<%BANNER%>
Pompano Pelican
ALL VOLUMES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00327
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 12-14-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00328

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Friday, December 14, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 50 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican At Broward Children’s Center, ashing lights bring season of joyBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach – Fire ghters usually see the children at Broward Children’s Center when they respond to a medical emergency. But last Friday, instead of bringing a child to the hospital they brought Christmas toys to the children. Helping the re ghters, some in uniform and three dressed as clowns, was Santa Claus – arriving on a vintage re truck. “It’s very heartfelt to us because we run a lot of calls here. It means a lot for us to see them smiling one day out of the year,” said Fire ghter Samantha Eslie. Founded in 1971, the non-pro t Broward Children’s Center specializes in See RECYCLING CARTS on page 16 Founders’ Days committee calls the game for lack of resourcesBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Faced with dwindling nancial resources and aging volunteers, the Founders’ Days’ committee is packing it in. This year, the city and a private event planner will stage the 66th annual festival which takes place in mid-February. Said former event chair David MacKay, “When we looked at the cost, over $100,000, it was scary. We have only $25,000 in the bank. Do we want to be operating in the red? We always had a slush fund to cover our expenses. ” MacKay said that out of 12 Founders’ Days’ board members, six are over the age of 70 and that although he himself was willing to “give it one more year” most were not. “It’s hard to get new volunteers,” he New recycling carts draw ravesLighthouse Point – Ask Art Graham, public works director, about recycling and he lights up. “It’s been one of the best programs we’ve had,” says Graham. “Residents are buying into the carts, and our recycling doubled the rst month we used them.” This year the city offered residents single-stream 64-gallon carts with lids and wheels. LHP has led the county in per capita recycling for years, holding on to rst place most of the time. Commission sends union new contract; one percent wage hike and severe pension cutsBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – City re ghters will work longer and realize pension cuts if their union rati es a contract approved by the city commission. Although pension reform was described as “obviously the big elephant in the room, the two sides also tried to reach agreement on wages and paid time off (PTO). After hours of discussion, commissioners reached a compromise on the pension issue. They approved a minimum retirement age of 52 with 55 the norm and they set the maximum pension at 70 percent of salary. Commissioners Jed Shank and Suzanne Boisvenue voted no. The city proposed no changes for See CONTRACT on page 14Inlet Bridge designers propose a signature lookBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Another statue of James Edward Hamilton, the long ago mailman whose tragic death has inspired art, cinema and literature, may overlook the inlet where he died. Dubbed the Barefoot Pompano Beach Fire ghter Jay Lester as Santa delivering presents to the Broward Children’s Center on Friday. Pompano re ghters delivered over 150 presents to children with special needs as they do every year. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira] See JOY on page 15 See BRIDGE on page 12 See FOUNDERS DAY on page 23

PAGE 2

2 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-TheSea – Town commissioners have awarded a $195, 552 contract for A1A parking lot renovations to Di Pompeo Construction Corp. Renovations to the lot, just north of Commercial Boulevard, include adding parking spaces, landscaping and new exits. Di Pompeo Construction is the rm also adding median parking on South Bougainvilla Drive, south of Commercial Boulevard. Plans for Bougainvilla call for adding 26 parallel parking spots in four medians and landscaping at a cost of $92,000. Bud Bentley, assistant town manager, said the projects will be done simultaneously with completion expected in 90 Parking lot to get redo days. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said he would like the commission to reassess the issue of a proposed sign in the A1A parking lot. The sign is not included in the contractor’s estimated price, since it has not been designed. In late October, commissioners approved a conceptual sign plan and canvas-topped structure, estimated to cost $58,280. Sasser was the lone dissenter. Designers were directed to get back to the commission with more realistic costs. Sasser said he can’t bring up the sign issue, since he opposed it. Commissioner Chris Vincent said he also would like more discussion of the sign, citing cost concerns. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said staff has been looking at toning the See LOT on page 23By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Dist. 2 City Commission Charlotte Burrie has made two important decisions: she will seek her fourth term in of ce and she accepted the chairmanship of this city’s Relay for Life event. Burrie, 68, said she was talked into taking on the fundraiser for cancer research because it “pulled at my heartstrings. I lost my best friend and my nana to cancer. Everyone has lost someone.” Her decision to run in March for two more years on the commission came about because, she said, “I enjoy being a public servant. I really like being close to the residents and helping them in any way I can.” Burrie’s district takes in northeast Pompano including Cresthaven, The Highlands, Commissioner Burrie to seek fourth term some of old Pompano and the community of Leisureville. She has run unopposed in her last two elections. Wednesday night at a party hosted by Galuppi’s, she was elated that so many people about 80turned out for her rst Relay meeting. “The enthusiasm was fantastic. We signed on two or three more teams. I am hoping to get the city involved, BSO and the re ghters.” The goal this year is to raise $45,000 at the May 1718 event at Community Park. Until this week, Burrie had told only her Cresthaven civic association that she would seek re-election. She has opened her campaign account and will le on Jan. 2, the day the books open. Burrie said her goals remain to improve the neighborhoods she represents. In the Highlands that mission won’t begin until Broward County nishes digging up the roads to make infrastructure improvements. After that, studies will be done to create a traf c calming plan. “There BurrieSee BURRIE on page 3

PAGE 3

The Pelican 3 Friday, December 14, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com is still a lot to do there,” Burrie said. Another of her goals has been, and still is, to build a civic center for the Cresthaven/Highlands neighborhoods. She has her eye on a piece of property but can’t reveal its location just yet she said. Burrie is a former Pompano Beach city clerk. She obtained her law degree in 1990 from St. Thomas University in Miami and practices estate, probate and real estate law in the city. In addition to her commitment to Relay for Life, she is a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, American Legion Auxiliary, Kiwanis Club and Moose Lodge.BurrieContinued from page 2BSO, city honor local volunteer By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – On Tuesday, Carol Waldrop, a long-time volunteer in Pompano Beach and Broward County, was too nervous to drive from her home to BSO headquarters in Pompano Beach. Her friend, Carolyn Mann, agreed to drive. It was a short trip from Waldrop’s Cresthaven home to headquarters, and it was See WALDROP on page 25Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher and Broward County Sheriff Al Lamberti join in their congratulatory praises for Carole Waldrop who was of cially honored by her peers, BSO and the city for her years of volunteer work in the city. 12-14 – The movie “Pirates! Band of Mis ts” will play at 7 p.m. at Villages of Hillsboro Park, 4111 NW 6 St., See SIGHTINGS on page 19

PAGE 4

4 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Wilton Manors reduces parking requirements for Wilton Drive retail By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – In an effort to attract more retail establishments to Wilton Drive, commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to eliminate parking requirements for retail businesses. Commissioner Ted Galatis was absent. Retail storefronts along Wilton Drive are currently required to provide three parking spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of oor area or one parking space per 333 sq. ft. But if nal approval is given, retail establishments would be exempt from providing parking along the Drive. Bars, lounges, restaurants and nightclubs would still be required to provide three spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Mayor Gary Resnick said he doesn’t foresee a problem with the reduction because most retail customers shop during the day when it’s a lot easier to nd a parking space. Most of the demand on parking is at night when the bars, clubs and restaurants are open. Vice Mayor Julie Carson said she wasn’t sure why a city, “plagued by parking problems,” would want to reduce its parking requirements. “We have a very serious parking problem,” she said. For years, the city has tried to nd ways to provide enough parking to the businesses along Wilton Drive. The city’s two municipal parking lots, Hagen Park and Richardson Park, provide enough parking on the south end of the street but many businesses to the north still struggle with a lack of parking. To alleviate some of the problem, the city purchased land on Northeast 8 Terrace that it plans to turn into a paved lot. Asked why she voted in favor of the reductions on the Drive, Carson said she didn’t hear any objections from residents. She added that there are other ways the city can address its economic challenges outside of altering parking requirements. In contrast, Carson said resident opposition to a proposal to reduce parking requirements in residential neighborhoods caused her to also be against the issue – which failed. “Based on comments from residents, I can’t see this as a good idea at the time.” City staff proposed reducing the number of residential parking spaces required for new developments, in certain parts See WILTON DRIVE on page 22

PAGE 5

The Pelican 5 Friday, December 14, 2012 Pompano Beach – Like a ne wine, the Pompano Beach Boat Parade has gotten better with age. “This was the best participation in the Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade in recent years. We had 53 boats. We feel the date change along with it being the 50th Anniversary of the event brought out a lot of people,” said Ric Green, president/ CEO of the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, the organization which organizes the annual event. “In addition to it being a free event for both participants and viewers, we also paid prize money in certain categories and gave all participants a $25 card for gas for the boat as well,” added Green. Organizers estimate thousands came out to watch the festivities, including hundreds at the Sands Harbor Resort where the judges reviewed the parade’s participants. The awards ceremony to recognize the winners will be held Wednesday, Jan. 9 at 5:30 p.m. at Oceans 234, 234 N. Ocean Blvd., Deer eld Beach.2012 Winners Best in Show Over 30 ft. – SEXY Most Unique Over 30 ft. – Noah’s Ark Under 30 ft. – Cruising Attitude Best in Sound Over 30 ft. – Bimini Twist Under 30 ft. – Captiva Best Entertainment Over 30 ft. – Rusty Hook Under 30 ft – Got Rum Best Club – Kokomo – HISC Best Commercial Killer Green Best First Timers Tie between: Angela Nuran and Down the Hatch Most Effective Lighting Over 30 ft. – Knot On Call Under 30 ft. – Coconut Telegraph Best Private Boat Over 30 ft. – War Eagle Under 30 ft. – SeaTeaz Best Deer eld Beach Entry Southern Breeze Best Lighthouse Point Entry Reel Priority Pompano Beach Chamber Award Over 30 ft. – Shake a Leg Miami Under 30 ft. – Tuned Blue Spirit of the Parade Award NO Name – Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach Top Three Point Winners – out of a possible 200 SEXY – 183 pts.Bimini Twist – 178 pts. Noah’s Ark – 163 pts.Floods of praises for 2012 Pompano Beach Holiday Boat ParadeBrightly decorated boats sailed the Intracoastal Waterway last weekend to celebrate its 50th anniversary of the nation’s oldest boat parade. [Photo by Clay Wieland] M o s t Most U n i q u e Unique N o a h ’ s Noah’s A r k Ark

PAGE 6

6 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 50 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & Letters Diane Dalsimer prepares to light the Chanukah candles the rst night of Chanukah which began Saturday, Dec. 8. The event took place at John Knox Village where more than 100 residents and family members shared the occasion followed by the traditional Chanukah treat, potato pancakes and applesauce. [Photo by Norm Rasmussen]By Rabbi David MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOM OF POMPANO BEACHChanukah is a festival which has taken on many different identities and roles, since it juxtaposes a major Christian holiday at this time of year. It represents a struggle for religious freedom, a subject dear to American hearts; an armed rebellion against a cruel colonizing power, also re ecting a theme popular in our history. Were the Maccabees, the priestly citizen-soldiers of the Chanukah saga, conservative traditionalists ghting a newfangled foreign culture, or liberal—sorry, progressive—warriors taking up arms in the name of diversity? Yes and yes. Just as there can be no objective telling of a country’s history— every historian has an ax to grind or a mold into which to cast his theories—so can the Chanukah story be adapted to different worldly outlooks. In the end, we Jews have the homely miracle of a single bottle of consecrated oil, barely suf cient to last for one night, yet burning steadily for eight, which gave the Jewish victors time to crush fresh olives and make new oil for the menorah, the sacred candlelabra which stood in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. But wait! Isn’t there an alternate reading to the tale? Yes: in the Apocrypha, the books which were not accepted into either the Hebrew or Protestant Bibles as Holy Writ (our Catholic neighbors do accept them as such, and preserved them through the centuries), Chanukah lasts for eight days because it was a delayed celebration of Sukkot, the Festival of Booths. Which version ought we to accept? We can believe both, but the oil story is the more famous, leading us to the particular foods served on this holiday: latkes, or potato pancakes, are the common fare for European-derived Jews, while Jews from the Arab countries prefer sufganiyote (Hebrew, “little sponges,”) or jelly doughnuts. Any food fried in vegetable oil is acceptable, so, bring on the tempura! Don’t expect to nd latkes mentioned in the Chanukah story, though: Judah Maccabee never saw a potato in his life; they derive from South America. Then, of course, there is the dreidel, the four-sided top which, according to legend, saved Torah study during the persecutions of the time. During Hebrew School, a lookout would keep guard against enemy soldiers on patrol; if they approached, the lesson would end abruptly, and the soldiers would nd nothing more subversive than children and a teacher betting on the spins of a top. This is a ne story, except that the dreidel derives from the Middle Ages, long after the Chanukah period, which was about 168 BCE. Chanukah is, decidedly, no “minor” holiday, for, had there been no Chanukah, I believe there might never have been a Christmas. Consider: had the Hellenistic Greek culture succeeded in eradicating Judaism, then, when Jesus was born in 4 BCE, he would not have been born a Jew, but a Greek. Christianity as we know it today might never have begun. And so, as our Christian neighbors deck their halls in red and green, perhaps they might consider adding a bit of blue and white. So much strife and anger in today’s world threatens to divide us—let us, rather, focus on what unites us: a common love of the One Who made us in His/Her image, and a common love of peace. Happy Holidays! Stories of Chanukah represent the struggles for religious freedomKnow your solar rights as a homeownerSPECIAL TO THE PELICANIn an effort to educate and encourage residents and businesses to convert to solar energy, the Broward County Go SOLAR program team is informing homeowners of their rights to install renewable energy devices. As a homeowner in the state of Florida, you may not be denied permission to install a renewable energy device [such as solar panels], or any other energy device based on renewable energy. Chapter 163 of the Florida Statutes – Section 163.04 forbids ordinances, deed restrictions, covenants, declarations, or similar binding agreements from prohibiting the installation of solar collectors or any other energy device based on renewable resources. Even though a homeowner cannot be prevented from installing a solar energy system, certain restrictions may apply. Restrictions must be reasonable, not arbitrary and must be uniformly imposed on all homeowners. Restrictions cannot impact the performance of solar energy systems nor may they prohibit the installation related to solar energy devices. Florida state law speci cally prohibits a community association from preventing the installation of solar collectors on a homeowner’s roof. The association may, however, determine where on the roof the collectors may be installed, so long as the installation is within the area required for effective operation; speci cally, or within 45 degrees east or west of due south. The association may not impose requirements which would effectively restrict the system’s operating ef ciency. It is important that you notify your homeowners’ or community association before installing a solar energy system on your home. Go SOLAR Broward Rooftop Solar Challenge is a U.S. Department of Energy grant-funded program that makes it easier for Broward County residents and businesses to convert to solar energy, by reducing the cost and wait time associated with the permitting process for installing photovoltaic rooftop solar systems. Go SOLAR Broward Rooftop Solar Challenge offers home and business owners and/or their contractors a streamlined, online permit application system with standardized fees, preapproved design plans, and uniform interconnection to utility systems. For more information, visit broward.org/GoGreen/GoSolar or call 954-5191260.Holiday in the ParkPompano Beach – The annual Community Holiday in the Park will be held tomorrow, Dec. 15, from 12 to 4 p.m. at Mitchell Moore Park, 901 NW 10 St. Organized by the Pass the Blessing Foundation, this program is designed to bring the community closer together regardless of what side of town people live on, what religion they belong to, what political party they vote for or what color their skin is. For more information, visit www.wepasstheblessings.org or call 954-755-7656.

PAGE 7

The Pelican 7 Friday, December 14, 2012 See the Sample-McDougald House by NightSPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach The historic Sample-McDougald House is decorated for the holidays and on Dec. 20 visitors will have an opportunity to see it lighted up after dark. On that evening the property will be open to the public from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Holiday dcor includes Christmas trees with antique lights and ornaments, a tree decorated by students from three Pompano Beach schools, as well as special holiday lighting in the gazebo and elsewhere on the grounds. There will be Yuletide music provided by Joe Balestreri as well as light refreshments. The Sample-McDougald House is located at 450 NE 10 Street, Pompano Beach (entrance on NE 5th Avenue) and admission is $5 per person. For information call 954 691-5686, By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Right now, it’s an empty 26,000 sq. ft. plot of land made up of patchy grass, sand and littered with trash. But the hope is that by March it will be a community garden home to hydroponic towers and individual vegetable garden plots grown by the people who live here. “It seems to me the enthusiasm is there. I think it’s something the community wants,” said Commissioner Woodrow Poitier, who represents Dist. 4, the area the garden would be located. And because it would be directly east of Blanche Ely High School, just north of the corner of Northwest 6 Avenue and Northwest 10 Street, Poitier said the garden would be good for students as well. “It would give them pride in being a part of something. We just need to get it done,” said Poitier. Carlton Moore, liaison to the Northwest CRA Advisory Committee, said the city wants to get Blanche Ely students of cially involved but is still working on the details. The $50,000 project still has a long way to go before the rst roots can be pulled out of the soil. “We have to get the zoning review,” said Natasha Alfonso, Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] planner/economic development manager. “And to think, this was [once] a farming community,” said Moore, who was dismayed that it would take a zoning change to allow a small garden. He estimates that once the city is ready to start assigning plots, a nominal fee of “not New community garden re ects early history of PompanoSee GARDEN on page 13

PAGE 8

8 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFJuly 2007, Steve Mark Wilson opened the doors of J. Mark’s Restaurant in a free standing, speci cally designed building on the Copans side of Pompano Citi Centre campus and it became an instant hit. The design, the ambiance, the menu and the service captured and kept the attention of the public because, as one of the rst customers said, “It has all of the elements that matter to those who want a versatile menu in an upscale setting, served by an attentive wait staff to discriminating diners.” At the time, Wilson explained that his brother James was an investor, but that he, with a successful career in the food industry, had carefully planned this restaurant with its well designed kitchen that can produce orders for up to 260 guests. The elevated bar and lounge seats about 72 people and the restaurant itself seats about 190 patrons. “Chef Rico [Rodrigo Copeland] is a gem who has been with us since opening day,” says Wilson. “ He’s talented, open to suggestions and executes our food to J. Mark’s Restaurant celebrates ve successful years of delivering consistently ne food and service perfection.” Wilson and his partner Ariel Ayala, have since opened a second successful J. Mark’s at 1245 N. Federal Hwy. in Fort Lauderdale and installed Fabian Gomez as general manager and operating partner in the Pompano Beach location. The Pelican sat down with Fabian to talk about what goes on behind the scenes to make J. Mark’s the consistent success it is. “We have four daily staff meetings, one for each shift, to keep our employees informed and on their toes when it comes to ef ciency and service,” Fabian explains. “Our menu is carefully planned to appeal to every taste and budget from a soup and salad combination at $8.99 to certi ed Angus beef tenderloin at $29.99. What’s great about this is the fact that people can dine together without compromising any taste or diet. We often see families at a table where Dad orders prime rib, Mom orders a chopped oriental salad, and the kids order cheese burgers. J. Mark’s can satisfy the entire group in one restaurant and that is just one of the reason’s for our popularity and success.”’ He goes on to say, “Every item on the menu has been taste tested and compared to the best offered by our competition. If ours isn’t better, it’s not on the menu.” Some of the best selling appetizers are Bam-Bam Shrimp and Spinach dip with artichokes. Our prime rib sliders were named “Award Winners” by YoLo, a restaurant critiquing group. The Oriental Chicken Salad is the most popular salad, especially on the midday menu. Fabian adds, ”Our prime rib is outstanding; the Hawaiian rib eye steak is to die for; and the Mizo glaze salmon is a winning sh selection.” Making the most of the “slow period” between lunch and dinner, J. Mark’s features its Mid-Day Menu. During this time slot between two and ve p.m., high quality items are offered at big discounts. On this menu are Oriental Chicken Salad, Five Cheese Pasta, Rack of Ribs, 8-Oz. Prime Rib, Walnut Shrimp on a bed of rice and Fish and Chips. “People who want a lighter meal, mid-day are grateful for this option and for the savings,” says Fabian. Fabian says. “At our staff meetings, we review our commitment to excellence and to providing the best product and service possible. The RAFT taste [recipe, appearance, avor, texture and temperature], gives servers the chance to taste a seasonal special drink and one food from the kitchen. See J.MARKS on page 18Fabian Gomez, general manager of the Pompano Beach J. Mark’s location pauses to chat with Chef Rico [Rodrigo Copeland] whom he describes as “talented, open to suggestions who executes our food to perfection.”History at High NoonDeerfield Beach – The Deerfield Beach Historical Society is hosting History at High Noon at 12 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 19 at the historic Butler House, 380 E. Hillsboro Blvd. There will be a special exhibit of vintage amateur images of Deerfield Beach as it once was. The event is free but donations will be welcome. Refreshments, cookies and punch will be served. 957-429-0378.Job fair tomorrowDeerfield Beach – O2 Media Productions is looking to fill 15 or more positions and collect resumes for future openings in early 2013 and will be holding a job fair tomorrow, Dec. 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at its studio, 3850 N. Powerline Road. O2 is looking for writers, producers, associate producers, business-to-business sales associates and programmers to work in the medium of television. Bring several resume copies and portfolios if applicable. For more information, visit www.o2mediainc.com or call 954-691-1102.

PAGE 9

The Pelican 9 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 10

10 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. Briefs Pace Girls graduate with con dence and tools to help them build a personal future success. Emily, Cierra, Karolyn (11th graders) and Monique (12th grade) look forward to graduation and new challenges. [Photos courtesy of PACE]By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPace Center for girls is a non pro t corporation that provides a non-residential, delinquency prevention program geared to the unique needs of young women at risk. The girls are targeted a number of ways as being in need of a safe, nurturing and therapeutic environment. The purpose of Pace Center is to intervene and prevent girls from school withdrawal, juvenile delinquency, teen pregnancy, substance abuse and welfare dependency. Touring the Pace Center with Kathleen Ryan, development director, gives the visitor a look into classrooms, media and art center, counseling of ces, staff of ces, auditorium, dining facilities and more in the attractive center under the leadership of Executive Director, Aggie Pappas. Located at 2225 N. Andrews Ave. in Wilton Pace Center for Girls 12 to 17 in Wilton Manors offers education, guidance, and coping skills for success Manors, it’s apparent that the staff dispenses love, dedication, positive thinking, support and education --a successful formula for the 80 girls attending the center. Ryan explains. “From day one, each girl has a counselor, a social service life skills counselor in addition to a full education program. We feel these are young women of courage who are motivated to succeed and they receive the help they need from us to do so. They are with us year ‘round from Monday through Friday from 8:30 to 3 p.m. All subjects are taught by certi ed teachers from sixth to 12 grade. This team approach insures that our girls are well prepared to transition to a regular commercial school, or at graduation they are ready to enter college or begin a career.” The average stay at the Pace Center is one year and a half, although some students are encouraged to remain for two years. The girls are mostly referred to Pace by family, school counselors, medical professionals, and sometimes they request consideration themselves because they have heard about Pace’s support system. The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice and School Board of Broward County Kathleen Ryan, development director of Pace, has been working for its funding and success for the past seven years. Touring and learning about the Center from Ryan makes it clear that caring and dedication is part of her job description. See PACE on page 11It’s time to celebrate the seasonDeer eld Beach Two parties are planned for the upcoming holidays by the City of Deer eld Beach. Winter Wonderland will be held Thursday, Dec. 20 at Villages of Hillsboro Park at 3 p.m. The event will be highlighted by real snow, horse drawn hayrides and photo ops with Santa Claus. Small fees may apply. Food will be sold. The park is at 4111 NW 6 St. Call 480-4495 for more information. Teenagers, 13-18, will have their special party, “Up All Night,” on Friday and Saturday, Dec. 21 to 22. They will meet at Constitution Park, 2841 W. Hillsboro Blvd., and enjoy an evening at Santa’s Enchanted Forest followed by bowling. Cost is $30 and includes all the fun and lots of food. Registration due by Dec. 20. Spots are lling fast. Call 954-571-4568 for more.Holiday hoursDeer eld Beach City Hall will be closed Dec. 24 through 26 for Christmas and Jan. 1 for New Year’s Day. The Aquatic Center will be closed Dec. 24, 25 and Jan. 1 and open Dec. 26 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The shing pier will be open every day throughout the holidays.Christmas tree pickupDeer eld Beach – The city solid waste department continues services throughout the holidays with the exception of Christmas Day. Residents with a normal Tuesday collection, will have garbage picked up on Wednesday the 26th. Christmas trees will be picked up on regular bulk trash days and must be free of lights and decorations. Do not bag. Oakland Park – An ensemble of actors will perform excerpts from Neil Simon comedies and an episode from the classic radio series, “The Great Gildersleeve.” The event is at 2 p.m. Friday, Dec. 14, at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. Call 954-567-9524.Comedy on library stage

PAGE 11

The Pelican 11 Friday, December 14, 2012 fund approximately 75 percent of this totally volunteer program. The remaining nancial support comes from individuals, businesses, community organization and corporate foundations. As Development Director, Ryan spends much of her time working with donors, writing grants, arranging for special events and fundraisers. She says, “We just had a wonderful and successful 20th anniversary celebration, titled ‘Year of the Dragon.’ The dragon is a symbol of good fortune which ts with the Center’s approach. Held at the Hyatt Rgency Pier 66 for 170 people, it was a nancial and social success with dinner, dancing and silent auctions. The total amount raised has not yet been announced.” She adds, “ We do about ve fundraisers a year. A luncheon, ‘ Believing in Girls’ features our girls. We do a Chefs for Pace Cook-Off at Hughes Culinary in Oakland Park which is another success. In our 20 years in existence, we have provided services for 2,500 girls. One member of our second class held 18 years ago, now serves on our board.” Ryan says, “Although the day program is the heart of our center, our well quali ed counseling staff is open afternoons and evenings for girls 8 to 18 and families. Everything we do here is strength based and gender responsive to young females and their special needs.” Pace operates 17 centers throughout Florida and one Reach program. Since its creation in1984, Pace has served over 21,000 girls. Every girl at Pace sets individual educational and social goals that are focused on earning a high school diploma or GED, re-entering public school, attending college, getting vocational training, joining the military or entering the private work force. After program completion, Pace continues to monitor each girl’s education and personal development with three years of follow up case management. Pace has come up with some statistics that prove its program works. “It costs an average of $42,500 per year to incarcerate a youth with only a sobering 25 percent success rate. At Pace, the average cost per girl is $12,500 per year for enrollment with a proven 88 percent ve year success rate.” Pace began as a community response to the realization that girls involved with the justice system were either placed in boys’ programs or further into the system for their own protection. Started by Vicki Burke and guided by researchbased recommendations which called for gender responsive programming, Pace created a new alternative to institutionalization or incarceration. Pace is now recognized as a national model for reducing recidivism and improving school success, employment and selfsuf ciency among girls. Readers are encouraged to alert friends and families to the services Pace offers to the community. Attend a free tour, held monthly at the Center. Here’s what two volunteers had to say:Toby Manke says, “I’ve been working with the girls for over three years and it’s been both challenging and rewarding. The girls come to Pace with individual needs, and some have anxieties about working with someone they do not know. In the end, it is very rewarding to see them change from shy, hostile, scared girls to selfcon dent young women ready and able to achieve their goals and to feel that maybe you have been part of their growth.” Barbara Wagner is a lawyer, a volunteer who also serves on the Board of Directors. She explains, “I’m part of a Women’s Lawyers Group who has a book and breakfast program with the girls that lasts for 10 weeks. We read and discuss a book and it’s wonderful for the girls to meet all female lawyers. They relate to us as role models as we discuss the book week after week. Right now we are reading Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye. Our group has done this six times in the last six years. Their favorite book was The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls.” Wagner continues, “Because Pace is so near my of ce, I am going to start going in once a week to tutor on a one-on-one basis. I admire the staff so much because they are so dedicated and caring for the girls.” Thank you for your contributions to Pace. Donations are welcome and can be made online or by mail. Send to Pace Center for Girls Broward, Leo Goodwin Campus, 2225 N. Andrew Ave., Wilton Manors, Fl. 33311. Phone 954-561-6939. Web site:www.pacecenter. org/broward To volunteer, call 954561-6939. PACEContinued from page 10

PAGE 12

12 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Mailman because he walked the beaches to deliver mail to South Florida, Hamilton’s likeness is being proposed to enhance the Hillsboro Inlet Bridge. City Engineer Lou Friend has been working with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) sculptor Frank Varga and architect Scott Bakos on designs that will enhance the city’s northeastern most entrance. Pompano has budgeted $1 million to improve the bridge’s appearance, but this week Friend said that gure could be less with the participation of FDOT, which is assured, and neighboring Hillsboro Beach and Lighthouse Point, which is not. What is being proposed is a two-story bridge house and Hamilton’s statue atop a tall column to create a landmark entry, Friend said. Other improvements include a new sidewalk, a decorative railing, a protective pedestrian screen, paint job, lighting and bronze lettering on the bridge face naming the cities it serves. Friend said erecting the Barefoot Mailman on the Pompano side of the Inlet pays homage to its history. “It’s our architectural connection,” he said. Bakos said the current bridge shows a “lack of character.” Residents of Hillsboro Shores were enthusiastic about the plans calling it a “great signature” and “wonderful.” Sculptor Varga has already made his mark on local art. He restored the original Barefoot Mailman statue in front of Hillsboro Beach Town Hall and cast the statue at the Hillsboro Inlet Lighthouse. Hamilton is believed to have lost his life when he attempted to swim the Hillsboro Inlet to retrieve the boat he used to cross the waterway. His story inspired a book by Theodore Pratt and a movie made in 1951 starring Robert Cummings.Three food rms vie for kiosk contractPompano Beach –The Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] will negotiate with the three top bidders for the kiosk food service contract. The three emerged from an original list of ve. They are: Dh2 Inc., the company rated highest by a staff selection committee, DiMaria Properties LLC, ranked second and Snack Time Catering LLC, with the third number of points. The vendors are vying for a ve-year contract to operate the 339-sq. ft. kiosk in Beachfront Park, a project of the CRA. Dh2 got points for its dcor, menu, nancial strength, professional presentation and reputation. DiMaria lost points for not having experience in fast food service. Snack Time for not having a creative menu. Criteria for the vendors was to provide high quality, freshly made food at a moderate price. The bid proposal calls for the vendor to pay $2,500 a minimum month or 12 percent of gross, whichever is higher. CRA engineer Horacio Donavich, lead staffer on the project, said two of the bidders have already exceeded the minimum and the negotiations will focus on getting the “best opportunity for the city ” as well as reevaluating all the information provided by each vendor and doing due diligence. Tuesday, a family spoke for Frank DiMaria who has operated Frank’s Ristorante on E. Atlantic Blvd, for 38 years and who recently spent $70,000 upgrading his restaurant faade. His restaurant location is less than 200 feet from the kiosk, the speaker said, and the restaurant has plenty of storage and refrigeration space. Dh2, Inc. was a bidder for the restaurant operation on the Deer eld Beach Fishing Pier, but did not make the short list for the contract awarded last week.BridgeContinued from page 1Arts & Jazz at SkolnickPompano Beach Lovers of art and jazz will nd friends at the Jazz Fest planned this weekend at the Herb Skolnick Center Dec. 16 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Local artists include Jo Ann Culligan, Marcia Hirschy, Val Lecklikner, Tammy Seymour and others. The Skolnick Center is located at 800 SW 36 Ave. at the Palm Aire Community. Call 954-786-4590.Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com

PAGE 13

The Pelican 13 Friday, December 14, 2012 Deer eld Beach – Cross Community Church presents a performance of the “Nutcracker Ballet” and a Christmas celebration on Friday, Dec. 14. Students from Astrid Audet Academy of Ballet will perform the ballet at 6 p.m. Fun for children, including bounce houses and food, will follow from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The church [formerly New Horizons Church] is at 841 Southeast Second Court in Deer eld Beach. Call 954300-9854.Nutcracker Ballet tonight, Dec. 14 at 6 p.m. more than $30 or $60 a year” will be charged to help maintain the garden. “I’m sure it will be rst-come, rst-served,” said Moore. Pompano started out as a farming community and crops continued to be an economic focus of the city throughout the Depression. Farming was so intertwined with the early identity and success of the city that students at Pompano High were then called the “Bean Pickers.” Today’s farmers who take a plot in the city’s garden will no doubt grow some of the things the city’s early residents did. But along with the gardens and hydroponic pods, Alfonso said there will be a gathering area for “picnics or things like that” and a small “cottagy-like” building that will serve as an of ce and storage shed for the person who will oversee the garden once it is open. Some fruit trees may also be planted. “We’re trying to design a GardenContinued from page 7really nice little building that will blend in with the area,” she said. Garden planned adjacent to Ely campus.

PAGE 14

14 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 those within seven years of retirement. The current pension plan allows a 42-year-old employee with 20 years of service to retire with 70 percent of salary, a situation Bill Underwood, the city’s nancial services director, called “unsustainable.” The union offered to raise the minimum retirement age from 42 to 48 and to reduce the maximum pension from the current 85 percent, to 75 percent of salary. The city proposal called for a retirement age of 52 for those with 25 years on the job and 55 for those with at least 10 years of service with a pension max of 65 percent of salary. The commission was also asked to lift a three-year wage freeze. Slade Bruce, union vice president and a local re ghter, said the department is “demoralized.” Staff has decreased by 20 percent since 2007. A wage freeze has been in effect since 2009. Commissioners approved a one percent wage increase for one year, less than the union’s request for a three-year contract. John McNamara, president of Local 3080, said Oakland Park is at the bottom of the salary range in the county. Commissioners also agreed to $750 a year in educational incentives and a PTO plan that combines sick leave, vacation leave and longevity pay and allows an employee to schedule time off for personal needs. Commissioner Boisvenue objected to the PTO plan saying “ re ghters/ paramedics have a job uniquely different from anyone. They work 24hour shifts and are exposed to blood, needles, fumes.” Other employees she noted sit behind a desk and are not exposed to such dangers. Commissioner Shari McCartney said the commission had no choice but to deal with the issues. “We need to make choices for the solvency of the city, but do so respectfully.” Commissioner Shank said he was disappointed at the length and cost of negotiations, faulting both sides. ContractContinued from page 1

PAGE 15

The Pelican 15 Friday, December 14, 2012 housing and helping infants, children, and young adults with mental, developmental and physical disabilities. Delivering toys to the Broward Children’s Center is a Christmas tradition started over 30 years ago with one toy delivered to one child by now retired re ghter Hank Taylor. “We’d come here in horrible times, and it just took,” said Lt. Bob McCarthy. That rst child is still under the care of Broward Children’s Center. “We don’t want this to be their forever home, but sometimes that is the case,” said Bridgette DeSeno, spokeswoman for Broward Children’s Center. “But we’ve had some great stories of kids being adopted.” This year’s haul included more toys for more kids. “We shopped for 55 kids,” said Eslie, who estimated about 150 toys were given out. Sandra King, re department spokesperson said that all toys purchased were paid for by re ghters personally. Gifts are coordinated through Broward Children’s Center. Usually the need of the child is foremost. In the past, re ghters brought a large-screen television and a “choo-choo train that runs throughout the center on its tracks. Eslie, who organizes the event with Fire ghter Petra Arnieri, said the pair took over a few years ago. “It’s kind of been passed down [from re ghter to re ghter]. We start organizing in October.” “They’re a very generous group,” said Debbie Thompson, social worker at Broward Children’s Center. “They support us all year in various events.” And the children remember the generosity of the re ghters every year. “The kids start talking about it a few months before it even gets here,” said Thompson. “It means as much [to them] as it does to the re ghters.”Another trip in sightThese re ghting Santas will still be packing gifts for children in Pompano Beach, and this time the public is asked to help out. “On Christmas Day,” said King. “The re ghters will take gifts to over 100 families in the city. To donate an unwrapped gift, visit any re station in the city or leave toys at city hall. Call 954-786-4601 for more information.JoyContinued from page 1Fire ghters Scott Frien, left, and Vinnie Tracon clowning around for the kids. Kaitlin King, 11, and Santa hand out presents.

PAGE 16

16 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Pompano Beach Broward Sheriff’s Of ce robbery detectives are looking for two men who robbed a Pompano Beach 7-Eleven store, hitting a clerk on the back with a ri e as they ordered him to the oor. Surveillance cameras captured the robbery, which happened just after 3 a.m. Nov. 13 at 290 Copans Rd. in Pompano Beach. One robber was tall and thin with a long-sleeve, blue shirt, khaki pants and a blue stocking over his face. He was armed with a ri e. The second was about 5-foot3 with a mustache, a black skull cap and a black shirt. He appeared to be in his early 30s. They walked in and headed right to the register. The shorter robber ordered everyone to the oor, while the taller man dragged one employee behind the counter and told him to open the register. Once the employee complied, the robber hit him in the back with the gun and told him to get on the oor. The two criminals ed with money from the register. Robbers who hit 7-Eleven, still at largeThe new carts, green and beige, were purchased from recycling rebate money and offered to residents freeof-charge. Cost was about $130,000. This coming week, another truckload, about 500 more carts, will be distributed throughout the city. Says Graham, “Our trucks will follow the Waste Management recycling trucks and we’ll collect the old green bins and leave the new carts.” To order the new carts or for more information, call 954-946-7386.Think nautical nowPompano Beach The Annual Nautical Flea Market opens Jan. 26 for a weekend of deals for boaters, divers, anglers and everyone else with an eye for a deal.Vendors will ll the grounds of Community Park with food, crafts, art, books and all things nautical. The event is a shared project between Pompano Beach and Lighthouse Point. Cost to attend is $5 per day. Call 954-786-4111 or visit www. nautical eamarket.com.MLK celebrations are family eventsPompano Beach Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. will be remembered in this city with several events. The rst event, an Interfaith Breakfast, Jan. 5 at 8:30 a.m. at the Annie Gillis Park, 520 MLK Blvd., will be a prayer breakfast. The event is open to the public. Breakfast is compliments of the Pompano Beach Clergymen’s association. The theme for 2013 MLK celebrations is “The Time is Always Right to Do What is Right.” On Jan. 7, the Basketball Classic will take place at Mitchell-Moore Center, 901 NW 10 St. Cost for teams of four is $60 for children ages 12 to 14 and 15 to 17. Games begin at 6 p.m. The MLK Parade is set for Jan. 21 with a line-up at 8 a.m. at Mitchell-Moore Park, 901 NW 10 St. At 10:30 a.m., the celebrations culminate with the “Salute to Greatness” at Blanche Ely High School, 1201 NW 6 Ave. with special guest, Vickie Winans, Gospel recording artist. Pompano Beach Fire Rescue evaluated the employee for injuries, though he was not transported to the hospital. Anyone with information can report it to BSO Det. Victor Carrasquillo at (954) 3214270 or call in anonymous tips to Crime Stoppers of Broward County at (954) 493-TIPS (8477) or online at www. browardcrimestoppers.org.Recycling cartsContinued from page 1

PAGE 17

The Pelican 17 Friday, December 14, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN WRITERBeach Fish Market 2781 E. Atlantic Pompano Beach 954-941-3275“The tradition continues,” says Terry Craft, the new proprietor of the impeccably clean and inviting Beach Fish Market. Located across the street from Houston’s restaurant, mere steps from the bridge spanning the Intracoastal, this seafood shop is the reinvention of what was for many years the old Mr. Fish. “Owning this store was somewhat accidental. I was in one day making a birthday lobster purchase and found out Mr. Fish was going to close its doors… so I decided to buy it!” Originally from Colorado, Craft moved to nearby Lauderdale-By-The-Sea a few years ago and had been on the lookout for a new business venture. She has now been open for about a month and is looking forward to providing fresh seafood to all who frequent the area. “We have a huge selection of fresh fish, shrimp, Maine lobster, diver scallops, clams, oysters, Prince Edward Island mussels and King crab legs. And of course, as it is the season, we have a ton of fresh stone crabs as well!” says Terry as she walks by the resplendent display cases bursting at the seams with eye-catching maritime Beach Fish Market serves up a wealth of fresh seafood by Intracoastaldelights. Jumbo, extra-large, large and medium shrimp or prawns overflow from their ice trays. Beach Fish Market owner Terry Craft shows off a couple of the store’s more famous attractions – the feisty 2 pound Maine lobster. Shrimp, shrimp and more shrimp of all sizes! See SEAFOOD on page 20

PAGE 18

18 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 J. MarksContinued from page 8“The point of doing this is to give servers rst hand tastes of what they serve and describe to patrons.” One server, Olivia Parker says, “RAFT is a terri c idea. It familiarizes the staff with everything on the menu and allows us to give customers an honest, personal opinion.” J. Mark’s has a loyal following. Jean M. McIntyre, branch manager of iBeriaBank, drops in often because she says, “It’s a great place to bring a client for lunch. I personally love the Oriental Chicken Salad. The quality of food and service is always up to expectations.” “My friends and I manage to dine at J. Mark’s at least twice a month,” says Geri Gunderson. “We’ve never been disappointed. One friend always chooses the Prime Rib. Another always orders the salmon salad. I love the cheeseburgers and sweet potato fries. We all appreciate Happy Hour between two and six p.m. when drinks are half price.”About Fabian GomezHe laughs and says, “I started in this business as a dish washer at 13 in New York and worked my way up the ladder, getting experience in a McDonalds, and moving up from being a bus boy to a server in a ne French restaurant in Manhattan. I was honored to become the manager of a ne Manhattan Italian restaurant and eventually became a food and beverage director. I moved to Miami as manager of Re ections on the Bay. When it went out of business, I opened my own place in Plantation which I had for two years. The hours are terrible for a guy with a family and I have one. I’m married to Luz and we have ve children ranging in age from 14 to 27. Three are still at home. I miss the pace of New York but I’m glad I traded it in for the easy life style of this paradise. I wanted to lighten my load and spend time with my family so I sold my business and took a job as a server at J. Mark’s. When my background became known, I was seduced into management once again. I admit, I love it.” J. Mark’s is open seven days. Call 954-782-7000 Pompano Beach or 954-3900770 Fort Lauderdale for information, reservations, gift cards, and private dining room for parties. The seared Ahi tuna salad features fresh eld greens with balsamic vinaigrette, fresh mango, avocado and tomatoes.

PAGE 19

The Pelican 19 Friday, December 14, 2012 Deerfield Beach — If you like shopping a bit later on Sunday mornings, the Green Market here has extended its shopping hours to 2 p.m. The seasonal marketplace is held at The Cove Shopping Center on East Hillsboro Blvd. and the Intercoastal Waterway and operates every Sunday from November through April. The Deer eld Green Market open for shoppers until 2 location provides plenty of convenient, free parking. This is the third year for the local green market which is now managed by Emily Lilly who instituted Boca Raton’s green market 16 years ago. “We are always expanding our vendors,” Lilly said. “Our success relies on the produce that is available.” Especially popular are the produce stands and bakery goods. There’s even a baker who makes treats for pets. This Sunday, 9 a.m. – noon, Dymin will perform her island–style music at the Cove which is decorated for the holidays. Along with fruits and vegetables, shoppers will find fresh herbs, soaps & lotions, an assorted variety of plants, fresh-cut flowers, orchids, prepared foods, gourmet foods, organic produce and eggs, fresh fish and seafood, grass-fed beef products, doggie treats, candles, and much more. The market includes arts and crafts---many of them homemade---including pottery and other agriculture-related products. Community service organizations are encouraged to share information or to promote a special project or fundraiser. Call the green market office, 562-299-8684. Deer eld Beach. Movie is free. Refreshments will be sold. Bring blankets and chairs. 954-480-4429. 12-15 – Gold and silver donation drop-off at New Presbyterian Church South Campus, 512 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors, from 9 to 11 a.m. Students perform a musical during the drop-off. Refreshments will be served. 954-946-4380. 12-15 – Friends of the Pompano Beach Library book sale 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. Gift books and stocking-stuffers will be available. Free roll of gift wrapping paper with purchases of $5 or more. Massage raf e entry with purchase of $10 or more. 954357-7595 12-15 – Winterfest Boat Parade watch party at Flip Flops Dockside Eatery 3051 NE 32 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $95 per person and $35 for children 12 and under. Includes buffet. 954-5671672. 12-15 –Spiritual Health Fair from 10 to 4 p.m. at Bridges of Wellness, 1881 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Event SightingsContinued from page 3 See SIGHTINGS on page 21

PAGE 20

20 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 “My favorite is our plump and sweet Gulf shrimp,” adds the savvy businesswoman with a knowing smile. Wild caught Chilean Sea Bass, sushi grade Yellowfin tuna, Scottish salmon, Red Snapper, Wahoo, MahiMahi, Grouper and Flounder are just a few of the many mouthwatering fish species available. The Beach Fish Market even offers the highly prized pumpkin swordfish whose flesh can acquire an orange tint from its diet of shrimp. Although this fish would generally command a premium over its whitish counterpart, it is sold here at regular prices. Speaking of white fish, classic farm raised Tilapia and Basa are also great low-cost choices (under $6 a pound) for fried fish recipes. Local residents will be thrilled to know they have a newly improved seafood emporium within walking distance of the beach. And in the near future, when the streetscape beautification project on Atlantic Blvd. is completed, “we will offer steamed lobster and drawn butter for immediate consumption at our outside dining tables.” In order to build a loyal customer base, The Beach Fish Market has strategically decided to sell its seafood at substantially lower prices than its competitors. In addition, “people just love our homemade crab cakes, conch salad, blue cheese potato salad and our wonderful dipping sauces,” says the gregarious fishmonger. “And our delightful lobster bisque and clam chowder are equally popular.” Indeed, the soups are ready to eat and make for a great quick start to any meal. And at $10 for the large 16 oz size, they are an inexpensive way to impress one’s dinner guests. The Beach Fish Market also offers a host tantalizing spices, holiday gift baskets and even a delightful Key Lime Pie for a sweet ending to any meal. And free lemons accompany each purchase. Enjoy! A magical platter for seafood lovers: (clockwise from the lemon wedges) a large, scored stone crab claw with mustard dipping sauce, a giant lightly battered and fried dry diver scallop, homemade conch salad, pan fried Chilean Sea Bass with lemon-cilantro butter sauce, a steaming bowl of lobster bisque, a pumpkin sword sh grilled skewer, a dollop of rice Tilapia, Wahoo, Mahi-Mahi, Scottish Salmon and sushi grade Yellow n Tuna are just a few of the many sh species available at the Beach Fish Market. SeafoodContinued from page 17

PAGE 21

The Pelican 21 Friday, December 14, 2012 includes gift drawings every half hour. 954-530-6006. 12-16 – Deer eld Beach Green Market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Cove Shopping Center at Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal. Held every Sunday until April 28. Vendors welcome. 561-2391536 or 561-299-8684. 12-16 – Dixieland/Hot Jazz Session from 1 to 4 p.m. at Henry’s Hideaway, 1500 S. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach. Presented by the Hot Jazz & Alligator Gumbo Society. Cost is $10. 954-5635390 or 561-809-6410. 12-17 – Women’s Lunch ‘N Learn from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Join Chaya Benjaminson for a discussion on the Torah Portion. Ladies Only. 954-2283338. Event is free. 12-19 – Oakland Park Commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. 12-19 – Holiday orchestra show at North Andrews Gardens Elementary School 345 NE 56 St., Oakland Park, at 7 p.m. 754-322-7300. 12-20 – Wilton Manors Historical Society meeting at 7 p.m. at the commission chambers, 2020 Wilton Drive. 954-566-9019. 12-21 – Reiki energy circle at 7 p.m. at Lisa’s Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Donation is $10. 954782-6564. 12-26 – Rabbi Lipa will host a discussion on the Mystical dimensions of the Torah from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Suggested donation is $10. 954-228-3338. 12-31 – Showboat, produced by Stage Door Theater, 8036 W. Sample Road, Coral Springs. 954-344-7765. 1-6 – Big Band Dance from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, 240 W. Prospect Road, Oakland Park. Cost is $8 at the door. Cash bar. 954564-2357. 1-7 – Charity auction at Java Boys 2230 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, at 7 p.m. Antiques, artwork, paintings, sculptures, furniture and other items will be available. Proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Email ajcrossconsulting@gmail.com. 1-7 – Retired Educators Social Club meeting at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca Raton. Meeting is free and SightingsContinued from page 19 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

PAGE 22

22 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 of the city, by half a space. But Resnick disagreed. “I think it’s a little bit too low,” he said. On the issue of businessrelated parking, Commissioner Tom Green said if parking is too restrictive the city would lose out. “You’re going to drive businesses away . and say hello to a new business in Oakland Park.” Robert Cassidy, planning and zoning board member, echoed Green and said the city needs to make sure its business owners aren’t “forced to move to shopping malls.” Commissioners also voted to reduce the percentage of parking that a business can purchase under the city’s payment in lieu of parking option. Currently, a business can pay $18,000 for every space it can’t provide, build its own parking spaces or hire a valet service to satisfy its parking requirements. The payment in lieu of option can be used to satisfy 100 percent of the required parking. The commission voted to reduce that to 75 percent for up to 20 spaces.Parking is not the only issueIn a move that was labeled as “protectionist” by Resnick, commissioners also approved changes to the regulations that deal with independent food vendor carts. Previously, commissioners approved regulations that allowed vendor carts to be set up along Wilton Drive and Dixie Highway on public and private property. But some businesses owners, afraid that the carts would be given an unfair advantage against brick Wilton DriveContinued from page 4and mortar storefronts, were opposed. Resnick voted in favor of the regulations and said he understood the reasons for it but added that if every city in Broward did this it would hurt business. Recently the city approved vendor carts along Wilton Drive, a law that has bothered some business owners. Nick Berry, who co-owns Courtyard Caf on Wilton Drive, said vendor carts would present another challenge to existing merchants in a business climate that already has too many challenges. In response to Berry and others, the city amended the regulations so that vendor cart owners could operate on the Drive. But only if a vendor has permission from a business owner to operate in front of their location. So far, no vending carts are operating along Wilton Drive and only one is operating on Dixie Highway at an auto care center. Green said he was disappointed that no vendor carts have opened along Wilton Drive – something he sees as a possible enhancement to the street. And with the city jockeying for one of the proposed Florida East Coast commuter rail stations, Carson said vendor carts could be an enhancement to the area near a station if one is built – south of Northeast 26 Street. The nal vote on payment in lieu of parking, vendor carts and retail parking requirements will be held at the next commission meeting on Jan. 8; the commission meeting for Dec. 25 has been cancelled. open to the public. The topic will be “Slimming down: super foods and supplements.” 954-255-6360 or 561-4835445. 1-12 & 13 – Tropical Postcard Show and Sale at the Pompano Beach Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $3. Free appraisals. 305-6660219. 1-13 – Sunday Matinee Music at Boca Raton Library. Jim Kovalcik Trio, featuring Jim Kovalcik on ute, Jason Hanley on guitar and Steve Jernigan on bass. 3 p.m. at the Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd. 561-239-1536. SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

PAGE 23

The Pelican 23 Friday, December 14, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-7838700! sign down and will bring the matter back to the commission in January. Paint Only Program amended Commissioners amended a Paint Only Program to include only the commercial portions of mixed-use buildings. The vote was 3-2, Scot Sasser and Chris Vincent dissenting. The town established the program recently to encourage commercial property owners to improve the exterior of buildings with a new coat of paint. The town reimburses quali ed owners 50 percent of the cost of painting, patching and pressure cleaning, up to a maximum grant of $5,000. The program was aimed at commercial properties, excluding hotels. However, the program, as written, overlooked mixed-use properties, “something we want to encourage in our commercial district,” Pat Himelberger, assistant to the town manager, wrote in a report to commissioners. “That’s not where I want to go, subsidizing (painting) the residential part of buildings,” Commissioner Stuart Dodd said prior to the vote. “Some are prominent buildings on Commercial Boulevard. Would you be willing to pay for the commercial part of the building?” Town Manager Connie Hoffmann asked. “Absolutely, with the proviso that it only applies to the commercial part of the building,” Dodd responded. Sasser asked if the town is doing something similar for residents, asking, “Don’t we want our residential neighborhoods to look as good? We’re doing a heck of a lot for businesses. The least they can do is spruce up their business. We should make the town’s property the best we can make it. I’m not necessarily for these programs,” he said.LotContinued from page 2said, “and we don’t have the money to cover the three days.” Biggest concern is the weather. One rain day wipes out major revenues MacKay said. The other concern is the cost of city services, $38,000 last year for police, re, sound and cleanup. Mayor Peggy Noland, who took over “Cracker Day” from the local Lions Club 20 years ago, concurred that the age of committee members is a factor. Pat Miller, one of her original team and parade chair, now spends her time with grandchildren, Noland said. “People just can’t do it anymore.” Community Event Liaison Phil Biscomer said the event will come off as always with the exception of the reworks which have always been shot off the end of the pier. With the pier’s “T” destroyed by Tropical Storm Sandy and not likely to be repaired in time for the festival, other options are being explored, Biscomer said. “Right now, it is in the hands of BSO,” he added. The city is in negotiations with FMG, an event planner that stages the Garlic Festival in Delray Beach and earlier this year held a small country music festival here, to help with Founders’ Days. The three day festival will still consist of parade, vendors, carnival, entertainment and food. The city will give FMG some seed money up front but will share in the pro ts from alcohol sales. “This is the model most cities are going to,” Biscomer said. There is no money in this year’s city budget for the event. Biscomer said funds set aside for Fourth of July may be used. It is his job to get the music and stage the parade. MacKay said bands for the parade have cost $10,000 in the past and the committee spent $35,000 for the entertainment. Biscomer said he will rely more on local musical groups. Noland said since the event takes place on the beach, funds could be available from the Community Redevelopement Agency. “All will go on as usual,” she said. Biscomer is also con dent this Deer eld Beach tradition will continue. “You shouldn’t be able to tell the difference,” he said. Founders’ Days is the new generation of Cracker Days established by the DB Lions Club in Pioneer Park 66 years ago. What began as a one-day barbecue, beauty pageant and talent contest, grew to become a three-day carnival. But the Lions Club also suffered from an aging membership and lack of funds which prompted Noland, not a public of cial at the time, to take over the event, gather a group of volunteers, move it to the beach and rename it Founders’ Days. Founders DayContinued from page 1

PAGE 24

24 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad 1-12 & 1-19 – Sign-up for Northeast Little League baseball will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wimberly Field batting cage, 4000 NE 3 Ave., Oakland Park. League is boys and girls ages 5 to 18. Jan. 26 is the last day to register. Volunteer and sponsorship opportunities available. Email davemcleod33@aol.com or 954-793-2348.FridaysThe Island City Art Walk is held every third Friday from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Many businesses along the street host an artist and serve up free appetizers and spirits. Visit www.islandcityartwalk.com for more information. Pompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach – The award of the fishing pier restaurant contract is being challenged by the bidder recommended by the city’s selection committee. Two Together LLC operating as BurgerFi has protested the commission’s decision to hire Class Act LLC who will operate here as the Deerfield Beach Caf. Commissioners met last week to assess the three bidders deemed by staff to be most suitable, and Class Act’s bid was given the highest ranking. Two Together had been given the most points by staff but the commission deadlocked 2-2 on accepting their bid forcing the matter to a special meeting where each commissioner ranked the bidders according to a point system. In that ranking, Class Act, owners of Flash Back diners in Hallandale and Davie, won the contract. A special meeting will be held Tuesday, 7 p.m. to consider the protest. Commissioners can hear from the protesters or deny a hearing without further action. They can also take no action, grant the petition and go out to bid again or give Two Together some relief to resolve the issue. According to legal sources, the protest may be a precursor to a lawsuit. No notice of legal action has been received by the city attorney, but city commissioners did approve last week hiring outside council in the event a lawsuit is filed. Two Together is represented by attorney Michael Weiner. Weiner had no comment. Awarding the restaurant contract has been a long process which began in August. Two bidders earlier filed protests after staff determined their bid information was insufficient. At that time, the commission upheld the staff’s decision and went forward to consider the top contenders.Pier restaurant contract challenged by runner up 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information. SightingsContinued from page 22 See SIGHTINGS on page 25

PAGE 25

The Pelican 25 Friday, December 14, 2012 well-escorted by motorcycle BSO patrols. Waldrop decided she would not cry. Tuesday was the day that Waldrop was to receive an award from BSO Sheriff Al Lamberti for her years of volunteer work in her community and the entire county. Waldrop is known as the “go-to” person in Cresthaven for up-to-the-minute information from a power failure to a crime event. She has headed up the Cresthaven neighborhood Watch for years, learning the ropes from the late Dennis Myers, whom Waldrop refers to as her mentor. When Myers died several years ago, Waldrop was active in getting Northeast 33 Street named in his honor. “Dennis taught us all to give back,” she said in an interview. Mayor Lamar Fisher was among those who came to say thank you to Waldrop. “Words cannot express the appreciation for Carole and her complete dedication to out city. She has devoted hours and hours as a citizen to help her city. We sincerely thank her.” Hailing from Michigan, Waldrop came to Pompano Beach 52 years ago. After a while, she met her future husband, Travis. They have three children. Waldrop worked as a teacher for 23 years at Highlands Christian Academy. She became certi ed in many safety programs sponsored by the local re and police departments, and shared that knowledge with other groups. “We hosted some of the biggest Night Out Against Crime events,” she says. “We learned from the police. We drove around our neighborhoods and reported suspicious activity.” Waldrop’s leadership helped others follow her into community programs. But on Tuesday, Waldrop had a hard time holding back her own emotions. “I couldn’t believe all those people could think I was worthy of this honor.” SightingsContinued from page 24SaturdaysPompano Beach GreenMarket is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. 954292-8040. Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. Pony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.WaldropContinued from page 3 See SIGHTINGS on page 30

PAGE 26

26 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26SEEKING EMPLOYMENTMAINTENANCE/ HANDYMAN – Professional. 30 Yrs. Exp. References, Tools, Transportation. I’m Looking For PT Work. Bondable. 954593-6833. 12-14 RELIABLE BILINGUAL LADY Seeks Position As Pet Sitter / Dog Walker (Responsible Animal LOVER) Pompano / E Ft Lauderdale Area. Giselle 954-942-8111. 1-4 CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AIDE – Seeking Job To Care For The Elderly. Nights/ Wkends. Live In / Out. 954549-0336. 12-14 COMPANION HOME CARE – Best Companion Care For You Or Your Loved One. Over 25 Years Experience, Reliable, Honest, Compassionate. Excellent References. Louise 954-258-1053. 12-14SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 12-14 EXPERIENCED DRIVER AVAILABLE! “TO & FROM STORES” “DOCTORS” “APPOINTMENTS” “AIRPORT”, ETC. CALL MARYANN 954-895-3202. 12-21 MOORE PLUMBINGPLUMBING SERVICES-Big Jobs-Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 12-28 A N A’ S CLEAN (RESIDENTIAL) CLEANING In Pompano – Lighthouse Point – Deer eld. Dependable – Thorough – Experienced. References. Good Work For A Good Price. Please Call Ana 954-692-4691. 12-7 SANTA’S HELPER – NOT ENOUGH Time To Decorate Or Last Minute Cleaning For That Special Occasion – Shop – Wrap Or Pick-up Gifts – Etc. Don’t Stress Out!! Call Me – Elf Ruth & I’ll Be On My Way In My Sleigh. 954-8618856. 12-28 XPERTS CLEANING SERVICE – Residential & Commercial. 10 Years Experience. References – Honest – Dependable. More Information Call 954-3760524. 1-4 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATIONPickup & Drop-Off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-234-0617. 1-4 DIGNITY CLEANING SERVICE INC – House – Condo – Of ce & More. 954826-6450. Lic/Ins. Call Today For A FREE Estimate. 5th Cleaning 1/2 Price. 12-21. HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1214 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CCOLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 12-28 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 12-14 THRIFT STORESDEERFIELD BEACH 801 SE 10 STREET. Every Week 10am-3pm On Mon & Wed. 10-4pm On Fri & Sat. CLF Thrift Store. Mention Ad – Receive 20% Off Fri & Sat Only. 12-14 MISC. ITEMSGOOD CHRISTMAS PRESENT!!!!! Adult Tricycle ( 3 Wheeler ) Royal Blue! Rear Basket. Brand NEW! $350. See In Pompano! Call 954-7857594. 12-14 JEWELRYGIVE WEARABLE ART THIS YEAR. www.etsy.com/ shop/TrekkietrishaJewelry 954-596-8991. 12-21 GARAGE SALEYARD SALE – DEERFIELD BUILDERS SUPPLY 77 SE 2 Avenue Deer eld. 954-4271010. 8am – Noon Saturday 12-15. Hardware – Skylights – Windows / Doors – Millwork. CASH & CARRY. 12-14

PAGE 27

The Pelican 27 Friday, December 14, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 POMPANO JUMBO GARAGE SALE & Silent Auction. Sunday Dec 16 – 9am – Noon. (Silent Auction 11:30) Temple Sholom 132 SE 11 Avenue. 12-14 YARD SALE SATURDAY DECEMBER 15 – 7:30am To 2pm. 124 NW 15 Street Pompano Beach. Clothes, Bric-a-brac – Shoes And Much More! 12-14 ROOMS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEAC Off Powerline & Hillsboro Blvd. $550 Per Month IncludesUtilities. Non-Smoker – No Drugs. 1st/Last/Ref/ Background Check To Movein. NEGOTIABLE! 754-2148131. 12-14 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH – Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38’ x 13’. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 11-14SEASONAL RENTALPOMPANO BEACH 2 / 2 Condo – Island Club – Federal Hwy. 9th Floor Corner Apt. Beautiful Views. Nicely Furnished. All Amenities. $2,000 Month. 954785-0177. 12-14 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO CHARMING 2/1 Home. Asking $975 Per Month. 611 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 12-28 POMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,100 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-28REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 1-4CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 1-4 DEERFIELD CENTURY VILLAGE 55+ 1/1.5 Furnished / Unfurnished. New Tile + Paint. Near Pool. $775 Month Yearly Lease. 305-7289481 561-504-5726. 12-14 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 E OF Federal Hwy. 2nd Floor. No Pets. Yearly Rental. $625 Month. Call Barbara 954-2637129. 12-14 DEERFIELD 1/1.5 – 1st FLOOR Corner Unit. Newer Appliances. No Car Needed. Pool – Clubhouse. $800 Month. Colleen – Newshott Realty. 954-536-2036. 12-14APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 12-14 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 1-4 POMPANO / MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 Avenue – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 12POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – 2/1 $750 NW – 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. LAUD BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Apt. Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 12-14 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-998-5681. POMPANO DIXIE & COPANS WAREHOUSE For Rent. 2 Units – 1-1640 Sq Ft – 1 – 2080 Sq Ft With A/C Of ces Zoned 3M. Both With Overhead Doors. No Reasonable Offers Refused. 716-316-3690. 12-14 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 12-28

PAGE 28

28 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ Boyle RJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point – There is nothing like Christmas time. I love seeing the people running around getting gifts for loved ones, hearing the music and the smell of Christmas candles. These are just a few of the things that get us red up around Christmas time at RJ Boyle Studios. We get to see lots of new customers as they come in looking for that special gift for their boyfriend, husband, brothers or family member. We have such a mix of items in our store that it is easy to nd something that is unique. One of the things we pride ourselves on is our artwork and shirt designs. You cannot buy our brand anywhere but in our store or on our website. We have never sold out to any of the big store chains though we have been approached many times. We have chosen to stay under the radar and somewhat private about what we offer. It is so cool to see a picture of All ready for Santa this Christmas someone in another state or another country wearing an RJ Boyle shirt. We know that they had to come directly through us to get it. It’s almost like this underground network of coolness, and I want to keep it that way. The big stores can keep there bubbly sh shirts and there overly promoted run of the mill items. As for us here at RJ Boyle Studios, we will continue to put out cool clothing and artwork for customers who appreciate the real deal. Also, I want to thank all of our customers that have supported us all of these years. We have had a store now for 10 years. Sometimes, I pull up to the store in the morning and look in the windows and think, “Man, I can’t believe that this is my store. I’m so blessed and lucky. Thank you to all and to all Tight Lines. RJ Boyle Studios has nautical gifts and stocking stuffers.

PAGE 29

The Pelican 29 Friday, December 14, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Adderly Gillis Park, 601 MLK Blvd., is home to the city’s annual Light Up Martin Luther King Boulevard event every December. And in October, the park became home to the monthly MLK marketplace, a new hot spot for food vendors, entertainment and a talent search. “We wanted to make the park a place to come to rather than to drive by,” said Carlton Moore, liaison to the NW Communiyt Redevelopment MLK Marketplace beefs up event calendar at Pompano Beach parkAgency, the event sponsor. Since its inception, the MLK Marketplace has hosted live entertainment, a talent contest, food vendors and merchants on the second Saturday of each month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Marketplace runs through June. Evans and Stacy Bruno, owners of Virgin Islands Delite, say they find their customers at events like MLK Marketplace. “We tend to go to neighborhood events. It’s where the customers are,” said Stacy. Selling their special brand of funnel cake at the Marketplace were Kay Quigley and Londell Monroe, owners of Hugs and Kisses Funnel Cakes, based in Margate. When compared with the city’s GreenMarket, Monroe and Quigley say turnout for MLK Marketplace is smaller, but they were confident the event would get much more popular as time goes on. “Anytime you get a corner it can’t be all bad. People like corners. They like to be at corners,” said Monroe. Revella Carter, CEO of Black Swan Special Events, based in Fort Lauderdale, said the event was “coming along” and worth promoting. “It’s good for the CRA. It’s a good family event. It’s just one of those things everyone needs to tell their friends about.” Monthly talent competition winners will compete in June for $1,500 in cash awarded to first, second and third place winners. For more information, call 954-7867824. Minister Jerome Turner cooks up some BBQ for MLK Marketplace.

PAGE 30

30 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.SundaysDeer eld Beach Green Market is held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Cove Shopping Center, Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal, every Sunday until April 28. Vendors are welcome. Call 561239-1536 or 561-299-8684.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the rst and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Oakland Park. 954-782-9951.TuesdaysYoga every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $7 per class. Classes are also held Saturday mornings from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. 954-607-3520. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Deer eld Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & See SIGHTINGS on page 32SightingsContinued from page 25 Bimini Twist won Best In Sound at the 2012 Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade [Clay Wieland photo]

PAGE 31

The Pelican 31 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 32

32 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 Toy drop off pointsDeerfield Beach Bartell Chiropractic Life Center, 57 W. Hillsboro Blvd., and the Chamber of Commerce, 1600 W.Hillsboro Blvd., are drop off centers for the US Marine’s Toys for Tots program. Donors should bring unwrapped gifts for children to either location by Dec. 17. This is the second year, Bartell has participated in the toy drive. Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954292-8040. The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysCresthaven Civic Association meets the second Thursday of the month at 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Moose Club, 3321 NE 6 Terrace. Email CresthavenNews@aol. com for more information. The South Florida Mustangs, an LGBTQ square dance club, hold beginner classes from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at Island City Park Preserve, 823 NE 28 St., Wilton Manors, every Thursday. Cost is $5 at the door. No dress code and no partner needed. Call 305899-1710. The Wilton Manors Historical Society meets on the third Thursday of the month at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 954-566-9019 or 954-5668219. The Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. SightingsContinued from page 30 Get a call from SantaOakland Park – Any child between the ages of three and seven who lives in Oakland Park can receive a personal phone call from Santa Claus next Tuesday, Dec. 18. Santa will be making his calls between the hours of 6 and 8 p.m. The deadline for the sign-up is 12 p.m. on Dec. 18. Parents interested should visit www.oaklandparkfl. org or call 954-630-4500. No make-up calls will be made.

PAGE 33

The Pelican 33 Friday, December 14, 2012 STOP HERE!

PAGE 34

34 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 35

The Pelican 35 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 36

36 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 37

The Pelican 37 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 38

38 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 39

The Pelican 39 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 40

40 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 41

The Pelican 41 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 42

42 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 43

The Pelican 43 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 44

44 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 45

The Pelican 45 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 46

46 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 47

The Pelican 47 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 48

48 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012



PAGE 1

Friday, December 14, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 50 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican At Broward Childrens Center, ashing lights bring season of joyBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach Fire ghters usually see the children at Broward Childrens Center when they respond to a medical emergency. But last Friday, instead of bringing a child to the hospital they brought Christmas toys to the children. Helping the re ghters, some in uniform and three dressed as clowns, was Santa Claus arriving on a vintage re truck. Its very heartfelt to us because we run a lot of calls here. It means a lot for us to see them smiling one day out of the year, said Fire ghter Samantha Eslie. Founded in 1971, the non-pro t Broward Childrens Center specializes in See RECYCLING CARTS on page 16 Founders Days committee calls the game for lack of resourcesBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Faced with dwindling nancial resources and aging volunteers, the Founders Days committee is packing it in. This year, the city and a private event planner will stage the 66th annual festival which takes place in mid-February. Said former event chair David MacKay, When we looked at the cost, over $100,000, it was scary. We have only $25,000 in the bank. Do we want to be operating in the red? We always had a slush fund to cover our expenses. MacKay said that out of 12 Founders Days board members, six are over the age of 70 and that although he himself was willing to give it one more year most were not. Its hard to get new volunteers, he New recycling carts draw ravesLighthouse Point Ask Art Graham, public works director, about recycling and he lights up. Its been one of the best programs weve had, says Graham. Residents are buying into the carts, and our recycling doubled the rst month we used them. This year the city offered residents single-stream 64-gallon carts with lids and wheels. LHP has led the county in per capita recycling for years, holding on to rst place most of the time. Commission sends union new contract; one percent wage hike and severe pension cutsBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City re ghters will work longer and realize pension cuts if their union rati es a contract approved by the city commission. Although pension reform was described as obviously the big elephant in the room, the two sides also tried to reach agreement on wages and paid time off (PTO). After hours of discussion, commissioners reached a compromise on the pension issue. They approved a minimum retirement age of 52 with 55 the norm and they set the maximum pension at 70 percent of salary. Commissioners Jed Shank and Suzanne Boisvenue voted no. The city proposed no changes for See CONTRACT on page 14Inlet Bridge designers propose a signature lookBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Another statue of James Edward Hamilton, the long ago mailman whose tragic death has inspired art, cinema and literature, may overlook the inlet where he died. Dubbed the Barefoot Pompano Beach Fire ghter Jay Lester as Santa delivering presents to the Broward Childrens Center on Friday. Pompano re ghters delivered over 150 presents to children with special needs as they do every year. [Photo by Michael dOliveira] See JOY on page 15 See BRIDGE on page 12 See FOUNDERS DAY on page 23

PAGE 2

2 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-TheSea Town commissioners have awarded a $195, 552 contract for A1A parking lot renovations to Di Pompeo Construction Corp. Renovations to the lot, just north of Commercial Boulevard, include adding parking spaces, landscaping and new exits. Di Pompeo Construction is the rm also adding median parking on South Bougainvilla Drive, south of Commercial Boulevard. Plans for Bougainvilla call for adding 26 parallel parking spots in four medians and landscaping at a cost of $92,000. Bud Bentley, assistant town manager, said the projects will be done simultaneously with completion expected in 90 Parking lot to get redo days. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said he would like the commission to reassess the issue of a proposed sign in the A1A parking lot. The sign is not included in the contractors estimated price, since it has not been designed. In late October, commissioners approved a conceptual sign plan and canvas-topped structure, estimated to cost $58,280. Sasser was the lone dissenter. Designers were directed to get back to the commission with more realistic costs. Sasser said he cant bring up the sign issue, since he opposed it. Commissioner Chris Vincent said he also would like more discussion of the sign, citing cost concerns. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said staff has been looking at toning the See LOT on page 23By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Dist. 2 City Commission Charlotte Burrie has made two important decisions: she will seek her fourth term in of ce and she accepted the chairmanship of this citys Relay for Life event. Burrie, 68, said she was talked into taking on the fundraiser for cancer research because it pulled at my heartstrings. I lost my best friend and my nana to cancer. Everyone has lost someone. Her decision to run in March for two more years on the commission came about because, she said, I enjoy being a public servant. I really like being close to the residents and helping them in any way I can. Burries district takes in northeast Pompano including Cresthaven, The Highlands, Commissioner Burrie to seek fourth term some of old Pompano and the community of Leisureville. She has run unopposed in her last two elections. Wednesday night at a party hosted by Galuppis, she was elated that so many people about 80turned out for her rst Relay meeting. The enthusiasm was fantastic. We signed on two or three more teams. I am hoping to get the city involved, BSO and the re ghters. The goal this year is to raise $45,000 at the May 1718 event at Community Park. Until this week, Burrie had told only her Cresthaven civic association that she would seek re-election. She has opened her campaign account and will le on Jan. 2, the day the books open. Burrie said her goals remain to improve the neighborhoods she represents. In the Highlands that mission wont begin until Broward County nishes digging up the roads to make infrastructure improvements. After that, studies will be done to create a traf c calming plan. There BurrieSee BURRIE on page 3

PAGE 3

The Pelican 3 Friday, December 14, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com is still a lot to do there, Burrie said. Another of her goals has been, and still is, to build a civic center for the Cresthaven/Highlands neighborhoods. She has her eye on a piece of property but cant reveal its location just yet she said. Burrie is a former Pompano Beach city clerk. She obtained her law degree in 1990 from St. Thomas University in Miami and practices estate, probate and real estate law in the city. In addition to her commitment to Relay for Life, she is a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, American Legion Auxiliary, Kiwanis Club and Moose Lodge.BurrieContinued from page 2BSO, city honor local volunteer By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach On Tuesday, Carol Waldrop, a long-time volunteer in Pompano Beach and Broward County, was too nervous to drive from her home to BSO headquarters in Pompano Beach. Her friend, Carolyn Mann, agreed to drive. It was a short trip from Waldrops Cresthaven home to headquarters, and it was See WALDROP on page 25Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher and Broward County Sheriff Al Lamberti join in their congratulatory praises for Carole Waldrop who was of cially honored by her peers, BSO and the city for her years of volunteer work in the city. 12-14 The movie Pirates! Band of Mis ts will play at 7 p.m. at Villages of Hillsboro Park, 4111 NW 6 St., See SIGHTINGS on page 19

PAGE 4

4 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Wilton Manors reduces parking requirements for Wilton Drive retail By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors In an effort to attract more retail establishments to Wilton Drive, commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to eliminate parking requirements for retail businesses. Commissioner Ted Galatis was absent. Retail storefronts along Wilton Drive are currently required to provide three parking spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of oor area or one parking space per 333 sq. ft. But if nal approval is given, retail establishments would be exempt from providing parking along the Drive. Bars, lounges, restaurants and nightclubs would still be required to provide three spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. Mayor Gary Resnick said he doesnt foresee a problem with the reduction because most retail customers shop during the day when its a lot easier to nd a parking space. Most of the demand on parking is at night when the bars, clubs and restaurants are open. Vice Mayor Julie Carson said she wasnt sure why a city, plagued by parking problems, would want to reduce its parking requirements. We have a very serious parking problem, she said. For years, the city has tried to nd ways to provide enough parking to the businesses along Wilton Drive. The citys two municipal parking lots, Hagen Park and Richardson Park, provide enough parking on the south end of the street but many businesses to the north still struggle with a lack of parking. To alleviate some of the problem, the city purchased land on Northeast 8 Terrace that it plans to turn into a paved lot. Asked why she voted in favor of the reductions on the Drive, Carson said she didnt hear any objections from residents. She added that there are other ways the city can address its economic challenges outside of altering parking requirements. In contrast, Carson said resident opposition to a proposal to reduce parking requirements in residential neighborhoods caused her to also be against the issue which failed. Based on comments from residents, I cant see this as a good idea at the time. City staff proposed reducing the number of residential parking spaces required for new developments, in certain parts See WILTON DRIVE on page 22

PAGE 5

The Pelican 5 Friday, December 14, 2012 Pompano Beach Like a ne wine, the Pompano Beach Boat Parade has gotten better with age. This was the best participation in the Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade in recent years. We had 53 boats. We feel the date change along with it being the 50th Anniversary of the event brought out a lot of people, said Ric Green, president/ CEO of the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, the organization which organizes the annual event. In addition to it being a free event for both participants and viewers, we also paid prize money in certain categories and gave all participants a $25 card for gas for the boat as well, added Green. Organizers estimate thousands came out to watch the festivities, including hundreds at the Sands Harbor Resort where the judges reviewed the parades participants. The awards ceremony to recognize the winners will be held Wednesday, Jan. 9 at 5:30 p.m. at Oceans 234, 234 N. Ocean Blvd., Deer eld Beach.2012 Winners Best in Show Over 30 ft. SEXY Most Unique Over 30 ft. Noahs Ark Under 30 ft. Cruising Attitude Best in Sound Over 30 ft. Bimini Twist Under 30 ft. Captiva Best Entertainment Over 30 ft. Rusty Hook Under 30 ft Got Rum Best Club Kokomo HISC Best Commercial Killer Green Best First Timers Tie between: Angela Nuran and Down the Hatch Most Effective Lighting Over 30 ft. Knot On Call Under 30 ft. Coconut Telegraph Best Private Boat Over 30 ft. War Eagle Under 30 ft. SeaTeaz Best Deer eld Beach Entry Southern Breeze Best Lighthouse Point Entry Reel Priority Pompano Beach Chamber Award Over 30 ft. Shake a Leg Miami Under 30 ft. Tuned Blue Spirit of the Parade Award NO Name Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach Top Three Point Winners out of a possible 200 SEXY 183 pts.Bimini Twist 178 pts. Noahs Ark 163 pts.Floods of praises for 2012 Pompano Beach Holiday Boat ParadeBrightly decorated boats sailed the Intracoastal Waterway last weekend to celebrate its 50th anniversary of the nations oldest boat parade. [Photo by Clay Wieland]Most Most Unique Unique Noahs Noahs Ark Ark

PAGE 6

6 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 50 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Call 954-783-8700 or send your letters to the editor to mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & Letters Diane Dalsimer prepares to light the Chanukah candles the rst night of Chanukah which began Saturday, Dec. 8. The event took place at John Knox Village where more than 100 residents and family members shared the occasion followed by the traditional Chanukah treat, potato pancakes and applesauce. [Photo by Norm Rasmussen]By Rabbi David MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOM OF POMPANO BEACHChanukah is a festival which has taken on many different identities and roles, since it juxtaposes a major Christian holiday at this time of year. It represents a struggle for religious freedom, a subject dear to American hearts; an armed rebellion against a cruel colonizing power, also re ecting a theme popular in our history. Were the Maccabees, the priestly citizen-soldiers of the Chanukah saga, conservative traditionalists ghting a newfangled foreign culture, or liberalsorry, progressivewarriors taking up arms in the name of diversity? Yes and yes. Just as there can be no objective telling of a countrys history every historian has an ax to grind or a mold into which to cast his theoriesso can the Chanukah story be adapted to different worldly outlooks. In the end, we Jews have the homely miracle of a single bottle of consecrated oil, barely suf cient to last for one night, yet burning steadily for eight, which gave the Jewish victors time to crush fresh olives and make new oil for the menorah, the sacred candlelabra which stood in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. But wait! Isnt there an alternate reading to the tale? Yes: in the Apocrypha, the books which were not accepted into either the Hebrew or Protestant Bibles as Holy Writ (our Catholic neighbors do accept them as such, and preserved them through the centuries), Chanukah lasts for eight days because it was a delayed celebration of Sukkot, the Festival of Booths. Which version ought we to accept? We can believe both, but the oil story is the more famous, leading us to the particular foods served on this holiday: latkes, or potato pancakes, are the common fare for European-derived Jews, while Jews from the Arab countries prefer sufganiyote (Hebrew, little sponges,) or jelly doughnuts. Any food fried in vegetable oil is acceptable, so, bring on the tempura! Dont expect to nd latkes mentioned in the Chanukah story, though: Judah Maccabee never saw a potato in his life; they derive from South America. Then, of course, there is the dreidel, the four-sided top which, according to legend, saved Torah study during the persecutions of the time. During Hebrew School, a lookout would keep guard against enemy soldiers on patrol; if they approached, the lesson would end abruptly, and the soldiers would nd nothing more subversive than children and a teacher betting on the spins of a top. This is a ne story, except that the dreidel derives from the Middle Ages, long after the Chanukah period, which was about 168 BCE. Chanukah is, decidedly, no minor holiday, for, had there been no Chanukah, I believe there might never have been a Christmas. Consider: had the Hellenistic Greek culture succeeded in eradicating Judaism, then, when Jesus was born in 4 BCE, he would not have been born a Jew, but a Greek. Christianity as we know it today might never have begun. And so, as our Christian neighbors deck their halls in red and green, perhaps they might consider adding a bit of blue and white. So much strife and anger in todays world threatens to divide uslet us, rather, focus on what unites us: a common love of the One Who made us in His/Her image, and a common love of peace. Happy Holidays! Stories of Chanukah represent the struggles for religious freedomKnow your solar rights as a homeownerSPECIAL TO THE PELICANIn an effort to educate and encourage residents and businesses to convert to solar energy, the Broward County Go SOLAR program team is informing homeowners of their rights to install renewable energy devices. As a homeowner in the state of Florida, you may not be denied permission to install a renewable energy device [such as solar panels], or any other energy device based on renewable energy. Chapter 163 of the Florida Statutes Section 163.04 forbids ordinances, deed restrictions, covenants, declarations, or similar binding agreements from prohibiting the installation of solar collectors or any other energy device based on renewable resources. Even though a homeowner cannot be prevented from installing a solar energy system, certain restrictions may apply. Restrictions must be reasonable, not arbitrary and must be uniformly imposed on all homeowners. Restrictions cannot impact the performance of solar energy systems nor may they prohibit the installation related to solar energy devices. Florida state law speci cally prohibits a community association from preventing the installation of solar collectors on a homeowners roof. The association may, however, determine where on the roof the collectors may be installed, so long as the installation is within the area required for effective operation; speci cally, or within 45 degrees east or west of due south. The association may not impose requirements which would effectively restrict the systems operating ef ciency. It is important that you notify your homeowners or community association before installing a solar energy system on your home. Go SOLAR Broward Rooftop Solar Challenge is a U.S. Department of Energy grant-funded program that makes it easier for Broward County residents and businesses to convert to solar energy, by reducing the cost and wait time associated with the permitting process for installing photovoltaic rooftop solar systems. Go SOLAR Broward Rooftop Solar Challenge offers home and business owners and/or their contractors a streamlined, online permit application system with standardized fees, preapproved design plans, and uniform interconnection to utility systems. For more information, visit broward.org/GoGreen/GoSolar or call 954-5191260.Holiday in the ParkPompano Beach The annual Community Holiday in the Park will be held tomorrow, Dec. 15, from 12 to 4 p.m. at Mitchell Moore Park, 901 NW 10 St. Organized by the Pass the Blessing Foundation, this program is designed to bring the community closer together regardless of what side of town people live on, what religion they belong to, what political party they vote for or what color their skin is. For more information, visit www.wepasstheblessings.org or call 954-755-7656.

PAGE 7

The Pelican 7 Friday, December 14, 2012 See the Sample-McDougald House by NightSPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach The historic Sample-McDougald House is decorated for the holidays and on Dec. 20 visitors will have an opportunity to see it lighted up after dark. On that evening the property will be open to the public from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Holiday dcor includes Christmas trees with antique lights and ornaments, a tree decorated by students from three Pompano Beach schools, as well as special holiday lighting in the gazebo and elsewhere on the grounds. There will be Yuletide music provided by Joe Balestreri as well as light refreshments. The Sample-McDougald House is located at 450 NE 10 Street, Pompano Beach (entrance on NE 5th Avenue) and admission is $5 per person. For information call 954 691-5686, By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Right now, its an empty 26,000 sq. ft. plot of land made up of patchy grass, sand and littered with trash. But the hope is that by March it will be a community garden home to hydroponic towers and individual vegetable garden plots grown by the people who live here. It seems to me the enthusiasm is there. I think its something the community wants, said Commissioner Woodrow Poitier, who represents Dist. 4, the area the garden would be located. And because it would be directly east of Blanche Ely High School, just north of the corner of Northwest 6 Avenue and Northwest 10 Street, Poitier said the garden would be good for students as well. It would give them pride in being a part of something. We just need to get it done, said Poitier. Carlton Moore, liaison to the Northwest CRA Advisory Committee, said the city wants to get Blanche Ely students of cially involved but is still working on the details. The $50,000 project still has a long way to go before the rst roots can be pulled out of the soil. We have to get the zoning review, said Natasha Alfonso, Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] planner/economic development manager. And to think, this was [once] a farming community, said Moore, who was dismayed that it would take a zoning change to allow a small garden. He estimates that once the city is ready to start assigning plots, a nominal fee of not New community garden re ects early history of PompanoSee GARDEN on page 13

PAGE 8

8 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFJuly 2007, Steve Mark Wilson opened the doors of J. Marks Restaurant in a free standing, speci cally designed building on the Copans side of Pompano Citi Centre campus and it became an instant hit. The design, the ambiance, the menu and the service captured and kept the attention of the public because, as one of the rst customers said, It has all of the elements that matter to those who want a versatile menu in an upscale setting, served by an attentive wait staff to discriminating diners. At the time, Wilson explained that his brother James was an investor, but that he, with a successful career in the food industry, had carefully planned this restaurant with its well designed kitchen that can produce orders for up to 260 guests. The elevated bar and lounge seats about 72 people and the restaurant itself seats about 190 patrons. Chef Rico [Rodrigo Copeland] is a gem who has been with us since opening day, says Wilson. Hes talented, open to suggestions and executes our food to J. Marks Restaurant celebrates ve successful years of delivering consistently ne food and service perfection. Wilson and his partner Ariel Ayala, have since opened a second successful J. Marks at 1245 N. Federal Hwy. in Fort Lauderdale and installed Fabian Gomez as general manager and operating partner in the Pompano Beach location. The Pelican sat down with Fabian to talk about what goes on behind the scenes to make J. Marks the consistent success it is. We have four daily staff meetings, one for each shift, to keep our employees informed and on their toes when it comes to ef ciency and service, Fabian explains. Our menu is carefully planned to appeal to every taste and budget from a soup and salad combination at $8.99 to certi ed Angus beef tenderloin at $29.99. Whats great about this is the fact that people can dine together without compromising any taste or diet. We often see families at a table where Dad orders prime rib, Mom orders a chopped oriental salad, and the kids order cheese burgers. J. Marks can satisfy the entire group in one restaurant and that is just one of the reasons for our popularity and success. He goes on to say, Every item on the menu has been taste tested and compared to the best offered by our competition. If ours isnt better, its not on the menu. Some of the best selling appetizers are Bam-Bam Shrimp and Spinach dip with artichokes. Our prime rib sliders were named Award Winners by YoLo, a restaurant critiquing group. The Oriental Chicken Salad is the most popular salad, especially on the midday menu. Fabian adds, Our prime rib is outstanding; the Hawaiian rib eye steak is to die for; and the Mizo glaze salmon is a winning sh selection. Making the most of the slow period between lunch and dinner, J. Marks features its Mid-Day Menu. During this time slot between two and ve p.m., high quality items are offered at big discounts. On this menu are Oriental Chicken Salad, Five Cheese Pasta, Rack of Ribs, 8-Oz. Prime Rib, Walnut Shrimp on a bed of rice and Fish and Chips. People who want a lighter meal, mid-day are grateful for this option and for the savings, says Fabian. Fabian says. At our staff meetings, we review our commitment to excellence and to providing the best product and service possible. The RAFT taste [recipe, appearance, avor, texture and temperature], gives servers the chance to taste a seasonal special drink and one food from the kitchen. See J.MARKS on page 18Fabian Gomez, general manager of the Pompano Beach J. Marks location pauses to chat with Chef Rico [Rodrigo Copeland] whom he describes as talented, open to suggestions who executes our food to perfection.History at High NoonDeerfield Beach The Deerfield Beach Historical Society is hosting History at High Noon at 12 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 19 at the historic Butler House, 380 E. Hillsboro Blvd. There will be a special exhibit of vintage amateur images of Deerfield Beach as it once was. The event is free but donations will be welcome. Refreshments, cookies and punch will be served. 957-429-0378.Job fair tomorrowDeerfield Beach O2 Media Productions is looking to fill 15 or more positions and collect resumes for future openings in early 2013 and will be holding a job fair tomorrow, Dec. 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at its studio, 3850 N. Powerline Road. O2 is looking for writers, producers, associate producers, business-to-business sales associates and programmers to work in the medium of television. Bring several resume copies and portfolios if applicable. For more information, visit www.o2mediainc.com or call 954-691-1102.

PAGE 9

The Pelican 9 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 10

10 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. Briefs Pace Girls graduate with con dence and tools to help them build a personal future success. Emily, Cierra, Karolyn (11th graders) and Monique (12th grade) look forward to graduation and new challenges. [Photos courtesy of PACE]By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPace Center for girls is a non pro t corporation that provides a non-residential, delinquency prevention program geared to the unique needs of young women at risk. The girls are targeted a number of ways as being in need of a safe, nurturing and therapeutic environment. The purpose of Pace Center is to intervene and prevent girls from school withdrawal, juvenile delinquency, teen pregnancy, substance abuse and welfare dependency. Touring the Pace Center with Kathleen Ryan, development director, gives the visitor a look into classrooms, media and art center, counseling of ces, staff of ces, auditorium, dining facilities and more in the attractive center under the leadership of Executive Director, Aggie Pappas. Located at 2225 N. Andrews Ave. in Wilton Pace Center for Girls 12 to 17 in Wilton Manors offers education, guidance, and coping skills for success Manors, its apparent that the staff dispenses love, dedication, positive thinking, support and education --a successful formula for the 80 girls attending the center. Ryan explains. From day one, each girl has a counselor, a social service life skills counselor in addition to a full education program. We feel these are young women of courage who are motivated to succeed and they receive the help they need from us to do so. They are with us year round from Monday through Friday from 8:30 to 3 p.m. All subjects are taught by certi ed teachers from sixth to 12 grade. This team approach insures that our girls are well prepared to transition to a regular commercial school, or at graduation they are ready to enter college or begin a career. The average stay at the Pace Center is one year and a half, although some students are encouraged to remain for two years. The girls are mostly referred to Pace by family, school counselors, medical professionals, and sometimes they request consideration themselves because they have heard about Paces support system. The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice and School Board of Broward County Kathleen Ryan, development director of Pace, has been working for its funding and success for the past seven years. Touring and learning about the Center from Ryan makes it clear that caring and dedication is part of her job description. See PACE on page 11Its time to celebrate the seasonDeer eld BeachTwo parties are planned for the upcoming holidays by the City of Deer eld Beach. Winter Wonderland will be held Thursday, Dec. 20 at Villages of Hillsboro Park at 3 p.m. The event will be highlighted by real snow, horse drawn hayrides and photo ops with Santa Claus. Small fees may apply. Food will be sold. The park is at 4111 NW 6 St. Call 480-4495 for more information. Teenagers, 13-18, will have their special party, Up All Night, on Friday and Saturday, Dec. 21 to 22. They will meet at Constitution Park, 2841 W. Hillsboro Blvd., and enjoy an evening at Santas Enchanted Forest followed by bowling. Cost is $30 and includes all the fun and lots of food. Registration due by Dec. 20. Spots are lling fast. Call 954-571-4568 for more.Holiday hoursDeer eld Beach City Hall will be closed Dec. 24 through 26 for Christmas and Jan. 1 for New Years Day. The Aquatic Center will be closed Dec. 24, 25 and Jan. 1 and open Dec. 26 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The shing pier will be open every day throughout the holidays.Christmas tree pickupDeer eld Beach The city solid waste department continues services throughout the holidays with the exception of Christmas Day. Residents with a normal Tuesday collection, will have garbage picked up on Wednesday the 26th. Christmas trees will be picked up on regular bulk trash days and must be free of lights and decorations. Do not bag. Oakland Park An ensemble of actors will perform excerpts from Neil Simon comedies and an episode from the classic radio series, The Great Gildersleeve. The event is at 2 p.m. Friday, Dec. 14, at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. Call 954-567-9524.Comedy on library stage

PAGE 11

The Pelican 11 Friday, December 14, 2012 fund approximately 75 percent of this totally volunteer program. The remaining nancial support comes from individuals, businesses, community organization and corporate foundations. As Development Director, Ryan spends much of her time working with donors, writing grants, arranging for special events and fundraisers. She says, We just had a wonderful and successful 20th anniversary celebration, titled Year of the Dragon. The dragon is a symbol of good fortune which ts with the Centers approach. Held at the Hyatt Rgency Pier 66 for 170 people, it was a nancial and social success with dinner, dancing and silent auctions. The total amount raised has not yet been announced. She adds, We do about ve fundraisers a year. A luncheon, Believing in Girls features our girls. We do a Chefs for Pace Cook-Off at Hughes Culinary in Oakland Park which is another success. In our 20 years in existence, we have provided services for 2,500 girls. One member of our second class held 18 years ago, now serves on our board. Ryan says, Although the day program is the heart of our center, our well quali ed counseling staff is open afternoons and evenings for girls 8 to 18 and families. Everything we do here is strength based and gender responsive to young females and their special needs. Pace operates 17 centers throughout Florida and one Reach program. Since its creation in1984, Pace has served over 21,000 girls. Every girl at Pace sets individual educational and social goals that are focused on earning a high school diploma or GED, re-entering public school, attending college, getting vocational training, joining the military or entering the private work force. After program completion, Pace continues to monitor each girls education and personal development with three years of follow up case management. Pace has come up with some statistics that prove its program works. It costs an average of $42,500 per year to incarcerate a youth with only a sobering 25 percent success rate. At Pace, the average cost per girl is $12,500 per year for enrollment with a proven 88 percent ve year success rate. Pace began as a community response to the realization that girls involved with the justice system were either placed in boys programs or further into the system for their own protection. Started by Vicki Burke and guided by researchbased recommendations which called for gender responsive programming, Pace created a new alternative to institutionalization or incarceration. Pace is now recognized as a national model for reducing recidivism and improving school success, employment and selfsuf ciency among girls. Readers are encouraged to alert friends and families to the services Pace offers to the community. Attend a free tour, held monthly at the Center. Heres what two volunteers had to say:Toby Manke says, Ive been working with the girls for over three years and its been both challenging and rewarding. The girls come to Pace with individual needs, and some have anxieties about working with someone they do not know. In the end, it is very rewarding to see them change from shy, hostile, scared girls to selfcon dent young women ready and able to achieve their goals and to feel that maybe you have been part of their growth. Barbara Wagner is a lawyer, a volunteer who also serves on the Board of Directors. She explains, Im part of a Womens Lawyers Group who has a book and breakfast program with the girls that lasts for 10 weeks. We read and discuss a book and its wonderful for the girls to meet all female lawyers. They relate to us as role models as we discuss the book week after week. Right now we are reading Toni Morrisons The Bluest Eye. Our group has done this six times in the last six years. Their favorite book was The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls. Wagner continues, Because Pace is so near my of ce, I am going to start going in once a week to tutor on a one-on-one basis. I admire the staff so much because they are so dedicated and caring for the girls. Thank you for your contributions to Pace. Donations are welcome and can be made online or by mail. Send to Pace Center for Girls Broward, Leo Goodwin Campus, 2225 N. Andrew Ave., Wilton Manors, Fl. 33311. Phone 954-561-6939. Web site:www.pacecenter. org/broward To volunteer, call 954561-6939. PACEContinued from page 10

PAGE 12

12 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Mailman because he walked the beaches to deliver mail to South Florida, Hamiltons likeness is being proposed to enhance the Hillsboro Inlet Bridge. City Engineer Lou Friend has been working with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) sculptor Frank Varga and architect Scott Bakos on designs that will enhance the citys northeastern most entrance. Pompano has budgeted $1 million to improve the bridges appearance, but this week Friend said that gure could be less with the participation of FDOT, which is assured, and neighboring Hillsboro Beach and Lighthouse Point, which is not. What is being proposed is a two-story bridge house and Hamiltons statue atop a tall column to create a landmark entry, Friend said. Other improvements include a new sidewalk, a decorative railing, a protective pedestrian screen, paint job, lighting and bronze lettering on the bridge face naming the cities it serves. Friend said erecting the Barefoot Mailman on the Pompano side of the Inlet pays homage to its history. Its our architectural connection, he said. Bakos said the current bridge shows a lack of character. Residents of Hillsboro Shores were enthusiastic about the plans calling it a great signature and wonderful. Sculptor Varga has already made his mark on local art. He restored the original Barefoot Mailman statue in front of Hillsboro Beach Town Hall and cast the statue at the Hillsboro Inlet Lighthouse. Hamilton is believed to have lost his life when he attempted to swim the Hillsboro Inlet to retrieve the boat he used to cross the waterway. His story inspired a book by Theodore Pratt and a movie made in 1951 starring Robert Cummings.Three food rms vie for kiosk contractPompano Beach The Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] will negotiate with the three top bidders for the kiosk food service contract. The three emerged from an original list of ve. They are: Dh2 Inc., the company rated highest by a staff selection committee, DiMaria Properties LLC, ranked second and Snack Time Catering LLC, with the third number of points. The vendors are vying for a ve-year contract to operate the 339-sq. ft. kiosk in Beachfront Park, a project of the CRA. Dh2 got points for its dcor, menu, nancial strength, professional presentation and reputation. DiMaria lost points for not having experience in fast food service. Snack Time for not having a creative menu. Criteria for the vendors was to provide high quality, freshly made food at a moderate price. The bid proposal calls for the vendor to pay $2,500 a minimum month or 12 percent of gross, whichever is higher. CRA engineer Horacio Donavich, lead staffer on the project, said two of the bidders have already exceeded the minimum and the negotiations will focus on getting the best opportunity for the city as well as reevaluating all the information provided by each vendor and doing due diligence. Tuesday, a family spoke for Frank DiMaria who has operated Franks Ristorante on E. Atlantic Blvd, for 38 years and who recently spent $70,000 upgrading his restaurant faade. His restaurant location is less than 200 feet from the kiosk, the speaker said, and the restaurant has plenty of storage and refrigeration space. Dh2, Inc. was a bidder for the restaurant operation on the Deer eld Beach Fishing Pier, but did not make the short list for the contract awarded last week.BridgeContinued from page 1Arts & Jazz at SkolnickPompano Beach Lovers of art and jazz will nd friends at the Jazz Fest planned this weekend at the Herb Skolnick Center Dec. 16 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Local artists include Jo Ann Culligan, Marcia Hirschy, Val Lecklikner, Tammy Seymour and others. The Skolnick Center is located at 800 SW 36 Ave. at the Palm Aire Community. Call 954-786-4590.Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com

PAGE 13

The Pelican 13 Friday, December 14, 2012 Deer eld Beach Cross Community Church presents a performance of the Nutcracker Ballet and a Christmas celebration on Friday, Dec. 14. Students from Astrid Audet Academy of Ballet will perform the ballet at 6 p.m. Fun for children, including bounce houses and food, will follow from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The church [formerly New Horizons Church] is at 841 Southeast Second Court in Deer eld Beach. Call 954300-9854.Nutcracker Ballet tonight, Dec. 14 at 6 p.m. more than $30 or $60 a year will be charged to help maintain the garden. Im sure it will be rst-come, rst-served, said Moore. Pompano started out as a farming community and crops continued to be an economic focus of the city throughout the Depression. Farming was so intertwined with the early identity and success of the city that students at Pompano High were then called the Bean Pickers. Todays farmers who take a plot in the citys garden will no doubt grow some of the things the citys early residents did. But along with the gardens and hydroponic pods, Alfonso said there will be a gathering area for picnics or things like that and a small cottagy-like building that will serve as an of ce and storage shed for the person who will oversee the garden once it is open. Some fruit trees may also be planted. Were trying to design a GardenContinued from page 7really nice little building that will blend in with the area, she said. Garden planned adjacent to Ely campus.

PAGE 14

14 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 those within seven years of retirement. The current pension plan allows a 42-year-old employee with 20 years of service to retire with 70 percent of salary, a situation Bill Underwood, the citys nancial services director, called unsustainable. The union offered to raise the minimum retirement age from 42 to 48 and to reduce the maximum pension from the current 85 percent, to 75 percent of salary. The city proposal called for a retirement age of 52 for those with 25 years on the job and 55 for those with at least 10 years of service with a pension max of 65 percent of salary. The commission was also asked to lift a three-year wage freeze. Slade Bruce, union vice president and a local re ghter, said the department is demoralized. Staff has decreased by 20 percent since 2007. A wage freeze has been in effect since 2009. Commissioners approved a one percent wage increase for one year, less than the unions request for a three-year contract. John McNamara, president of Local 3080, said Oakland Park is at the bottom of the salary range in the county. Commissioners also agreed to $750 a year in educational incentives and a PTO plan that combines sick leave, vacation leave and longevity pay and allows an employee to schedule time off for personal needs. Commissioner Boisvenue objected to the PTO plan saying re ghters/ paramedics have a job uniquely different from anyone. They work 24hour shifts and are exposed to blood, needles, fumes. Other employees she noted sit behind a desk and are not exposed to such dangers. Commissioner Shari McCartney said the commission had no choice but to deal with the issues. We need to make choices for the solvency of the city, but do so respectfully. Commissioner Shank said he was disappointed at the length and cost of negotiations, faulting both sides. ContractContinued from page 1

PAGE 15

The Pelican 15 Friday, December 14, 2012 housing and helping infants, children, and young adults with mental, developmental and physical disabilities. Delivering toys to the Broward Childrens Center is a Christmas tradition started over 30 years ago with one toy delivered to one child by now retired re ghter Hank Taylor. Wed come here in horrible times, and it just took, said Lt. Bob McCarthy. That rst child is still under the care of Broward Childrens Center. We dont want this to be their forever home, but sometimes that is the case, said Bridgette DeSeno, spokeswoman for Broward Childrens Center. But weve had some great stories of kids being adopted. This years haul included more toys for more kids. We shopped for 55 kids, said Eslie, who estimated about 150 toys were given out. Sandra King, re department spokesperson said that all toys purchased were paid for by re ghters personally. Gifts are coordinated through Broward Childrens Center. Usually the need of the child is foremost. In the past, re ghters brought a large-screen television and a choo-choo train that runs throughout the center on its tracks. Eslie, who organizes the event with Fire ghter Petra Arnieri, said the pair took over a few years ago. Its kind of been passed down [from re ghter to re ghter]. We start organizing in October. Theyre a very generous group, said Debbie Thompson, social worker at Broward Childrens Center. They support us all year in various events. And the children remember the generosity of the re ghters every year. The kids start talking about it a few months before it even gets here, said Thompson. It means as much [to them] as it does to the re ghters.Another trip in sightThese reghting Santas will still be packing gifts for children in Pompano Beach, and this time the public is asked to help out. On Christmas Day, said King. The reghters will take gifts to over 100 families in the city. To donate an unwrapped gift, visit any re station in the city or leave toys at city hall. Call 954-786-4601 for more information.JoyContinued from page 1Fire ghters Scott Frien, left, and Vinnie Tracon clowning around for the kids. Kaitlin King, 11, and Santa hand out presents.

PAGE 16

16 The PelicanFriday, December 14, 2012 Pompano Beach Broward Sheriffs Of ce robbery detectives are looking for two men who robbed a Pompano Beach 7-Eleven store, hitting a clerk on the back with a ri e as they ordered him to the oor. Surveillance cameras captured the robbery, which happened just after 3 a.m. Nov. 13 at 290 Copans Rd. in Pompano Beach. One robber was tall and thin with a long-sleeve, blue shirt, khaki pants and a blue stocking over his face. He was armed with a ri e. The second was about 5-foot3 with a mustache, a black skull cap and a black shirt. He appeared to be in his early 30s. They walked in and headed right to the register. The shorter robber ordered everyone to the oor, while the taller man dragged one employee behind the counter and told him to open the register. Once the employee complied, the robber hit him in the back with the gun and told him to get on the oor. The two criminals ed with money from the register. Robbers who hit 7-Eleven, still at largeThe new carts, green and beige, were purchased from recycling rebate money and offered to residents freeof-charge. Cost was about $130,000. This coming week, another truckload, about 500 more carts, will be distributed throughout the city. Says Graham, Our trucks will follow the Waste Management recycling trucks and well collect the old green bins and leave the new carts. To order the new carts or for more information, call 954-946-7386.Think nautical nowPompano Beach The Annual Nautical Flea Market opens Jan. 26 for a weekend of deals for boaters, divers, anglers and everyone else with an eye for a deal.Vendors will ll the grounds of Community Park with food, crafts, art, books and all things nautical. The event is a shared project between Pompano Beach and Lighthouse Point. Cost to attend is $5 per day. Call 954-786-4111 or visit www. nautical eamarket.com.MLK celebrations are family eventsPompano Beach Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. will be remembered in this city with several events. The rst event, an Interfaith Breakfast, Jan. 5 at 8:30 a.m. at the Annie Gillis Park, 520 MLK Blvd., will be a prayer breakfast. The event is open to the public. Breakfast is compliments of the Pompano Beach Clergymens association. The theme for 2013 MLK celebrations is The Time is Always Right to Do What is Right. On Jan. 7, the Basketball Classic will take place at Mitchell-Moore Center, 901 NW 10 St. Cost for teams of four is $60 for children ages 12 to 14 and 15 to 17. Games begin at 6 p.m. The MLK Parade is set for Jan. 21 with a line-up at 8 a.m. at Mitchell-Moore Park, 901 NW 10 St. At 10:30 a.m., the celebrations culminate with the Salute to Greatness at Blanche Ely High School, 1201 NW 6 Ave. with special guest, Vickie Winans, Gospel recording artist. Pompano Beach Fire Rescue evaluated the employee for injuries, though he was not transported to the hospital. Anyone with information can report it to BSO Det. Victor Carrasquillo at (954) 3214270 or call in anonymous tips to Crime Stoppers of Broward County at (954) 493-TIPS (8477) or online at www. browardcrimestoppers.org.Recycling cartsContinued from page 1

PAGE 17

The Pelican 17 Friday, December 14, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN WRITERBeach Fish Market 2781 E. Atlantic Pompano Beach 954-941-3275The tradition continues, says Terry Craft, the new proprietor of the impeccably clean and inviting Beach Fish Market. Located across the street from Houstons restaurant, mere steps from the bridge spanning the Intracoastal, this seafood shop is the reinvention of what was for many years the old Mr. Fish. Owning this store was somewhat accidental. I was in one day making a birthday lobster purchase and found out Mr. Fish was going to close its doors so I decided to buy it! Originally from Colorado, Craft moved to nearby Lauderdale-By-The-Sea a few years ago and had been on the lookout for a new business venture. She has now been open for about a month and is looking forward to providing fresh seafood to all who frequent the area. We have a huge selection of fresh fish, shrimp, Maine lobster, diver scallops, clams, oysters, Prince Edward Island mussels and King crab legs. And of course, as it is the season, we have a ton of fresh stone crabs as well! says Terry as she walks by the resplendent display cases bursting at the seams with eye-catching maritime Beach Fish Market serves up a wealth of fresh seafood by Intracoastaldelights. Jumbo, extra-large, large and medium shrimp or prawns overflow from their ice trays. Beach Fish Market owner Terry Craft shows off a couple of the stores more famous attractions the feisty 2 pound Maine lobster. Shrimp, shrimp and more shrimp of all sizes! See SEAFOOD on page 20

PAGE 18

18 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 J. MarksContinued from page 8The point of doing this is to give servers rst hand tastes of what they serve and describe to patrons. One server, Olivia Parker says, RAFT is a terri c idea. It familiarizes the staff with everything on the menu and allows us to give customers an honest, personal opinion. J. Marks has a loyal following. Jean M. McIntyre, branch manager of iBeriaBank, drops in often because she says, Its a great place to bring a client for lunch. I personally love the Oriental Chicken Salad. The quality of food and service is always up to expectations. My friends and I manage to dine at J. Marks at least twice a month, says Geri Gunderson. Weve never been disappointed. One friend always chooses the Prime Rib. Another always orders the salmon salad. I love the cheeseburgers and sweet potato fries. We all appreciate Happy Hour between two and six p.m. when drinks are half price.About Fabian GomezHe laughs and says, I started in this business as a dish washer at 13 in New York and worked my way up the ladder, getting experience in a McDonalds, and moving up from being a bus boy to a server in a ne French restaurant in Manhattan. I was honored to become the manager of a ne Manhattan Italian restaurant and eventually became a food and beverage director. I moved to Miami as manager of Re ections on the Bay. When it went out of business, I opened my own place in Plantation which I had for two years. The hours are terrible for a guy with a family and I have one. Im married to Luz and we have ve children ranging in age from 14 to 27. Three are still at home. I miss the pace of New York but Im glad I traded it in for the easy life style of this paradise. I wanted to lighten my load and spend time with my family so I sold my business and took a job as a server at J. Marks. When my background became known, I was seduced into management once again. I admit, I love it. J. Marks is open seven days. Call 954-782-7000 Pompano Beach or 954-3900770 Fort Lauderdale for information, reservations, gift cards, and private dining room for parties. The seared Ahi tuna salad features fresh eld greens with balsamic vinaigrette, fresh mango, avocado and tomatoes.

PAGE 19

The Pelican 19 Friday, December 14, 2012 Deerfield Beach If you like shopping a bit later on Sunday mornings, the Green Market here has extended its shopping hours to 2 p.m. The seasonal marketplace is held at The Cove Shopping Center on East Hillsboro Blvd. and the Intercoastal Waterway and operates every Sunday from November through April. The Deer eld Green Market open for shoppers until 2 location provides plenty of convenient, free parking. This is the third year for the local green market which is now managed by Emily Lilly who instituted Boca Ratons green market 16 years ago. We are always expanding our vendors, Lilly said. Our success relies on the produce that is available. Especially popular are the produce stands and bakery goods. Theres even a baker who makes treats for pets. This Sunday, 9 a.m. noon, Dymin will perform her islandstyle music at the Cove which is decorated for the holidays. Along with fruits and vegetables, shoppers will find fresh herbs, soaps & lotions, an assorted variety of plants, fresh-cut flowers, orchids, prepared foods, gourmet foods, organic produce and eggs, fresh fish and seafood, grass-fed beef products, doggie treats, candles, and much more. The market includes arts and crafts---many of them homemade---including pottery and other agriculture-related products. Community service organizations are encouraged to share information or to promote a special project or fundraiser. Call the green market office, 562-299-8684. Deer eld Beach. Movie is free. Refreshments will be sold. Bring blankets and chairs. 954-480-4429. 12-15 Gold and silver donation drop-off at New Presbyterian Church South Campus, 512 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors, from 9 to 11 a.m. Students perform a musical during the drop-off. Refreshments will be served. 954-946-4380. 12-15 Friends of the Pompano Beach Library book sale 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. Gift books and stocking-stuffers will be available. Free roll of gift wrapping paper with purchases of $5 or more. Massage raf e entry with purchase of $10 or more. 954357-7595 12-15 Winterfest Boat Parade watch party at Flip Flops Dockside Eatery, 3051 NE 32 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $95 per person and $35 for children 12 and under. Includes buffet. 954-5671672. 12-15 Spiritual Health Fair from 10 to 4 p.m. at Bridges of Wellness, 1881 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Event SightingsContinued from page 3 See SIGHTINGS on page 21

PAGE 20

20 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 My favorite is our plump and sweet Gulf shrimp, adds the savvy businesswoman with a knowing smile. Wild caught Chilean Sea Bass, sushi grade Yellowfin tuna, Scottish salmon, Red Snapper, Wahoo, MahiMahi, Grouper and Flounder are just a few of the many mouthwatering fish species available. The Beach Fish Market even offers the highly prized pumpkin swordfish whose flesh can acquire an orange tint from its diet of shrimp. Although this fish would generally command a premium over its whitish counterpart, it is sold here at regular prices. Speaking of white fish, classic farm raised Tilapia and Basa are also great low-cost choices (under $6 a pound) for fried fish recipes. Local residents will be thrilled to know they have a newly improved seafood emporium within walking distance of the beach. And in the near future, when the streetscape beautification project on Atlantic Blvd. is completed, we will offer steamed lobster and drawn butter for immediate consumption at our outside dining tables. In order to build a loyal customer base, The Beach Fish Market has strategically decided to sell its seafood at substantially lower prices than its competitors. In addition, people just love our homemade crab cakes, conch salad, blue cheese potato salad and our wonderful dipping sauces, says the gregarious fishmonger. And our delightful lobster bisque and clam chowder are equally popular. Indeed, the soups are ready to eat and make for a great quick start to any meal. And at $10 for the large 16 oz size, they are an inexpensive way to impress ones dinner guests. The Beach Fish Market also offers a host tantalizing spices, holiday gift baskets and even a delightful Key Lime Pie for a sweet ending to any meal. And free lemons accompany each purchase. Enjoy! A magical platter for seafood lovers: (clockwise from the lemon wedges) a large, scored stone crab claw with mustard dipping sauce, a giant lightly battered and fried dry diver scallop, homemade conch salad, pan fried Chilean Sea Bass with lemon-cilantro butter sauce, a steaming bowl of lobster bisque, a pumpkin sword sh grilled skewer, a dollop of rice Tilapia, Wahoo, Mahi-Mahi, Scottish Salmon and sushi grade Yellow n Tuna are just a few of the many sh species available at the Beach Fish Market. SeafoodContinued from page 17

PAGE 21

The Pelican 21 Friday, December 14, 2012 includes gift drawings every half hour. 954-530-6006. 12-16 Deer eld Beach Green Market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Cove Shopping Center at Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal. Held every Sunday until April 28. Vendors welcome. 561-2391536 or 561-299-8684. 12-16 Dixieland/Hot Jazz Session from 1 to 4 p.m. at Henrys Hideaway, 1500 S. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach. Presented by the Hot Jazz & Alligator Gumbo Society. Cost is $10. 954-5635390 or 561-809-6410. 12-17 Womens Lunch N Learn from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Join Chaya Benjaminson for a discussion on the Torah Portion. Ladies Only. 954-2283338. Event is free. 12-19 Oakland Park Commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. 12-19 Holiday orchestra show at North Andrews Gardens Elementary School, 345 NE 56 St., Oakland Park, at 7 p.m. 754-322-7300. 12-20 Wilton Manors Historical Society meeting at 7 p.m. at the commission chambers, 2020 Wilton Drive. 954-566-9019. 12-21 Reiki energy circle at 7 p.m. at Lisas Healing Center, 4301 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 4, Pompano Beach. Donation is $10. 954782-6564. 12-26 Rabbi Lipa will host a discussion on the Mystical dimensions of the Torah from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Suggested donation is $10. 954-228-3338. 12-31 Showboat, produced by Stage Door Theater, 8036 W. Sample Road, Coral Springs. 954-344-7765. 1-6 Big Band Dance from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, 240 W. Prospect Road, Oakland Park. Cost is $8 at the door. Cash bar. 954564-2357. 1-7 Charity auction at Java Boys, 2230 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, at 7 p.m. Antiques, artwork, paintings, sculptures, furniture and other items will be available. Proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Email ajcrossconsulting@gmail.com. 1-7 Retired Educators Social Club meeting at 12 p.m. at Stratford Court, 6343 Via de Sonrisa del Sur, Boca Raton. Meeting is free and SightingsContinued from page 19 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

PAGE 22

22 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 of the city, by half a space. But Resnick disagreed. I think its a little bit too low, he said. On the issue of businessrelated parking, Commissioner Tom Green said if parking is too restrictive the city would lose out. Youre going to drive businesses away . and say hello to a new business in Oakland Park. Robert Cassidy, planning and zoning board member, echoed Green and said the city needs to make sure its business owners arent forced to move to shopping malls. Commissioners also voted to reduce the percentage of parking that a business can purchase under the citys payment in lieu of parking option. Currently, a business can pay $18,000 for every space it cant provide, build its own parking spaces or hire a valet service to satisfy its parking requirements. The payment in lieu of option can be used to satisfy 100 percent of the required parking. The commission voted to reduce that to 75 percent for up to 20 spaces.Parking is not the only issueIn a move that was labeled as protectionist by Resnick, commissioners also approved changes to the regulations that deal with independent food vendor carts. Previously, commissioners approved regulations that allowed vendor carts to be set up along Wilton Drive and Dixie Highway on public and private property. But some businesses owners, afraid that the carts would be given an unfair advantage against brick Wilton DriveContinued from page 4and mortar storefronts, were opposed. Resnick voted in favor of the regulations and said he understood the reasons for it but added that if every city in Broward did this it would hurt business. Recently the city approved vendor carts along Wilton Drive, a law that has bothered some business owners. Nick Berry, who co-owns Courtyard Caf on Wilton Drive, said vendor carts would present another challenge to existing merchants in a business climate that already has too many challenges. In response to Berry and others, the city amended the regulations so that vendor cart owners could operate on the Drive. But only if a vendor has permission from a business owner to operate in front of their location. So far, no vending carts are operating along Wilton Drive and only one is operating on Dixie Highway at an auto care center. Green said he was disappointed that no vendor carts have opened along Wilton Drive something he sees as a possible enhancement to the street. And with the city jockeying for one of the proposed Florida East Coast commuter rail stations, Carson said vendor carts could be an enhancement to the area near a station if one is built south of Northeast 26 Street. The nal vote on payment in lieu of parking, vendor carts and retail parking requirements will be held at the next commission meeting on Jan. 8; the commission meeting for Dec. 25 has been cancelled. open to the public. The topic will be Slimming down: super foods and supplements. 954-255-6360 or 561-4835445. 1-12 & 13 Tropical Postcard Show and Sale at the Pompano Beach Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $3. Free appraisals. 305-6660219. 1-13 Sunday Matinee Music at Boca Raton Library. Jim Kovalcik Trio, featuring Jim Kovalcik on ute, Jason Hanley on guitar and Steve Jernigan on bass. 3 p.m. at the Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd. 561-239-1536. SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

PAGE 23

The Pelican 23 Friday, December 14, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-7838700! sign down and will bring the matter back to the commission in January. Paint Only Program amended Commissioners amended a Paint Only Program to include only the commercial portions of mixed-use buildings. The vote was 3-2, Scot Sasser and Chris Vincent dissenting. The town established the program recently to encourage commercial property owners to improve the exterior of buildings with a new coat of paint. The town reimburses quali ed owners 50 percent of the cost of painting, patching and pressure cleaning, up to a maximum grant of $5,000. The program was aimed at commercial properties, excluding hotels. However, the program, as written, overlooked mixed-use properties, something we want to encourage in our commercial district, Pat Himelberger, assistant to the town manager, wrote in a report to commissioners. Thats not where I want to go, subsidizing (painting) the residential part of buildings, Commissioner Stuart Dodd said prior to the vote. Some are prominent buildings on Commercial Boulevard. Would you be willing to pay for the commercial part of the building? Town Manager Connie Hoffmann asked. Absolutely, with the proviso that it only applies to the commercial part of the building, Dodd responded. Sasser asked if the town is doing something similar for residents, asking, Dont we want our residential neighborhoods to look as good? Were doing a heck of a lot for businesses. The least they can do is spruce up their business. We should make the towns property the best we can make it. Im not necessarily for these programs, he said.LotContinued from page 2said, and we dont have the money to cover the three days. Biggest concern is the weather. One rain day wipes out major revenues MacKay said. The other concern is the cost of city services, $38,000 last year for police, re, sound and cleanup. Mayor Peggy Noland, who took over Cracker Day from the local Lions Club 20 years ago, concurred that the age of committee members is a factor. Pat Miller, one of her original team and parade chair, now spends her time with grandchildren, Noland said. People just cant do it anymore. Community Event Liaison Phil Biscomer said the event will come off as always with the exception of the reworks which have always been shot off the end of the pier. With the piers T destroyed by Tropical Storm Sandy and not likely to be repaired in time for the festival, other options are being explored, Biscomer said. Right now, it is in the hands of BSO, he added. The city is in negotiations with FMG, an event planner that stages the Garlic Festival in Delray Beach and earlier this year held a small country music festival here, to help with Founders Days. The three day festival will still consist of parade, vendors, carnival, entertainment and food. The city will give FMG some seed money up front but will share in the pro ts from alcohol sales. This is the model most cities are going to, Biscomer said. There is no money in this years city budget for the event. Biscomer said funds set aside for Fourth of July may be used. It is his job to get the music and stage the parade. MacKay said bands for the parade have cost $10,000 in the past and the committee spent $35,000 for the entertainment. Biscomer said he will rely more on local musical groups. Noland said since the event takes place on the beach, funds could be available from the Community Redevelopement Agency. All will go on as usual, she said. Biscomer is also con dent this Deer eld Beach tradition will continue. You shouldnt be able to tell the difference, he said. Founders Days is the new generation of Cracker Days established by the DB Lions Club in Pioneer Park 66 years ago. What began as a one-day barbecue, beauty pageant and talent contest, grew to become a three-day carnival. But the Lions Club also suffered from an aging membership and lack of funds which prompted Noland, not a public of cial at the time, to take over the event, gather a group of volunteers, move it to the beach and rename it Founders Days. Founders DayContinued from page 1

PAGE 24

24 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad 1-12 & 1-19 Sign-up for Northeast Little League baseball will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wimberly Field batting cage, 4000 NE 3 Ave., Oakland Park. League is boys and girls ages 5 to 18. Jan. 26 is the last day to register. Volunteer and sponsorship opportunities available. Email davemcleod33@aol.com or 954-793-2348.FridaysThe Island City Art Walk is held every third Friday from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Many businesses along the street host an artist and serve up free appetizers and spirits. Visit www.islandcityartwalk.com for more information. Pompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach The award of the fishing pier restaurant contract is being challenged by the bidder recommended by the citys selection committee. Two Together LLC operating as BurgerFi has protested the commissions decision to hire Class Act LLC who will operate here as the Deerfield Beach Caf. Commissioners met last week to assess the three bidders deemed by staff to be most suitable, and Class Acts bid was given the highest ranking. Two Together had been given the most points by staff but the commission deadlocked 2-2 on accepting their bid forcing the matter to a special meeting where each commissioner ranked the bidders according to a point system. In that ranking, Class Act, owners of Flash Back diners in Hallandale and Davie, won the contract. A special meeting will be held Tuesday, 7 p.m. to consider the protest. Commissioners can hear from the protesters or deny a hearing without further action. They can also take no action, grant the petition and go out to bid again or give Two Together some relief to resolve the issue. According to legal sources, the protest may be a precursor to a lawsuit. No notice of legal action has been received by the city attorney, but city commissioners did approve last week hiring outside council in the event a lawsuit is filed. Two Together is represented by attorney Michael Weiner. Weiner had no comment. Awarding the restaurant contract has been a long process which began in August. Two bidders earlier filed protests after staff determined their bid information was insufficient. At that time, the commission upheld the staffs decision and went forward to consider the top contenders.Pier restaurant contract challenged by runner up 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information. SightingsContinued from page 22 See SIGHTINGS on page 25

PAGE 25

The Pelican 25 Friday, December 14, 2012 well-escorted by motorcycle BSO patrols. Waldrop decided she would not cry. Tuesday was the day that Waldrop was to receive an award from BSO Sheriff Al Lamberti for her years of volunteer work in her community and the entire county. Waldrop is known as the go-to person in Cresthaven for up-to-the-minute information from a power failure to a crime event. She has headed up the Cresthaven neighborhood Watch for years, learning the ropes from the late Dennis Myers, whom Waldrop refers to as her mentor. When Myers died several years ago, Waldrop was active in getting Northeast 33 Street named in his honor. Dennis taught us all to give back, she said in an interview. Mayor Lamar Fisher was among those who came to say thank you to Waldrop. Words cannot express the appreciation for Carole and her complete dedication to out city. She has devoted hours and hours as a citizen to help her city. We sincerely thank her. Hailing from Michigan, Waldrop came to Pompano Beach 52 years ago. After a while, she met her future husband, Travis. They have three children. Waldrop worked as a teacher for 23 years at Highlands Christian Academy. She became certi ed in many safety programs sponsored by the local re and police departments, and shared that knowledge with other groups. We hosted some of the biggest Night Out Against Crime events, she says. We learned from the police. We drove around our neighborhoods and reported suspicious activity. Waldrops leadership helped others follow her into community programs. But on Tuesday, Waldrop had a hard time holding back her own emotions. I couldnt believe all those people could think I was worthy of this honor. SightingsContinued from page 24SaturdaysPompano Beach GreenMarket is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. 954292-8040. Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. Pony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.WaldropContinued from page 3 See SIGHTINGS on page 30

PAGE 26

26 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26SEEKING EMPLOYMENTMAINTENANCE/ HANDYMAN Professional. 30 Yrs. Exp. References, Tools, Transportation. Im Looking For PT Work. Bondable. 954593-6833. 12-14 RELIABLE BILINGUAL LADY Seeks Position As Pet Sitter / Dog Walker (Responsible Animal LOVER) Pompano / E Ft Lauderdale Area. Giselle 954-942-8111. 1-4 CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AIDE Seeking Job To Care For The Elderly. Nights/ Wkends. Live In / Out. 954549-0336. 12-14 COMPANION HOME CARE Best Companion Care For You Or Your Loved One. Over 25 Years Experience, Reliable, Honest, Compassionate. Excellent References. Louise 954-258-1053. 12-14SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 12-14 EXPERIENCED DRIVER AVAILABLE! TO & FROM STORES DOCTORS APPOINTMENTS AIRPORT, ETC. CALL MARYANN 954-895-3202. 12-21 MOORE PLUMBINGPLUMBING SERVICES-Big Jobs-Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 12-28 A N A S CLEAN (RESIDENTIAL) CLEANING In Pompano Lighthouse Point Deer eld. Dependable Thorough Experienced. References. Good Work For A Good Price. Please Call Ana 954-692-4691. 12-7 SANTAS HELPER NOT ENOUGH Time To Decorate Or Last Minute Cleaning For That Special Occasion Shop Wrap Or Pick-up Gifts Etc. Dont Stress Out!! Call Me Elf Ruth & Ill Be On My Way In My Sleigh. 954-8618856. 12-28 XPERTS CLEANING SERVICE Residential & Commercial. 10 Years Experience. References Honest Dependable. More Information Call 954-3760524. 1-4 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATIONPickup & Drop-Off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-234-0617. 1-4 DIGNITY CLEANING SERVICE INC House Condo Of ce & More. 954826-6450. Lic/Ins. Call Today For A FREE Estimate. 5th Cleaning 1/2 Price. 12-21. HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1214 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CCOLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 12-28 FURNITUREBEDSETS-King $180-Queen $130-Full $110-Twin $90. 5 Pc Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. www.bedsbestbargain.com 954-465-6498. 12-14 THRIFT STORESDEERFIELD BEACH 801 SE 10 STREET. Every Week 10am-3pm On Mon & Wed. 10-4pm On Fri & Sat. CLF Thrift Store. Mention Ad Receive 20% Off Fri & Sat Only. 12-14 MISC. ITEMSGOOD CHRISTMAS PRESENT!!!!! Adult Tricycle ( 3 Wheeler ) Royal Blue! Rear Basket. Brand NEW! $350. See In Pompano! Call 954-7857594. 12-14 JEWELRYGIVE WEARABLE ART THIS YEAR. www.etsy.com/ shop/T rekkietrishaJewelry 954-596-8991. 12-21 GARAGE SALEYARD SALE DEERFIELD BUILDERS SUPPLY 77 SE 2 Avenue Deer eld. 954-4271010. 8am Noon Saturday 12-15. Hardware Skylights Windows / Doors Millwork. CASH & CARRY. 12-14

PAGE 27

The Pelican 27 Friday, December 14, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 POMPANO JUMBO GARAGE SALE & Silent Auction. Sunday Dec 16 9am Noon. (Silent Auction 11:30) Temple Sholom 132 SE 11 Avenue. 12-14 YARD SALE SATURDAY DECEMBER 15 7:30am To 2pm. 124 NW 15 Street Pompano Beach. Clothes, Bric-a-brac Shoes And Much More! 12-14 ROOMS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEAC Off Powerline & Hillsboro Blvd. $550 Per Month IncludesUtilities. Non-Smoker No Drugs. 1st/Last/Ref/ Background Check To Movein. NEGOTIABLE! 754-2148131. 12-14 DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38 x 13. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 11-14SEASONAL RENTALPOMPANO BEACH 2 / 2 Condo Island Club Federal Hwy. 9th Floor Corner Apt. Beautiful Views. Nicely Furnished. All Amenities. $2,000 Month. 954785-0177. 12-14 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO CHARMING 2/1 Home. Asking $975 Per Month. 611 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 12-28 POMPANO COZY 3/2 With Central Air Conditioning. Fenced In Yard. $1,100 Per Month. 540 NE 35 Street. Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-28REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 1-4CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 1-4 DEERFIELD CENTURY VILLAGE 55+ 1/1.5 Furnished / Unfurnished. New Tile + Paint. Near Pool. $775 Month Yearly Lease. 305-7289481 561-504-5726. 12-14 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 E OF Federal Hwy. 2nd Floor. No Pets. Yearly Rental. $625 Month. Call Barbara 954-2637129. 12-14 DEERFIELD 1/1.5 1st FLOOR Corner Unit. Newer Appliances. No Car Needed. Pool Clubhouse. $800 Month. Colleen Newshott Realty. 954-536-2036. 12-14APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 12-14 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. Across From Beach. 954-294-8483 Or 248-7361533. 1-4 POMPANO / MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 Avenue 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 12POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 2/1 $750 NW 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. LAUD BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Apt. Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 12-14 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-998-5681. POMPANO DIXIE & COPANS WAREHOUSE For Rent. 2 Units 1-1640 Sq Ft 1 2080 Sq Ft With A/C Of ces Zoned 3M. Both With Overhead Doors. No Reasonable Offers Refused. 716-316-3690. 12-14 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 12-28

PAGE 28

28 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ Boyle RJ BOYLE STUDIOSLighthouse Point There is nothing like Christmas time. I love seeing the people running around getting gifts for loved ones, hearing the music and the smell of Christmas candles. These are just a few of the things that get us red up around Christmas time at RJ Boyle Studios. We get to see lots of new customers as they come in looking for that special gift for their boyfriend, husband, brothers or family member. We have such a mix of items in our store that it is easy to nd something that is unique. One of the things we pride ourselves on is our artwork and shirt designs. You cannot buy our brand anywhere but in our store or on our website. We have never sold out to any of the big store chains though we have been approached many times. We have chosen to stay under the radar and somewhat private about what we offer. It is so cool to see a picture of All ready for Santa this Christmas someone in another state or another country wearing an RJ Boyle shirt. We know that they had to come directly through us to get it. Its almost like this underground network of coolness, and I want to keep it that way. The big stores can keep there bubbly sh shirts and there overly promoted run of the mill items. As for us here at RJ Boyle Studios, we will continue to put out cool clothing and artwork for customers who appreciate the real deal. Also, I want to thank all of our customers that have supported us all of these years. We have had a store now for 10 years. Sometimes, I pull up to the store in the morning and look in the windows and think, Man, I cant believe that this is my store. Im so blessed and lucky. Thank you to all and to all Tight Lines. RJ Boyle Studios has nautical gifts and stocking stuffers.

PAGE 29

The Pelican 29 Friday, December 14, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Adderly Gillis Park, 601 MLK Blvd., is home to the citys annual Light Up Martin Luther King Boulevard event every December. And in October, the park became home to the monthly MLK marketplace, a new hot spot for food vendors, entertainment and a talent search. We wanted to make the park a place to come to rather than to drive by, said Carlton Moore, liaison to the NW Communiyt Redevelopment MLK Marketplace beefs up event calendar at Pompano Beach parkAgency, the event sponsor. Since its inception, the MLK Marketplace has hosted live entertainment, a talent contest, food vendors and merchants on the second Saturday of each month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Marketplace runs through June. Evans and Stacy Bruno, owners of Virgin Islands Delite, say they find their customers at events like MLK Marketplace. We tend to go to neighborhood events. Its where the customers are, said Stacy. Selling their special brand of funnel cake at the Marketplace were Kay Quigley and Londell Monroe, owners of Hugs and Kisses Funnel Cakes, based in Margate. When compared with the citys GreenMarket, Monroe and Quigley say turnout for MLK Marketplace is smaller, but they were confident the event would get much more popular as time goes on. Anytime you get a corner it cant be all bad. People like corners. They like to be at corners, said Monroe. Revella Carter, CEO of Black Swan Special Events, based in Fort Lauderdale, said the event was coming along and worth promoting. Its good for the CRA. Its a good family event. Its just one of those things everyone needs to tell their friends about. Monthly talent competition winners will compete in June for $1,500 in cash awarded to first, second and third place winners. For more information, call 954-7867824. Minister Jerome Turner cooks up some BBQ for MLK Marketplace.

PAGE 30

30 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.SundaysDeer eld Beach Green Market is held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Cove Shopping Center, Hillsboro Boulevard and the Intracoastal, every Sunday until April 28. Vendors are welcome. Call 561239-1536 or 561-299-8684.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the rst and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Oakland Park. 954-782-9951.TuesdaysYoga every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $7 per class. Classes are also held Saturday mornings from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. 954-607-3520. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deereld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Deer eld Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & See SIGHTINGS on page 32SightingsContinued from page 25 Bimini Twist won Best In Sound at the 2012 Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade [Clay Wieland photo]

PAGE 31

The Pelican 31 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 32

32 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012 Toy drop off pointsDeerfield Beach Bartell Chiropractic Life Center, 57 W. Hillsboro Blvd., and the Chamber of Commerce, 1600 W.Hillsboro Blvd., are drop off centers for the US Marines Toys for Tots program. Donors should bring unwrapped gifts for children to either location by Dec. 17. This is the second year, Bartell has participated in the toy drive. Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954292-8040. The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysCresthaven Civic Association meets the second Thursday of the month at 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Moose Club, 3321 NE 6 Terrace. Email CresthavenNews@aol. com for more information. The South Florida Mustangs, an LGBTQ square dance club, hold beginner classes from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at Island City Park Preserve, 823 NE 28 St., Wilton Manors, every Thursday. Cost is $5 at the door. No dress code and no partner needed. Call 305899-1710. The Wilton Manors Historical Society meets on the third Thursday of the month at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 954-566-9019 or 954-5668219. The Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. SightingsContinued from page 30 Get a call from SantaOakland Park Any child between the ages of three and seven who lives in Oakland Park can receive a personal phone call from Santa Claus next Tuesday, Dec. 18. Santa will be making his calls between the hours of 6 and 8 p.m. The deadline for the sign-up is 12 p.m. on Dec. 18. Parents interested should visit www.oaklandparkfl. org or call 954-630-4500. No make-up calls will be made.

PAGE 33

The Pelican 33 Friday, December 14, 2012 STOP HERE!

PAGE 34

34 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 35

The Pelican 35 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 36

36 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 37

The Pelican 37 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 38

38 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 39

The Pelican 39 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 40

40 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 41

The Pelican 41 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 42

42 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 43

The Pelican 43 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 44

44 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 45

The Pelican 45 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 46

46 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 47

The Pelican 47 Friday, December 14, 2012

PAGE 48

48 The Pelican Friday, December 14, 2012