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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00324
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 11-16-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00324

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Friday, November 16, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 46 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican 14 days left in 2012 Hurricane season A SEA OF GLORY A young boy wades through nearly 7,000 American ags at Pompano Beach High School last Thursday. The ags were placed there to remember every American soldier stationed throughout the world. Pompano Beach High School students bought the ags. Each ag holds a photograph of a soldier not yet home this Veterans Day weekend. [Photo by Tom Mann] Transit Center a key piece of the puzzle for Pompano redevelopmentBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach After ve years, the terminals at Broward Countys Northeast Transit Center are ready to start accepting buses and ferrying passengers. Tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., of cials from Pompano Beach, Broward County and Broward County Transit [BCT] will hold a ribbon cutting to celebrate the opening of the Transit Center, located at the corner of By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea -Eric Yankwitt credits his daughter Lindsey, then 15, as the inspiration for the Thanksgiving dinner for Holiday Orphans he now organizes for about 12,000 people in 40 locations. He recalls a conversation seven years ago when as a single parent, he didnt know how to make the holiday festive for Lindsey. Its just you and me and grandpa. Are you kidding? she said. Why Verenice Rapaport and Eric Yankwitt will celebrate Thanksgiving with thousands of others like themselves who cant make it home for the holidays. [Courtesy of Eric Yankwitt] Mom may not be in the kitchen this year, but the turkey and all the xins are being served up hot See THANKSGIVING on page 23 See TRANSIT on page 16 Political prank leads to internal investigation for re departmentBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Fire station 103 presents me, said Ernestine Price. It is paid by me. We pay them well. NAACP president Willie Lawson called the incident disgraceful and offensive. Lawson called for a public apology. He added that the incident, according to the citys charter, is cause for dismissal.See PRANK on page 12

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2 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Traditional re engine blessing draws crowd in Lauderdale-By-The-SeaThe blessing the re engine is a traditional way to ask for protection for all people involved within a re department. In many instances, uniforms, re houses, and equipment are Mayor Roseann Minnet and Commissioner Mark Brown join other re ghters and volunteers to roll the re truck out of its station. Sherry Richter, a member of the South Florida Police Pipe & Drum Corps provided bagpipe music for the ceremony. Richter works with the Fort Lauderdale Fire Department. included in the ceremoney. On Tuesday, prior to the town commission meeting, Lauderdale-By-The-Seas new re engine was of cially placed into service Tuesday after it was blessed by three clergy. Following the prayers, the mayor and commissioners, with help from Volunteer Fire Department personnel, symbolically pushed the 25ton truck into the station, while Fire ghter/Driver Jim Silverstone backed it up using the motor. The tradition of pushing a truck into the station dates to the 1800s when horses pulled re wagons. After returning from a re, horses would be unlatched, and community members would help re ghters push the wagon back into the station.The Rev. Jim Goldsmith of Community Church, the Rev. Real Maddau of Assumption Catholic Church and Rabbi Bantzion Singer of Chabad LBTS all said prayers of blessing for the new re truck and for the safety of VFD personnel. At right is Judson Hopping, the newly elected re chief.

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The Pelican 3 Friday, November 16, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea -Town commissioners and the town manager formed a mutual admiration society Tuesday as the commission conducted the managers annual performance evaluation. Connie Hoffmann received an overall rating of 4.63 on a scale of one to ve with 4 meaning more than satisfactory and 5 exceeds expectations. She received her highest marks for scal and organizational management. Commissioners rated her on seven factors with one, achievement of stated goals, counting for 50 percent of the overall score. Hoffmann was hired as city manager in April 2010. She is a former city manager of Fort Lauderdale. Here are the commissioners comments:Vice Mayor Scot SasserSasser, who rated her a 4.190 overall, said Hoffmann has delivered despite a very heavy workload. He would like her to keep staff and the commission focused on priorities and blamed the commission for burdening the objectives with lesser priorities. There is no doubt that Connie can deliver. She is fully capable and has proven to be exemplary in her management of the deliverables the commission has placed on her, Sasser wrote. However, there are always ways to improve. I think focus is the key to staying on track. Sometimes its not the amount of work done but the value of the things accomplished that count. Sasser said the category of managing the organization was dif cult to score. Connie is very effective in her performance. No question. However, in her zeal to deliver on every whim of the commission, we are easily distracted on our priorities. I think Connie has learned quickly and continues to learn the dif culties and differences of managing a small town rather than a large city, Sasser wrote. She continues to grow, and we continue to learn and grow together. She is never condescending and never feels like she is too smart to learn something new. She is a pleasure to work with, and I can think of no other I would rather sit on the dais with, Sasser said. Sasser would like to see Hoffmann use her expertise to drive down costs before submitting estimates to the commission. He asked for Hoffman comes out of review with raves from commissionersSee HOFFMAN on page 15

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4 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The city commission moved ahead this week with two Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] projects that will be nanced with a $7 million bond. Sullivan Park and Cove Gardens are in line for redevelopment. The Gardens residential area between the Cove Shopping Center and the Publix shopping center Is shovel ready according to CRA Coordinator Kris Mory and bids could be advertised as soon as January. The neighborhood is blighted due to poor drainage, low lighting, lack of sidewalks and parking. Those amenities will be constructed with $2 million from the new bond issue. The other project, Cove Gardens, Sullivan Park bene t from $7 million bond issueSullivan Park, will be more complicated. The park lies north of Hillsboro Boulevard with frontage on the Intracoastal Waterway. Over the years, the area has been studied in public forums and by urban planners to determine what should be developed there. Several studies have favored a maritime village with access to the Intracoastal for boaters and kayakers. The Florida Inland Navigational District has committed $306,000 to development of the area if the focus is on the water. This grant must be spent within 36 months. Mory cautioned the commissioners that getting permits to build on the environmentally sensitive land could be a lengthy process. Dredging the Intracoastal could be involved and a manatee zone is nearby, she said. Underwater grasses must also be considered, she said. Commissioners agreed that the best way to move forward on this project is with a construction manager at-risk contract which blends the architect and the builder. It is the method being used to rebuild the shing pier restaurant, entrance, restrooms and bait house. Were really trying to roll this out, Mory told the board. If we can come to a consensus on the general concept [of a development plan], we may be able to avoid a RFP and design this in-house. Kory told the commission that coming to an agreement on Sullivan Park soon will be necessary if the 36-month schedule is to be met. In other CRA business, the board agreed to incorporate community policing for the CRA area into the agencys master plan. Mory proposed adding a law enforcement detail to the area for eight hours a day, Thursday through Saturday. Purpose of this heightened police presence is to enhance public safety and to protect the citys investment in the See CRA on page 31

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The Pelican 5 Friday, November 16, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach It seems a perfect match: the Kiwanis Club with its purpose to serve the children of the world and Scholastic Book Fairs, a company that believes literacy is the birthright of Assistant Principal Donna Rucker, Media Specialist Collen Clarke, Principal Jocelyn Reid, Shane Brown, student council president and honor roll student Phillip Adams.New partnership brings rst reading Oasis to a Deer eld Beach schoolevery child. These two forces have come together here to create Scholastics rst Kiwanis Community Reading Oasis at Deer eld Park Elementary School. Deer eld Beach Kiwanians will make a $12,000 investment in the reading room, enough money to buy 1,230 books for kids pre-k through grade 6, bookcases, bean bag chairs for comfortable reading, a colorful rug that identi es the oasis, a listening center See OASIS on page 25

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6 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 46 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Send your letter to the editor mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & LettersLetters Heavenly Pizza owner offers Thanksgiving pizzas to allTo the editor, This year, were making Thanksgiving pizzas and traditional trimmings. The pizzas will be offered to everyone who would like to stop by. We will hold a 9 a.m. Bible study to start the day off. All are welcome to attend. Afterward we will be serving the Thanksgiving pizzas. Anyone who would like to assist or donate, call Phil at 954-943-9271. If we do not see you, have a blessed Thanksgiving. Phil KasseesThis dream beach is a reality for a good reason, citizen input countsTo the editor, The new beautiful family-friendly Deer eld beach pier facility will soon have tis grand opening. Lets not forget that back in 2004, we nearly lost this public treasure to an individual who almost got a 54-year lease on the pier property and was going to build an 18,000 square foot massive restaurant and banquet facility right at the pier entrance. Members of the Deer eld Beach Original Save Our Beach committee [OSOB] found out about this and sprang into action to protect the pier. We fought a long hard battle to prevent this taking of our public property. We had the full support of the people of Deer eld beach who were adamantly against the idea of giving away our pier area. Due to our love of the beach and pier area and our rm belief it needed to be preserved for future generations, we fought the battle and the residents won. So as the city and its residents celebrate the opening of the new pier facility, remember that if it had not been for the OSOB committee and our supporters, the pier today would only be a dream. Pam MillitelloCommission blundered when setting March electionTo the Editor On the day of the most important presidential election of our time, the Deer eld Beach Commission scheduled an of cial city meeting. It is not as though they have not canceled meetings throughout October, November and December. Why this meeting on this historical day? Was it so they could pass a resolution setting the next municipal election for Tuesday, Mar. 12, 2013. At that time, the mayors seat held by Peggy Noland, the Dist. 3 seat held by term-limited Marty Popelsky and the Dist. 4 seat held by Bill Ganz will be up for election. Now they take the time to set the date for the election, but when it was suggested that the date be made to coincide with this presidential election on Nov. 6, it was n even put to a vote. This lack of action cost the city $62,000 that would have been saved with the date change. Many of our neighboring cities took advantage of this saving opportunity, but not our group. When a great number of your readers are struggling to make ends meet, why bypass the opportunity for saving $62,000? That cost savings would pay the salaries of two of the commissioners, add money to your youth programs, light up the dangerous intersection in Dist. 2 or payback some of the money taken from the city employees. Well, now they have told you that on Tuesday, Mar. 12, you can tell them how you feel about their duciary blunder of our tax dollars. Let them hear your voices. Steve Krevoy Deer eld BeachPlan to travel for Thanksgiving? BSO offers tips to keep you safeThe Thanksgiving holiday is fast approaching and many Broward County residents will be taking vacations or leaving town to visit with family and friends. The Broward Sheriffs Of ce reminds everyone that there are certain security-minded steps to take before leaving town. Remember to stop all newspaper deliveries, ask a trusted neighbor to pick up your mail and contact your local Broward Sheriffs Of ce district of ce to sign up for our Home Watch program. When you sign up for BSOs Home Watch program, a deputy, community service aide or BSO volunteer will check on your home regularly while you are on vacation. An exterior check of your home will be conducted to make sure there have been no unlawful entries and that no other obvious problems have occurred outside of your home. To sign up for this FREE service, visit www.sheriff.org/homewatch and download the form. Complete it and return it to the BSO district that serves your community. You may also stop by your BSO district of ce and our staff will help you complete the form. Knowing that your home is being protected will put your mind at ease during your vacation. We only offer our Home Watch program in our patrol jurisdictions. If you live outside of a BSO jurisdiction, contact your city or towns police department and ask if they offer a similar service. Before you leave town it is important to make sure your home appears occupied. Place timers on your lights and set them to turn on and off at different times. Lock your garage door and disconnect the automatic opener. Most importantly, tell a trusted neighbor that you are going to be away and ask them to dial 911 immediately if they see anyone on your property.Here are some additional home security tips to keep in mind:Install good locks on all doors and windows and always use them. Give a spare key to your trusted neighbor and provide them with an emergency telephone number where they can reach you. Have someone mow your lawn if youll be away more than a couple of weeks. Never leave a message on your telephone answering machine stating you are out of town. Leave your window blinds as you normally would if you were home. Invite your neighbor to park their car in your driveway. If you are traveling by air, we remind you to arrive early. At the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport our deputies are in place to ensure your safety, but long lines to check-in and security check points are often a cause of frustration for travelers. Arriving early alleviates congestion and allows you appropriate time to arrive at your gate. If you are picking up guests at the airport, you are reminded not to park on the swale at the entrance of the airport. You can park in the cell phone lot until your loved ones ight arrives.Black Friday Adoption EventFort Lauderdale Broward County Animal Care is hosting its Black Friday Adoption Event on Friday, Nov. 23 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Fort Lauderdale Adoption Center, 1870 S.W. 39 St., from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The special kennel buster event will allow adopters to pay any amount they choose for their new pet from adult dogs and cats, to younger kittens and puppies. There will also be a chance to win prizes for those who bring wish list items for donation. Items wanted include: blankets, canned dog and cat food, dry dog and cat food, newspaper, towels, treats and beds. For more information, call 954-359-1010.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, November 16, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park City commissioners recently approved a charter amendment that would eliminate numbered commission seats, and candidates would continue to run at large. The top vote getters would be elected. The vote was 4 -1, Mayor Anne Sallee dissenting. The proposed charter revision goes to referendum in the March 2013 election, along with ve other ordinances to amend the charter. Resident Diane Wendt said that since the city doesnt have districts, having numbered commission seats isnt necessary. All of you represent all of us. Were not New York or Chicago. Were not even Fort Lauderdale. Were small Oakland Park, she said. Wendt said its counterproductive to have candidates running against someone instead of for the commission. It encourages negative campaigning, she said. By not having numbered seats, Candidates would campaign on their strengths instead of against someones weaknesses, Wendt said. This is best for the people of Oakland Park. Let us vote in March on whether or not we want to do this. Resident Jack Doren agreed with Wendt that not numbered seats sets a different tone. You dont have to decide who to run against. Having numbered seats is unnecessarily complicated, he said. Doren said if there are no numbered seats, there will be more competition. Candidates will be running against four or ve opponents. Sara Guevrekian and Lori Winner urged commissioners to place the proposed charter amendment on the ballot and let the people decide. Think about the quality of candidates you will get, said Caryl Stevens, arguing against the change. Bill Sears argued that not having numbered districts would keep a lot of good candidates from running and that campaign costs would increase. Urging support of putting the proposed charter amendment on the ballot, Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue noted, The decision isnt ours. This is how the majority lets us know what they want. Sallee said she wouldnt support the proposed amendment. I have watched the Wilton Manors Commission running like this (without numbered districts.) We will have fewer people running. Commissioners also approved on second reading these ve proposed ordinances to amend the charter. They include: An ordinance changing the election dates for all Oakland Park municipal elections from March in odd numbered years to November in even numbered years to coincide with the general election cycle. The vote was 3-2, Mayor Sallee and Commissioner Shari See CHARTER on page 17Oakland Park residents will vote on charter changes this March

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8 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRobert E. Cote, owner of Property Loss Consultants, has been in the insurance eld since 1992 I was an estimator for State Farm for ve years, he says. Public adjuster, Robert E. Cote, represents clients by negotiating with insurers for the best settlement possibleWorking for the insurance company made me realize that the injured party needed representation when negotiating a claim with his or her insurance company. The average person may deal with a claim once or twice in a lifetime. Thats why having a professional public adjuster representative is a real nancial advantage. He further explained, In order to get the fairest and best settlement possible from an insurance company, one needs a person who can assess the property damage, study the policy and negotiate from experience. Going it on your own is like going into court without a lawyer, or doing your own taxes without an accountant who is up on the rules. Cote charges no fee up front. His commission is between 10 and 20 percent of the settlement depending upon the circumstances and state rules. The State of Florida has capped the fee for hurricane damage at 10 percent for one year. In his own business since 2001, he is licensed and bonded in Florida, New Hampshire, Georgia and plans to include New York in his list of states where he is quali ed as a public adjuster. In a 2010 report, a Florida Of ce of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability [OPPAGA] study of over 76,321 claims examined found that those claims handled by public adjusters resulted in settlements ve to seven times higher than those handled by the injured party. Asked to de ne a public adjuster, Cote said, The person is a quali ed professional who is licensed and bonded by the state and who, for a commission, represents and negotiates your property damages with your insurance company. To become a public adjuster one must work as an apprentice with a public adjuster rm for one year, become bonded, and pass a qualifying test. Our job is to analyze your policy, including the obligations of the insurance company. We document the claim to the full extent of the loss, including estimates of damage, additional living expenses, loss of income, and repairs. Once the full extent of the loss is determined and documented, the schedule of loss and damages is prepared, reviewed and presented to the insurance carrier for negotiations. This professionally done process gives the public adjuster the ability to maximize the injured partys settlement. Cote says it is to the advantage of any property owner including people with a home, of ce, commercial building, boat or plane suffering damages to seek the professional services of a public adjuster. Nobody knows what your claim is worth better than an experienced public adjuster who knows state statutes and how to read an insurance policy. Bruce Pontner, Parkland agrees, saying, Im in the shoe business and when I suffered roof damage as a result of Hurricane Wilma, I put my claim into my insurance company and got nowhere. They offered me very little. Fortunately a friend told me to call Robert and he saved my life. He got me what I needed, and my roof has been xed. If it Public Adjuster, Robert Cote, talks to clients wherever he happens to be. His job is to represent the injured party with property damage by handling the negotiations with the insurance carrier for the client. [Staff photo]See COTE on page 9Wellness FestPompano Beach The Small Biz Health & Wellness Fest will take place on Saturday, Nov. 17 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Boulevard. The free event will feature programs and services provided by health insurance companies, hospitals, clinics and private doctors. For more information, call 954-3536396.Food for FinesOakland Park The Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St., will be accepting non-perishable, non-expired food donations in lieu of library nes in the month of November. Lost items cannot be cleared. One item will take care of any nes of $5 or less; two items $5 to $9.99; four items $10 to $14.99; six items $15 to $19.99 and eight items $20 to $39.99. Examples of accepted items are canned goods, soup, rice, cooking oil, dry pasta, beans, cereal, peanut butter, tuna, oatmeal, grits, baby food and powdered milk. For more information, call 954-630-4374.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, November 16, 2012 werent for him, Id still be ghting with my insurance company. Steven Byers, Delray Beach, has a similar story. He says, I had damage from Hurricane Wilma and my insurance kept giving me the run around about doing the xing. I was so frustrated that a friend suggested I call Robert, whom I hired. He managed to get me double what my insurance company was offering and in so doing he solved my problems and ended my frustration. I recommend getting the services of a pro like Robert to anyone having to negotiate with an insurance company. Theres no job too big or too small according to Cote. He cites a few examples from his own les. One client took his boat out in rough seas and cracked the hull. His claim was denied until I reviewed the policy and negotiated a settlement based on the policy language. He went from zero on his own to a $20,000 settlement. One of his larger cases dealt with Hurricane Wilmas damage to a three-story of ce building on Atlantic Boulevard. He says with a proud smile, I was able to negotiate a settlement of about $500,000 more than the original offer from the insurer. Cote adds, To be current snowbirds who are here now and who have property damages in the Northeast from Hurricane Sandy can contact me for claim assistance or referrals. To contact Cote at Property Loss Consultants, call 954-545-1450 or visit www.propertyloss.net CoteContinued from page 8SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com 11-17 Pompano Beach GreenMarket from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. 954-292-8040. 11-17 7th Annual 5K Walk/Run for Hunger at See SIGHTINGS on page 12

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10 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFMake St. Gabriels Fair the rst stop tomorrow and get that happy holiday feeling. Shoppers will nd mouthwatering homemade bakery goods, Christmas crafts, ornaments, small trimmed trees, wreaths and white elephant bargains galore. We price very low so that everyone can take away wonderful gift items and everything Christmas, says Gilda Riley, chairman of the event. Well be here at 731 N. Ocean Blvd. in Pompano Beach from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 8:30 to 1 p.m. on Sunday. The Christmas Fair is sponsored by the Council of Catholic Women of St. Gabriel. No vendors allowed. Its amazing what colorful and varied collections of merchandise just a handful of dedicated volunteers put together, says Georgette Meikle, council president. Im a snowbird, but the rest of our group of active volunteers will prepare for next year soon after this years event. Riley nods her head in agreement and with a wide smiles says, Bloomingdales and Saks Fifth Ave. have nothing on us. Andy Buglione, an honorary member of the womens group, works as hard as the ladies. Riley says, Holiday shopping starts tomorrow Nov. 17 and Sunday Nov. 18 at St. Gabriels festive annual Christmas fair Andy and I love to shop the yard sales. We do it every Saturday seeking big values and donations which we bring back to the parish hall. The items are cleaned and repaired for sale at our Christmas event. We also accept donations from parishioners, neighborhood people and stores going out of business or getting rid of overstock. She holds up a painting, saying, This framed artwork is tagged $25. Well price it at $3. This Burdines Christmas stocking was $25. Well tag it $4. This year we have some fabulous items donated from estates. One original oil, valued at $500 will be sold for $100. We price low to attract all shoppers. Many of our new items were priced much higher in the stores. Nothing is wasted. If its not sold at the fair, we donate it to St. Vincent De Paul thrift store. The dedicated ladies hope to raise $6,500. Riley says, We raised $5,500 last year. This year will be better because of the donations from several estates. The collectables will be raf ed off. Shoppers will be delighted with the selection of jewelry, books, toys, hand made Christmas crafts, ornaments, trees and wreaths, and many white elephant items. President Meikle says, The monies we raise in this and our other fund raisers go to support the Burse Fund, Scholarship Fund, Madonna Plan, Help a Child, Water for Life, Food for the Poor & Cross International, Covenant House, Chastity Days, America Moms for Soldiers, Holiday Mail for Heroes, and Lobby Days at the Capitol. She adds, We have 69 members, but just eight hard workers for this event which is a very big challenge for our aging group. We urgently need young people to step up to the plate. Every year Gilda says, This is my last year. We have events from December through March when our snowbirds double our population. They dont just go to Mass; theyre hard workers for our Christmas Dinner-Dance, February Fashion Show and the St. Patricks Dinner and Dance with the Mens Club. Chairman Riley has been involved in this Christmas Fair for 15 years because, she says, It keeps me busy. I forget my own problems. My committee and I are here every Tuesday and Thursday receiving merchandise. We couldnt stage this affair without Andy and the volunteers from the Mens Club. They set us up and make it happen. The Christmas Fair volunteers include, Georgette Meikle, Gilda Riley, Barbara Freeman and Jackie Draskins. Lorraine Ficaro and Lisa Rombkowski make all of the Christmas trees and wreaths. Arts and crafts volunteers are Claire Mitchell, Rose Manni and Margaret Barrosse who makes the ornaments. Riley adds that Andy has worked for this fair and other events for St. Gabriel for the past 35 years. Barbara and Georgia admit that they often leave with more than they brought in. Were our own best customers, Barbara smiles and adds, You know one mans junk is the next mans treasure. The bake table, lled with homemade goodies sells out fast, but shoppers need not be discouraged because freshly-made treats arrive every hour of the event. Every club member is asked to bake something. Barbara specializes in spice muf ns as does Riley. Georgia says, I do breads and candies. Andy grins and says, I buy it and eat it. Barbara Freeman, active in the club for the past three years, says, I love it and Hard working team brings the Christmas Fair to St. Gabriel. Left to right: Chairman Gilda Riley, Barbara Freeman, Council President Georgette Meikle and Andy Buglioni. Not pictured: Jackie Draskins, Lorraine Ficaso, Lisa Rombkowski, Claire Mitchell, Rose Manni and Margaret Barrosse. [Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]See FAIR on page 11Holiday Lighting Extravaganza Boca Raton The City of Boca Raton hosts its annual Holiday Lighting Extravaganza at the Mizner Park Amphitheater, 201 West Palmetto Park Road, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Event highlights will include real snow, a live ice sculpture demonstration, meeting Santa Claus, childrens rides and activities, a reworks display and a state-of-the-art virtual tree lighting ceremony introduced by Mayor Susan Whelchel. The Spirit of Giving Network will be collecting unwrapped gifts for its annual toy drive. Food and beverage vendors will be on site, so no coolers or outside alcoholic beverages are permitted. Lighting starts at 5:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.mizneramphitheater. com or call 561-544-8600.LBTS Visitors Guide coming soon Lauderdale-By-The-Sea The LBTS Chamber of Commerce will release its 2013 Visitors Guide sometime in mid-December. This coming years booklet will take on a new look, feature a cartoon style map of the area, suitable for hanging, and include more participants than ever before. Originally the booklet was scheduled to be released this month but the artist, who lives in the New York area, was delayed due to Hurricane Sandy. Miles for SmilesPompano Beach The Broward Childrens Center is hosting its 9th Annual Miles for Smiles Walkathon on Saturday, Nov. 17 at 9 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. The cost is $20 per person before the event and $25 the day of. Registration is at 8 a.m. All the proceeds go to support medical and educational programs serving children with disabilities. Walkers will circle the ve-mile Pompano Beach Airpark trail and celebrate at the nish line with family fun, food and entertainment. To sign up visit www.bcckids.org or call 954943-7336.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, November 16, 2012 encourage others to join us and make time to help. Like me volunteers get a great sense of contributing to the parish. I have gained great friendships. Georgette Meikle, serving her second year as president of the Council, says, Im a snowbird from Maine. Were here for six months, and during our stay I enjoy volunteering and the sense of belonging. Its a pleasure to be active in my church and give meaning to my winters in Florida. Thank you hard working volunteers from St. Gabriel for all that you do in both your parish and in the world around you.FairContinued from page 10 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors New of cer wanted: Must have four legs, a tail and be able to detect illegal narcotics using just your snout. With $8,000 to spend, the Wilton Manors Police Department is looking to buy a new narcotics detection dog. The K-9 will be purchased from Indianas Vohne Liche Kennels, a facility that trains and sells dogs to over 5,000 state, local and national law enforcement agencies Wilton Manors police buy new drug dogincluding the Pentagon, National Security Agency, State Department and U.S. Army. The funding, which includes an additional $600 in travel expenses to pay for an of cer to go to Indiana to pick out a canine, comes out the Law Enforcement Forfeiture Trust Fund which consists of moneys obtained from cases involving convicted criminals. If a police department seizes cash, cars or other property associated with a crime it gets to keep all or a portion of the funds. Those dollars can be used for the purchase of anything from radios to police cars. They can also be used for certain community projects. The department has been without a K-9 unit since Of cer Maria Sweat stepped down from the position and her partner, Caja, a Dutch Shepherd, was given to the Fort Lauderdale Police Department. Detective Sgt. Gary Blocker said along with a new dog the department is also looking for a new K-9 of cer.See K-9 on page 17

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12 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Both speakers and others referred to a Pompano Beach re ghter who had placed toilet paper in one of the restrooms that had pictures of President Obama printed on it. The incident came to light when someone reported it to re administration two weeks ago. According to Sandra King, public information of cer, the re chief, Harry Small, began an immediate investigation. Its not the rst kind of incident of this sort at the same station when one re ghter had placed an antiObama bumper sticker on his locker. That incident was reported by another re ghter who said he had been insulted by the sticker. The re ghter apologized for the bumper sticker and removed it. This most recent incident brought a dozen residents to Tuesdays commission meeting. City Manager Dennis Beach said the internal investigation is still underway and full disclosure will be brought to the public when it has been completed. Mayor Lamar Fisher added that the incident was offensive to the commission as well. PrankContinued from page 1 6:30 a.m. at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S Powerline Rd., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $20 for adults and $15 for kids. Visit www.foodforthepoor. org/walk for more information, 11-17 9th Annual Miles for Smiles Walk-a-Thon from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10th Street. Cost is $25. 954-299-5012. 11-17 Florida Turkish Festival from 11 a.m. to 8 SightingsContinued from page 9 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. Free admission. Visit www. oridaturkishfestival.org or 786-251-9996. 11-27 Card party hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order Of DOES Drove 142 and the Pompano Beach ELKS Lodge, 700 NE 10 St., from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost is $4 and includes dessert and coffee/tea, door prizes and raf e items. 561479-2002. 11-30 Guy Harvey will be signing and personalizing purchases at West Marine, 2401 S. Andrews Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, from 6 to 8 p.m. 954-400-5323 or visit www.westmarine.com. 12-1 & 12-2 City-Wide Market from 9 to 5 p.m. War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Ft. Lauderdale. Free admission and parking. Vintage and locally made good available for sale. Over 200 vendors. 954-785-7475.See SIGHTINGS on page 20

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The Pelican 13 Friday, November 16, 2012 By Bill JohnsonPELICAN WRITERPompano Beach A sixmonth-old baby boy has lost his foot to cancer, and his family has gained a pile of escalating medical bills. Fortunately for them, some loving friends organized a fund raising event to help pay those bills. The event, called a FunRaiser, will be this Sunday, Nov. 18, at Leading Lady Fitness at 1616 S. Cypress Road., in the Pompano Plaza. Tammy Kornowski, the owner of the tness club, organized the event with help from others who work with her. The babys grandmother, Jeannie Eddy, of Fort Lauderdale, is a member of the tness club and has become friends with the owner and staff. She explains that the baby has lived most of his life in the hospital being treated for a rare type of cancer. Last week his foot was amputated. The baby is Dylan Leslie, who lives in Alabama with his parents, Trish and Greg Leslie. The family has health Fun-Raiser scheduled Sunday for cancer-stricken baby plight, Tammy Kornowski began recruiting businesses to help raise money by donating items and services for a silent auction and numerous raf es. She received a generous response. The auction will include a two-night vacation package at Atlantis in the Bahamas, scenic airplane ights, an eye examination, wine baskets, massages and facials, ten yoga lessons with babysitting included, swim lessons, a membership at Leading Lady Fitness, among many other things. I am so overwhelmed, the babys grandmother says. Its all from the goodness of their hearts. Additional donors are encouraged to contribute insurance, Eddy says, but it covers only 80 percent of the medical bills. The baby has had more transfusions than she can count, she says, each one at a cost of $900. His care, including surgery, chemotherapy and long hospital stays, has been extensive. At one point, he had a port in his chest holding four IVs and another IV inserted in his head. Learning of the familys items or services for the auction and raf es. While adults can enjoy the auction, there will be activities for youngsters, too. Busy Bee Rentals donated a bounce house and offers an opportunity to win the use of a bounce house for your own private party. There will be cotton candy, snow cones, hot dogs, face painting and hip hop dancing. A re truck will also be on display. The Fun-Raiser will run from noon to 3 p.m. on Sunday. The Pompano Plaza is near the corner of S. Cypress Road and East McNab Road. To donate items or money, contact Tammy Kornowski at 954-650-1041. Baby Dylan Leslie has lost his foot to cancer. Now friends and family members are raising funds to help pay medical bills. The event takes place at Leading Lady Fitness at 1616 S. Cypress Road in Pompano Beach.

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14 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Eight months after re, Checkers Old Munchen restaurant reopensBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach After almost eight months, the beer is nally owing and Matt Moore feels like hes home again. Moore, the owner of Checkers Old Munchen on Atlantic Boulevard, reopened his doors two weeks ago after a March 12 re destroyed the kitchen and heavily damaged other parts of the German restaurant. It feels like being home again. Were just happy to be back open, said Moore, who added that the hardest part of the whole ordeal was dealing with contractors and bureaucratic red tape so he could open his doors again. And while Checkers was being brought back to life, Moores staff served up the German restaurants menu at Diner by the Sea in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. We basically gutted the entire place, said Moore, who repainted the whole restaurant, redesigned the kitchen, installed new ooring and ceiling tiles, remodeled the bathrooms and hallway and bought new silverware and plates. Spared during the re were the beer steins, wooden shelves and the glass rack with the names of every customer who has drank their way through Checkers Old Munchens beer menu. The rst question a lot of people asked was Were you able to save my beer card? said Moore. And along with the same menu and prices, Moores original staff is back, serving up German beer, bratwurst, knackwurst, sauerkraut and other German fare and plenty of it. And back are the customers. South Florida residents Jack Thibaut, originally from Sweden, and Kai Stadler, See CHECKERS on page 22 Matt Moore is home again in Pompano Beach, serving his German fare and myriad selections of German beers and ales. [Staff Photo]

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The Pelican 15 Friday, November 16, 2012 she seek more grants and said its time to dial back on consultant expenses. He commended her for cutting expenses and increasing ef ciency with town services, including successfully outsourcing services in several areas.Mayor Roseann MinnetThe mayor scored Hoffmann a 5 in scal management and personnel management and nearly a 5 in managing the organization. Overall she rated the manager a 4.903. Minnet wrote, Not only were many of the stated goals achieved, but many were added.Connie does not like to say no. Instead she will tackle the task and make it happen.Commissioner Mark BrownBrown wrote, Progress is being made all across the town. We are catching up with years of neglect to our infrastructure and moving now to prepare for the challenges of the future. Our scal house is in order. People seem happy with the way government is functioning in town. There is a sense of optimism that we didnt have before. The town manager deserves credit for this. Brown, the newest member of the commission, gave Hoffmann an over-all rating of 4.770. In the category of relations with the governing body and providing information, Brown said, Connie and her staff have done an excellent job in this respect. On scal management, Brown wrote, The town managers performance on scal matters has been superb. He noted that the town is debt-free and investing wisely in improving infrastructure. And he added that LBTS is one of only a few towns to lower the millage rate for this scal year. In the area of personnel management Brown said, She has nally put together her own team after three years. They are working hard and have a great attitude. In the category of relations with the public/other governments, Brown wrote, Im very impressed with Connies personal skills, her willingness to listen to people, return their calls and try to help. That is not always easy, but its important, and she is doing an excellent job.Commissioner Stuart DoddDodd wrote, In a little over two years, the manager has completely turned the town around. [Personnel] in four out of seven top positions were replaced. The towns nancials are on a rm footing, and many projects have been accomplished. More projects will be started very shortly, including the downtown area and Commercial Boulevard improvements. Dodd gave Hoffmann an over-all rating of 4.449. Dodd wrote, The theme is now How can we help? rather than What do you want?Commissioner Chris VincentVincent rated the manager a 5 in both personnel management and relations with the public. He said she has a phenomenal ability to lead, expects the best from staff and exhibits con dence in leadership. Vincent wrote, She completes goals in an ef cient and timely manner. She stays focused and prepared. At the beginning of the meeting Vincent said, Connie, Connie, Connie. We are the luckiest town in Broward County. Hoffmann thanked the commission for their comments. She said she was surprised she got signi cantly better marks this year. She attributed that to some key additions to staff which dramatically improved the quality of work done and the amount of work done. You wouldnt be saying these nice things about me if I didnt have 30-some people backing me up every day, she said. Hoffmann said when she talks to other city managers they often ask what the LBTS commission is like. I tell them its like a great commission from 25 years ago that no one has anymore. This commission is almost apolitical compared to others where everyone is jousting for power and people are trying to make themselves look good, she said. Its a real pleasure working with the ve of you. Very different personalities, all really intelligent people. Thats also sometimes a rarity on city commissions, she said. HoffmanContinued from page 3

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16 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Its going to be an economic engine, he said, adding that the Transit Center also fits into the citys plan to redevelop the Northwest Community Redevelopment Area [NW CRA]. On Tuesday, commissioners approved land use changes to the NW CRA that would allow for mixed use and easier redevelopment of the area. By allowing mixed use, officials hope private entities will come to the area and build residential, commercial and retail TransitContinued from page 1 developments. In the past CRA officials have also said the new Transit Center would improve the citys chances of getting a Florida East Coast railway commuter station at Atlantic and Dixie. With buses from routes 20, 42, 50, 60 and Pompanos community bus converging at the Transit Center, the area would already be a transit destination for thousands of riders and compliment a commuter station. The $5.3 million facility sits on 3.5 acres owned by the county and was built through funding from the Florida Department of Transportation, grants and local matches comprised of transit impact fees. Doris Williams, Broward County Transits administrator for customer relations, said the long period between the groundbreaking and the grand opening stemmed from the city, county and state trying to work out the details in their partnership together. Along with the ribbon cutting, there will be a tour of the facility, musical and dance entertainment and a drumming workshop highlighting the Transit Centers public art feature, Pompano Drum Circle. Designed by artists Bill and Mary Buchen, Pompano Drum Circle is a grouping of five sculptural percussion instruments inspired by the musical traditions of cultures represented in the local area: African, Bahamian, Brazilian, Cuban and Haitian. The Transit Center also features a passenger dropoff area, platform canopies, restrooms, walk-up customer information window, bench seating, garden feature and is certified as a NatureScape Broward site. Dixie Highway and Atlantic Boulevard, ve years after the groundbreaking ceremony was held. Its the game changer for us, said Mayor Lamar Fisher, who expects the Transit Center to attract more people to the city.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, November 16, 2012Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com McCartney dissenting. An ordinance establishing a procedure to ll a vacancy in the position of vice mayor was approved unanimously. An ordinance modernizing charter language and removing antiquated and statutorily superseded provision was approved unanimously. An ordinance amending the city managers power and duties to provide that contracts for construction of public improvements be let in accordance with the citys procurement code. The vote was 4-1, Commissioner Boisvenue dissenting. An ordinance establishing a procedure by which commissioners who have a voting con ict must disclose the con ict prior to participating in discussion on that matter. It was approved unanimously. CharterContinued from page 3 Blocker, who was the K-9 of cer ve years ago when Rasta, a Belgian Malinois, was snif ng his way around Wilton Manors. Rasta died in 2007 of an ear canal tumor. Its an added resource that opens up different avenues to enforcing drug laws that, in some instances, law enforcement of cers themselves can not be successful in, said Blocker in a previous interview with The Pelican He added that the dogs are able to sniff out the odor of narcotics in places where of cers would not have found them. And those skills can be quite lucrative. In May of 2007, Rasta assisted police with the seizure of ve kilos of cocaine, 17 lbs. of marijuana, and over $108,000 in U.S. currency. The WMPD was able to retain that entire cash amount for its use. K-9Continued from page 11

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18 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012

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The Pelican 19 Friday, November 16, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFOakland Park We used to sell sizzle; now we sell numbers, says Gary Lanham, President & Broker at Lanham & Associates, Inc. Those who experienced the days of easy loans, house flipping and mini-mansion sizzle probably know exactly what this experienced broker is talking about. To Lanham and his numbers-oriented agents, this philosophy simply means efficient and more logical buying and selling in todays market. He explains. Were different. No one comes to Lanhams company without a strong background in real estate analysis. He leans over and shows the numbers for Victoria Park in Fort Lauderdale. This is a favorite community for young professionals looking for classic Florida homes, top schools and memorable landscaping. The prices look like bargain-basement deals relative to 2008, but the numbers now are also realistic for the sellers, and that means quick closings. Its all part of the market recovery from the 2008 collapse that brought real estate sales to a standstill, foreclosures to new heights and long waits for short sales. In 2010, deals were escalating in foreclosures and short sales. We all thought it was the beginning of the recovery, Lanham said. I opened my business in 2011 so I could be part of the recovery, which has turned out to be the case. Trend data shows prices are increasing. In the beginning a lot of time was spent working short sales and foreclosures. Foreclosures put a person out of the housing market for years, he says. However, it is Lanhams mission to help people maintain their dignity and character as they go through the short sale process. And it seemed to be one learning curve after another. Each bank was working short sales differently, he says. Volume was so high that banks didnt know which one to attend to first. Short sales took months, sometimes more than a year to close. But Lanham says he found a secret weapon that sped his short sale closings to 30 days. He had done over 60 deals with Moraitis, Cofar, Karney & Moraitis, a law firm in Fort Lauderdale. One of its name partners, George Moraitis, Jr., represents District 93 in the Florida House. This law firm knew how to negotiate with the banks. It is their specialty. I had met George, Jr. through Bryan Phegley, who attends Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church with George, Lanham said. Now they [Moraitis et al] handle the banks for us. Said Rep. Moraitis, regarding his firms connection with Lanham, As a law firm we represent our clients when negotiating a settlement between the seller, their lender and the buyer to facilitate the sale of the property. In cooperation with Gary and other Realtors, we have helped our clients to manage an orderly sale of their properties which allows them to move forward with their lives. The short sale process avoids a foreclosure and the resulting waste of the property. In many cases we are able to negotiate a release of the client from further liability associated with the loan depending on the circumstances. We appreciate the opportunity to work with Gary and his clients as he is an excellent professional who understands the needs of his clients attempting to recover in a difficult economy. Just prior to opening his company, Lanham had stepped into a 60-unit project to help the developer sell out the units. I sold that project in a collapsing market. It took two years. He refers to that as chasing the market down. It worked. Now Lanham believes the markets downward chase is finally bumping along the bottom. He calls that good news, but the bad news is that expectant sellers are not going to see the rapid price increases they desire. Now is the time to buy, he says. And the buyers are coming to us with cash. Were selling like that. He snaps his fingersHow to sell itLanhams team uses analysis to help sellers price HOUSE Rulestheir homes. Once a realistic figure is set, there are other aspects to consider. We consult with the Seller to coach them on the best way to present their house. For example, curb appeal does make a difference when a prospective buyer enters the picture. You can never recreate a first impression, says Lanham. Todays buyers are not looking for re-dos or fix-ups.Real hot itemsThe rental market is up, and Lanham says there is not enough space to accommodate the growing rental needs. Vacation rentals are also hot items. Buyers are picking up small homes and converting them into vacation rentals and banking income up to $5,000 monthly. We have no inventory. Its a sellers market, Lanham says.What makes this broker different?Born in Virginia, Lanham headed to Florida State University where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in International Affairs. He followed that up at Virginia Commonwealth University with an MHA, Masters of Hospital Administration. He spent 25 years in healthcare software sales an emerging field that proved very profitable. At 49, he retired to Florida and bought a home in Oakland Park, a city he loves today. He has since refined his business development skills.What makes Lanham Real Estate Recovery different?Our agents have heavy quantitative analysis backgrounds. They are all fulltime. We know how to market your home to where the buyers are coming from. We have a strong social media presence, and your listing will be there, Lanham says, as he demonstrates to me how he places one of his listings in Sao Paulo, a market known to bring cash buyers to South Florida As a boutique agency, it is important to offer a higher level of service than other residential agencies. We know that many of our residential customers also have commercial real estate needs. Ive empowered my Fort Lauderdale broker nds different sizzle in real estatecommercial agents, Jeff Yunis, Esq., and Harry Burnett, with CoStar, a quantitative tool for commercial real estate agents. Many residential agencies do not offer this commercial muscle to their residential clients. After all, Lanham concludes many people who retire to Florida remain entreprenneurs and after their first few years here, they need a go-to brokerage for their business needs, too. They grow tired of lying on the beach and playing golf. For more information, call 954-530-8198. Gary Lanham, President & Broker at Lanham & Associates, Inc..

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20 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 12-3 Palm Aire/Cypress Bend Democratic Club meeting at the Herb Skolnick Center 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Mitch Ceasar, chairman of the Broward County Democratic Executive Committee, will discuss the Nov. 6 election results. 954-975-3772 or 786-877-1644. 12-8 & 9 Christmas craft sale from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church, 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. Vendors wanted. 954-9418117. 12-9 Pompano Beach Boat Parade at 6 p.m. at Lake Santa Barbara in Pompano and ends at Hillsboro Boulevard Bridge. Family entertainment, shore decorating contest. Each entry receives a hand painted commemorative ornament. 954-941-2940. SightingsContinued from page 12 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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The Pelican 21 Friday, November 16, 2012 Vietnam Veterans can be assessed for possible Agent Orange exposure Tamarac The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs [VA] has recently implemented new procedures to assess physical injuries to Vietnam veterans and these changes can help Broward County veterans who served in Southeast Asia. The U.S. military sprayed millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War to help expose possible enemy locations. To help Veterans who may have been exposed to Agent Orange, from 1961 to 1975, the VA has established a free Agent Orange Registry health exam to alert veterans to possible long-term health problems that may be related to Agent Orange exposure. This affects military men and women who served in Vietnam, Korea and Thailand. The free, comprehensive health exam includes an exposure history, medical history, physical exam and any tests, if needed. In Broward, this exam can be conducted at the Broward County VA Outpatient Clinic, 9800 W. Commercial Blvd., Tamarac. Veterans who take the Agent Orange health exam can le a claim for disability compensation. During the claims process, VA will check military records to verify exposure to Agent Orange. For more information, call 954-357-6622.7th Annual 5K Walk/Run for HungerDeerfield Beach The 7th Annual 5K Walk/Run for Hunger will be held Saturday, Nov, 17 starting at 6:30 a.m. at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road. Registration is at 6:30 a.m. and the race starts at 7 a.m. The awards ceremony is at 8 a.m. Cost is $20 per adult and $15 per kids under 10. Kids who are six years old or younger are free. Visit www. foodforthepoor.org/walk for more information.Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!

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22 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012 CheckersContinued from page 14from Germany, have both been coming to Checkers for about 10 years. And they both know a good German place when they see it. The beers great. The food and staff are fantastic. Its like that bar Cheers. Everyone knows your name, said Thibaut. Stadler, originally from the Black Forest region of southern Germany, said Checkers comes the closest to cooking up what the fare of the beer halls and restaurants in his homeland. To me, its almost a homey feeling. Its German. Checkers is open Monday through Friday for lunch from 11 to 2 p.m. and Monday through Sunday from 5 to 9 p.m. for dinner. Every month Checkers also hosts a beer tasting. The cost is $18 and includes a buffet, eight beer samples and the chance to win raf e prizes. Visit www. checkersoldmunchen.com for more information. 12-15 Spiritual Health Fair from 10 to 4 p.m. at Bridges of Wellness, 1881 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Event includes gift drawings every half hour. 954-530-6006.Further Out1-25 & 26 Go SOLAR Fest from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturday at Broward County Convention Center, 1950 Eisenhower Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Visit www.broward.org/gogreen/gosolar.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information. SightingsContinued from page 20 See SIGHTINGS on page 28

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The Pelican 23 Friday, November 16, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! cant we go to New York? [to see relatives as they had in other years.] The trip wasnt possible that year because Yankwitt, an attorney, had an upcoming trial. He tried to look at the situation through his daughters eyes and could see the pain. Their family didnt match those large, happy groups of relatives gathered around the holiday table in TV ads. Eric and Lindsey gured there must be other families in the same boat as them. He was president of the Lauderhill Chamber of Commerce at the time, and he mentioned his situation to chamber members. I tend to wear my heart on my sleeve, he said. A month later they partnered with the Lord of the Word Church and the Smart School in Lauderhill and served a free Thanksgiving dinner to about 1,000 people. Yankwitt has continued the effort through the Florida Community Support Organization, a non-pro t group he founded, along with Verenice Rapaport, now his ance. Rapaport is a social worker with Broward County. She and Yankwitt met through community outreach projects. The organization works to build a better community one neighbor at a time, he says. In a promotional yer, Yankwitt calls Thanksgiving a wonderful day to celebrate with your neighbors. We have a lot to be thankful for in life. Many of us have families that live outside our immediate area and for one reason or another we will not be able to spend time with them this holiday.I tell guests that the dinner is free, but I will charge $20 every time their phone makes a noise.This year, for the rst time, Jarvis Hall, at 4505 N. Ocean Drive in LBTS will be the site for one of the dinners. Yankwitt invites residents to come for a free holiday meal and begin to know one another. The event is set from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. I want them to meet their neighbors, and then they have the best gift of all, a friend and someone to rely on. That helps to grow our community, he says. The day after a hurricane were all thankful, and we meet our neighbors. But we dont have to wait for a hurricane, he says. Through these dinners, Yankwitt says friendships and relationships are formed. Rapaport recalled one guest, a veteran whose daughter usually sent him airline tickets so he could travel to Wisconsin for Thanksgiving each year. He always enjoyed the trip and seeing his grandchildren. But two years ago his daughter lost her job and was unable to provide the tickets. Instead, he was persuaded to go to a dinner for holiday orphans, where he met several vets and joined in the singing. He had a ball. Yankwitt emphasizes the goal of the dinner is communication. Weve taught that its OK to ignore people around us and communicate electronically, he says. I dont know why were so detached from each other and why were OK with that. At the holiday dinner he asks that cellphones be turned off. I tell guests that the dinner is free, but I will charge $20 every time their phone makes a noise, he quips. He urges local holiday orphans to come to the dinner and connect with their neighbors face-to-face. If youre looking for a gourmet dinner, this is not it. Its not Zagat-rated. The food is good, and the menu includes turkey and all the usual trimmings, Yankwitt said. There wont be ne china and silver. Dinner is served in a styrofoam container with plasticware. But just as at home, guests are invited to have seconds and even to take leftovers home. Besides the food, the event at Jarvis will include entertainment by a dance troupe, Casa Salsa; music by Marcel Rasa; a tai chi demonstration and a silent auction with raf e prizes. The free holiday dinners also will be held at many area churches, VFW and American Legion halls. The parking lot at Yankwitts law of ce on Atlantic Boulevard in Pompano Beach serves as the distribution center. Last year they served 150 dinners in the parking lot to guests, including college students and tourists. Yankwitts daughter Lindsey, now 21 and studying psychology at Florida Atlantic University will be helping out at the dinner in LBTS. Her brother David, 24, is just back from serving in Afghanistan. He is also a student at FAU and plans to go to law school. Rapaports son Alberto, is coming for the holiday from New Jersey, where he was a victim of Hurricane Sandy. More volunteers are needed to help out at the LBTS dinner, and donations are always welcome. For reservations or more information, call Eric Yankwitt at 954-4494368. For a list of other sites where dinners for holiday orphans are planned, see the website at www.FloridaCommunitySupport.Org. ThanksgivingContinued from page 1

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24 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012 By Ric GreenPELICAN WRITERI saw a video recently in which Jay Leno, Tonight Show host and avid auto enthusiast, made a comment that really hit home with me. He said that one of the really fun driving experiences is going fast in a small car. I could not agree more, however make that small car a 2012 Mazda MX-5 Miata and the experience has the person behind the wheel imagining how a racecar driver feels when he has taken the green flag. The 2012 Mazda MX-5 Miata is a two-seat roadster that is offered in three trim levels: base Sport, wellequipped Touring and premium Grand Touring. All come standard with a manually operated soft top, while the top two trims can be had with a power-retractable hardtop (PRHT). I am fortunate to be driving a Special Edition MX-5, one of only 450 produced. Powered by the Miatas standard for all models, the 2012 Mazda MX-5 Special Edition PRHT is pushed by a 2.0L DOHC 16-valve, 4cylinder engine that produces 167 horsepower and 140 pound-feet of torque. It has sleek, open-air styling and a top of line all options with six-speed manual transmission price tag of $31,225, making this a ride that delights the senses and the wallet. Standard on the Touring and Grand Touring models are 17-inch alloy wheels, foglights, cruise control, power door locks, an autodimming rearview mirror, trip computer, six-CD changer, steering-wheel-mounted audio controls and a leatherwrapped shift knob. Mazda enhances the already nimble handling Touring and Grand Touring models with a sport-tuned suspension featuring Bilstein shocks and a limited-slip differential (only available with a manual transmission). The Grand Touring edition qualifies for the Premium package that features keyless ignition/entry, xenon headlights, Bluetooth and satellite radio. An Appearance package adds a unique front spoiler and extended rocker sills. These additions give the 2012 MX-5 a responsiveness thatll blow your mind. Lightweight, perfectly balanced and precise, it seems to anticipate your next move. Out for my first drive, I leave my driveway shifting into first gear. I squeeze the accelerator and the MX5 sings a throaty rumble bringing a smile to my face. Ive stowed the Power Retractable Hard Top (PRHT), the windows are down and m low to the ground. The smells and sounds around me are exaggerated by normal standards. With every shift, I feel the grip of the tires plus the stiffness and rebound of the suspension. My driving emotions and sensations are all there with me behind the wheel and not buried in the sheet metal and noise suspension material beneath the fenders. Driving the Mazda MX-5 produces, and improves on, the special experience that the British Roadsters of the 50s, 60s and early 70s were famous for. Over the years I have developed my own system of evaluating cars by driving on two sections of road. One has two connected turns with following short straight. Now, before you think I am truly irresponsible, I rarely get manual shift cars past second gear. My other evaluation area is a sweeping I-95 on-ramp where I note my speed when I have merged with the traffic. On the two turns section, The 2012 Mazda MX-5 Miata Special Edition PRHT is small but fast See Mazda on page 29

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The Pelican 25 Friday, November 16, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Boca Raton Actor Don Bunny McArt, who made his small stature and prominent ears his trademark, died Tuesday, Nov. 13 in Boca Raton. Known locally for starring with his sister Jan McArt in productions at Royal Palm Dinner Theatre, his long career began on Broadway in George Abbotts Kiss and Tell, moved to television where he appeared in Alfred Hitckcock Presents and numerous commercials and then to Hollywood where he was under contract to Distinguished actor starred here with Jan McArtDisney. While still a student, McArt was a newscaster/ disc jockey in Evansville, Indiana. The range of his acting ability is demonstrated by his work in theatre: Barefoot in the Park, The Odd Couple; in the movies, The Son of Flubber and The Absent-minded Professor and on TV where he appeared with a long list of stars including Shirley Temple, Goucho Marx, Robert Taylor, Chill Wills, Jackie Coogan and Peter Lorre. In The Adams Family he was one of the cousin characters. Turning to motivational speaking, McArt became affiliated with the Science of Mind centers touring the country. He moved to Boca Raton in 1990 to star with Jan McArt in Sugar Babies and then filled other comedy, character roles at the dinner theatre. He received a Carbonell nomination for his performance in Finnigans Rainbow. For the last four years, he has been on stage in the oneman show, Say Goodnight, Gracie, playing George Burns, and was scheduled to appear January with his sister in Back Stage Story at the Wold Performing Arts Center at Lynn University. stocked with CDs and a smart board. This donation takes our literacy program to the next level, said Jocelyn Reid principal of Deer eld Park. Its like having a book fair all year. Reid said she has found a storage room within the school that can be used for the reading oasis and Kiwanis Club members will assemble the shelves and have it in place for a dedication event Dec. 18 at 5 p.m. Deer eld Park is a Title I school which makes it eligible for Scholastics newest initiative. It is also a magnet school in the performing arts. The Oasis will be open for family literacy nights and is the rst of 10 models that Scholastic is launching around the country. The project is being chaired locally by Bob Partin, a member of the Deer eld Beach club and soon to be president of the Kiwanis International Foundation. Within hours of letting Kiwanis President Avis Swenson know of the new partnership between Kiwanis International and Scholastic Book Fairs, club members committed both their money and their time to bringing this asset here. The kids at Deer eld Park will need mentors to pair them with the right book and to listen to them read. Kiwanians will ll that need. This is the way to change a childs life, Partin said. Scholastic is a 90-year old company, the largest publisher and distributor of childrens books in the world. It published the US edition of Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, but well before that had as its mission, providing affordable, quality books to young readers. It operates book fairs in more than 90 percent of US school continually offering the latest books to capture the fancy of young readers. But for some kids, buying a book is not in the familys budget, said Dillon Kalkhurst, Scholastics director of community alliances. Money is always an obstacle and many schools have no strong parent-teacher organizations to help out. We were looking for other ways to give kids access to books. OasisContinued from page 5

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26 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 NOW HIRING SHORT ORDER COOKS!! Part Or Full Time. All Shifts. Open 7 Days. Apply 2211 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors Courtyard Caf. 11-16SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs. Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 11-16 CNA LICENSED LEVEL 2 Background Check. Compassionate & Caring. Seeks Job To Care For The Elderly. Own Car Drs. Appts. Light Housekeeping Shopping. 954-270-0639. CAREGIVER / COMPANION Over 25 Years Experience. Alzheimers Diabetes & Other Medical Conditions Including Physical Limitations. Dressing Bathing Cooking Cleaning Errands Laundry. My Home Or Yours. Diane 954618-3003 Or 954-960-2125. SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 11-16 NINAS CLEANING Exceptional Cleaning Service. Res/Comm. 12 Years Experience. References Available. Your Home Will Be Treated With Respect & Attention To Detail. 954-6016141. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees Landscape Yard Fill Pressure Wash Roofs Home Repairs Welding Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 11-23 MIKE THE GARDENER The All American Yardman Yard And Garden Care Get The Best For Less! Call 561543-6337 Cell. 11-23 CROWN MOLDING Enhance Your Home For The Holidays. Call Margie At Royal Crown Moldings. 954717-1805. 11-23 MOORE PLUMBINGPLUMBING SERVICES-Big Jobs-Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 11-30 EXPERIENCED DRIVER AVAILABLE! TO & FROM STORES DOCTORS APPOINTMENTS AIRPORT, ETC. CALL MARYANN 954-895-3202. GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable Love To Clean Windows! Refrigerators, Ovens. No Problem. FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. 11SEMI RETIRED ELECTRICIAN. Call If Your Desire Is To Pay Less Than The Real Price For Electrical Work Done Right! Beech Electrical Corp. Lic # ER13012551. Call 954-5548520. 11-16 DIGNITY CLEANING SERVICE INC House Condo Of ce & More. 954826-6450. Lic/Ins. Call Today For A FREE Estimate. 5th Cleaning 1/2 Price. 11-16 NO DEDUCTIBLE HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN, No CoPayment, Low Low Rates! Doctor, Hospital, Wellcare, Accident, Etc. 561-715-2863. AIRPORT TRANSPORTATIONPickup & Drop-Off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-234-0617. 1-4 ANAS CLEAN (RESIDENTIAL) CLEANING In Pompano Lighthouse Point Deer eld. Dependable Thorough Experienced. References. Good Work For A Good Price. Please Call Ana 954-692-4691. 11-30 HOUSEKEEPER NEED AN Honest Detailed Person To Take Care Of Your Home Or Of ce? References Available & FREE Estimate. Please Call 954-579-3866. 11-23 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. GARAGE SALESEVERYTHING SALE & Silent Auction At Temple Sholom 132 SE 11 Avenue Pompano Beach Sunday November 18 9am Noon. 11-16 POMPANO / LHP MULTI FAMILY SALE! (Soroptimist Intl. ) Saturday Nov. 17 8am1pm. St. Nicholas Church 1111 E S ample Road Pompano Beach. 11-16 FURNITUREBEAUTIFUL 7 PIECE Rattan Living Room Set Honey Color Floral Pattern. Excellent Condition. Asking $850 Paid $5,000. Ft Lauderdale. 954557-8185. 11-16

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The Pelican 27 Friday, November 16, 2012 Pelican Classi eds mean business! 954783-8700!Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds mean business! 954-783-8700! SHARE TOWNHOUSETAMARAC PRIVATE ROOM & BATH In Newly Renovated Townhouse. Single Mature Professional. 1 Car Space. Pool. Available Now. Diane 954-618-3003 Or 954960-2125. MOBILE HOME SALESFORT LAUDERDALE MOBILE HOME 2/1 15x55. Central Air/Heat. Furnished. Distress Sale! $8K OBO. 15 Minutes To Anywhere! Call 954-557-8185. DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38 x 13. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 11-16 DEEP WATER 15 Minutes To Hillsboro Inlet. Up To 63. Electric Up To 50 AMPS & Water. Call Julie 954-224-2216. 11-16 SEASONAL RENTALPOMPANO BEACH 2 / 2 Condo Island Club Federal Hwy. 9th Floor Corner Apt. Beautiful Views. Nicely Furnished. All Amenities. $2,000 Month. 954785-0177. LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 55+ Beautiful 2 / 2 Furnished. Walk To Beach Shops Restaurants. Large Pool Nice Grounds. 3 5 Month Rental. 413-244-2807. HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO KEY WEST STYLE House 2/2. $1,100 Month. 541 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954-7833723. 11-30OPEN HOUSESPOMPANO OPEN SUNDAY 1-4PM. 2831 NE 8 COURT. 4/3/2 Deep Water Pool Home In Harbor Village. $599K. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. 954-803-4174. 11-16 ROOMS FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT ON Deep Water Canal Pool (2) Private Rooms & Bath. Dockage Available. Call Julie 954-224-2216. 11-16 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 Totally Renovated! Ocean & Intracoastal Views. LOCATION! LOCATION! $175K. More Information Call 954-783-6619. POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 12-7CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 12-7 DEERFIELD CENTURY VILLAGE Garden Apt. Large 1 / 1.5 Condo. Clean. 954-4214987 Or 954-254-2229. 11-9 DEERFIELD BEACH Century Village. 55+. No Pets. 2/1.5 Furnished. A/C, Cable, Many Amenities. Pool, Gym, Billiards, Etc. $1,600 Per Month Seasonal. 954573-8388. LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1 / 1 Yearly Lease. 1st/Last/Security. Good Credit. Small Pet OK! Tiled. $765 Month. 954-7097688 Or 954-493-9449. 11-16 POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Beautiful Renovated 2 / 1 Pool! Sunroom Ground Floor, Beautifully Furnished. On Golf Course. $700 Mo. 1 Year +. Good Credit. 917-544-0771. 11-23 POMPANO BEACH FURNISHED CONDO On The Water. Lovely 1/1.5 Condo On The Intracoastal/ Canals. See Beautiful Views & Sunsets From Floor To Ceiling Windows. Dock Availability. $940 w/Yearly Lease. 954-7857571 Or 954-249-2710. 11-16 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 11-16 WALK TO BEACH! Got Boat? (Common Dockage When Avail). Updated & Nicest 1/1 Around! Annual Unfurn $965 Monthly. 954-415-1408 Agent. BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. 500 To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. POMPANO 1 / 1 APT. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-857-5207. POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 2/1 $750 NW 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-7816299. 11-16 POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W / D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 HIGH END APARTMENT. $1,100 Month Yearly Lease. Call 609-638-1291. 11-16 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/Unfurnished. $650$850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. BEACHY-KEEN! 1 Bedroom/1 Bath-1 Block From The Sand In NE Pompano. Annual Lease $900 Month. 954-614-8428 Agent. POMPANO ATLANTIC/ INTRACOASTAL Area. South Of Publix. Efficiency/Furn. Private Entrance. Utilities Included. Non Smoker. Long Term.. $700 Month. 954-4158838. 1 LAUD BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Apt. Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 11-16 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 11-30 PAINT AND BODY SHOP For Rent. Legal, Permitted Paint Booth, 15HP Compressor, Air Lines Thru Out Unit, Paint Cabinet, Good Lighting, Drive Thru Unit, Freshly Refurbished, Ready To Go. $3,200 Per Month. 954-4488172. 11-30 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 11-16 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Wont Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 11-30 POMPANO BEACH WAREHOUSE For Rent. 800 To 2500 Square Foot, 14 ft. Clear Ceilings, All Units Freshly Refurbished, Excellent Lighting, Fresh Paint, Epoxy Floors, Three Phase Power, Safe Fenced Complex. $650 Per Month And Up Depending On Size. 954-448-8172. 11-30

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28 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your shing news! mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ Boyle RJ BOYLE STUDIOSWhat a nice change of pace. Take a ride up and down the Intracoastal Waterway and you cant help but notice all of the snook swimming in the lights near the docks. It is that time of the year, when the mullet start to run, that the snook stack up in our local waters. We fished the Lighthouse Point to Boca lights and it was awesome. In two hours we caught two snook and jumped off 3 more. In addition to the snook we caught 12 mangroves and five nice moonfish. It was awesome to bend the rod and only burn five gallons of gas. We left the dock at 6 p.m., brought four dozen shrimp, a pizza, and some cokes and we were back at the dock at 8:30 p.m.The snook bite is on, make sure youre readySaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.SightingsContinued from page 22The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, See SIGHTINGS on page 29 RJ Boyle with the catch of the day. [Photo courtesy of RJ Boyle]

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The Pelican 29 Friday, November 16, 2012 I was sure I was up over 40 miles-per-hour, but my quick glance at the speedometer read 32 mph, which by the way was three mph under the speed limit. To be sure, I did it again with a similar result. The on-ramp experience was just as surprising. As I shot out ahead of a Publix 18wheeler and dove ahead of it, I had that moment of I better back off or Ill be explaining another speeding ticket to my wife when I glanced at the gages I was shocked to see a number just over 65 when I was sure I would between 75 and 80. Whether it takes you to work, the market or just a Sunday drive, theres no other car on the road that is so much fun to at the posted speed limits. MazdaContinued from page 24 SightingsContinued from page 282020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the rst and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Oakland Park. 954-782-9951.TuesdaysYoga every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $7 per class. Classes are also held Saturday mornings from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. 954-6073520. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Deer eld Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954292-8040. The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957.Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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30 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012

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The Pelican 31 Friday, November 16, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! area. Cost will run $49,000 for this rst year she said, the money coming from CRA funds. To kick-off the program, an event will be held Nov. 17, 6:30 p.m. at the Wyndham Resort. DCIA resists; Arboretum band shell scuttledDeerfield Beach Plans to build a small, covered stage in the Arboretum at Constitution Park were soundly denounced by the Deer Creek Improvement Association [DCIA] Board last week. This week, Commissioner Bill Ganz withdrew his support of the project citing community opposition, and his fellow board members agreed. The Friends of the Arboretum had secured a $150,000 grant from Broward County to erect a 15-foot by 30-foot stage in the easternmost meadow of the park. Encouraged by the Deerfield Beach Cultural Committee, the Friends hoped the stage could be used for small performances and a storytelling festival scheduled in March. When the idea was presented to the DCIA, some board members and three or four residents protested loudly citing noise and traffic as their concern. Distressed over the reception he got, Friends president Jerry Behan said, They didnt want to hear anything about it. They dont want anything there. They think it is their own private park. Now Behan is hoping the funds can be diverted to the rain forest area of the arboretum. A design was drawn some time ago that includes canopy trees, shrubs and waterfall, but lack of funds has delayed its development. Behan said he will go back to the county and see if the park grant is still available to the Friends. There may be something else they feel is a higher priority, he said.Funds voted to assess pier damageDeerfield Beach Commissioners gave city engineer Charlie DeBrusco $45,000 this week to begin an assessment of the damage to the fishing pier caused by Tropical Storm Sandy. The T at the east end of the pier will have to be completely replaced DeBrusco said after high seas torn most of the planks from the pilings and took away some of the railing. His estimate is that the pier suffered $400,000 in total damages, but to date waves have been too high to send a boat underneath the structure to make a complete assessment. Also lost to the storm are water and electric lines that provide service to the pier and the people who fish there. Repairing the pier will likely cost taxpayers $250,000, the deductible in the citys insurance policy. Asked where that money will come from, City Manager Burgess Hanson said we will have to find it one way or another.CRAContinued from page 4

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Friday, November 16, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 46 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican 14 days left in 2012 Hurricane season A SEA OF GLORY A young boy wades through nearly 7,000 American ags at Pompano Beach High School last Thursday. The ags were placed there to remember every American soldier stationed throughout the world. Pompano Beach High School students bought the ags. Each ag holds a photograph of a soldier not yet home this Veterans Day weekend. [Photo by Tom Mann] Transit Center a key piece of the puzzle for Pompano redevelopmentBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach After ve years, the terminals at Broward County’s Northeast Transit Center are ready to start accepting buses and ferrying passengers. Tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., of cials from Pompano Beach, Broward County and Broward County Transit [BCT] will hold a ribbon cutting to celebrate the opening of the Transit Center, located at the corner of By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea -Eric Yankwitt credits his daughter Lindsey, then 15, as the inspiration for the “Thanksgiving dinner for Holiday Orphans” he now organizes for about 12,000 people in 40 locations. He recalls a conversation seven years ago when as a single parent, he didn’t know how to make the holiday festive for Lindsey. “It’s just you and me and grandpa. Are you kidding?” she said. “ Why Verenice Rapaport and Eric Yankwitt will celebrate Thanksgiving with thousands of others like themselves who can’t make it home for the holidays. [Courtesy of Eric Yankwitt] Mom may not be in the kitchen this year, but the turkey and all the xin’s are being served up hot See THANKSGIVING on page 23 See TRANSIT on page 16 Political prank leads to internal investigation for re departmentBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – “Fire station 103 presents me,” said Ernestine Price. “It is paid by me. We pay them well.” NAACP president Willie Lawson called the incident “disgraceful” and “offensive.” Lawson called for a public apology. He added that the incident, according to the city’s charter, is cause for dismissal.”See PRANK on page 12

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2 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Traditional re engine blessing draws crowd in Lauderdale-By-The-SeaThe blessing the re engine is a traditional way to ask for protection for all people involved within a re department. In many instances, uniforms, re houses, and equipment are Mayor Roseann Minnet and Commissioner Mark Brown join other re ghters and volunteers to roll the re truck out of its station. Sherry Richter, a member of the South Florida Police Pipe & Drum Corps provided bagpipe music for the ceremony. Richter works with the Fort Lauderdale Fire Department. included in the ceremoney. On Tuesday, prior to the town commission meeting, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea’s new re engine was of cially placed into service Tuesday after it was blessed by three clergy. Following the prayers, the mayor and commissioners, with help from Volunteer Fire Department personnel, symbolically pushed the 25ton truck into the station, while Fire ghter/Driver Jim Silverstone backed it up using the motor. The tradition of pushing a truck into the station dates to the 1800s when horses pulled re wagons. After returning from a re, horses would be unlatched, and community members would help re ghters push the wagon back into the station.The Rev. Jim Goldsmith of Community Church, the Rev. Real Maddau of Assumption Catholic Church and Rabbi Bantzion Singer of Chabad LBTS all said prayers of blessing for the new re truck and for the safety of VFD personnel. At right is Judson Hopping, the newly elected re chief.

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The Pelican 3 Friday, November 16, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea -Town commissioners and the town manager formed a mutual admiration society Tuesday as the commission conducted the manager’s annual performance evaluation. Connie Hoffmann received an overall rating of 4.63 on a scale of one to ve with 4 meaning “more than satisfactory” and 5 “exceeds expectations.” She received her highest marks for scal and organizational management. Commissioners rated her on seven factors with one, achievement of stated goals, counting for 50 percent of the overall score. Hoffmann was hired as city manager in April 2010. She is a former city manager of Fort Lauderdale. Here are the commissioner’s comments:Vice Mayor Scot SasserSasser, who rated her a 4.190 overall, said Hoffmann has delivered despite a very heavy workload. He would like her to keep staff and the commission focused on priorities and blamed the commission for “burdening the objectives with lesser priorities.” “There is no doubt that Connie can deliver. She is fully capable and has proven to be exemplary in her management of the deliverables the commission has placed on her,” Sasser wrote. “However, there are always ways to improve. I think focus is the key to staying on track. Sometimes it’s not the amount of work done but the value of the things accomplished that count.” Sasser said the category of managing the organization was dif cult to score. “Connie is very effective in her performance. No question. However, in her zeal to deliver on every whim of the commission, we are easily distracted on our priorities. “I think Connie has learned quickly and continues to learn the dif culties and differences of managing a small town rather than a large city,” Sasser wrote. She continues to grow, and we continue to learn and grow together. She is never condescending and never feels like she is too smart to learn something new. She is a pleasure to work with, and I can think of no other I would rather sit on the dais with,” Sasser said. Sasser would like to see Hoffmann use her expertise to drive down costs before submitting estimates to the commission. He asked for Hoffman comes out of review with raves from commissionersSee HOFFMAN on page 15

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4 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – The city commission moved ahead this week with two Community Redevelopment Agency [CRA] projects that will be nanced with a $7 million bond. Sullivan Park and Cove Gardens are in line for redevelopment. The Gardens residential area between the Cove Shopping Center and the Publix shopping center Is shovel ready according to CRA Coordinator Kris Mory and bids could be advertised as soon as January. The neighborhood is blighted due to poor drainage, low lighting, lack of sidewalks and parking. Those amenities will be constructed with $2 million from the new bond issue. The other project, Cove Gardens, Sullivan Park bene t from $7 million bond issueSullivan Park, will be more complicated. The park lies north of Hillsboro Boulevard with frontage on the Intracoastal Waterway. Over the years, the area has been studied in public forums and by urban planners to determine what should be developed there. Several studies have favored a maritime village with access to the Intracoastal for boaters and kayakers. The Florida Inland Navigational District has committed $306,000 to development of the area if the focus is on the water. This grant must be spent within 36 months. Mory cautioned the commissioners that getting permits to build on the environmentally sensitive land could be a lengthy process. Dredging the Intracoastal could be involved and a manatee zone is nearby, she said. Underwater grasses must also be considered, she said. Commissioners agreed that the best way to move forward on this project is with a construction manager at-risk contract which blends the architect and the builder. It is the method being used to rebuild the shing pier restaurant, entrance, restrooms and bait house. “We’re really trying to roll this out,” Mory told the board. “If we can come to a consensus on the general concept [of a development plan], we may be able to avoid a RFP and design this in-house.” Kory told the commission that coming to an agreement on Sullivan Park soon will be necessary if the 36-month schedule is to be met. • • • In other CRA business, the board agreed to incorporate community policing for the CRA area into the agency’s master plan. Mory proposed adding a law enforcement detail to the area for eight hours a day, Thursday through Saturday. Purpose of this heightened police presence is to enhance public safety and to protect the city’s investment in the See CRA on page 31

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The Pelican 5 Friday, November 16, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – It seems a perfect match: the Kiwanis Club with its purpose to serve the children of the world and Scholastic Book Fairs, a company that believes literacy is the birthright of Assistant Principal Donna Rucker, Media Specialist Collen Clarke, Principal Jocelyn Reid, Shane Brown, student council president and honor roll student Phillip Adams.New partnership brings rst reading Oasis to a Deer eld Beach schoolevery child. These two forces have come together here to create Scholastic’s rst Kiwanis Community Reading Oasis at Deer eld Park Elementary School. Deer eld Beach Kiwanians will make a $12,000 investment in the reading room, enough money to buy 1,230 books for kids pre-k through grade 6, bookcases, bean bag chairs for comfortable reading, a colorful rug that identi es the oasis, a listening center See OASIS on page 25

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6 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 46 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Send your letter to the editor mdpelican@yahoo.com Opinion & LettersLetters Heavenly Pizza owner offers Thanksgiving pizzas to allTo the editor, This year, we’re making Thanksgiving pizzas and traditional trimmings. The pizzas will be offered to everyone who would like to stop by. We will hold a 9 a.m. Bible study to start the day off. All are welcome to attend. Afterward we will be serving the Thanksgiving pizzas. Anyone who would like to assist or donate, call Phil at 954-943-9271. If we do not see you, have a blessed Thanksgiving. Phil KasseesThis dream beach is a reality for a good reason, citizen input countsTo the editor, The new beautiful family-friendly Deer eld beach pier facility will soon have tis grand opening. Let’s not forget that back in 2004, we nearly lost this public treasure to an individual who almost got a 54-year lease on the pier property and was going to build an 18,000 square foot massive restaurant and banquet facility right at the pier entrance. Members of the Deer eld Beach Original Save Our Beach committee [OSOB] found out about this and sprang into action to protect the pier. We fought a long hard battle to prevent this “taking” of our public property. We had the full support of the people of Deer eld beach who were adamantly against the idea of giving away our pier area. Due to our love of the beach and pier area and our rm belief it needed to be preserved for future generations, we fought the battle and the residents won. So as the city and its residents celebrate the opening of the new pier facility, remember that if it had not been for the OSOB committee and our supporters, the pier today would only be a dream. Pam MillitelloCommission blundered when setting March electionTo the Editor On the day of the most important presidential election of our time, the Deer eld Beach Commission scheduled an of cial city meeting. It is not as though they have not canceled meetings throughout October, November and December. Why this meeting on this historical day? Was it so they could pass a resolution setting the next municipal election for Tuesday, Mar. 12, 2013. At that time, the mayor’s seat held by Peggy Noland, the Dist. 3 seat held by term-limited Marty Popelsky and the Dist. 4 seat held by Bill Ganz will be up for election. Now they take the time to set the date for the election, but when it was suggested that the date be made to coincide with this presidential election on Nov. 6, it was n even put to a vote. This lack of action cost the city $62,000 that would have been saved with the date change. Many of our neighboring cities took advantage of this saving opportunity, but not our group. When a great number of your readers are struggling to make ends meet, why bypass the opportunity for saving $62,000? That cost savings would pay the salaries of two of the commissioners, add money to your youth programs, light up the dangerous intersection in Dist. 2 or payback some of the money taken from the city employees. Well, now they have told you that on Tuesday, Mar. 12, you can tell them how you feel about their duciary blunder of our tax dollars. Let them hear your voices. Steve Krevoy Deer eld BeachPlan to travel for Thanksgiving? BSO offers tips to keep you safeThe Thanksgiving holiday is fast approaching and many Broward County residents will be taking vacations or leaving town to visit with family and friends. The Broward Sheriff’s Of ce reminds everyone that there are certain security-minded steps to take before leaving town. Remember to stop all newspaper deliveries, ask a trusted neighbor to pick up your mail and contact your local Broward Sheriff’s Of ce district of ce to sign up for our Home Watch program. When you sign up for BSO’s Home Watch program, a deputy, community service aide or BSO volunteer will check on your home regularly while you are on vacation. An exterior check of your home will be conducted to make sure there have been no unlawful entries and that no other obvious problems have occurred outside of your home. To sign up for this FREE service, visit www.sheriff.org/homewatch and download the form. Complete it and return it to the BSO district that serves your community. You may also stop by your BSO district of ce and our staff will help you complete the form. Knowing that your home is being protected will put your mind at ease during your vacation. We only offer our Home Watch program in our patrol jurisdictions. If you live outside of a BSO jurisdiction, contact your city or town’s police department and ask if they offer a similar service. Before you leave town it is important to make sure your home appears occupied. Place timers on your lights and set them to turn on and off at different times. Lock your garage door and disconnect the automatic opener. Most importantly, tell a trusted neighbor that you are going to be away and ask them to dial 911 immediately if they see anyone on your property.Here are some additional home security tips to keep in mind:Install good locks on all doors and windows and always use them. Give a spare key to your trusted neighbor and provide them with an emergency telephone number where they can reach you. Have someone mow your lawn if you’ll be away more than a couple of weeks. Never leave a message on your telephone answering machine stating you are out of town. Leave your window blinds as you normally would if you were home. Invite your neighbor to park their car in your driveway. If you are traveling by air, we remind you to arrive early. At the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport our deputies are in place to ensure your safety, but long lines to check-in and security check points are often a cause of frustration for travelers. Arriving early alleviates congestion and allows you appropriate time to arrive at your gate. If you are picking up guests at the airport, you are reminded not to park on the swale at the entrance of the airport. You can park in the “cell phone” lot until your loved one’s ight arrives.Black Friday Adoption EventFort Lauderdale – Broward County Animal Care is hosting its Black Friday Adoption Event on Friday, Nov. 23 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Fort Lauderdale Adoption Center, 1870 S.W. 39 St., from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The special “kennel buster” event will allow adopters to pay any amount they choose for their new pet — from adult dogs and cats, to younger kittens and puppies. There will also be a chance to win prizes for those who bring “wish list” items for donation. Items wanted include: blankets, canned dog and cat food, dry dog and cat food, newspaper, towels, treats and beds. For more information, call 954-359-1010.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, November 16, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park – City commissioners recently approved a charter amendment that would eliminate numbered commission seats, and candidates would continue to run at large. The top vote getters would be elected. The vote was 4 -1, Mayor Anne Sallee dissenting. The proposed charter revision goes to referendum in the March 2013 election, along with ve other ordinances to amend the charter. Resident Diane Wendt said that since the city doesn’t have districts, having numbered commission seats isn’t necessary. “All of you represent all of us. We’re not New York or Chicago. We’re not even Fort Lauderdale. We’re small Oakland Park,” she said. Wendt said it’s counterproductive to have candidates running against someone instead of for the commission. “It encourages negative campaigning,” she said. By not having numbered seats, “Candidates would campaign on their strengths instead of against someone’s weaknesses,” Wendt said. “This is best for the people of Oakland Park. Let us vote in March on whether or not we want to do this.” Resident Jack Doren agreed with Wendt that not numbered seats sets a different tone. “You don’t have to decide who to run against. Having numbered seats is unnecessarily complicated,” he said. Doren said if there are no numbered seats, there will be more competition. “Candidates will be running against four or ve opponents.” Sara Guevrekian and Lori Winner urged commissioners to place the proposed charter amendment on the ballot and let the people decide. “Think about the quality of candidates you will get,” said Caryl Stevens, arguing against the change. Bill Sears argued that not having numbered districts would keep a lot of good candidates from running and that campaign costs would increase. Urging support of putting the proposed charter amendment on the ballot, Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue noted, “The decision isn’t ours. This is how the majority lets us know what they want.” Sallee said she wouldn’t support the proposed amendment. “I have watched the Wilton Manors Commission running like this (without numbered districts.) “We will have fewer people running.” Commissioners also approved on second reading these ve proposed ordinances to amend the charter. They include: • An ordinance changing the election dates for all Oakland Park municipal elections from March in odd numbered years to November in even numbered years to coincide with the general election cycle. The vote was 3-2, Mayor Sallee and Commissioner Shari See CHARTER on page 17Oakland Park residents will vote on charter changes this March

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8 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRobert E. Cote, owner of Property Loss Consultants, has been in the insurance eld since 1992 “I was an estimator for State Farm for ve years,” he says. Public adjuster, Robert E. Cote, represents clients by negotiating with insurers for the best settlement possible“Working for the insurance company made me realize that the injured party needed representation when negotiating a claim with his or her insurance company. The average person may deal with a claim once or twice in a lifetime. That’s why having a professional public adjuster representative is a real nancial advantage.” He further explained, “In order to get the fairest and best settlement possible from an insurance company, one needs a person who can assess the property damage, study the policy and negotiate from experience. Going it on your own is like going into court without a lawyer, or doing your own taxes without an accountant who is up on the rules.” Cote charges no fee up front. His commission is between 10 and 20 percent of the settlement depending upon the circumstances and state rules. The State of Florida has capped the fee for hurricane damage at 10 percent for one year. In his own business since 2001, he is licensed and bonded in Florida, New Hampshire, Georgia and plans to include New York in his list of states where he is quali ed as a public adjuster. In a 2010 report, a Florida Of ce of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability [OPPAGA] study of over 76,321 claims examined found that those claims handled by public adjusters resulted in settlements ve to seven times higher than those handled by the injured party. Asked to de ne a public adjuster, Cote said, “The person is a quali ed professional who is licensed and bonded by the state and who, for a commission, represents and negotiates your property damages with your insurance company. To become a public adjuster one must work as an apprentice with a public adjuster rm for one year, become bonded, and pass a qualifying test.” “Our job is to analyze your policy, including the obligations of the insurance company. We document the claim to the full extent of the loss, including estimates of damage, additional living expenses, loss of income, and repairs. Once the full extent of the loss is determined and documented, the schedule of loss and damages is prepared, reviewed and presented to the insurance carrier for negotiations. This professionally done process gives the public adjuster the ability to maximize the injured party’s settlement.” Cote says it is to the advantage of any property owner including people with a home, of ce, commercial building, boat or plane suffering damages to seek the professional services of a public adjuster. “Nobody knows what your claim is worth better than an experienced public adjuster who knows state statutes and how to read an insurance policy.” Bruce Pontner, Parkland agrees, saying, “I’m in the shoe business and when I suffered roof damage as a result of Hurricane Wilma, I put my claim into my insurance company and got nowhere. They offered me very little. Fortunately a friend told me to call Robert and he saved my life. He got me what I needed, and my roof has been xed. If it Public Adjuster, Robert Cote, talks to clients wherever he happens to be. His job is to represent the injured party with property damage by handling the negotiations with the insurance carrier for the client. [Staff photo]See COTE on page 9Wellness FestPompano Beach – The Small Biz Health & Wellness Fest will take place on Saturday, Nov. 17 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Boulevard. The free event will feature programs and services provided by health insurance companies, hospitals, clinics and private doctors. For more information, call 954-3536396.Food for FinesOakland Park – The Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St., will be accepting non-perishable, non-expired food donations in lieu of library nes in the month of November. Lost items cannot be cleared. One item will take care of any nes of $5 or less; two items $5 to $9.99; four items $10 to $14.99; six items $15 to $19.99 and eight items $20 to $39.99. Examples of accepted items are canned goods, soup, rice, cooking oil, dry pasta, beans, cereal, peanut butter, tuna, oatmeal, grits, baby food and powdered milk. For more information, call 954-630-4374.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, November 16, 2012 weren’t for him, I’d still be ghting with my insurance company.” Steven Byers, Delray Beach, has a similar story. He says, “I had damage from Hurricane Wilma and my insurance kept giving me the run around about doing the xing. I was so frustrated that a friend suggested I call Robert, whom I hired. He managed to get me double what my insurance company was offering and in so doing he solved my problems and ended my frustration. I recommend getting the services of a pro like Robert to anyone having to negotiate with an insurance company.” There’s no job too big or too small according to Cote. He cites a few examples from his own les. “One client took his boat out in rough seas and cracked the hull. His claim was denied until I reviewed the policy and negotiated a settlement based on the policy language. He went from zero on his own to a $20,000 settlement.” One of his larger cases dealt with Hurricane Wilma’s damage to a three-story of ce building on Atlantic Boulevard. He says with a proud smile, “I was able to negotiate a settlement of about $500,000 more than the original offer from the insurer.” Cote adds, “ To be current snowbirds who are here now and who have property damages in the Northeast from Hurricane Sandy can contact me for claim assistance or referrals.” To contact Cote at Property Loss Consultants, call 954-545-1450 or visit www.propertyloss.net CoteContinued from page 8SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com 11-17 – Pompano Beach GreenMarket from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard. 954-292-8040. 11-17 – 7th Annual 5K Walk/Run for Hunger at See SIGHTINGS on page 12

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10 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFMake St. Gabriel’s Fair the rst stop tomorrow and get that happy holiday feeling. Shoppers will nd mouthwatering homemade bakery goods, Christmas crafts, ornaments, small trimmed trees, wreaths and white elephant bargains galore. “We price very low so that everyone can take away wonderful gift items and everything Christmas,” says Gilda Riley, chairman of the event. “We’ll be here at 731 N. Ocean Blvd. in Pompano Beach from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 8:30 to 1 p.m. on Sunday.” The Christmas Fair is sponsored by the Council of Catholic Women of St. Gabriel. No vendors allowed. “It’s amazing what colorful and varied collections of merchandise just a handful of dedicated volunteers put together,” says Georgette Meikle, council president. “I’m a snowbird, but the rest of our group of active volunteers will prepare for next year soon after this year’s event.” Riley nods her head in agreement and with a wide smiles says, “Bloomingdale’s and Sak’s Fifth Ave. have nothing on us. Andy Buglione, an honorary member of the women’s group, works as hard as the ladies. Riley says, Holiday shopping starts tomorrow Nov. 17 and Sunday Nov. 18 at St. Gabriel’s festive annual Christmas fair “Andy and I love to shop the yard sales. We do it every Saturday seeking big values and donations which we bring back to the parish hall. “The items are cleaned and repaired for sale at our Christmas event. We also accept donations from parishioners, neighborhood people and stores going out of business or getting rid of overstock.” She holds up a painting, saying, “This framed artwork is tagged $25. We’ll price it at $3. This Burdine’s Christmas stocking was $25. We’ll tag it $4.” This year we have some fabulous items donated from estates. One original oil, valued at $500 will be sold for $100. We price low to attract all shoppers. Many of our new items were priced much higher in the stores. Nothing is wasted. If it’s not sold at the fair, we donate it to St. Vincent De Paul thrift store.” The dedicated ladies hope to raise $6,500. Riley says, “We raised $5,500 last year. This year will be better because of the donations from several estates. The collectables will be raf ed off. Shoppers will be delighted with the selection of jewelry, books, toys, hand made Christmas crafts, ornaments, trees and wreaths, and many white elephant items.” President Meikle says, “The monies we raise in this and our other fund raisers go to support the Burse Fund, Scholarship Fund, Madonna Plan, Help a Child, Water for Life, Food for the Poor & Cross International, Covenant House, Chastity Days, America Moms for Soldiers, Holiday Mail for Heroes, and Lobby Days at the Capitol.” She adds, “We have 69 members, but just eight hard workers for this event which is a very big challenge for our aging group. We urgently need young people to step up to the plate. Every year Gilda says, ‘This is my last year.’ “We have events from December through March when our snowbirds double our population. They don’t just go to Mass; they’re hard workers for our Christmas Dinner-Dance, February Fashion Show and the St. Patrick’s Dinner and Dance with the Men’s Club.” Chairman Riley has been involved in this Christmas Fair for 15 years because, she says, “It keeps me busy. I forget my own problems. My committee and I are here every Tuesday and Thursday receiving merchandise. We couldn’t stage this affair without Andy and the volunteers from the Men’s Club. They set us up and make it happen.” The Christmas Fair volunteers include, Georgette Meikle, Gilda Riley, Barbara Freeman and Jackie Draskins. Lorraine Ficaro and Lisa Rombkowski make all of the Christmas trees and wreaths. Arts and crafts volunteers are Claire Mitchell, Rose Manni and Margaret Barrosse who makes the ornaments. Riley adds that Andy has worked for this fair and other events for St. Gabriel for the past 35 years.” Barbara and Georgia admit that they often leave with more than they brought in. “We’re our own best customers,” Barbara smiles and adds, “You know one man’s junk is the next man’s treasure.” The bake table, lled with homemade goodies sells out fast, but shoppers need not be discouraged because freshly-made treats arrive every hour of the event. Every club member is asked to bake something. Barbara specializes in spice muf ns as does Riley. Georgia says, “I do breads and candies.” Andy grins and says, “I buy it and eat it.” Barbara Freeman, active in the club for the past three years, says, “ I love it and Hard working team brings the Christmas Fair to St. Gabriel. Left to right: Chairman Gilda Riley, Barbara Freeman, Council President Georgette Meikle and Andy Buglioni. Not pictured: Jackie Draskins, Lorraine Ficaso, Lisa Rombkowski, Claire Mitchell, Rose Manni and Margaret Barrosse. [Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]See FAIR on page 11Holiday Lighting Extravaganza Boca Raton – The City of Boca Raton hosts its annual Holiday Lighting Extravaganza at the Mizner Park Amphitheater, 201 West Palmetto Park Road, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Event highlights will include real snow, a live ice sculpture demonstration, meeting Santa Claus, children’s rides and activities, a reworks display and a state-of-the-art virtual tree lighting ceremony introduced by Mayor Susan Whelchel. The Spirit of Giving Network will be collecting unwrapped gifts for its annual toy drive. Food and beverage vendors will be on site, so no coolers or outside alcoholic beverages are permitted. Lighting starts at 5:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.mizneramphitheater. com or call 561-544-8600.LBTS Visitor’s Guide coming soon Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – The LBTS Chamber of Commerce will release its 2013 Visitor’s Guide sometime in mid-December. This coming year’s booklet will take on a new look, feature a cartoon style map of the area, suitable for hanging, and include more participants than ever before. Originally the booklet was scheduled to be released this month but the artist, who lives in the New York area, was delayed due to Hurricane Sandy. Miles for SmilesPompano Beach – The Broward Children’s Center is hosting its 9th Annual Miles for Smiles Walkathon on Saturday, Nov. 17 at 9 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Elk’s Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. The cost is $20 per person before the event and $25 the day of. Registration is at 8 a.m. All the proceeds go to support medical and educational programs serving children with disabilities. Walkers will circle the ve-mile Pompano Beach Airpark trail and celebrate at the nish line with family fun, food and entertainment. To sign up visit www.bcckids.org or call 954943-7336.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, November 16, 2012 encourage others to join us and make time to help. Like me volunteers get a great sense of contributing to the parish. I have gained great friendships.” Georgette Meikle, serving her second year as president of the Council, says, “I’m a snowbird from Maine. We’re here for six months, and during our stay I enjoy volunteering and the sense of belonging. It’s a pleasure to be active in my church and give meaning to my winters in Florida.” Thank you hard working volunteers from St. Gabriel for all that you do in both your parish and in the world around you.FairContinued from page 10 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – New of cer wanted: Must have four legs, a tail and be able to detect illegal narcotics using just your snout. With $8,000 to spend, the Wilton Manors Police Department is looking to buy a new narcotics detection dog. The K-9 will be purchased from Indiana’s Vohne Liche Kennels, a facility that trains and sells dogs to over 5,000 state, local and national law enforcement agencies Wilton Manors police buy new drug dogincluding the Pentagon, National Security Agency, State Department and U.S. Army. The funding, which includes an additional $600 in travel expenses to pay for an of cer to go to Indiana to pick out a canine, comes out the Law Enforcement Forfeiture Trust Fund which consists of moneys obtained from cases involving convicted criminals. If a police department seizes cash, cars or other property associated with a crime it gets to keep all or a portion of the funds. Those dollars can be used for the purchase of anything from radios to police cars. They can also be used for certain community projects. The department has been without a K-9 unit since Of cer Maria Sweat stepped down from the position and her partner, Caja, a Dutch Shepherd, was given to the Fort Lauderdale Police Department. Detective Sgt. Gary Blocker said along with a new dog the department is also looking for a new K-9 of cer.See K-9 on page 17

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12 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Both speakers and others referred to a Pompano Beach re ghter who had placed toilet paper in one of the restrooms that had pictures of President Obama printed on it. The incident came to light when someone reported it to re administration two weeks ago. According to Sandra King, public information of cer, the re chief, Harry Small, began an immediate investigation. It’s not the rst kind of incident of this sort at the same station when one re ghter had placed an antiObama bumper sticker on his locker. That incident was reported by another re ghter who said he had been insulted by the sticker. The re ghter apologized for the bumper sticker and removed it. This most recent incident brought a dozen residents to Tuesday’s commission meeting. City Manager Dennis Beach said the internal investigation is still underway and full disclosure will be brought to the public when it has been completed. Mayor Lamar Fisher added that the incident was offensive to the commission as well. PrankContinued from page 1 6:30 a.m. at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S Powerline Rd., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $20 for adults and $15 for kids. Visit www.foodforthepoor. org/walk for more information, 11-17 – 9th Annual Miles for Smiles Walk-a-Thon from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10th Street. Cost is $25. 954-299-5012. 11-17 – Florida Turkish Festival from 11 a.m. to 8 SightingsContinued from page 9 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. Free admission. Visit www. oridaturkishfestival.org or 786-251-9996. 11-27 – Card party hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order Of DOES Drove 142 and the Pompano Beach ELKS Lodge, 700 NE 10 St., from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost is $4 and includes dessert and coffee/tea, door prizes and raf e items. 561479-2002. 11-30 – Guy Harvey will be signing and personalizing purchases at West Marine, 2401 S. Andrews Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, from 6 to 8 p.m. 954-400-5323 or visit www.westmarine.com. 12-1 & 12-2 – City-Wide Market from 9 to 5 p.m. War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Ft. Lauderdale. Free admission and parking. Vintage and locally made good available for sale. Over 200 vendors. 954-785-7475.See SIGHTINGS on page 20

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The Pelican 13 Friday, November 16, 2012 By Bill JohnsonPELICAN WRITERPompano Beach – A sixmonth-old baby boy has lost his foot to cancer, and his family has gained a pile of escalating medical bills. Fortunately for them, some loving friends organized a fund raising event to help pay those bills. The event, called a FunRaiser, will be this Sunday, Nov. 18, at Leading Lady Fitness at 1616 S. Cypress Road., in the Pompano Plaza. Tammy Kornowski, the owner of the tness club, organized the event with help from others who work with her. The baby’s grandmother, Jeannie Eddy, of Fort Lauderdale, is a member of the tness club and has become friends with the owner and staff. She explains that the baby “has lived most of his life in the hospital” being treated for a rare type of cancer. Last week his foot was amputated. The baby is Dylan Leslie, who lives in Alabama with his parents, Trish and Greg Leslie. The family has health Fun-Raiser scheduled Sunday for cancer-stricken baby plight, Tammy Kornowski began recruiting businesses to help raise money by donating items and services for a silent auction and numerous raf es. She received a generous response. The auction will include a two-night vacation package at Atlantis in the Bahamas, scenic airplane ights, an eye examination, wine baskets, massages and facials, ten yoga lessons with babysitting included, swim lessons, a membership at Leading Lady Fitness, among many other things. “I am so overwhelmed,” the baby’s grandmother says. “It’s all from the goodness of their hearts.” Additional donors are encouraged to contribute insurance, Eddy says, but it covers only 80 percent of the medical bills. The baby has had more transfusions than she can count, she says, each one at a cost of $900. His care, including surgery, chemotherapy and long hospital stays, has been extensive. At one point, he had a port in his chest holding four IVs and another IV inserted in his head. Learning of the family’s items or services for the auction and raf es. While adults can enjoy the auction, there will be activities for youngsters, too. Busy Bee Rentals donated a bounce house and offers an opportunity to win the use of a bounce house for your own private party. There will be cotton candy, snow cones, hot dogs, face painting and hip hop dancing. A re truck will also be on display. The Fun-Raiser will run from noon to 3 p.m. on Sunday. The Pompano Plaza is near the corner of S. Cypress Road and East McNab Road. To donate items or money, contact Tammy Kornowski at 954-650-1041. Baby Dylan Leslie has lost his foot to cancer. Now friends and family members are raising funds to help pay medical bills. The event takes place at Leading Lady Fitness at 1616 S. Cypress Road in Pompano Beach.

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14 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 Eight months after re, Checkers Old Munchen restaurant reopensBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – After almost eight months, the beer is nally owing and Matt Moore feels like he’s “home again.” Moore, the owner of Checkers Old Munchen on Atlantic Boulevard, reopened his doors two weeks ago after a March 12 re destroyed the kitchen and heavily damaged other parts of the German restaurant. “It feels like being home again. We’re just happy to be back open,” said Moore, who added that the hardest part of the whole ordeal was dealing with contractors and “bureaucratic red tape” so he could open his doors again. And while Checkers was being brought back to life, Moore’s staff served up the German restaurant’s menu at Diner by the Sea in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. “We basically gutted the entire place,” said Moore, who repainted the whole restaurant, redesigned the kitchen, installed new ooring and ceiling tiles, remodeled the bathrooms and hallway and bought new silverware and plates. Spared during the re were the beer steins, wooden shelves and the glass rack – with the names of every customer who has drank their way through Checkers Old Munchen’s beer menu. “The rst question a lot of people asked was ‘Were you able to save my beer card?’” said Moore. And along with the same menu and prices, Moore’s original staff is back, serving up German beer, bratwurst, knackwurst, sauerkraut and other German fare – and plenty of it. And back are the customers. South Florida residents Jack Thibaut, originally from Sweden, and Kai Stadler, See CHECKERS on page 22 Matt Moore is home again in Pompano Beach, serving his German fare and myriad selections of German beers and ales. [Staff Photo]

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The Pelican 15 Friday, November 16, 2012 she seek more grants and said it’s time to dial back on consultant expenses. He commended her for cutting expenses and increasing ef ciency with town services, including successfully outsourcing services in several areas.Mayor Roseann MinnetThe mayor scored Hoffmann a 5 in scal management and personnel management and nearly a 5 in managing the organization. Overall she rated the manager a 4.903. Minnet wrote, “Not only were many of the stated goals achieved, but many were added.“Connie does not like to say no. Instead she will tackle the task and make it happen.”Commissioner Mark BrownBrown wrote, “Progress is being made all across the town. We are catching up with years of neglect to our infrastructure and moving now to prepare for the challenges of the future. Our scal house is in order. People seem happy with the way government is functioning in town. There is a sense of optimism that we didn’t have before. The town manager deserves credit for this.” Brown, the newest member of the commission, gave Hoffmann an over-all rating of 4.770. In the category of relations with the governing body and providing information, Brown said, “Connie and her staff have done an excellent job in this respect.” On scal management, Brown wrote, “The town manager’s performance on scal matters has been superb.” He noted that the town is debt-free and investing wisely in improving infrastructure. And he added that LBTS is one of only a few towns to lower the millage rate for this scal year. In the area of personnel management Brown said, “She has nally put together her own team after three years. They are working hard and have a great attitude.” In the category of relations with the public/other governments, Brown wrote, “I’m very impressed with Connie’s personal skills, her willingness to listen to people, return their calls and try to help. That is not always easy, but it’s important, and she is doing an excellent job.”Commissioner Stuart DoddDodd wrote, “In a little over two years, the manager has completely turned the town around. [Personnel] in four out of seven top positions were replaced. The town’s nancials are on a rm footing, and many projects have been accomplished. More projects will be started very shortly, including the downtown area and Commercial Boulevard improvements. Dodd gave Hoffmann an over-all rating of 4.449. Dodd wrote, “The theme is now ‘How can we help?’ rather than ‘What do you want?”Commissioner Chris VincentVincent rated the manager a 5 in both personnel management and relations with the public. He said she has “a phenomenal ability to lead, expects the best from staff and exhibits con dence in leadership.” Vincent wrote, “She completes goals in an ef cient and timely manner. She stays focused and prepared.” At the beginning of the meeting Vincent said, “Connie, Connie, Connie. We are the luckiest town in Broward County.” Hoffmann thanked the commission for their comments. She said she was surprised she got signi cantly better marks this year. She attributed that to “some key additions to staff which dramatically improved the quality of work done and the amount of work done. You wouldn’t be saying these nice things about me if I didn’t have 30-some people backing me up every day,” she said. Hoffmann said when she talks to other city managers they often ask what the LBTS commission is like. “I tell them it’s like a great commission from 25 years ago that no one has anymore. This commission is almost apolitical compared to others where everyone is jousting for power and people are trying to make themselves look good,” she said. “It’s a real pleasure working with the ve of you. Very different personalities, all really intelligent people. That’s also sometimes a rarity on city commissions,” she said. HoffmanContinued from page 3

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16 The PelicanFriday, Novemeber 16, 2012 “It’s going to be an economic engine,” he said, adding that the Transit Center also fits into the city’s plan to redevelop the Northwest Community Redevelopment Area [NW CRA]. On Tuesday, commissioners approved land use changes to the NW CRA that would allow for mixed use and easier redevelopment of the area. By allowing mixed use, officials hope private entities will come to the area and build residential, commercial and retail TransitContinued from page 1 developments. In the past CRA officials have also said the new Transit Center would improve the city’s chances of getting a Florida East Coast railway commuter station at Atlantic and Dixie. With buses from routes 20, 42, 50, 60 and Pompano’s community bus converging at the Transit Center, the area would already be a transit destination for thousands of riders and compliment a commuter station. The $5.3 million facility sits on 3.5 acres owned by the county and was built through funding from the Florida Department of Transportation, grants and local matches comprised of transit impact fees. Doris Williams, Broward County Transit’s administrator for customer relations, said the long period between the groundbreaking and the grand opening stemmed from the city, county and state trying to work out the details in their partnership together. Along with the ribbon cutting, there will be a tour of the facility, musical and dance entertainment and a drumming workshop highlighting the Transit Center’s public art feature, “Pompano Drum Circle.” Designed by artists Bill and Mary Buchen, “Pompano Drum Circle” is a grouping of five sculptural percussion instruments inspired by the musical traditions of cultures represented in the local area: African, Bahamian, Brazilian, Cuban and Haitian. The Transit Center also features a passenger dropoff area, platform canopies, restrooms, walk-up customer information window, bench seating, garden feature and is certified as a NatureScape Broward site. Dixie Highway and Atlantic Boulevard, ve years after the groundbreaking ceremony was held. “It’s the game changer for us,” said Mayor Lamar Fisher, who expects the Transit Center to attract more people to the city.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, November 16, 2012Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com McCartney dissenting. An ordinance establishing a procedure to ll a vacancy in the position of vice mayor was approved unanimously. An ordinance modernizing charter language and removing antiquated and statutorily superseded provision was approved unanimously. An ordinance amending the city manager’s power and duties to provide that contracts for construction of public improvements be let in accordance with the city’s procurement code. The vote was 4-1, Commissioner Boisvenue dissenting. An ordinance establishing a procedure by which commissioners who have a voting con ict must disclose the con ict prior to participating in discussion on that matter. It was approved unanimously. CharterContinued from page 3 Blocker, who was the K-9 of cer ve years ago when Rasta, a Belgian Malinois, was snif ng his way around Wilton Manors. Rasta died in 2007 of an ear canal tumor. “It’s an added resource that opens up different avenues to enforcing drug laws that, in some instances, law enforcement of cers themselves can not be successful in,” said Blocker in a previous interview with The Pelican He added that the dogs are able to sniff out the odor of narcotics in places where of cers would not have found them. And those skills can be quite lucrative. In May of 2007, Rasta assisted police with the seizure of ve kilos of cocaine, 17 lbs. of marijuana, and over $108,000 in U.S. currency. The WMPD was able to retain that entire cash amount for its use. K-9Continued from page 11

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18 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012

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The Pelican 19 Friday, November 16, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFOakland Park “We used to sell sizzle; now we sell numbers,” says Gary Lanham, President & Broker at Lanham & Associates, Inc. Those who experienced the days of easy loans, house flipping and mini-mansion sizzle probably know exactly what this experienced broker is talking about. To Lanham and his numbers-oriented agents, this philosophy simply means efficient and more logical buying and selling in today’s market. He explains. “We’re different. No one comes to Lanham’s company without a strong background in real estate analysis.” He leans over and shows the numbers for Victoria Park in Fort Lauderdale. This is a favorite community for young professionals looking for classic Florida homes, top schools and memorable landscaping. The prices look like bargain-basement deals relative to 2008, but the numbers now are also realistic for the sellers, and that means quick closings. It’s all part of the market recovery from the 2008 collapse that brought real estate sales to a standstill, foreclosures to new heights and long waits for short sales. “In 2010, deals were escalating in foreclosures and short sales. We all thought it was the beginning of the recovery,” Lanham said. “I opened my business in 2011 so I could be part of the recovery,” which has turned out to be the case. Trend data shows prices are increasing. In the beginning a lot of time was spent working short sales and foreclosures. “Foreclosures put a person out of the housing market for years,” he says. However, it is Lanham’s mission to help people maintain their dignity and character as they go through the short sale process. And it seemed to be one learning curve after another. “Each bank was working short sales differently,” he says. “Volume was so high that banks didn’t know which one to attend to first. Short sales took months, sometimes more than a year to close.” But Lanham says he found a secret weapon that sped his short sale closings to 30 days. He had done over 60 deals with Moraitis, Cofar, Karney & Moraitis, a law firm in Fort Lauderdale. One of its name partners, George Moraitis, Jr., represents District 93 in the Florida House. “This law firm knew how to negotiate with the banks. It is their specialty. I had met George, Jr. through Bryan Phegley, who attends Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church with George,” Lanham said. “Now they [Moraitis et al] handle the banks for us.” Said Rep. Moraitis, regarding his firm’s connection with Lanham, “As a law firm we represent our clients when negotiating a settlement between the seller, their lender and the buyer to facilitate the sale of the property. In cooperation with Gary and other Realtors, we have helped our clients to manage an orderly sale of their properties which allows them to move forward with their lives. The short sale process avoids a foreclosure and the resulting waste of the property. In many cases we are able to negotiate a release of the client from further liability associated with the loan depending on the circumstances. We appreciate the opportunity to work with Gary and his clients as he is an excellent professional who understands the needs of his clients attempting to recover in a difficult economy.” Just prior to opening his company, Lanham had stepped into a 60-unit project to help the developer sell out the units. “I sold that project in a collapsing market. It took two years.” He refers to that as “chasing the market down.” It worked. Now Lanham believes the market’s downward chase is finally “bumping along the bottom.” He calls that “good news,” but the “bad news” is that expectant sellers are not going to see the rapid price increases they desire. “Now is the time to buy,” he says. “And the buyers are coming to us with cash. We’re selling like that.” He snaps his fingersHow to sell itLanham’s team uses analysis to help sellers price HOUSE Rulestheir homes. Once a realistic figure is set, there are other aspects to consider. We consult with the Seller to coach them on the best way to present their house. For example, curb appeal does make a difference when a prospective buyer enters the picture. “You can never recreate a first impression,” says Lanham. “Today’s buyers are not looking for re-do’s or fix-ups.”Real hot itemsThe rental market is up, and Lanham says there is not enough space to accommodate the growing rental needs. Vacation rentals are also hot items. Buyers are picking up small homes and converting them into vacation rentals and banking income up to $5,000 monthly. “We have no inventory. It’s a sellers’ market,” Lanham says.What makes this broker different?Born in Virginia, Lanham headed to Florida State University where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in International Affairs. He followed that up at Virginia Commonwealth University with an MHA, Masters of Hospital Administration. He spent 25 years in healthcare software sales an emerging field that proved very profitable. At 49, he retired to Florida and bought a home in Oakland Park, a city he loves today. He has since refined his business development skills.What makes Lanham Real Estate Recovery different?“Our agents have heavy quantitative analysis backgrounds. They are all fulltime. We know how to market your home to where the buyers are coming from. We have a strong social media presence, and your listing will be there,” Lanham says, as he demonstrates to me how he places one of his listings in Sao Paulo, a market known to bring cash buyers to South Florida “As a boutique agency, it is important to offer a higher level of service than other residential agencies. We know that many of our residential customers also have commercial real estate needs. I’ve empowered my Fort Lauderdale broker nds different ‘sizzle’ in real estatecommercial agents, Jeff Yunis, Esq., and Harry Burnett, with CoStar, a quantitative tool for commercial real estate agents. Many residential agencies do not offer this commercial muscle to their residential clients. “After all,” Lanham concludes “many people who retire to Florida remain entreprenneurs and after their first few years here, they need a ‘go-to’ brokerage” for their business needs, too. They grow tired of lying on the beach and playing golf.” For more information, call 954-530-8198. Gary Lanham, President & Broker at Lanham & Associates, Inc..

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20 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 12-3 – Palm Aire/Cypress Bend Democratic Club meeting at the Herb Skolnick Center 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Mitch Ceasar, chairman of the Broward County Democratic Executive Committee, will discuss the Nov. 6 election results. 954-975-3772 or 786-877-1644. 12-8 & 9 – Christmas craft sale from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church, 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. Vendors wanted. 954-9418117. 12-9 – Pompano Beach Boat Parade at 6 p.m. at Lake Santa Barbara in Pompano and ends at Hillsboro Boulevard Bridge. Family entertainment, shore decorating contest. Each entry receives a hand painted commemorative ornament. 954-941-2940. SightingsContinued from page 12 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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The Pelican 21 Friday, November 16, 2012 Vietnam Veterans can be assessed for possible Agent Orange exposure Tamarac – The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs [VA] has recently implemented new procedures to assess physical injuries to Vietnam veterans and these changes can help Broward County veterans who served in Southeast Asia. The U.S. military sprayed millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War to help expose possible enemy locations. To help Veterans who may have been exposed to Agent Orange, from 1961 to 1975, the VA has established a free Agent Orange Registry health exam to alert veterans to possible long-term health problems that may be related to Agent Orange exposure. This affects military men and women who served in Vietnam, Korea and Thailand. The free, comprehensive health exam includes an exposure history, medical history, physical exam and any tests, if needed. In Broward, this exam can be conducted at the Broward County VA Outpatient Clinic, 9800 W. Commercial Blvd., Tamarac. Veterans who take the Agent Orange health exam can le a claim for disability compensation. During the claims process, VA will check military records to verify exposure to Agent Orange. For more information, call 954-357-6622.7th Annual 5K Walk/Run for HungerDeerfield Beach – The 7th Annual 5K Walk/Run for Hunger will be held Saturday, Nov, 17 starting at 6:30 a.m. at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road. Registration is at 6:30 a.m. and the race starts at 7 a.m. The awards ceremony is at 8 a.m. Cost is $20 per adult and $15 per kids under 10. Kids who are six years old or younger are free. Visit www. foodforthepoor.org/walk for more information.Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!

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22 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012 CheckersContinued from page 14from Germany, have both been coming to Checkers for about 10 years. And they both know a good German place when they see it. “The beer’s great. The food and staff are fantastic. It’s like that bar Cheers. Everyone knows your name,” said Thibaut. Stadler, originally from the Black Forest region of southern Germany, said Checkers comes the closest to cooking up what the fare of the beer halls and restaurants in his homeland. “To me, it’s almost a homey feeling. It’s German.” Checkers is open Monday through Friday for lunch from 11 to 2 p.m. and Monday through Sunday from 5 to 9 p.m. for dinner. Every month Checkers also hosts a beer tasting. The cost is $18 and includes a buffet, eight beer samples and the chance to win raf e prizes. Visit www. checkersoldmunchen.com for more information. 12-15 –Spiritual Health Fair from 10 to 4 p.m. at Bridges of Wellness, 1881 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Event includes gift drawings every half hour. 954-530-6006.Further Out1-25 & 26 – Go SOLAR Fest from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturday at Broward County Convention Center, 1950 Eisenhower Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Visit www.broward.org/gogreen/gosolar.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information. SightingsContinued from page 20 See SIGHTINGS on page 28

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The Pelican 23 Friday, November 16, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! can’t we go to New York? [to see relatives as they had in other years.] The trip wasn’t possible that year because Yankwitt, an attorney, had an upcoming trial. He tried to look at the situation through his daughter’s eyes and could see the pain. Their family didn’t match those large, happy groups of relatives gathered around the holiday table in TV ads. Eric and Lindsey gured there must be other families in the same boat as them. He was president of the Lauderhill Chamber of Commerce at the time, and he mentioned his situation to chamber members. “I tend to wear my heart on my sleeve,” he said. A month later they partnered with the Lord of the Word Church and the Smart School in Lauderhill and served a free Thanksgiving dinner to about 1,000 people. Yankwitt has continued the effort through the Florida Community Support Organization, a non-pro t group he founded, along with Verenice Rapaport, now his ance. Rapaport is a social worker with Broward County. She and Yankwitt met through community outreach projects. The organization works “to build a better community one neighbor at a time,” he says. In a promotional yer, Yankwitt calls Thanksgiving “a wonderful day to celebrate with your neighbors. We have a lot to be thankful for in life. Many of us have families that live outside our immediate area and for one reason or another we will not be able to spend time with them this holiday.”“I tell guests that the dinner is free, but I will charge $20 every time their phone makes a noise.”This year, for the rst time, Jarvis Hall, at 4505 N. Ocean Drive in LBTS will be the site for one of the dinners. Yankwitt invites residents to come for a free holiday meal and begin to know one another. The event is set from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. “I want them to meet their neighbors, and then they have the best gift of all, a friend and someone to rely on. That helps to grow our community,” he says. The day after a hurricane we’re all thankful, and we meet our neighbors. “But we don’t have to wait for a hurricane,” he says. Through these dinners, Yankwitt says friendships and relationships are formed. Rapaport recalled one guest, a veteran whose daughter usually sent him airline tickets so he could travel to Wisconsin for Thanksgiving each year. He always enjoyed the trip and seeing his grandchildren. But two years ago his daughter lost her job and was unable to provide the tickets. Instead, he was persuaded to go to a dinner for holiday orphans, where he met several vets and joined in the singing. He had a ball. Yankwitt emphasizes the goal of the dinner is communication. “We’ve taught that it’s OK to ignore people around us and communicate electronically,” he says. “I don’t know why we’re so detached from each other and why we’re OK with that.” At the holiday dinner he asks that cellphones be turned off. “I tell guests that the dinner is free, but I will charge $20 every time their phone makes a noise,” he quips. He urges local holiday orphans to come to the dinner and connect with their neighbors face-to-face. “If you’re looking for a gourmet dinner, this is not it. It’s not Zagat-rated. The food is good, and the menu includes turkey and all the usual trimmings,” Yankwitt said. There won’t be ne china and silver. Dinner is served in a styrofoam container with plasticware. But just as at home, guests are invited to have seconds and even to take leftovers home. Besides the food, the event at Jarvis will include entertainment by a dance troupe, Casa Salsa; music by Marcel Rasa; a tai chi demonstration and a silent auction with raf e prizes. The free holiday dinners also will be held at many area churches, VFW and American Legion halls. The parking lot at Yankwitt’s law of ce on Atlantic Boulevard in Pompano Beach serves as the distribution center. Last year they served 150 dinners in the parking lot to guests, including college students and tourists. Yankwitt’s daughter Lindsey, now 21 and studying psychology at Florida Atlantic University will be helping out at the dinner in LBTS. Her brother David, 24, is just back from serving in Afghanistan. He is also a student at FAU and plans to go to law school. Rapaport’s son Alberto, is coming for the holiday from New Jersey, where he was a victim of Hurricane Sandy. More volunteers are needed to help out at the LBTS dinner, and donations are always welcome. For reservations or more information, call Eric Yankwitt at 954-4494368. For a list of other sites where dinners for holiday orphans are planned, see the website at www.FloridaCommunitySupport.Org. ThanksgivingContinued from page 1

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24 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012 By Ric GreenPELICAN WRITERI saw a video recently in which Jay Leno, Tonight Show host and avid auto enthusiast, made a comment that really hit home with me. He said that one of the really fun driving experiences is going fast in a small car. I could not agree more, however make that small car a 2012 Mazda MX-5 Miata and the experience has the person behind the wheel imagining how a racecar driver feels when he has taken the green flag. The 2012 Mazda MX-5 Miata is a two-seat roadster that is offered in three trim levels: base Sport, wellequipped Touring and premium Grand Touring. All come standard with a manually operated soft top, while the top two trims can be had with a power-retractable hardtop (PRHT). I am fortunate to be driving a Special Edition MX-5, one of only 450 produced. Powered by the Miata’s standard for all models, the 2012 Mazda MX-5 Special Edition PRHT is pushed by a 2.0L DOHC 16-valve, 4cylinder engine that produces 167 horsepower and 140 pound-feet of torque. It has sleek, open-air styling and a top of line all options with six-speed manual transmission price tag of $31,225, making this a ride that delights the senses and the wallet. Standard on the Touring and Grand Touring models are 17-inch alloy wheels, foglights, cruise control, power door locks, an autodimming rearview mirror, trip computer, six-CD changer, steering-wheel-mounted audio controls and a leatherwrapped shift knob. Mazda enhances the already nimble handling Touring and Grand Touring models with a sport-tuned suspension featuring Bilstein shocks and a limited-slip differential (only available with a manual transmission). The Grand Touring edition qualifies for the Premium package that features keyless ignition/entry, xenon headlights, Bluetooth and satellite radio. An Appearance package adds a unique front spoiler and extended rocker sills. These additions give the 2012 MX-5 a responsiveness that’ll blow your mind. Lightweight, perfectly balanced and precise, it seems to anticipate your next move. Out for my first drive, I leave my driveway shifting into first gear. I squeeze the accelerator and the MX5 sings a throaty rumble bringing a smile to my face. I’ve stowed the Power Retractable Hard Top (PRHT), the windows are down and ’m low to the ground. The smells and sounds around me are exaggerated by normal standards. With every shift, I feel the grip of the tires plus the stiffness and rebound of the suspension. My driving emotions and sensations are all there with me behind the wheel and not buried in the sheet metal and noise suspension material beneath the fenders. Driving the Mazda MX-5 produces, and improves on, the special experience that the British Roadsters of the 50’s, 60’s and early 70’s were famous for. Over the years I have developed my own system of evaluating cars by driving on two sections of road. One has two connected turns with following short straight. Now, before you think I am truly irresponsible, I rarely get manual shift cars past second gear. My other evaluation area is a sweeping I-95 on-ramp where I note my speed when I have merged with the traffic. On the two turns section, The 2012 Mazda MX-5 Miata Special Edition PRHT is small but fast See Mazda on page 29

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The Pelican 25 Friday, November 16, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Boca Raton Actor Don “Bunny” McArt, who made his small stature and prominent ears his trademark, died Tuesday, Nov. 13 in Boca Raton. Known locally for starring with his sister Jan McArt in productions at Royal Palm Dinner Theatre, his long career began on Broadway in George Abbott’s “Kiss and Tell,” moved to television where he appeared in “Alfred Hitckcock Presents” and numerous commercials and then to Hollywood where he was under contract to Distinguished actor starred here with Jan McArtDisney. While still a student, McArt was a newscaster/ disc jockey in Evansville, Indiana. The range of his acting ability is demonstrated by his work in theatre: Barefoot in the Park, The Odd Couple ; in the movies, The Son of Flubber and The Absent-minded Professor and on TV where he appeared with a long list of stars including Shirley Temple, Goucho Marx, Robert Taylor, Chill Wills, Jackie Coogan and Peter Lorre. In The Adams Family he was one of the ‘cousin’ characters. Turning to motivational speaking, McArt became affiliated with the Science of Mind centers touring the country. He moved to Boca Raton in 1990 to star with Jan McArt in Sugar Babies and then filled other comedy, character roles at the dinner theatre. He received a Carbonell nomination for his performance in Finnigan’s Rainbow. For the last four years, he has been on stage in the oneman show, Say Goodnight, Gracie playing George Burns, and was scheduled to appear January with his sister in “Back Stage Story” at the Wold Performing Arts Center at Lynn University. stocked with CDs and a smart board. “This donation takes our literacy program to the next level,” said Jocelyn Reid principal of Deer eld Park. “It’s like having a book fair all year.” Reid said she has found a storage room within the school that can be used for the reading oasis and Kiwanis Club members will assemble the shelves and have it in place for a dedication event Dec. 18 at 5 p.m. Deer eld Park is a Title I school which makes it eligible for Scholastic’s newest initiative. It is also a magnet school in the performing arts. The Oasis will be open for family literacy nights and is the rst of 10 models that Scholastic is launching around the country. The project is being chaired locally by Bob Partin, a member of the Deer eld Beach club and soon to be president of the Kiwanis International Foundation. Within hours of letting Kiwanis President Avis Swenson know of the new partnership between Kiwanis International and Scholastic Book Fairs, club members committed both their money and their time to bringing this asset here. The kids at Deer eld Park will need mentors to pair them with the right book and to listen to them read. Kiwanians will ll that need. “This is the way to change a child’s life,” Partin said. Scholastic is a 90-year old company, the largest publisher and distributor of children’s books in the world. It published the US edition of “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” but well before that had as its mission, providing affordable, quality books to young readers. It operates book fairs in more than 90 percent of US school continually offering the latest books to capture the fancy of young readers. But for some kids, buying a book is not in the family’s budget, said Dillon Kalkhurst, Scholastic’s director of community alliances. “Money is always an obstacle and many schools have no strong parent-teacher organizations to help out. We were looking for other ways to give kids access to books.” OasisContinued from page 5

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26 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26 NOW HIRING SHORT ORDER COOKS!! Part Or Full Time. All Shifts. Open 7 Days. Apply 2211 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors – Courtyard Caf. 11-16SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs. Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 11-16 CNA – LICENSED LEVEL 2 Background Check. Compassionate & Caring. Seeks Job To Care For The Elderly. Own Car – Drs. Appts. – Light Housekeeping – Shopping. 954-270-0639. CAREGIVER / COMPANION – Over 25 Years Experience. Alzheimers – Diabetes & Other Medical Conditions Including Physical Limitations. Dressing – Bathing – Cooking – Cleaning – Errands – Laundry. My Home Or Yours. Diane 954618-3003 Or 954-960-2125. SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 11-16 NINA’S CLEANING – Exceptional Cleaning Service. Res/Comm. 12 Years Experience. References Available. Your Home Will Be Treated With Respect & Attention To Detail. 954-6016141. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees – Landscape – Yard Fill – Pressure Wash – Roofs – Home Repairs – Welding – Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 11-23 MIKE THE GARDENER “The All American Yardman” Yard And Garden Care – Get The Best For Less! Call 561543-6337 Cell. 11-23 CROWN MOLDING – Enhance Your Home For The “Holidays”. Call Margie At Royal Crown Moldings. 954717-1805. 11-23 MOORE PLUMBINGPLUMBING SERVICES-Big Jobs-Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 11-30 EXPERIENCED DRIVER AVAILABLE! “TO & FROM STORES” “DOCTORS” “APPOINTMENTS” “AIRPORT’’, ETC. CALL MARYANN 954-895-3202. GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – Love To Clean Windows! Refrigerators, Ovens. No Problem. FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. 11SEMI – RETIRED ELECTRICIAN. Call If Your Desire Is To Pay Less Than “The Real Price” For Electrical Work Done Right! Beech Electrical Corp. Lic # ER13012551. Call 954-5548520. 11-16 DIGNITY CLEANING SERVICE INC – House – Condo – Of ce & More. 954826-6450. Lic/Ins. Call Today For A FREE Estimate. 5th Cleaning 1/2 Price. 11-16 NO DEDUCTIBLE HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN, No CoPayment, Low Low Rates! Doctor, Hospital, Wellcare, Accident, Etc. 561-715-2863. AIRPORT TRANSPORTATIONPickup & Drop-Off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-234-0617. 1-4 ANA’S CLEAN (RESIDENTIAL) CLEANING In Pompano – Lighthouse Point – Deer eld. Dependable – Thorough – Experienced. References. Good Work For A Good Price. Please Call Ana 954-692-4691. 11-30 HOUSEKEEPER – NEED AN Honest Detailed Person To Take Care Of Your Home Or Of ce? References Available & FREE Estimate. Please Call 954-579-3866. 11-23 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. GARAGE SALESEVERYTHING SALE & Silent Auction At Temple Sholom 132 SE 11 Avenue Pompano Beach Sunday November 18 – 9am – Noon. 11-16 POMPANO / LHP MULTI FAMILY SALE! (Soroptimist Int’l. ) Saturday Nov. 17 8am1pm. St. Nicholas Church 1111 E S ample Road Pompano Beach. 11-16 FURNITUREBEAUTIFUL 7 PIECE Rattan Living Room Set – Honey Color – Floral Pattern. Excellent Condition. Asking $850 – Paid $5,000. Ft Lauderdale. 954557-8185. 11-16

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The Pelican 27 Friday, November 16, 2012 Pelican Classi eds mean business! 954783-8700!Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds mean business! 954-783-8700! SHARE TOWNHOUSETAMARAC PRIVATE ROOM & BATH In Newly Renovated Townhouse. Single – Mature – Professional. 1 Car Space. Pool. Available Now. Diane 954-618-3003 Or 954960-2125. MOBILE HOME SALESFORT LAUDERDALE – MOBILE HOME 2/1 – 15x55’. Central Air/Heat. Furnished. Distress Sale! $8K OBO. 15 Minutes To Anywhere! Call 954-557-8185. DOCK RENTALPOMPANO BEACH – Minutes To Inlet. Up To 38’ x 13’. New Dock/Sea Wall, Deep Water, Gated Security/Water/Electric. No Fixed Bridges, No Live Aboard. Annual $400/Month. 954-471-6704. 11-16 DEEP WATER – 15 Minutes To Hillsboro Inlet. Up To 63’. Electric Up To 50 AMPS & Water. Call Julie 954-224-2216. 11-16 SEASONAL RENTALPOMPANO BEACH 2 / 2 Condo – Island Club – Federal Hwy. 9th Floor Corner Apt. Beautiful Views. Nicely Furnished. All Amenities. $2,000 Month. 954785-0177. LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 55+ Beautiful 2 / 2 Furnished. Walk To Beach – Shops – Restaurants. Large Pool – Nice Grounds. 3 – 5 Month Rental. 413-244-2807. HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO KEY WEST STYLE House – 2/2. $1,100 Month. 541 NE 34 Street. Call Darci 954-7833723. 11-30OPEN HOUSESPOMPANO OPEN SUNDAY 1-4PM. 2831 NE 8 COURT. 4/3/2 – Deep Water Pool Home In Harbor Village. $599K. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. 954-803-4174. 11-16 ROOMS FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT ON Deep Water Canal – Pool (2) Private Rooms & Bath. Dockage Available. Call Julie 954-224-2216. 11-16 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-18 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 – Totally Renovated! Ocean & Intracoastal Views. LOCATION! LOCATION! $175K. More Information Call 954-783-6619. POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 12-7CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 12-7 DEERFIELD CENTURY VILLAGE Garden Apt. Large 1 / 1.5 Condo. Clean. 954-4214987 Or 954-254-2229. 11-9 DEERFIELD BEACH – Century Village. 55+. No Pets. 2/1.5 Furnished. A/C, Cable, Many Amenities. Pool, Gym, Billiards, Etc. $1,600 Per Month Seasonal. 954573-8388. LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1 / 1 Yearly Lease. 1st/Last/Security. Good Credit. Small Pet OK! Tiled. $765 Month. 954-7097688 Or 954-493-9449. 11-16 POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Beautiful Renovated 2 / 1 Pool! Sunroom – Ground Floor, Beautifully Furnished. On Golf Course. $700 Mo. 1 Year +. Good Credit. 917-544-0771. 11-23 POMPANO BEACH FURNISHED CONDO On The Water. Lovely 1/1.5 Condo On The Intracoastal/ Canals. See Beautiful Views & Sunsets From Floor To Ceiling Windows. Dock Availability. $940 w/Yearly Lease. 954-7857571 Or 954-249-2710. 11-16 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 11-16 WALK TO BEACH! Got Boat? (Common Dockage When Avail). Updated & Nicest 1/1 Around! Annual Unfurn $965 Monthly. 954-415-1408 Agent. BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Seasonal, Yearly Or Monthly. 500’ To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. POMPANO 1 / 1 APT. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-857-5207. POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – 2/1 $750 NW – 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App Mov-U-In. 954-7816299. 11-16 POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W / D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. LIGHTHOUSE POINT 1/1 HIGH END APARTMENT. $1,100 Month Yearly Lease. Call 609-638-1291. 11-16 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/Unfurnished. $650$850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. BEACHY-KEEN! 1 Bedroom/1 Bath-1 Block From The Sand In NE Pompano. Annual Lease $900 Month. 954-614-8428 Agent. POMPANO ATLANTIC/ INTRACOASTAL Area. South Of Publix. Efficiency/Furn. Private Entrance. Utilities Included. Non Smoker. Long Term.. $700 Month. 954-4158838. 1 LAUD BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Apt. Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 11-16 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 11-30 PAINT AND BODY SHOP For Rent. Legal, Permitted Paint Booth, 15HP Compressor, Air Lines Thru Out Unit, Paint Cabinet, Good Lighting, Drive Thru Unit, Freshly Refurbished, Ready To Go. $3,200 Per Month. 954-4488172. 11-30 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 11-16 POMPANO BEACH COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – Prime Sample Rd Location. 650 E Sample Rd Approx. 2,000 Sq Ft. $2,500 + Tax AND 630 E Sample Rd Approx 700 Sq Ft. $1,300 + Tax. Yearly Lease. C/A. Nice Of ces. Hurry Won’t Last Long! Darci 954-783-3723. 11-30 POMPANO BEACH WAREHOUSE For Rent. 800 To 2500 Square Foot, 14 ft. Clear Ceilings, All Units Freshly Refurbished, Excellent Lighting, Fresh Paint, Epoxy Floors, Three Phase Power, Safe Fenced Complex. $650 Per Month And Up Depending On Size. 954-448-8172. 11-30

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28 The Pelican Friday, November 16, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your shing news! mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ Boyle RJ BOYLE STUDIOSWhat a nice change of pace. Take a ride up and down the Intracoastal Waterway and you can’t help but notice all of the snook swimming in the lights near the docks. It is that time of the year, when the mullet start to run, that the snook stack up in our local waters. We fished the Lighthouse Point to Boca lights and it was awesome. In two hours we caught two snook and jumped off 3 more. In addition to the snook we caught 12 mangroves and five nice moonfish. It was awesome to bend the rod and only burn five gallons of gas. We left the dock at 6 p.m., brought four dozen shrimp, a pizza, and some cokes and we were back at the dock at 8:30 p.m.The snook bite is on, make sure you’re readySaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.SightingsContinued from page 22The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, See SIGHTINGS on page 29 RJ Boyle with the catch of the day. [Photo courtesy of RJ Boyle]

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The Pelican 29 Friday, November 16, 2012 I was sure I was up over 40 miles-per-hour, but my quick glance at the speedometer read 32 mph, which by the way was three mph under the speed limit. To be sure, I did it again with a similar result. The on-ramp experience was just as surprising. As I shot out ahead of a Publix 18wheeler and dove ahead of it, I had that moment of “I better back off or I’ll be explaining another speeding ticket to my wife” when I glanced at the gages I was shocked to see a number just over 65 when I was sure I would between 75 and 80. Whether it takes you to work, the market or just a Sunday drive, there’s no other car on the road that is so much fun to at the posted speed limits. MazdaContinued from page 24 SightingsContinued from page 282020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the rst and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Oakland Park. 954-782-9951.TuesdaysYoga every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $7 per class. Classes are also held Saturday mornings from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. 954-6073520. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Deer eld Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954292-8040. The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957.Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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The Pelican 31 Friday, November 16, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-783-8700! area. Cost will run $49,000 for this rst year she said, the money coming from CRA funds. To kick-off the program, an event will be held Nov. 17, 6:30 p.m. at the Wyndham Resort. DCIA resists; Arboretum band shell scuttledDeerfield Beach – Plans to build a small, covered stage in the Arboretum at Constitution Park were soundly denounced by the Deer Creek Improvement Association [DCIA] Board last week. This week, Commissioner Bill Ganz withdrew his support of the project citing community opposition, and his fellow board members agreed. The Friends of the Arboretum had secured a $150,000 grant from Broward County to erect a 15-foot by 30-foot stage in the easternmost meadow of the park. Encouraged by the Deerfield Beach Cultural Committee, the Friends hoped the stage could be used for small performances and a storytelling festival scheduled in March. When the idea was presented to the DCIA, some board members and three or four residents protested loudly citing noise and traffic as their concern. Distressed over the reception he got, Friends’ president Jerry Behan said, “They didn’t want to hear anything about it. They don’t want anything there. They think it is their own private park.” Now Behan is hoping the funds can be diverted to the rain forest area of the arboretum. A design was drawn some time ago that includes canopy trees, shrubs and waterfall, but lack of funds has delayed its development. Behan said he will go back to the county and see if the park grant is still available to the Friends. “There may be something else they feel is a higher priority,” he said.Funds voted to assess pier damageDeerfield Beach – Commissioners gave city engineer Charlie DeBrusco $45,000 this week to begin an assessment of the damage to the fishing pier caused by Tropical Storm Sandy. The “T” at the east end of the pier will have to be completely replaced DeBrusco said after high seas torn most of the planks from the pilings and took away some of the railing. His estimate is that the pier suffered $400,000 in total damages, but to date waves have been too high to send a boat underneath the structure to make a complete assessment. Also lost to the storm are water and electric lines that provide service to the pier and the people who fish there. Repairing the pier will likely cost taxpayers $250,000, the deductible in the city’s insurance policy. Asked where that money will come from, City Manager Burgess Hanson said “we will have to find it one way or another.”CRAContinued from page 4

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