuts, basil and a drop of olive oil. When I put it all through the food processor, it becomes a creamy soup. If it’s a cold day, I might heat the mix slightly. Dinner might be a couscous of cranberries, pine nuts, spinach seasoned with apple cider vinegar and a green salad. “This diet is very filling and satisfying. All I know is that every morning I wake up feeling light and happy,” she said. Paul-Johannson can even make bread and crackers without turning on an oven, and her breads last for weeks in the freezer. Now that’s a plus for Florida homemakers! For more information contact Paul-Johansson at info@onthelime.com or www. onthelime.com. Here is one of PaulJohansson’s favorite recipes:Date TarteServes 4-6 Here is a rich tarte with FoodContinued from page 18

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22 The Pelican Friday, December 21, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 BOCA RATON SALON WANTED – Hair Stylist – Manicurist – Pedicurist – Facialist – Massage. Salary – Commission Or Rent 1 Month FREE. 954-415-4937. 12-28 SEEKING EXPERIENCED DECKHAND ON CHARTER BOAT. CALL 954-832-0890. 12-28 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTRELIABLE BILINGUAL LADY Seeks Position As Pet Sitter / Dog Walker (Responsible Animal LOVER) Pompano / E Ft Lauderdale Area. Giselle 954-942-8111. 1-4 COMPANION HOME CARE – Best Companion Care For You Or Your Loved One. Over 25 Years Experience, Reliable, Honest, Compassionate. Excellent References. Louise 954-258-1053. 12-21 HOME HEALTH AIDE – Seeking Employment – Alzheimer’s Tube Feeding – Errands. References. More Information 954-226-2089. 12-28SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-11 EXPERIENCED DRIVER AVAILABLE! “TO & FROM STORES” “DOCTORS” “APPOINTMENTS” “AIRPORT”, ETC. CALL MARYANN 954-895-3202. 12-21 CROWN MODING – Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 1-11 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954818-9538. 1-11 MOORE PLUMBINGPLUMBING SERVICES-Big Jobs-Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 12-28 A N A’ S CLEAN (RESIDENTIAL) CLEANING In Pompano – Lighthouse Point – Deer eld. Dependable – Thorough – Experienced. References. Good Work For A Good Price. Please Call Ana 954-692-4691. 12-7 SANTA’S HELPER – NOT ENOUGH Time To Decorate Or Last Minute Cleaning For That Special Occasion – Shop – Wrap Or Pick-up Gifts – Etc. Don’t Stress Out!! Call Me – Elf Ruth & I’ll Be On My Way In My Sleigh. 954-8618856. 12-28 XPERTS CLEANING SERVICE – Residential & Commercial. 10 Years Experience. References – Honest – Dependable. More Information Call 954-3760524. 1-4 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATIONPickup & Drop-Off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-234-0617. 1-4 DIGNITY CLEANING SERVICE INC – House – Condo – Of ce & More. 954826-6450. Lic/Ins. Call Today For A FREE Estimate. 5th Cleaning 1/2 Price. 12-21. HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1221 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 12-28 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 1-11 SLEEP COMFORT ADJUSTABLE QUEEN SIZED BED – Never Used. Pompano Beach 954-638-9656. 12-21 JEWELRYGIVE WEARABLE ART THIS YEAR. www.etsy.com/ shop/TrekkietrishaJewelry 954-596-8991. 12-21 ROOMS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH Off Powerline & Hillsboro Blvd. $500 Per Month IncludesUtilities. Non-Smoker – No Drugs. 1st/Last/Ref/ Background Check To Movein. NEGOTIABLE! 754-2148131. 12-21 LIGHTHOUSE POINT ON Deep Water Canal – Pool (2) Private Rooms & Bath. Dockage Available. Call Julie 954-224-2216. 12-21SEASONAL RENTALLAUD BY THE SEA – 55+. BEAUTIFUL 2/2 Furnished. Walk To Beach, Shops, Restaurants. Large Pool – Nice Grounds. 3-5 Month Rental. 413-244-2807. 12-21 POMPANO – BEACH BLOCK – POOLSIDE 1 & 2 BEDROOM APTS. Close To Fine Restaurants & Shopping. For Reservations 561-4883110. 12-21 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH – Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38’ x 13’. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 12-28 DEEP WATER – 15 Minutes To Hillsboro Inlet. Up To 63’. Electric Up To 50 AMPS & Water. Call Julie 954-224-2216. 12-21 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO CHARMING 2/1 Home. Asking $975 Per Month. 611 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 12-28 POMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,100 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-28Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com or 954-7838700!

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The Pelican 23 Friday, December 21, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700!Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com or 954-7838700! Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO 2 / 1 – 1 Car Garage. Central Air – Screened Porch. Double Shed With Sundeck. $124,900. Barbara Balistreri Realty – 954-2637129. 12-21 REAL ESTATE WANTED I BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE / DEERFIELD – Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny w/Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furnished. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $63,900. 561-372-9837. 12-21 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 1-4CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 1-4 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 1-11 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 1-4 POMPANO / MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 Avenue – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 12-28 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – NW – NE 2/1 New $9752/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 12-28 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-28 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 12-28 POMPANO DIXIE & COPANS WAREHOUSE For Rent. 2 Units – 1-1640 Sq Ft – 1 – 2080 Sq Ft With A/C Of ces Zoned 3M. Both With Overhead Doors. No Reasonable Offers Refused. 716-316-3690. 12-28

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24 The Pelican Friday, December 21, 2012 Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Elite Force Martial Arts, a black belt School in Lighthouse Point, 4754 N. Federal Hwy., recently celebrated its black belt graduates. Craig Haley, co-owner with KC Colbin, said, “The family that kicks together sticks together and we have one-third of our student body is training with a family member. Our schools are a nice balance of 50 percent kids and 50 percent adults so everyone ts in.” 1st Degree Black Belt Graduates Brenda Belanger, Andres Gonzalez, Kenneth Parker, Frances Vaughn, Paul Willis, Kim Berntsen, James Hons, Lorraine Noboa-Robbins, Daniel Walter, Kyle Zahn, Rick Connolly, Piper Neuls, Michael Sheehan, Rachel Wheeler 2nd Degree All-Stars Nicholas DiMarco, Tyler Hirsch, Natalie Novak 3rd Degree Top Guns Christian Acosta, Michael Adkins, Alonso Perez, Lori Ann Pon, Edgar Perez 6th Degree Elite Force Leader Shihan KC ColvinRJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point – You’d better hurry up and get your spoons ready for the big bite. That’s right, spoons. A spoon is what we use to catch Spanish mackerel, which are plentiful around the Deerfield Beach International Fishing Pier right now. And these mackerel are attracting schools of large kingfish. Some skilled anglers have already caught kingfish up to 70 lbs. To catch one of these kings, first cast a spoon into a school of mackerel. Prepare your rod with a 7/0 “J” hook and an additional treble hook hanging six inches behind it. Take the mackerel off Giant kings are hanging-out in Deer eld the spoon rod and switch it quickly over to rod you plan to use for the kingfish. Hook the mackerel through the top lip and put the treble in his back. Now for the king! At this point just free spool the reel allowing the mackerel to swim away naturally. Hold on tight because the bite from a 60-lb. kingfish is insane. Sometimes the big kings will jump as they eat the mackerel, and at other times the line will just start melting off the spool. At that point lock up the reel and watch line melt off the reel. You will probably have to fire up the boat and chase the king down. Remember that you are only fishing in 15 feet of water so the giant kingfish can’t go down, he can only go out. If you need any help getting rigged up give us a call. Elite Force Martial Arts MLK Marketplace in PompanoPompano Beach – Every second Saturday of the month MLK Marketplace is held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Annie Adderly Gillis Park, 601 Martin Luther King Boulevard. The next installment takes place Jan. 12. The event features live entertainment, a talent contest, food vendors and merchants. Those who win the monthly talent competition will enter into a final event in June for $1,500 in cash prizes awarded for first, second and third place. Call 954-786-7824.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, December 21, 2012 Buy a brick and help nish Wilton Manors’ Children’s Art ProjectThe Wilton Manors Development Alliance [WMDA] is about halfway to its goal of raising $35,000 to complete the Children’s Art Project at Jaycee Park. [Rendering courtesy of WMDA] By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Three years ago, Wilton Manors Elementary School students and Fort Lauderdale artist Kevin Kichar finished the mosaic portion of the Children’s Art Project. But the finishing touches are yet to be realized. The 5’3 ft. by 7’4 ft. mosaic, located in Jaycee Park at the corner of Wilton Drive and Northeast 21 Court represents this town’s history. In 1925 the two medieval castles were the brainstorm of developer E.J. Willingham who constructed the towers in the city to market real estate. Now, the Wilton Manors Development Alliance [WMDA] is looking to finish the job. To do that, more money is needed. The final construction will include a plaza with walls of two interlocking hands in friendship, a decorative wall, benches, landscaping, lighting and brick pavers. “It would be celebratory of the diversity of Wilton Manors,” said Krishan Manners, president/CEO of WMDA. To help fund the expression of that diversity, WMDA is selling the brick pavers. “We’re halfway [to the $35,000 needed] as far as fundraising goes. We want to really make this a showplace for Wilton Manors.” Each brick purchased can be inscribed with the name of a person or a business and will be laid in the plaza. The cost is $100 for a 4 x 8 brick and $175 for an 8 x 8 brick. Messages are limited to three lines and 18 characters each line for the 4 x 8 bricks; six lines and 18 characters each line for the 8 x 8 bricks. Bricks can also be purchased as gift items for display and include a felt backing with a stand. The cost is $50 for a smaller replica of a 4 x 8 brick and $75 for a smaller replica of an 8 x 8 brick. Visit www.developwm.org for more information on buying bricks.

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26 The Pelican Friday, December 21, 2012 Pelican Classi eds mean business! Call 954-783-8700! their own paths. Before that, she and art teacher, Sara Marc, challenged their students to create a piece of sculpture from recycled materials. It was a replica of a famous Louise Nevelson work and another lesson in creating one’s own path. A resident of Pompano Beach, Englehart began her education at the University of Akron where she obtained her BS. She went on from there to study holistic education and counseling, earn a master of arts degree and finally an advanced graduate arts education national board certification. Her resume includes a long list of honors and awards in her field. On Jan. 8 she will speak to a group of educators at a meeting at Young At Art in Hollywood and she is in the process of getting “Whose Shoes?” into school libraries. Recently, she distributed her book at the NE Focal Point Day Care Center and the kids read it to the senior citizens who come to the Focal Point for recreation and care. “Whose Shoes” is available online at Amazon and Barnes and Noble. It is published by Balboa Press.Whose Shoes?Continued from page 5The Sunshine BoysTamarac – The Tamarac Theatre Of Performing Arts, 7143 Pine Island Road, presents the Sunshine Boys. The play focuses on aging Al Lewis and Willy Clark, a onetime vaudevillian team known as “Lewis and Clark” who, over the course of forty-odd years, grew to hate each other and never spoke off-stage. Clark is convinced by his nephew Ben to revive one of the old routines one last time. The play runs from Jan. 5 to Jan. 20. Show times are Saturdays at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $25. Visit www.ttopa.org for more information.

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Friday, December 21, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 51 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Price of gold driving chain snatching crimesBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea A signi cant increase in gold chain snatchings has occurred recently in the beach areas of Lauderdale-By-TheSea, Deer eld Beach and Pompano Beach. Weve had three in the last two weeks, Broward Sheriffs Of ce LBTS District Chief Oscar Llerena said at a recent Town Commission meeting.See GOLD on page 14 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach Students at Crystal Lake Middle School got a special treat last week when a Daytona International Speedway race car made a stop at the school. The 2010 Chevrolet, wrapped with logos, is touring the state through February to promote Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida. Crystal Lake and Lauderdale Lakes Middle Schools were the only Broward County schools selected for the visit. Students were invited outside to get an up-close look at the car, but rst they heard from Hope Colle of the Florida Department of Education and John Pickard, who conducts tours of the speedway and brought the car. Colle said Florida schools used to be in the bottom 40th percentile among states in reading. But now, after implementing some good reading strategies, we have made great gains, and our eighth-graders are eighth in the nation in reading. Were celebrating our successes, Colle said. We want to be at the head of the race. We want to be the No. 1 state. Now we have other states looking at Florida to see what were doing. Colle said students who read an extra 20 minutes a day after school are better students. Think about that, and take that extra 20 minutes to read, she said. Promoting that concept, the state is challenging students to rev-up and read for an additional 20 minutes Students rev up for Literacy Week See LITERACY on page 17 Commission upholds its position; Burger loses bid protestBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach City Commissioners were not swayed Tuesday by arguments that they had shown favoritism when selecting the restaurant operator for the shing pier. Attorney Michael Weiner, representing Two Together, LLC doing business as Burger also argued the commission failed to follow procedures set by city code when selecting another vendor, FlashBack Diner. Weiner said the request for proposal [RFP] established the criteria for the bidders, and his client ful lled that criteria. Mayor Peggy Nolands stated preference for a traditional breakfast menu was her personal See PROTEST on page 11Pompano Beach The home of Mark and Patricia Macek, 2700 SE 6 St., shines with signs of the holidays. Its a massive effort that takes 541 man hours to assemble. The task began early in November and was completed on Thanksgiving. Two boom lifts were used to hang the 131,848 lights. Holding it all together are 20,000 zip ties and 8,635 staples. The themed display contains an animated Santas workshop built entirely by hand, Eskimos, penguins and their sled dogs; Santas and snowmen galore, a Nativity Scene, a sled lled with toys, stockings by a re, Christmas trees, wreaths, and new this year, an area decorated in blue lights. It takes 10 days to dismantle the display, which the family has built for the last eight years. Cost of their electric bill this month? Its a secret only Santa Claus knows, they say. On Saturday, Dec. 22, the Maceks will add music to their gift for the community. Oh! Magic Sight!Neighbors create scenic holiday drive for family car tours Staff photo New sheriff axing popular Deer eld Beach police chiefPompano Beach favorites also caught up in ringsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The ring of Police Chief Pete Sudler by incoming sheriff Scott Israel has left this community reeling. It is shocking that a town that voted 2 to 1 for the new sheriff could be so hurt by his rst action, said Sally Potter, a member of the housing authority board. Avis Swenson, president of the local Kiwanis Club said, This is not politics are usual. This is our city and we are on a roll. Deer eld Beach is coming together as never before. I dont care if the new chief is the best thing ever, this will set our city back. Sudler, a 22-year veteran of the department, came here in 2006 as executive of cer and became chief in 2010. He holds degrees in criminal See SHERIFF on page 15

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2 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com Pelican 954-783-8700 See SIGHTINGS on page 3By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors City commissioners here hoped to get a hotel proposal to develop the Hagen Park/City Hall parking lot as part of a public/private partnership. Instead, the only rm to submit a bid envisions a residential/commercial development on the four-acre site. IBI, a Pompano Beach architecture and engineering company, has proposed a mixed-use complex that includes residential and commercial space. But city of cials have declined to release IBIs speci c proposal for public review. State statute 119.071 exempts bids from public requests for up to 30 days after a bid is opened. IBI executives have also declined to discuss the bid. Sole bidder for city land wants residential units but no hotelSee BID on page 16But The Pelican has learned that IBI proposed a minimum of 120 residential units and has named the development Wilton Village Residences & Commons. If approved, it could be open as early as the end of 2014. Although a boutique hotel was the citys preferred plan, the bid request left room for alternative proposals. Mayor Gary Resnick had previously complained that the citys lack of hotels was hurting efforts to attract tourists. Now, commissioners must approve or reject the bid after talks with IBI. In 2010, the city turned down a bid from Gables Residential to develop the site. Of cials wanted to tie the development to a federal grant that would have allowed the city to take over and transform Wilton Drive into two-lanes. The plan was to have Gables pay the citys portion of the matching Holiday religious services BaptistHopewell Baptist Church Dec. 25 8 a.m. 890 Northwest 15 Street Pompano Beach 954943-2141CatholicAssumption Catholic Church Dec. 24 Christmas Eve Vigil, 4 p.m.,

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The Pelican 3 Friday, December 21, 2012 Mia Cliff, 3, of Pompano Beach meets with Santa [AKA Jim Silverstone] at Christmas-By-The-Sea in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. About 1,000 people turned out for the celebration, which included classic holiday tradition with Santa, who arrived on a Volunteer Fire Department truck. The town and LBTS Chamber of Commerce teamed up to sponsor the event. [Staff photo by Judy Vik] SightingsContinued from page 25:30 p.m., 11:30 p.m. and Midnight. Dec. 25 10:30 a.m. [Christmas Music]; 10:45 a.m. Mass. and 12:15 p.m. Spanish Mass 2001 S. Ocean Blvd. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea 954-941-7647 St. Clement Catholic Church Dec. 24 Services at 5 and 8 p.m. Midnight Mass in Creole at midnight. Dec. 25 7:30, 9 and 11 a.m.; 12:30 and 7 p.m. 2975 N. Andrews Ave. Wilton Manors 954-563-2838 St. Coleman Roman Catholic Church Dec. 24 Confessions, 11 a.m. to noon; Masses 4:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 8 p.m. and Midnight. Dec. 25 7:30 a.m., 9 a. m., 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. 1200 S. Federal Hwy. Pompano Beach 954-942-3533 St. Elizabeth of Hungary Call for information 3331 NE 10 Terrace Pompano Beach 954-941-8117CommunityNorth Star Community Church Dec. 23 at 10:15 a.m. 116 NE 24 St. Wilton Manors 954-564-4374 EpiscopalSt. Martins Episcopal Dec. 24 Family Service 5 p.m.; Concert, 10 p.m. and Candle light Mass 11 p.m. Dec. 25 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist with hymns 128 SE 28 Ave. Pompano Beach 954-941-4943 St. Nicholas Episcopal Church Dec. 23 at 5 p.m. Lessons & Carols Dec. 24 at 6 and 11 p.m., Christmas Eve services And Dec. 25 at 10 a.m. service 1111 E. Sample Road Pompano Beach 954-941-4519LutheranSt. Stephen Evangelical Lutheran Christmas Eve Worship 5:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. 2500 NE 14th Street Causeway Pompano Beach 954-942-4473 Zion Lutheran Church Dec. 24, Candlelight Christmas Eve Eucharist at 5:30, 8 and 10:30 p.m. 959 SE 6th Ave Deer eld Beach, 954421-3146 PresbyterianFirst Presbyterian Church Dec. 24 3 p.m. Communion [Chapel]; 5 p.m. Family Service [Sanctuary]; 7 p.m. Lessons and Carols [Sanctuary] and 9 p.m., Contemporary service in the chapel. Child care is available for the 7 and 9 p.m. services. 2331 N.E. 26 Ave. Pompano Beach 954-941-2308 New Presbyterian Church Christmas Eve 4 p.m. 512 NE 26 St. 954-946-4380UnitarianUnity Church of Fort Lauderdale Dec. 24 at 6 and 7:30 p.m. 1501 NE 26 St. 954-463-4359 Christmas Eve at 6 and 7:30 p.m.See SIGHTINGS on page 4

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4 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 One last call for help . Deer eld Beach A sperm whales unfortunate end became known to beach-goers in Pompano Beach and Deer eld Beach on Sunday when the mammal, estimated between 20 and 25 ft., was found dead just offshore in Pompano. The whale drifted north to Deer elds International Fishing Pier Monday. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] of cials were unable to perform a necropsy, an autopsy performed on animals, before they had to tow the whale out to sea Monday. Its somewhere out in the Gulfstream right now, said Allison Garrett, spokesperson for NOAA. She added that NOAA of cials are hoping it will wash up again so they will have another chance at a necropsy. [Photo courtesy of Jeff Graves]SightingsContinued from page 312-26 Rabbi Lipa will host a discussion on the Mystical dimensions of the Torah from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Suggested donation is $10. 954-228-3338. 12-31 Showboat, produced by Stage Door Theater, 8036 W. Sample Road, Coral Springs. 954344-7765. 1-6 Big Band Dance from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, 240 W. Prospect Road, Oakland Park. Cost is $8 at the door. Cash bar. 954564-2357. 1-7 Charity auction at Java Boys, 2230 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, at 7 p.m. Antiques, artwork, paintings, sculptures, furniture and other items will be available. Proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Email ajcrossconsulting@gmail. com. 1-7 Retired Educators Social Club meeting at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca See SIGHTINGS on page 9

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The Pelican 5 Friday, December 21, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach A little girls attempt to nd her true self by wearing a variety of shoes is the storyline of Victoria Engleharts book, Whose Shoes? In the book, Alexandra ponders a question her aunt asks her, Whose shoes will you walk in when you grow up? It is not a question with a simple answer. It forces Alexandra to try on dozens of shoes, her cousins brown moccasins, her dads loafers, her mothers ballet slippers, a pair of cowboy boots, red high heels. Despite her mothers scolding that she will hurt herself wearing such ill tting footwear, Alexandra persists: someones sandals, a pair of remans boots. None t right. Some are downright painful. At last, feeling discouraged, she reaches under her bed and pulls out the perfect pair, her own. And Teacher authors book she hopes will put young girls on the right path the message for young girls ages 6 to 10 becomes clear: walk your own path in your own shoes. Englehart, an art instructor at Deer eld Beach High School, has illustrated several childrens books but this is the rst one she has authored. It took her ve years to get it on paper and nd a publisher. Her illustrations were hand drawn then splashed with water color, pastels and colored pencils. The result is a beautiful little book that at the very end includes af rmations about movement: I jump for joy, I am one step closer to my dreams and I put my best foot forward. The idea for her story came about, Englehart believes, because, I am always saying to my students what is your next step? The book evolved from that, but the theme is universal. Several years ago Engleharts students created a Peace Labyrinth and in that process learned about creating See WHOSE SHOES on page 26Design for Whose Shoes cover by Englehart

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6 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park and Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 51 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & Letters Lighthouse Point Over 200 people turned out to watch Trinity Church unveil its annual live Nativity scene on Dec. 12. Members sang Christmas carols while Jennifer Becker narrated the story of Jesus birth. More than 60 children participated, playing the parts of Mary, Joseph, the Three Wise Men, shepherds and angels. Live animals were also part of the festivities.Trinity Church celebrates the season with its annual Nativity Samuel Holmes as Joseph; Tatiana Maker as Mary; Gianna Alfano as an angel and Angel Ruguian as a shepherd. [Photos courtesy of Trinity Church] [Above] Anthony Ortiz as a shepherd. [Below] Ava Atkins as an angel. Jordan Hricko as an angel. Coral Springs The non-profit Sawgrass Nature Center & Wildlife Hospital, 3000 Sportsplex Drive, is seeking bird seed, fresh produce, dry pet food, formula, cleaning supplies and other items to help take care of the animals it houses. For more information on how to donate, visit www.sawgrassnaturecenter.org or call 954-752-9453.Send a little holiday cheer to the animal kingdom this season Send a stocking stuffer to exotic animals like Zeke. [Photo courtesy of Sawgrass Nature Center]Beef up security at every school with armed police on every campusBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFThe recent massacre of 26 children and teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut should mandate armed police at every school in this nation. Tougher gun laws and a more robust mental health system are also needed. But laws and social programs cant prevent every tragedy as this nation witnessed last week. Schools must be ready for the day when someone slips through the cracks. And putting a police of cer in every school is the best way to be ready when that someone isnt stopped by the system. Response to a crisis call can take several minutes minutes a killer can use. Sandy Hook has taught us that lesson. On Dec. 14, Sandy Hook taught the world that we need experts who can respond immediately. Someone trained and armed to use deadly force to stop a deadly threat. If all schools were assigned police of cers, these high-body count massacres might not happen. And other things might not happen. We might not see the faces of grieving parents so often that their images are engraved in our minds. We might not hear stories of heroic teachers who sacri ced themselves for their students. This kind of a solution is expensive. Millions of parents drop their children off at school for the purpose of learning and socializing. This massacre has changed that. Lets demand government do this now. Once the children are safe, we can look at solutions for mental illness and gun control.Heavenly Pizza owner opens door for ChristmasTo the editor, This year, we are making Christmas celebration pizzas with traditional trimmings. The pizzas will be offered to anyone who would like to stop by at 2647 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach. We will hold a 10 a.m. Bible study to start the day. All are welcome to attend. Afterwards, we will serve our special Christmas Celebration pizzas. Anyone who would like to assist or donate, call Phil at 954-943-9271. If we dont see you, have a blessed Christmas. God Bless! Phil Kassees Letters

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The Pelican 7 Friday, December 21, 2012 US 1 intersection no place for religious symbolsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach If there were ever an argument for separation of church and state, the Southwest corner of U.S. 1 and Hillsboro Boulevard makes the point. This time of year, this patch of public property becomes littered with religious and holiday symbols. Observers will see a decrepit manger scene with Mary and the others much worse for wear. The menorah is askew; there are two Santa Claus gures toppled onto one another, lighted reindeer and a tower of beer cans erected by local blogger Chaz Stevens as his honor to Festivus. But most prominent of all is a large sign promoting Opinion & Letters No room at the inn in Bethlehem and blighted space on Federal HighwayNativity Scene and Menorah share the corner of U.S. 1 and Hillsboro Blvd. with a sign announcing city paper shredding program.the citys paper shredding program. Clearly, there is a mixed message here or no message at all. We walked the property on Sunday looking for the peace and joy that is supposed to accompany Christmas and Chanukah. What we found was graf ti on the sidewalk, yellowing grass, and a tropical jungle of dead palm fronds, weeds and vines alongside the coral rock waterfall and empty bottles and cans. Why would anyone want the symbols of their religious holiday in such a setting? Ideally, we think, public property should not be used for religious displays. There are plenty of privately-owned sites for expressions of piety. But that argument goes unresolved. More importantly, this area, for years the citys of cial entryway is a disaster all year-round. The grass is never green. The landscaping rarely tamed. And the waterfall with its tepid turquoise pool and Bambi-like gure is straight out of the s. Where are the signs of the progressive, well-managed and maintained city that for the most part Deer eld Beach has become? This prime piece of property is so obviously neglected we cant help wondering why? Two calls to City Manager Burgess Hanson went unanswered by press time Thursday. So the why remains a mystery. But it seems strange to us that with all the money being spent by the Community Redevelopment Agency [and this corner is within the bounds of the CRA we believe] that no one has suggested a major redo of the citys oldest, and potentially most signi cant, portal.

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8 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com Historic Preservation BoardOakland Park The city is seeking ve people to serve on a new historic preservation board. City residents and professionals from the disciplines of architecture, history, architectural history, archaeology, anthropology, conservation, cultural anthropology, cultural geography, folklore, landscape architecture, planning and other related disciplines are encouraged to apply. Board applications are available online at www. oaklandpark .gov or by visiting the city clerks of ce. Call 954-630-4300 for more information.Lets go to the movies at the park Oakland Park A free showing of the movie, Arthur Christmas, is set for sundown Friday, Dec. 28, at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Highway. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. The event is sponsored by the Oakland Park Parks & Leisure Services department. Call 954-630-4500. Seasons greetings . Pompano Beach Julia Schulte, Coach Chris Nowviskie and Konnor Katzmark served as grand marshalls for Pompano Beachs Yuletide Parade on Dec. 7. Last month, Schulte and Nowviskie competed in the Rescue 2012 World Lifesaving Championships in Australia. Katzmark placed 4th in male youth board rescue and 5th in male youth beach relay. Schulte placed 6th in female youth board rescue, 7th in female youth board race, 10th in female youth beach sprint and 12th in female youth surf race. [Photo by Chris Mullin]

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The Pelican 9 Friday, December 21, 2012 Deer eld Beach How should our streets look in the future? The ideas of the very young may be among those considered by urban planners. To bring attention to this citys Complete Streets initiative, students at Quiet Poster contest seeks ideas for streets of the futureWaters Elementary School will create posters showing the elements of what they believe will be safe streets for all users: pedestrians, bicyclists and mass transit. The idea is streets need not be designed solely for automobiles. The public will vote on the art work which will hang in city hall Jan. 7 to 11 and rst, second and third place winners will be given ribbons and certi cates at the Jan. 15 city commission meeting. All the posters will be displayed at the Festival of the Arts, Jan. 26 to 27 in a booth that explains the complete the streets program.Pioneer Park boat ramp reopensDeer eld Beach The boat ramp and adjacent parking lot in Pioneer Park opened Friday, Dec. 15 after being closed for renovations. The $387,000 project was funded by the Florida Inland Navigational District and Broward Better Boating Improvement Program. Although not totally complete, work has been done to improve the launching ramps, roads and lighting. The park is located on Northeast 2 Street east of Dixie Highway. The ramp is popular with boaters because it provides access to the Intracoastal Waterway and two inlets, Boca Raton and Hillsboro. The ramp is now accessible only from Northeast 6 Avenue. The entrance to the park from Dixie Highway has been closed. Raton. Meeting is free and open to the public. The topic will be Slimming down: super foods and supplements. 954-255-6360 or 561-4835445. 1-12 & 13 Tropical Postcard Show and Sale at the Pompano Beach Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $3. Free appraisals. 305-666-0219. 1-13 Sunday Matinee Music at Boca Raton Library. Jim Kovalcik Trio, featuring Jim Kovalcik on ute, Jason Hanley on guitar and Steve Jernigan on bass. 3 p.m. at the Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd. 561239-1536. 1-12 & 1-19 Sign-up for Northeast Little League baseball will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wimberly Field batting cage, 4000 NE 3 Ave., Oakland Park. League is boys and girls ages 5 to 18. Jan. 26 is the last day to register. Volunteer and sponsorship opportunities available. Email davemcleod33@aol.com or 954-793-2348. Fridays The Island City Art SightingsContinued from page 4 See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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10 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Deerfield Beach Angelos Station House Grille opened in the Cove Shopping Center this week with a traditional ribbon-cutting ceremony staged by the Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce. The Grille features Italian fare including antipasti, pasta, zuppa, insalata, vitello, pollo, pesche, carne entrees and dolci. Angelo Morinielli is executive chef. David Greenfield is the manager.Chamber welcomes new restaurant owners Among those pictured are Chamber Executive Director Larry DeVille, Commissioner Joe Miller, restaurant owners Silvio and Marian ne Trentalange, Mayor Peggy Noland, assorted Chamber members and friends of the management. By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach If you need to know what kind of olive oil to pair with whatever youre dining on, Frank Roth is your guy. We tell you what goes on salads, fish, pastas, all kinds Heart of The Olive makes debut in Pompano Beachof stuff. We teach anyone how to shake this and pour that, said Roth, who opened Heart of the Olive last month. He plans an official ribbon cutting sometime in mid-January. We have a whole tasting bar of infused olive oils from Italy and a balsamic tasting bar from Italy.Bluesfest on Las OlasFort Lauderdale The 1st Annual Las Olas Bluesfest will be held Jan. 17 through Jan. 20 on the lawn next to the Riverside Hotel, 620 Las Olas Blvd. Join South Florida radio personality and Florida Panther MC, Bill Murphy, and 17 top Blues bands for a Party on the Lawn and four days of international food and beer. Held daily from 5 to 10 p.m., general admission is $10 or attendees can buy a fourday pass for $35. For more information, email hn25@aol. com or call 305-776-4048 or 954-530-7043. But Heart of the Olive, 816 N. Federal Hwy., is about much more than just olive oil. Roth has brought in furniture from Indonesia, stocked the shelves with handmade pottery and baskets, jarred food, coffee, tea, spices, rubs, salt, picture frames made from materials salvaged after Hurricane Katrina, books, paintings and salad bowls from Africa. You come in; you have all these tasting samples and you can also buy gifts. Its sort of an art tasting experience, said Roth. Heart of The Olive is opening Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit www.theheartoftheolive.com or call 754-222-8071.LEAD$ Group looks for membersDeer eld Beach The Deer eld Beach Chamber LEAD$ Group meets the rst and third Wednesday of the month at the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. The group is business-to-business organization that admits one member per business category. Call Larry DeVille at 954-427-1050 or director@ deer eldchamber.com.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, December 21, 2012 preference, not a criterion of the RFP, Weiner said. The commission, Weiner argued, strayed from the criteria and distrusted the local committee [recommendation] based on emotion. He also questioned the fact that Commissioner Marty Popelsky, absent due to illness, had not reviewed the bid materials as required by code if the commission sits as the ranking committee. Any leasing decision made by the commission in regards to the pier restaurant also requires a super majority, 4 out of 5, vote. Under the ranking procedure used by the commission, however, only a vote to accept the top-ranked bidder, FlashBack, was taken and it was unanimous. Weiner asked the commission to place faith in the original selection committee and accept their recommendation in which his client was ranked rst or prepare another RFP which states clearly that breakfast is everything. The issue has drawn considerable public comment via email. One resident in particular, John Grassi, has sent commissioners and the press health inspection reports which show FlashBack Diner with a number of violations at its Davie and Hallandale locations. Addressing the matter, Vice Mayor Bill Ganz said he investigated the inspection reports of two other local diner-style restaurants and found violations that exceeded those incurred by FlashBack. Although there were a high number of critical violations cited, and on two occasions, a stop-sell order put in on a food item, Ganz said his research showed even more serious complaints from health of cials at the two local diners. Ganz noted some of the infractions incurred by FlashBack were pretty minute . I dont believe the state would allow them to operate [if the diner did not meet the standards]. Maybe we dont see the whole story. The Burger owners are currently engaged in a lawsuit charging a business partner with operating a criminal enterprise that committed theft, bribery, fraud, thefts and extortion. A fast-growing franchise company, Burger claims it will soon have 250 locations. A new one opened recently in Coral Springs. ProtestContinued from page 1 Christmas concertLauderdale-By-TheSea Jan. 12 at 6:45 p.m., Assumption Catholic Church presents it nal concert including a sing-a-long and refreshments. The concert is free and open to the public. Call 954-941-7647.

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12 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFLois Cangelosi remembers being a little girl with white leather Mary Jane shoes. I would pull up a rug at grandmothers house and put on a show. I fell in love with the sound my shoes [without taps] made on her hardwood oor. Ive been dancing ever since. My love of dance turned into a 40-year career. I was Miss Lois with my own dance studio, which I opened at 18, and ran in East Rockaway, Long Island, New York until we moved to Florida in 1994. She and Carmine, her husband were drawn to Florida for the usual reasons of weather and health. Lois says, I became a tennis player, but once a dancer, always a dancer. I missed dancing, went on line to see what was around and I found Esther Beardsworth who put me in touch with Cathy Dooley and her Original Florida Follies. Dancing for charitable causes to help children appealed to me and I joined the group nine years ago. Those dancing feet kept on moving until a balance Lois Cangelosi has danced her way from East Rockaway, New York to Cathy Dooleys Original Florida Follies Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. issue forced her to step out of the chorus line and resume being a teacher to the dancers and assistant to Dooley. I was hooked and have worked closely with Cathy ever since. And Carmine is as willing as I am to volunteer for this worthwhile organization. Hes a back stage guy who works on props and sets to get our the shows on the road. Weve been married for 47 years and hes been my right hand all my life. And he still is. Lois describes Cathy Dooley saying, For her, the Follies is a 24/7, year-round project. She creates such a season. I love what I do as do all of our volunteer dancers and dedicated members of our group. You have to be to work as hard as we do. Asked about Lois, Cathy Dooley had this to say: Lois Cangelosi is very special and a tremendous support for me all during rehearsals and especially in preparation for our winter season shows which run from January through March. Every year is a brand new show; therefore new routines, new production numbers, new costumes, new acts which must be continually polished and repolished. I depend on Lois in all of these areas and she is there for me at all times. I thank Lois from the bottom of my heart. Husband Carmine says, Lois has the same enthusiasm for this charity as she did for her own business, high bar but we all try to live up to her expectations. We rehearse the dancers two days a week, year round, but I am involved with Cathy all the time. We have a think tank for ideas as we face each new year, and we begin to prepare just a few weeks after we nish the last show of the See FOLLIES on page 13Cathy Dooley [left] and Lois Cangelosi enjoy The Original Florida Follies Christmas Brunch at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club. The event is the annual collection of childrens clothing and diapers for two charities. [Photo courtesy of Cathy Dooley]

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The Pelican 13 Friday, December 21, 2012 and so do I. Its good for us, and we get a great deal of pleasure from seeing our donations at work in the childrens agencies to whom we contribute. Lois nods. At our recent Christmas brunch held at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, we had a lot of fun, but we also all donated what looked like a store full of clothing and diapers to the childrens agencies. Mary Whyte from Family Central came in the van we bought for them last year. When she left it was with her van packed with clothing and diapers. An equal amount went to Dr. Ana Calderon and Stephanie Clayton from Childrens Diagnostic and Treatment Center who were on hand for the party. Every social function we have has a purpose, in addition to having fun, we never quit collecting for needy children. Last year we donated $100,000 dollars to these two worthy charities. And this year we hope to do as well. In fact, one of the dancing ladies, Hank Phillips, owner of Hanky Panky, collected and donated $500 additional dollars for much needed diapers. Thank you, and all of the Follies volunteers for the good work you do!Catch the Follies at Viva Las Vegas 2013 Sunday, Jan. 20 at the Omni Auditorium, Coconut Creek Call 954-4620222; ext. #3 or visit www. parkerplayhouse.com FolliesContinued from page 12Lois Cangelosi gets into the spirit with her holiday wardrobe.

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14 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012 Four teens were arrested after the most recent incident, which started along the beach in LBTS and ended in the Cresthaven section of Pompano Beach. A witness told police he saw a teen and a man ghting in the street in the 1900 block of South Ocean Boulevard [A1A] at about 9:20 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 5. The witness yelled at them to stop ghting, and they did. As the teen walked toward him, the witness told him, It is too nice of a day to be ghting. He thought the teen was going to shake his hand, but instead he pushed him violently and grabbed a gold chain and cross from his neck. The witness received abrasions and scratches on his chest but declined medical treatment. The suspect ed the area with three others in a white In niti, which deputies spotted near Northeast 13 Avenue and Northeast 23 Street in Pompano Beach. The teens bailed out of the car, and two ran off. Police set up a perimeter with help from other agencies and used police dogs to track down the eeing suspects. All four were charged with strong-armed robbery. They are Rontavis Holton, 19; and his 17-year-old brother, both of Coral Springs; and Idris Matthews, 18, and Michael Davis, 19, both of Pompano Beach. Matthews also was charged with grand theft/auto. This has become common and unpredictable, Llerena said. This was a loosely organized group. Other similar incidents occurred in town late last month. On Friday, Nov. 23, LBTS deputies responded to the area of Washingtonia Avenue and North Ocean Drive to reports of a strong-armed robbery. The victim said a suspect snatched a chain from his neck and ed. Due to a delay in reporting the incident, deputies were unable to apprehend the suspect. On Sunday, Nov. 25, LBTS deputies responded to reports of another strongarmed robbery in the 1900 block of North Ocean Drive. The victim said a suspect snatched a gold chain from him and ed the area. Deputies quickly established a perimeter, and with the assistance of aviation and canine units, apprehended the suspect. The investigation is still active, since the suspect is believed to have committed multiple similar incidents along the beach areas of Deer eld Beach and Pompano Beach, in addition to LBTS. Llerena said its dif cult for the public to prevent such incidents. These suspects are mobile. They come to town long enough to commit the crime and leave the area. Llerena noted the price of gold has hit the roof, and shops buying gold are proliferating in the area, though there are none in LBTS. Were a small cog in a big wheel, he said. The shops are regulated as second-hand dealers, similar to pawn shops, he said. He said these cases are being worked at the county level with a lot of covert work being done by police. Similar crimes also are occurring in the Orlando area and in Tampa. GoldContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 15 Friday, December 21, 2012 justice, management, has earned two masters and is a graduate of the FBI school. A spokesperson for Israels team, Ron Gunzberger, told local blogger Bett Willett that community leaders and elected of cials had been contacted prior to Sudlers being told by email that he is being terminated Jan. 8 if he has not resigned. Attempts to reach Mayor Peggy Noland before press time were unsuccessful, but Vice Mayor Bill Ganz said he absolutely had not been contacted, not before, nor since [Sudlers] termination. Sudler is one of 26 highranking BSO personnel whose terminations were announced this week. Another on the chopping block is Broward Fire Chief Neal de Jesus who was instrumental in converting Deer elds re/rescue service to BSO. Taking his place will be Margate Fire Chief Tony Stravino who was Deer eld Beach Fire Chief for a brief period. Also relieved of her position is Donna Council a former head of purchasing here who is purchasing director at BSO.Pompano Beach changesIn Pompano Beach, Major William Knowles will be promoted to lieutenant colonel. Knowles will no longer serve in Pompano Beach. Another loss to the city will be Captain Milton Wiener, whose name was on the re list. The Pelican was unable to reach Major Knowles to con rm the SheriffContinued from page 1 reports. Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher said he was extremely pleased about Major Knowles promotion. It is well deserved after his many years of dedication to this city. I was also disappointed about the termination of Captain Wiener. He has always been an asset to the city. The transition of leadership in the Broward Sheriffs Of ce takes place on Jan. 8. Walk is held every third Friday from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Visit www. islandcityartwalk.com Pompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal SightingsContinued from page 9 See SIGHTNGS on page 16

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16 The PelicanFriday, December 21, 2012Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! BidContinued from page 2funding included in the grant requirements. But failing to get approval, the city walked away from Gables proposal. Because the new proposed development would be on public land, city of cials and IBI will have to work out the details of a partnership that could possibly include the cost and length of IBIs lease on the property and an agreement on how to share the revenue generated from the parking structure. The required parking structure must have a minimum of 300 spaces for public use. The present number of spaces is 213. The city also requires LEED energy ef ciency and environmental certi cation for the project. The mixeduse project can have up to ve stories or a maximum height of 60 feet. Twentyve percent of the property must be used for open space. That was a bone of contention for two residents because the bid request allows Hagen Parks retention area to be considered as part of the development. Former mayor John Fiore and Paul Kuta say the development will ruin access to Hagen. Theyre giving part of the park away so that the developer doesnt have to provide any open space, said Fiore. Were de cient in park land as it is. City hall, the police station and Hagen Parks basketball court are not part of the proposed development area. Randy Welker, economic development coordinator, said a committee would review the bid before it goes to commissioners. We have a committee we will call together after Christmas, and they will look at the proposal, Welker said. He estimates the issue will go before the commission sometime in February. Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information. SaturdaysPompano Beach GreenMarket is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. 954-292-8040. SightingsContinued from page 15

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The Pelican 17 Friday, December 21, 2012 read for an additional 20 minutes during the day on Monday, Jan. 14, in a Million Minute Marathon. We will add the minutes up and try to reach our goal of 30 million minutes, Colle said. Last year the goal of 20 million minutes was exceeded by ve million. Students will be encouraged to read at the same time from a magazine, book, newspaper, a blog post whatever appeals to them. Then it was Pickards turn to emphasize the importance of literacy, but he also had a few words about his race car. He said a lot of planning went into building the car. Like everything else, designs start in the drawing room and move to the building of the chassis to the last detail. Safety features are built in to protect drivers from getting hurt in a crash, he said. The average speed is 200 mph. Some crashes are very horrendous, but [with the safety features] a driver can walk out unscathed. Pickard explained that the cars tires are slick for better traction. Windows are all plastic, so they dont shatter. And the car has two holes in the back window with hoses connected to the brakes and transmission so they can be cooled. If the brakes get hot, they lose their stopping power. Next he quizzed the students with a trick question. How many miles is the Daytona 500 race? That would be 500. And now for a math question: If driving one lap takes 2-1/2 minutes, how many laps does it take to go 500 miles? That took a bit more time. Pickard said a really good pit stop takes 12 to 13 seconds. Thats when the crews change all four tires, clean the windshield and add fuel. Crystal Lakes Middle School will take part in Celebrate Literacy Week by participating in the Million Minute Marathon and having a book fair that week and a Family Literacy Night on Jan. 16, according to Tarshe Freeman, reading department chairperson and literacy coach. LiteracyContinued from page 1 Grace Greenwood, language arts teacher, is thrilled with her chance to start the engine on a race car. The car made a stop at Crystal Lakes Middle School last week to promote Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida, coming in January.

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18 The Pelican Friday, December 21, 2012 By Carol RomanoPELICAN WRITERI have to admit I was very skeptical about the raw food diet that seems to be the next foodie trend. Could such a diet satisfy not only my appetite, but the sensory pleasure and variety of cooked foods? A few of my more dedicated healthy-lifestyle buddies were beginning to delve into recipes and attend classes, so out of curiosity I agreed to meet Asa Paul-Johansson, a certified raw food teacher and coach, at a class she gave in my condominium. A few of my more dedicated healthylifestyle buddies were beginning to delve into recipes and attend classes, so out of curiosity I contacted Asa Paul-Johansson, a certified raw food teacher and coach. Paul-Johansson was born in Sweden but has lived in the United States for the past 34 years. Although trained as an archeologist, she could not continue her career once the family moved to the States, so she spent most of her life as a homemaker, caring for her husband and two children. Always interested in nutrition, she came across an article in her local newspaper which discussed the possibilities of broccoli as a preventative of cancer. That got her thinking about converting the family to a vegetarian diet as a protective measure for the future health of her children. It also led her to the books of Ann Wigmore known as the Grandmother of Raw Food. Wigmores books intrigued her, but she didnt yet feel ready to go that route. Instead she slowly transitioned her family into giving up meat and dairy products. She had never allowed processed foods into her kitchen and the switch was not a difficult one. Said Paul-Johansson, When my children had friends over, I offered fresh fruits or homemade ice cream. I have recipes for many treats that were loved by the children. My ice creams are dairy free. The family was still enjoying a vegetarian diet when Paul-Johansson began to take the next step on her Why Asa PaulJohansson Wakes Up Happy! [Left] A rich tarte with intense avor and yet very few ingredients. It keeps very well three to four days in the fridge. [Above] Great tasting chewy patties with an earthy avor from the mushrooms. Cranberry sauce or Orange Curry sauce goes wonderfully with these mushroom patties.See FOOD on page 21

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The Pelican 19 Friday, December 21, 2012 Northeast Little LeagueOakland Park The time to sign up for the Northeast Little League is under way. The baseball league welcomes boys and girls ages 5 to 18. Upcoming registration events will be held Jan. 12 and Jan. 19 at the citys Wimberly Field batting cage, 4000 NE 3 Ave. Last chance registration will be available on Jan. 26 during tryouts at Northeast Field. For volunteer and sponsorship inquires, call 954-793-2348 or email davemcleod33@aol.comCasting call for The Dating Game Senior StyleDeerfield Beach The TV show The Dating Game is making a comeback, Senior Style. Producers are looking for fun-loving singles, age 65 and up, to be a part of a dating game panel. Auditions are Monday, Jan. 7 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Broward Health North, 201 E. Sample Rd., classroom 5. The dating panel will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 23 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Broward Health North. During the Jan. 23 panel, Dr. H Murray Todd, neurologist and medical director of the Broward Health North Neurologic Institute, will also give an introduction about socialization and its importance for the senior community. Seating is limited. Call 954-786-5197 to RSVP.

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20 The Pelican Friday, December 21, 2012 Sponsors needed for Unity in the CommunityPompano Beach Unity in the Community is looking for sponsors for its upcoming event on Feb. 2, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St. The event is open to the public and includes free parking, admission, food and beverages, live music, display booths, childrens activities, cultural groups and special demonstrations by the Broward Sheriffs Office. Unity was first started last year as a way to help people of every culture, religion and race come together to foster a more unified city. To become a sponsor, call Pompano Has Heart at 954-654-3757, email Pompanohasheart@yahoo. com or call Unity in the Community at 954-586-1123 or 954-709-5894 or email cmannpfs@hotmail.com or orknorris9310@yahoo.com.North Broward Leadership ProgramBroward Leadership North Broward, which encompasses Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point and the surrounding areas, is an innovative and interactive learning experience designed to develop leadership skills. The next series of classes begins on Thursday, Jan. 17 and is held on the third Thursday of every month. The cost for this six-month program is $395. This years program will be comprised of nine full-day seminars. Leadership North Broward provides a comprehensive introduction to the communities it serves. For an application, call Chadia Meroueh at Auto Tech and Body at 954-946-Blood pressure screeningsPompano Beach The North Broward Senior Citizens Club, a non-profit organization, will meet on Thursday, Jan. 3 at 1 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olsen Center, 1801 NE 6 St., From 12:40 to 12:55 p.m. blood pressure readings will be taken. Refreshments, entertainment after the meeting. All senior citizens are welcome. Call 954-786-4111.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, December 21, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad quest. Six years ago she decided to eat only raw foods for a three month trial. She put away her pots and pans and invested in a dehydrator, which paired with a good food processor, was all she needed to turn out unbelievably delicious meals. Almost at once she felt more energized. She slept less, but more restfully. intense flavor and yet very few ingredients. It keeps very well three to four days in the fridge, so why not make a double batch? Whipped cashew cream is just divine with the date tarte and so are fresh berries. Ingredients 2 cups raisins 2 cups walnuts Optional: 1 tablespoon cacao powder 1 cups dates, pitted Juice from 2 limes Optional serving: fresh berries or kiwi and whipped cashew cream.Preparation1. Place raisins and walnuts in food processor and chop. Run for a long time until the nuts start to release their oil and form into a ball. 2. Place on a serving plate and form to an even crust/ base. Do not make it too thick, half an inch is fine. 3. Mix dates with lime juice in food processor. No need to wash the bowl in between. Add a few drops water only if it will not process the dates. Spread evenly over date crust. 4. Decorate with fresh berries and if you like serve with cashew cream. Although living in Chicago with its brutal winters, PaulJohansson never caught a cold and had the intense feeling that her body was in harmony with her emotional and psychological well being. After three months of 100 percent raw foods, PaulJohansson began the regime she follows today, 90 percent raw and 10 percent cooked vegetables. What was a typical days menu at the Paul-Johansson house? Well, she says, I begin my day with a glass of water and lemon juice; then I either have a green vegetable or fresh fruit smoothie, or cereal. I make my cereal by soaking whole oats or buckwheat overnight in water. Then I add apple slices or dates, perhaps banana slices and a touch of honey or agave syrup. If I have lunch it might be a soup of sundried tomato, pine nuts, basil and a drop of olive oil. When I put it all through the food processor, it becomes a creamy soup. If its a cold day, I might heat the mix slightly. Dinner might be a couscous of cranberries, pine nuts, spinach seasoned with apple cider vinegar and a green salad. This diet is very filling and satisfying. All I know is that every morning I wake up feeling light and happy, she said. Paul-Johannson can even make bread and crackers without turning on an oven, and her breads last for weeks in the freezer. Now thats a plus for Florida homemakers! For more information contact Paul-Johansson at info@onthelime.com or www. onthelime.com. Here is one of PaulJohanssons favorite recipes:Date TarteServes 4-6 Here is a rich tarte with FoodContinued from page 18

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22 The Pelican Friday, December 21, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 BOCA RATON SALON WANTED Hair Stylist Manicurist Pedicurist Facialist Massage. Salary Commission Or Rent 1 Month FREE. 954-415-4937. 12-28 SEEKING EXPERIENCED DECKHAND ON CHARTER BOAT. CALL 954-832-0890. 12-28 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTRELIABLE BILINGUAL LADY Seeks Position As Pet Sitter / Dog Walker (Responsible Animal LOVER) Pompano / E Ft Lauderdale Area. Giselle 954-942-8111. 1-4 COMPANION HOME CARE Best Companion Care For You Or Your Loved One. Over 25 Years Experience, Reliable, Honest, Compassionate. Excellent References. Louise 954-258-1053. 12-21 HOME HEALTH AIDE Seeking Employment Alzheimers Tube Feeding Errands. References. More Information 954-226-2089. 12-28SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-11 EXPERIENCED DRIVER AVAILABLE! TO & FROM STORES DOCTORS APPOINTMENTS AIRPORT, ETC. CALL MARYANN 954-895-3202. 12-21 CROWN MODING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Molding. 954-717-1805. (Woman Owned). 1-11 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Call Dave 954818-9538. 1-11 MOORE PLUMBINGPLUMBING SERVICES-Big Jobs-Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 12-28 A N A S CLEAN (RESIDENTIAL) CLEANING In Pompano Lighthouse Point Deer eld. Dependable Thorough Experienced. References. Good Work For A Good Price. Please Call Ana 954-692-4691. 12-7 SANTAS HELPER NOT ENOUGH Time To Decorate Or Last Minute Cleaning For That Special Occasion Shop Wrap Or Pick-up Gifts Etc. Dont Stress Out!! Call Me Elf Ruth & Ill Be On My Way In My Sleigh. 954-8618856. 12-28 XPERTS CLEANING SERVICE Residential & Commercial. 10 Years Experience. References Honest Dependable. More Information Call 954-3760524. 1-4 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATIONPickup & Drop-Off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-234-0617. 1-4 DIGNITY CLEANING SERVICE INC House Condo Of ce & More. 954826-6450. Lic/Ins. Call Today For A FREE Estimate. 5th Cleaning 1/2 Price. 12-21. HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1221 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 12-28 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 1-1 1 SLEEP COMFORT ADJUSTABLE QUEEN SIZED BED Never Used. Pompano Beach 954-638-9656. 12-21 JEWELRYGIVE WEARABLE ART THIS YEAR. www.etsy.com/ shop/T rekkietrishaJewelry 954-596-8991. 12-21 ROOMS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH Off Powerline & Hillsboro Blvd. $500 Per Month IncludesUtilities. Non-Smoker No Drugs. 1st/Last/Ref/ Background Check To Movein. NEGOTIABLE! 754-2148131. 12-21 LIGHTHOUSE POINT ON Deep Water Canal Pool (2) Private Rooms & Bath. Dockage Available. Call Julie 954-224-2216. 12-21SEASONAL RENTALLAUD BY THE SEA 55+. BEAUTIFUL 2/2 Furnished. Walk To Beach, Shops, Restaurants. Large Pool Nice Grounds. 3-5 Month Rental. 413-244-2807. 12-21 POMPANO BEACH BLOCK POOLSIDE 1 & 2 BEDROOM APTS. Close To Fine Restaurants & Shopping. For Reservations 561-4883110. 12-21 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38 x 13. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 12-28 DEEP WATER 15 Minutes To Hillsboro Inlet. Up To 63. Electric Up To 50 AMPS & Water. Call Julie 954-224-2216. 12-21 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO CHARMING 2/1 Home. Asking $975 Per Month. 611 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 12-28 POMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,100 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-28Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com or 954-7838700!

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The Pelican 23 Friday, December 21, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700!Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com or 954-7838700! Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO 2 / 1 1 Car Garage. Central Air Screened Porch. Double Shed With Sundeck. $124,900. Barbara Balistreri Realty 954-2637129. 12-21 REAL ESTATE WANTED I BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18 CONDOS FOR SALECENTURY VILLAGE / DEERFIELD Beautiful 2/2 Ground Floor Corner Unit. Bright & Sunny w/Screened Patio Overlooking Canal. Fully Furnished. Move-in Ready. MUST SEE! Asking $63,900. 561-372-9837. 12-21 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 1-4CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 1-4 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call Noelle 888269-3095. 1-11 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 1-4 POMPANO / MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 Avenue 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 12-28 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 NW NE 2/1 New $9752/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 12-28 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 2-15 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-28 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 1-11 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 12-28 POMPANO DIXIE & COPANS WAREHOUSE For Rent. 2 Units 1-1640 Sq Ft 1 2080 Sq Ft With A/C Of ces Zoned 3M. Both With Overhead Doors. No Reasonable Offers Refused. 716-316-3690. 12-28

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24 The Pelican Friday, December 21, 2012 Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Elite Force Martial Arts, a black belt School in Lighthouse Point, 4754 N. Federal Hwy., recently celebrated its black belt graduates. Craig Haley, co-owner with KC Colbin, said, The family that kicks together sticks together and we have one-third of our student body is training with a family member. Our schools are a nice balance of 50 percent kids and 50 percent adults so everyone ts in. 1st Degree Black Belt Graduates Brenda Belanger, Andres Gonzalez, Kenneth Parker, Frances Vaughn, Paul Willis, Kim Berntsen, James Hons, Lorraine Noboa-Robbins, Daniel Walter, Kyle Zahn, Rick Connolly, Piper Neuls, Michael Sheehan, Rachel Wheeler 2nd Degree All-Stars Nicholas DiMarco, Tyler Hirsch, Natalie Novak 3rd Degree Top Guns Christian Acosta, Michael Adkins, Alonso Perez, Lori Ann Pon, Edgar Perez 6th Degree Elite Force Leader Shihan KC ColvinRJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point Youd better hurry up and get your spoons ready for the big bite. Thats right, spoons. A spoon is what we use to catch Spanish mackerel, which are plentiful around the Deerfield Beach International Fishing Pier right now. And these mackerel are attracting schools of large kingfish. Some skilled anglers have already caught kingfish up to 70 lbs. To catch one of these kings, first cast a spoon into a school of mackerel. Prepare your rod with a 7/0 J hook and an additional treble hook hanging six inches behind it. Take the mackerel off Giant kings are hanging-out in Deer eld the spoon rod and switch it quickly over to rod you plan to use for the kingfish. Hook the mackerel through the top lip and put the treble in his back. Now for the king! At this point just free spool the reel allowing the mackerel to swim away naturally. Hold on tight because the bite from a 60-lb. kingfish is insane. Sometimes the big kings will jump as they eat the mackerel, and at other times the line will just start melting off the spool. At that point lock up the reel and watch line melt off the reel. You will probably have to fire up the boat and chase the king down. Remember that you are only fishing in 15 feet of water so the giant kingfish cant go down, he can only go out. If you need any help getting rigged up give us a call. Elite Force Martial Arts MLK Marketplace in PompanoPompano Beach Every second Saturday of the month MLK Marketplace is held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Annie Adderly Gillis Park, 601 Martin Luther King Boulevard. The next installment takes place Jan. 12. The event features live entertainment, a talent contest, food vendors and merchants. Those who win the monthly talent competition will enter into a final event in June for $1,500 in cash prizes awarded for first, second and third place. Call 954-786-7824.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, December 21, 2012 Buy a brick and help nish Wilton Manors Childrens Art ProjectThe Wilton Manors Development Alliance [WMDA] is about halfway to its goal of raising $35,000 to complete the Childrens Art Project at Jaycee Park. [Rendering courtesy of WMDA] By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Three years ago, Wilton Manors Elementary School students and Fort Lauderdale artist Kevin Kichar finished the mosaic portion of the Childrens Art Project. But the finishing touches are yet to be realized. The 5 ft. by 7 ft. mosaic, located in Jaycee Park at the corner of Wilton Drive and Northeast 21 Court represents this towns history. In 1925 the two medieval castles were the brainstorm of developer E.J. Willingham who constructed the towers in the city to market real estate. Now, the Wilton Manors Development Alliance [WMDA] is looking to finish the job. To do that, more money is needed. The final construction will include a plaza with walls of two interlocking hands in friendship, a decorative wall, benches, landscaping, lighting and brick pavers. It would be celebratory of the diversity of Wilton Manors, said Krishan Manners, president/CEO of WMDA. To help fund the expression of that diversity, WMDA is selling the brick pavers. Were halfway [to the $35,000 needed] as far as fundraising goes. We want to really make this a showplace for Wilton Manors. Each brick purchased can be inscribed with the name of a person or a business and will be laid in the plaza. The cost is $100 for a 4 x 8 brick and $175 for an 8 x 8 brick. Messages are limited to three lines and 18 characters each line for the 4 x 8 bricks; six lines and 18 characters each line for the 8 x 8 bricks. Bricks can also be purchased as gift items for display and include a felt backing with a stand. The cost is $50 for a smaller replica of a 4 x 8 brick and $75 for a smaller replica of an 8 x 8 brick. Visit www.developwm.org for more information on buying bricks.

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26 The Pelican Friday, December 21, 2012 Pelican Classi eds mean business! Call 954-783-8700! their own paths. Before that, she and art teacher, Sara Marc, challenged their students to create a piece of sculpture from recycled materials. It was a replica of a famous Louise Nevelson work and another lesson in creating ones own path. A resident of Pompano Beach, Englehart began her education at the University of Akron where she obtained her BS. She went on from there to study holistic education and counseling, earn a master of arts degree and finally an advanced graduate arts education national board certification. Her resume includes a long list of honors and awards in her field. On Jan. 8 she will speak to a group of educators at a meeting at Young At Art in Hollywood and she is in the process of getting Whose Shoes? into school libraries. Recently, she distributed her book at the NE Focal Point Day Care Center and the kids read it to the senior citizens who come to the Focal Point for recreation and care. Whose Shoes is available online at Amazon and Barnes and Noble. It is published by Balboa Press.Whose Shoes?Continued from page 5The Sunshine BoysTamarac The Tamarac Theatre Of Performing Arts, 7143 Pine Island Road, presents the Sunshine Boys. The play focuses on aging Al Lewis and Willy Clark, a onetime vaudevillian team known as Lewis and Clark who, over the course of forty-odd years, grew to hate each other and never spoke off-stage. Clark is convinced by his nephew Ben to revive one of the old routines one last time. The play runs from Jan. 5 to Jan. 20. Show times are Saturdays at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $25. Visit www.ttopa.org for more information.

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