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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00322
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Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 10-19-2012
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00322

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Friday, October 19, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 42 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The Pelican 39 days left in 2012 Hurricane season October is Breast Cancer awareness month October is Domestic Violence awareness month Chamber to honor Shining Stars WednesdayBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – On Wednesday, Oct. 24, the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce will recognize its 2012 Shining Stars. The Shining Star Awards Luncheon will be held from 12 to 2 p.m. at Hillsboro Club, 901 Hillsboro Mile, Hillsboro Beach. “These awards are given to call attention to people for what they do, for what they’ve done,” said Ric Green, president/CEO of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. In selecting this year’s recipients, the Chamber has singled out a race car driver, the mayor and members of the Brazilian business community. “There’s so much in the community that residents don’t know about,” said Green. “People don’t know these things. It’s our job to go out and tell them. It’s all about telling the stories of everyday heroes . working hard to improve their See SHINING STARS on page 24Another motion delays mayor’s trialDeer eld Beach The trial of former mayor Al Capellini was delayed this week to give the state attorney time to respond to a motion led by the defense. Capellini’s attorney, David Bogenshutz led a motion that the case be dismissed on the grounds of selective prosecution. In granting the state attorney’s request for more time, Judge Carlos Rebollo reset the trial to Monday, Dec.10. Capellini was charged in 2010 with public corruption after he voted to approve a project while his rm was doing its consulting work. Previous motions to dismiss this case have been denied by Rebollo.Deer eld’s International Fishing Pier is a popular setting for photographers. Now, city videographers would like submissions of suc h photos for a video to be featured at the pier’s new welcome station scheduled to be open Dec. 7. Pictures showing family and friends enjoying memo rable moments at the pier and beach are also welcome. Photos can be old or new, but must have been taken at this beach. Submit to web.pio@Deer eld-Beach.com. For further details, call 954-480-4317. [Photo courtesy of Jeff Graves] By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Dedication of the new entrance to the shing pier has been set for Friday, Dec. 7 and appropriate ceremonies are planned. But the pier will open without its restaurant. Determining who will operate the 70-seat eatery has been slowed by a challenge to the bidding process. One of the protests has been led by Pete Boinis, a former restaurant owner with a colorful history here. Eco-Eatery, Inc. and Red Baron Entertainment have led protests challenging the selection committee’s decision that found they were “nonresponsive” bidders, i.e. did not submit all the required information. The city commission will meet in special session Oct. 29 to rule on the protest. Principal in Eco-Eatery is Pete Boinis, the Boca Raton restaurant Pete Boinis challenging city as two le protests in pier restaurant biddingowner whose attempt to build a restaurant on the pier parking lot in 2004 created huge controversy and gave momentum to the Original Save Our Beach organization. When his restaurant failed to win commission approval, Boinis posted an area of beach property he owned adjacent to the pier as “Private” and did not allow public use. Eventually, the city purchased the tract in order to make the current pier renovations. Red Baron Entertainment is a Lighthouse Point entity whose principal is Mike Coner. The other bidder deemed non-responsive was Johanna Gallagher, Gallagher and Associates of Deer eld Beach. Gallagher did not le a protest. The remaining bidder was Todd Weiss, DH2 of Boca Raton, who was not recommended by the selection See PIER PROTEST on page 3

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2 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – BSO Police Chief Pete Sudler and the FAU Foundation are embarking on a pilot project that will eventually grant eight local students fouryear scholarships to Florida Atlantic University. Sudler outlined his program for city commissioners Tuesday saying it grew out of his approaching members of the FAU football team to ride with his deputies as examples to young people. The “Owls on Patrol” stop at parks and mentor the kids, occasionally, as a bonus, getting in on some real law enforcement action.First-ever partnership with FAU sends 8 kids to college That program was so successful that Sudler decided to give 30 disadvantaged kids a real college experience – football games. Using funds raised from con scated contraband, he purchased 30 season tickets on the 40-yard line to the Owls’ games and “got amazing reactions from the kids.” Not content, Sudler began searching for a way to expand this ‘college and cops’ partnership and contacted Jennifer O’FlanneryAnderson who directs the FAU Foundation. The result of that matchup is a $100,000 scholarship fund seeded by $50,000 from the Law See FAU on page 21Casino Royale . for your eyes only with your ticket!3rd Annual Casino Night to bene t the Pompano Beach Historical Society.Win two Goodyear Blimp rides! Tickets $100 Call 954-609-7974. Meet you at Galuppi’s Oct. 19 10-20 – Granny’s Attic from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Over 80 vendors selling trinkets and treasures. Admission is free. 954-7864111. Hope to see you there! 10-20 – Walk for Peace at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., at 8 a.m. Cost is $10 for children 18 and under and $12 for adults. The walk promotes self confidence, fitness and tolerance. 754-322-8950. 10-20 – Party in the Patch at the Pink Church from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. Pumpkins, face painting, kids crafts, photo ops, local vendors and more. 954-941-2308. 10-20 – Halloween Horse Show and Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sands and Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Costumed “Horsey Half Time Show,” costume contest, pony rides, mini horses, hay rides, bounce houses, games, pumpkin patch, food and more. 954-786-4507. 10-22 – Senior Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach. Expo will include 85 vendors showcasing products and services catered to seniors. Free admission and parking. Visit www.retirement-times.com or call 754-246-2874. 10-23 – Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 10-23 – Pompano Beach City Commission meeting See SIGHTINGS on page 3

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The Pelican 3 Friday, October 19, 2012 committee. Three companies of the seven that responded to the request for proposal have been recommended by the committee: Brewzii International, Boca Raton; Class Act Restaurant Group, LLC from Hallandale, and Two Together, LLC out of Delray Beach. Depending on the commission’s decision on the 29th, the committee’s recommendation will likely come before them in December. The protest is not the only reason the restaurant will not be operational when the pier opens. The rst proposal issued in June for a restaurant tenant was rejected by the commission, rewritten and readvertised. Based on the new schedule, choosing the restaurateur, negotiating a lease and out tting the dining space, could not have happened by December, according to Purchasing Manager David Santucci. Pier protestContinued from page 1 Scene about town . Broward County Property Appraiser’s Bob Wolfe, State Representative George Moraitis and Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Commissioner Chris Vincent with daughter Paige at Aruba’s during a recent fundraising event. at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 10-23 – Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 10-23 – Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 10-24 – Oakland Park Commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall, 3650 NE 12 SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 7

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4 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 Lighthouse Point – Supporting local business has always been a focus of the LHP Chamber of Commerce. Now the effort is being stepped up with the introduction of “Shop the Point” discount cards that will be mailed to every household. The card makes shoppers eligible for discounts on merchandise, meals and services. According to Chamber President Mike McLain the discounts are being offered to answer an oftasked question: “What is the Chamber doing for me?” Special perks for locals and business owners in LHPMcLain acknowledges that some professionals like himself who work with a nancial brokerage rm, may not be able to come up with offers. But he is encouraging all of his 115 members to participate if they can. The effort is being organized now. McLain plans to have “Shop the Point” cards in the mail to every residence and LHP business owners by Thanksgiving. One of the requirements for Chamber membership here is to either live or have a business in the city. Despite that restriction, the 10-yearold organization, still edging by most Chamber standards, now has 115 members and ‘outsiders’ are constantly asking to join. But, as McClain said “It would easy to get more members. But the rules are clear.” JB’s marks a decade by holding a partyDeer eld Beach JB’s on the Beach, the rst upscale restaurant to be built beachside here, is celebrating 10 years next weekend with three days of food and drink offers and continual entertainment including “The Voice” contestant Laura Vivas. Also in the house, magician John Savarese, longtime radio 105.9 See JB’s on page 5

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The Pelican 5 Friday, October 19, 2012 broadcaster Paul Castronova, musicians “Uproot Hootanny” and “The Resolvers.” A $30 pass buys two for one drinks, a food discount and raf e opportunities for the entire weekend. The festivities begin Friday with a rollout of wines from the Castronova Vineyards and a roast pig barbecue. It continues through Sunday. General Manager Scott Moen, who has been at JB’s helm since the beginning said, “It’s been a good run. I feel lucky we are still here and we look forward to another 10 years.” The weekend pass is available on line at allaccesspass@jbsonthe beach. Proceeds bene t the Lynn Cancer Institute in Boca Raton. JB’sContinued from page 4In Deer eld Beach, the list is longBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Gordon Vatch has been an advocate of this city’s Relay for Life so long his name is synonymous with the event. He was there for the premier of Relay in 2003, chaired the event for three years and remains one of its major movers. “I would never, never leave Relay. It’s part of my life,” Vatch said. Michelle Long was concerned about the rising number of burglaries in the Cove, including two that happened at her home, so she organized a neighborhood watch that is now connected by email with 150 of her neighbors. “I thought we needed better communication. There was a void here,” BSO establishes Community Heroes awardsLong said. Now crime watch signs and an increased police presence let the bad guys know these residents are on alert, Long said. Vatch and Long are two of the citizens honored last week by the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce as “community heroes.” More than ve dozen people were on the list of honorees, many of them deeply involved with improving the lives of children either through giving time or nancial support. Some of those recognized had saving a life to their credit such as the team of re ghters who brought wrestling coach Bob Burns back to life after he went into cardiac arrest at the Deer eld Beach High School gym. They were Battalion Chief Scott Holloway, Lt. David McCluskey, Lt. Bruce Young, Driver Engineer Lance Ambruster, re ghter/paramedics Jennifer Ameerally and Brian Baker. BSO Dep. Kevin Coleman was also in on the save. Some 20 church leaders who have worked with BSO to establish a liaison with the deputies in their area and their members were also given ‘hero’ status at this inaugural meeting that was held at Embassy Suites. Others receiving the handsome crystal plaque were the Citizens on Patrol organization, Avis Swenson for organizing the Coral Manor Neighborhood Watch, businessman Frank Congemi for his signi cant nancial See HEROES on page 16

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6 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 42 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & LettersAmendment Four sounds nice But at what cost?Florida’s Amendment Four, which gives tax breaks to incoming homeowners, caps corporate and non-homestead property assessment growth, and removes “recapture,” was added to the November ballot and comes with it government promises to improve the housing market and add jobs. Don’t believe the hype.Existing homeowners will see a property tax increase By providing a tax rebate to out-of-state and rst time home buyers, local residents will be asked to make up for up to ve percent of the city, county, and hospital district budgets. In Lighthouse Point, property owners may see a tax increase of $30 to $50 dollars, on average, and the city’s levy represents twenty percent of one’s property tax bill. When considering county and hospital levies, residents may see a property tax increase of $150 per year. State legislators are violating home rule for cities and counties Cities and counties, already dealing with shrinking property tax revenue, will be forced to wrestle with smaller budgets or pass tax increases along to residents. In addition to raising property taxes, cities and counties could raise the costs of licenses, permits, and other local fees.Amendment Four extends property tax unfairness caused by Save Our HomesSave Our Homes created wide gaps between what homeowners pay in property taxes based on nothing more than the date you purchased a home. People who bought homes more than fteen years ago already pay half or less in property taxes than those who bought a similarly valued home within the last ve years. This amendment will create another situation where families living in virtually the same house on the same street could pay signi cantly different property tax bills while using no more city or county services than their neighbors. If Amendment Four passes, cities and counties will be forced to decide between increasing taxes or reducing services, without having input into the legislative process, and will extend the existing unfairness built into the property tax system created by Save Our Homes. Ignore the promises of jobs and real estate market growth, and look at the costs of this expensive and unnecessary amendment. We strongly urge everyone to consider the impact of this amendment on your city and county before voting. Becky Lysengen Lighthouse Point City Commissioner and Paul Proia Lighthouse Point Community Appearance Board Member Recently the Pompano Beach Exchange Club hosted its monthly student recognition luncheon at the LHP Yacht Club. Students from six local area high schools were recognized as being the most improved students of the month. The following is a list of schools and students who were honored. The Pompano Beach Exchange Club has been serving the local community for over 55 years with an emphasis on Child Abuse Prevention. The students are Blanche Ely High School, Amanda Jeanmary and Adeyinka Obisanya; Highlands Christian Academy, Kyle Audet and Heather Gray; Zion Lutheran Christian School, Michael Herzig and Caitlin Huiting; Deer eld Beach High School, Luis Cardenas and Angel De Sousa; Coconut Creek High School, Samantha Truong and Albert Dima; Pompano Beach High School, Alexandria L Stuart and Patrick R Sullivan. For more information about the Pompano Beach Exchange Club or to attend a meeting, visit www.exchangeclubofpompanobeach.com Most Improved [Back row] Kyle Audet, Luis Cardenas, Michael Herzig, Albert Dima, Alexandra Stuart, Patrick Sullivan, Angel DeSousa, Jim Balistreri [Front row] Heather Gray, Caitlin Huiting, Amanda Jeanmary, Samantha Truong, Adeyinka Obisanya Local students honored for being “Most Improved” by Exchange ClubThe Pelican urges voters to vote “NO” on this amendment.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, October 19, 2012 Cast Your Advertising Net to 7 Northeast Broward Cities! The Pelican • 954783-8700 Oakland Park – Commissioners have approved an amendment to the city code to require doing business with the city to provide equal bene ts for their employees’ domestic partners and the dependents of domestic partners.New rules for contractors in Oakland ParkThe city extends equal bene ts to employees’ spouses, their dependents and employees’ domestic partners and their dependents. Commissioners also amended the ordinance to change the amount of contracts affected from $200,000 to $100,000 to companies with 25 full-time employees instead of ve. “We are thrilled that you have brought this forward,” said Stratton Pollitzer, deputy director of Equality Florida.SightingsContinued from page 3Ave. 10-25 – Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Chamber of Commerce networking event at Blue Martini in The Galleria Mall, 2432 East Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, from 5 to 8 p.m. One free drink and hors d’oeuvres. Cost is $20 in advance and $25 at the door. RSVP by calling 954-5635454. 10-26 – Halloween Spooktacular from 6 to 9 p.m. at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., Wilton Manors. Costume contest, games, concession stand, giant cake walk, hay ride and pictures with the Great Pumpkin. 10-26 – Trunk or Treat on Halloween Street at 6 p.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 West Atlantic Blvd. Admission is free to the event. Entering a trunk in the See SIGHTINGS on page 13Internet safety workshopFort Lauderdale – NetSmartz, an internet safety workshop by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, will be held at 8:30 a.m. on Monday, Oct. 29 at Christ Church, 4845 NE 25 St. Parents, guardians, educators, law enforcement of cers and children ages 5 to 17 are welcome to attend. The workshop is part of Christ Church School’s Breakfast with Bonham series, topical discussions hosted by Principal Tane Bonham. This seminar will promote two-way conversation between children and adults about online and of ine risks; empower children to help them avoid exploitation and to report victimization to a trusted adult; and teach children how to recognize potential internet risks. To reserve a spot, send an email

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8 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFSeasoned Realtors, Garrett Wayne and James Williams, each has had a 25-year career in real estate sales and property management in the Washington, D.C. area and in South Florida. “Our combined experience plus our association with an internationally famous company like Coldwell Banker means we can give our clients maximum exposure nationally and internationally,” claims James Paul Williams, licensed Realtor and broker associate. The other half of this team is Garrett Wayne who is a licensed Realtor and also licensed in condominium management with a national designation. Operating out of the main Coldwell Banker of ce at 909 E. Las Olas Blvd., the team can offer a client rst rate service. Garrett says, “One of us is always available to answer a client’s needs.” He adds, “This is an ideal time to sell property because interest rates are so attractive, it’s hard to resist becoming a property owner. And inventory is low which means sellers have a wide open opportunity to sell. Prices are beginning to go up, making the market attractive. The season is about to begin. The sun lovers are coming and many will want a property in South Florida. We have buyers looking right now. Sellers should take advantage of this opportunity while it lasts.” “On the other side of the coin,” James adds, “we encourage people wanting to buy to act now because prices are moving up. It’s foolish to wait too long. We advise all of our clients to get prequali ed so that they can act fast and not lose their dream home when they see it. We are happy to guide them through the process.”Coldwell Banker team, Garrett and James Realtors have buyers, sellers, property management services coveredGarrett says, “We have clients who are ready to buy, but not able to occupy yet. For them and all of our clients we offer a complete residential property management service for condominiums, coops, rentals, duplexes and single and multi unit properties. This service is ideal for investors, part time residents or anyone seeking professional management. At Coldwell Banker we realize that you don’t need the additional hassles of trying to rent your own property, manage appliance repairs, check prospective tenant’s credit history or handle three a.m. emergencies. We offer all of these services for a reasonable price.” Asked how business is these days, James says, “After a long period of an unstable economy, the phones are ringing again. All indications are for a positive recovery in the housing market. Because Coldwell is an international See COLDWELL on page 28Democrats meet in PompanoPompano Beach – The North Broward Democratic Club holds its next meeting at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 24. For more information, call 954-783-8232.Local pioneers to be honored at Pioneer Day eventOakland Park – The Broward County Historical Commission celebrates four decades of honoring Broward County pioneers at its 40th Annual Pioneer Day Event on Saturday, Oct. 20 at 2 p.m. at Oakland Park Elementary School, 936 NE 33 St. Among the 29 men and women selected as pioneers are: Oakland Park residents Ira B. Rubinstein, Merceda Edwards Dykes, Robert A. McCarty, Jr and Andrew E. Buchta; Pompano Beach residents James L. Jones and Robert W. Holmes; Deer eld Beach resident Martha L. Butler and Wilton Manors resident Virginia Pearce. The public is welcome at this free event. Call 954-357-5553.Broward Sierra Club MeetingThe Broward Sierra Club meets Nov. 1 at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek at 7:30 p.m. November’s program will feature guest speaker Kenneth Banks, Broward County Natural Resource Specialist IV, who will discuss coral reefs. The free event is open to the public. Call Barbara Curtis 954-946-7359 or emaillegalbarb2@yahoo.comJames Williams and Garrett Wayne pause to show one of their listings. This Realtor team operates out of Coldwell Bankers’ main of ce on Las Olas Boulevard. [Photo courtesy of Williams and Wayne]

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The Pelican 9 Friday, October 19, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – City commissioners gave initial approval Wednesday to an historic preservation ordinance. The vote was 4-0. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue had left the room. The ordinance was proposed to assist with grant applications and to encourage historic preservation and maintenance of historic properties. The city hopes to become eligible for non-matching state grants and will establish an Historic Preservation Board to recommendations on whether a property meets requirements for historic designation. City commissioners will name the board members. To the extent possible, the board must be composed of professionals, who Law will encourage historic preservationhave signi cant working experience/certi cation in architecture, history, architectural history, archaeology, etc. Laypersons with a special interest, experience or knowledge in these elds are eligible only if there aren’t enough professionals available to serve. Commissioner Jed Shank asked for assurance that any property’s designation as historic is voluntary on the part of the property owner. Chris Gratz, senior planner, assured him that it is. To create a historic district, the ordinance requires the majority of property owners in the area agree to request designation. According to the ordinance, all decisions of the Historic Preservation Board can be appealed and reversed by the city commission. Commissioner Shari McCartney said she has concerns about encumbering property rights. “What if the owner of a house designated as historic sells the house?” she asked. Would the new See HISTORIC LAW on page 17Fair in Coconut CreekCoconut Creek – The Women’s Club of Coconut Creek and the City of Coconut Creek will hold its annual fair on Saturday, Nov. 3 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Coconut Creek Government Center, 4800 W. Copans Road. Free admission. Vendors will be selling new and handcrafted items and a homemade quilt will be raf e. Raf e tickets are $1 each or six for $5. There will also be baked goods, refreshments and coffee for sale as well as a food truck. The money raised will go toward scholarships for residents of Coconut Creek. For more information, visit www.coconutcreek.net, email Carolyn @ caprn@att.net or call 954-545-6670. Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700!

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10 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-7838700. Briefs America’s Moms to host garage salePompano Beach – Great deals will be for the taking on Nov. 3 at 701 SE 6 Ave., Pompano Beach. The sale will bene t America’s Moms for Soldiers, a non-pro t group that sends packages overseas to soldiers overseas who normally do not receive mail for a number of reasons, including cost. The sale runs from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Editor’s note: Last week The Pelican pro led Robert Holmes, the other Pompano Beach gentleman designated a Pioneer by Broward County Group. Holmes and James Jones are both educators and friends. They have been neighbors for over 50 years pioneering Pompano Beach together, but because each has a signi cant history, The Pelican decided to give each man space for his own story. James Jones arrived in Pompano in 1956, mathematics degree in hand from Bethune-Cookman College, ready to teach math at Blanche Ely High School He recalls getting off the train at Dixie Highway and what was then Hammondville Road, a dirt road upon which he walked to his cousin’s house where he would stay. James Jones, retired principal of Blanche Ely High School to become a Broward County Pioneer tomorrow “I had been a teacher intern at Blanche Ely the year before and was pleased to have a job in this farming community. My students all helped on farms after school and on weekends. Ours was a totally segregated community. Everyone seemed to be involved in churches, and I joined them. I have been involved with Antioch Missionary Baptist Church for many years, serving as a deacon, trustee board chairman and nancial director.” “When I turned 80, I made up my mind to be supportive, but no longer take leadership roles. Young people must begin to take over. We’ve trained many capable men and women. They are doing good jobs in the church community and city.” He continues, “The changes in this city are phenomenal. We’ve grown from a farming town to a metropolitan city. I have stayed in my rst neighborhood by choice because I have spent most of my rewarding and ful lling adult life here and I have stayed to give back. The people I have had the opportunity to work with, mainly students, have grown and many are now ne contributing neighbors and residents giving their time and talents as we did. I have enjoyed being a role model to these young people and in turn I believe I have impacted their lives in a positive way. I know they have had a positive in uence in my life.” He says things have improved for the African Americans in Pompano Beach. “We are very much a part of our city’s government A young James Jones [Left] began his career in education as a math teacher at Ely High School in 1956. He retired in 1992 as principal of the school. He has been honored as Ely Teacher of the Year and Man of the Year in 2009 by the Pompano City Commission. [Photos courtesy of James L. Jones] Pictured here with the late E. Pat Larkins, former mayor of Pompano Beach, Jones knew Larkins when he was president of the Ely Student Council. He saw promise in Larkins, supported his political campaigns and saw Larkins rise to become a powerful leader in the city. See JONES on page 9National College Fair Fort Lauderdale – The Greater Fort Lauderdale National College Fair takes place Thursday, Nov 1 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 5 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fort Lauderdale/ Broward County Convention Center, 1950 Eisenhower Blvd. The college fair allows students and parents to meet one-on-one with over 250 representatives from colleges and universities across the country. In addition to browsing the college and university booths, students will have the opportunity to attend information workshops designed to make the college transition a little easier. These workshops will be geared towards parents as well. Students can register for a barcode at Browardschools. com/collegefair or call 754321-2119.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, October 19, 2012 The Pelican! 954-783-8700 and we are represented as a district. The CRA is nally acting and it’s a beginning. We’ve seen some improvements in our community, but not as fast as we’d like. The plans sound good. I’m eager to see them become a reality. We must be patient, but that’s not easy because we’ve been patient for a long time.” Currently, I’m a walker. I walk three miles three times a week with Commissioner Poitier who is a former student and one of many I am very proud of.” Jones began his professional career as an educator with the Broward County School Board under the leadership of the esteemed Mrs. Blanche Ely. He says, “During my time at Ely, my growth was immense. I chaired the mathematics department, served as student council advisor, faculty chairperson, of cer of the assistant administrative council and became Teacher of the Year. My 12 years at Blanche Ely shaped my educational philosophy in subsequent leadership positions. While there I earned a Master of Education degree in Guidance and Counseling from Florida Atlantic University.” Jones went on to become guidance director at Everglades Middle School, Dean of Boys at Plantation High School, assistant principal at Pompano Beach High School and in 1980 he became principal at Ely High School where he remained until retirement in 1992. He became the longest tenure principal at Blanche Ely, exceeded only by the school’s founder, Mrs. Blanche General Ely. In those 12 years, Jones supervised the infusion of students from Pompano Beach High School which was closed, helped develop and implement Ely’s magnet program, increased academic and athletic scholarships and was honored to have the school auditorium named after him. After retiring, he established the James L. Jones Scholarship Fund and subsequently awarded 24 scholarships to deserving students. While serving on Pompano’s Education Advisory Board, he helped to advance the city’s Blanche Ely Scholarship program for academically disadvantaged students from a two year to a four year program. In 2009, he was honored to be recognized as Man Of The Year by the Pompano City Commission. Jones has been married to Thelma Black Jones for 50 years. Their daughter, Angella Jones Vann is a department planning administrator with the city of West Palm Beach. He says “Life has been a rewarding and ful lling journey for me.” And now he can add Broward County Pioneer to his long list of impressive titles. Congratulations and thank you for impacting so many lives with your shared knowledge and energy. Jones’ service record is legend• 13 years Pompano Beach Charter Review Board • 8 years Education Advisory Board Chair • 15 year member of Pompano Community Development Advisory Bd. • 6 years Pompano Police and Fire ghters’ Pension Board • Chair of Broward County Charter Review Commission 1994-95 • 6 years Professional Standards Bd., Broward County Sheriff’s Dept. • Member Kiwanis Club, founder Tiger’s Roar Club • Eta Nu Chapter, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. JonesContinued form page 8

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12 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – When King Wilkinson travels with his kegs it’s time for Taste of the Island. “Every year we bring in at least half a keg more. We’re bringing four kegs of Bud Light this year,” said Wilkinson, owner of Red’s Bar. For Wilkinson and his bar staff, the trip is short and so is the life of the beer he brings. “We don’t even shut the tap off. They drink ‘em faster than we can put them out there.” Wilkinson and dozens of other area bar and restaurant proprietors will be serving up Seven years later, Taste of the Island is still a premier eventsome of their best beverages and menu items at the 7th Annual Taste of the Island on Monday, Nov. 5 at Richardson Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, from 6 to 9 p.m. “It’s an outdoor evening of food and libations in Wilton Manors,” said Krishan Manners, Taste of the Island board member. “The event features and introduces bars and restaurants to the surrounding area.” So far, about 34 businesses including Whole Foods, Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt, Humpy’s Pizza, Rosie’s Bar and Grill, The Alibi, The Melting Pot and Nuts About Yogurt have all jumped on board; some for their rst year of the Taste, some as veterans of the culinary occasion. “We’re still taking restaurants at this point,” said Manners. Returning for its third year is Shawn and Nick’s Courtyard Caf. And along with their fried green tomatoes, Courtyard’s owners are frying up Oreos and bringing out the pineapple basil gelato from their other Wilton Drive business, Gelato Station. The Oreos, tomatoes and gelato were all a big hit at last year’s Taste and Nick Berry, co-owner of Courtyard Caf, expects the same popularity this year. The fried Oreos are a Berry family recipe and the fried green tomatoes are something he brought back from Georgia a few years ago. “We’re not the Jenny Craig of The Drive. We’re about comfort food. Just good oldfashioned comfort food,” he said. And for Berry, comfort food and Taste of the Island are much the same. “It’s just an awesome thing to do that unites both gay and straight and brings everyone together for a family event. It’s just a real warm feeling when you have this event.” Along with giving local bars and restaurants a chance to addict some new customers to their menus, Taste of the Island also bene ts local organizations. The Kiwanis Club, Historical Society, Leisure Services Department and the Wilton Manors Development Alliance, or WMDA, all receive a portion of the money raised. The Friends of the Library receives money generated from the silent auction. “Last year, we each received $3,500,” said Manners, who also serves as president and CEO of WMDA. “It’s substantial for us,” said Manners about the money. “We look forward to that check on an annual basis. See TASTE on page 13

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The Pelican 13 Friday, October 19, 2012 Last year was the most we’ve ever received and we hope to grow it this year.” Tickets are $30 in advance and $35 at the door. Tickets can be purchased at www. tasteoftheisland.org or at the following locations: Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive; Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive; Barton & Miller Cleaners, 2600 N. Dixie Hwy., WMDA, 2164 Wilton Drive and the Wilton Manors Library, 500 NE 26 St. Silent auction prizes include: four all day Water Taxi passes, $50 gift certi cate to Big City Tavern, $25 gift card to Cheesecake Factory, two admission passes to Museum of Discovery & Science, four passes to Jungle Island, a family pass to Monkey Jungle and two passes to the Improv Comedy Club in West Palm Beach. TasteContinued from page 12 decorating contest is $5. 954-786-4111. 10-26 & 27 – Book sale at the Oakland Park Library, SightingsContinued from page 71298 NE 27 St. from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 26 and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Oct. 27. 954-6304370. 10-26 – Democrat Maria Sachs and Republican Ellyn Bogdanoff debate issues for state senate District 34] election at 7:30 a.m. at Blue Moon, 4405 West Tradewinds Ave., Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Cost for breakfast is $20. Call 954-776-1000. 10-27 & 28 – Arts and Crafts Show at Pelican Square, east end of Commercial Boulevard, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. Event is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. 954776-1000. 10-27 & 28 – Arts and Crafts Show at Pelican Square, east end of Commercial Boulevard, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. Event is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. 954776-1000. 10-27 – Broward Sheriff’s Office will hold its Sheriff’s Community Day at The Pride Center, 2040 N. Dixie Hwy., Wilton Manors, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free child fingerprinting, K-9 and police gear demonstrations. 954-8318900. 10-27 – Falloween and Trunk or Treat from 5 to 9 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. Kids costume contest, magic show, crafts, music, bounce house, trick or treating, interactive stage show and trunk decorating contest. See SIGHTINGS on page 18

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14 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFRemember when people whispered, “It’s the Big C?” The Big C was always cancer, a word that implied a hopeless prospect. That was then. In 1985, Relay for Life was founded in Washington State. The public decided to shake out the shame and shine a light on hope. Research was on the rise. In 2003, Pompano Beach hosted its rst Relay for Life and became part of the largest fundraiser for the American Cancer Society, or ACS. The Relay event consists of a night of walking, feasting, sharing and talking about cancer. Relay has since raised more than $374 million since its inception. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and the main reason for all that pink stuff going on around town. And all those pink tee shirts, police cars, newspapers and posters aren’t alone. Even the Queen of England gave her nod to bathe Buckingham Palace in pink lights to launch this year’s awareness month. Lighthouse Point Commissioner Sandy Johnson, a breast cancer survivor, lost her mother to breast cancer 40 years ago. Johnson was one of the early people to support Relay for Life. “Relay for Life has made enormous strides in cancer research. I’m a survivor. My mother wasn’t. Research made the difference for me.” She adds that ACS volunteers, most of them survivors, came to her side when she had her surgery several years ago. “A woman came to me in the hospital to see if I needed any help. She held my hand and asked me if I needed to cry. She was the sweetest woman. A week later when I was home, another volunteer rang my doorbell and wanted to show me some Breast Cancer Month focuses attention on a dreaded disease exercises that I needed to do. It’s a phenomenal network.” Diane Hurwit learned in her 60s that she had breast cancer. She lost her breasts in 2007, thought it was all over and in 2010 the cancer returned to her chest cavity. Today, Hurwit is a survivor, a H E A L HEAL T T H To breathe easy, take in the air at Salt SuitesBy Carol RomanoPELICAN WRITERFrom the salt mines of 19th century Poland and the depths of the Dead Sea comes a fascinating turn on an ancient method of healing known as Halotherapy. Now it is available in South Florida. According to the owners of Salt Suite, Jessica and Elliot Holmer, salt, when processed by a Halogenerator to the nth degree and circulated into a soothing, dimly lit retreat, gives relief to those with respiratory or dermatological conditions. The Holmers, who imported 24,000 tons of Dead Sea salt, opened their unique spa almost a year ago and have already developed a loyal and enthusiastic clientele. StatePoint News Not all American children get regular doses of fresh air. A 2012 report published in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that only about half of U.S. preschoolers are taken outside to walk or play daily. And older kids aren’t faring much better, say experts. Too much time inside contributes to obesity, attention problems, hyperactivity and lack of appreciation for the earth’s resources. By taking kids outside regularly to explore nature, you can help them get physical activity and connect to the world. From building bird feeders to camping, discover together what makes the outdoors great. Project Learning Tree, a non-pro t environmental education program, has great tips for family activities on its website to get you started. Visit www.plt.org/outdoors for ideas.Too much time indoors is bad for kids’ healthSalt Suite3 100 South Federal Hwy. #3 Delray Beach 561-316-7258 The couple rst heard of this therapy from a friend in California who had enjoyed its bene ts. Wanting to take a new turn in their life path, and eager to do something that brought goodness to others, the Holmers researched salt therapy and soon decided they wanted to work in the eld. Jessica is a native Floridian while Elliot hails from Vermont. The Sunshine State won out over Vermont and the Holmers moved back here and found a perfect spot for The Salt Suites in the bright yellow complex at 3100 S. Federal Highway, Delray Beach. Entering the spa doorway the rst thing one sees, through a giant picture window, is the children’s room where the deep salt on the oor, the sealife mural on one wall and the brightlycolored beach toys give the illusion of a giant sandbox. But it’s salt, not sand on the oors, and the walls are made of salt. Salt air is being ltered into the room so little ones can play to their hearts content while getting therapy for allergies or skin conditions such as eczema. Watched over by their accompanying adult, the children spend 45 -minute sessions in the healing environment. While there is a charge for the child, there is no charge for the adult care taker, so mom can bask in the beach-like See SALT SUITE on page 17 Diane Hurwit chairs the survivor and caretaker laps. She is seeking names of people in the community who should be honored.See RELAY FOR LIFE on page Clients bring white socks to make it through the small desert of salt and reach their comfortable chairs. Once seated, relaxation takes over.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, October 19, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – The romance and mystery of barefoot mailman James Hamilton, who lost his life at the Hillsboro Inlet, inspired local history-makers to have his statue overlooking the Inlet recast at a cost of about $30,000. The original sculptor, Frank Varga, did the work and funds were raised to pay him by former mayor Carmen McGarry and members of the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society, or HLPS. This week, Mayor Dan Dodge said $7,000 is still needed to pay for the restoration and he suggested donations would be welcome. In other news concerning the lighthouse, the HLPS has taken over its maintenance from the Coast Guard. HLPS President Art Makenian said The life of James “Ed” Hamilton was remembered this month in a proclamation presented by Hillsboro Beach Mayor Dan Dodge (l) to Art Makenian, president of the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society. Hamilton, one of the barefoot mailmen who trudged the beaches of South Florida delivering the mail, was presumed drowned at the Hillsboro Inlet in 1887. The mayor proclaimed Oct. 11, James Hamilton Day. Two statues, one at Hillsboro Town Hall and the other at the Inlet, also commemorate Hamilton.Donations needed to pay for Barefoot Mailman repairshe anticipates the annual budget will be $25,000, money that comes from membership dues and donations to the Society. “Every penny donated will go to maintenance,” he said. “And it is only a matter of time before the Coast Guard is out of there.” The service currently uses cottages on the site for R&R. Makenian said he will propose to Broward County that the lighthouse be designated as a national monument. In the meantime, volunteers are now doing some refurbishment of the structure. Tours for the public will continue. The next one is Saturday, Oct. 13 and Hamilton will be remembered at a brief ceremony.RMA lands contract for planning services in Hillsboro BeachHillsboro Beach – Commissioners have chosen Redevelopment Management Associates over three other bidders this week for the town’s planning services. The rm, headed by Chris Brown and Kim Briesemeister, See HILLSBORO on page 27

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16 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 support, John DiPrato, Driver’s Alert Program; Judy Stanich, DB Cultural committee; Alex Leon, Steve Collazo and Butch Santy for their work with the Police Athletic League; BSO Sgt. Craig Brown, Sgt. Valerie Devlin, Det. Neil Munson and Det. Frank Canales for contributions to Special Olympics; Jan Moran from the Jim Moran Foundation and Kim Bentley from the JM Family Enterprises, City Commissioner Ben Preston for his work with kids in Dist. 2; Roxanne Liddiard and Joy Surrusco from the Dart Foundation, Lucio and Joan Giambattista of SAHL Group, Barry and Renee Honig and their charitable foundation, Derek Schwartz of The Schwartz Group, Dr. Jennifer O’Flannery – Anderson with the FAU Foundation, the Deer eld Kiwanis club and Deer eld Rotary Club for their donations to youth programs and BSO deputies Chad Dunham, Harold Morrison and Lamar Williams.HeroesContinued from page 5 Lighthouse Point Curves of Lighthouse Point, a women’s tness club, is celebrating its second anniversary by waiving the joining fee for anyone joining during the month of October. Check out the club and start your success story getting in shape for the holidays. In September, members completed pledges showing the strength they’ve gained at Curves and that they have no limits including the First Annual Curves of Lighthouse Point Triathlon. Curves is a facility specially designed for women featuring a complete 30 minute workout and weight management program that is fun, fast and safe. Curves works every major muscle group with a complete 30minute workout that combines strength training and sustained cardiovascular activity through safe and effective hydraulic resistance. Curves also works to help women lose weight, gain muscle strength and aerobic capacity, and raise metabolism with its groundbreaking, scienti cally proven method that ends the need for perpetual dieting. Curves of Lighthouse Point has participated in local health fairs and charity walks and Making Strides against Breast Cancer. Curves mission is to strengthen women. Come check out the club this month, take advantage of the waived joining fee and start your healthier life. For more information please contact us at 954-783-2900.Curves of Lighthouse Point waives joining fee for new members in celebration of its second year

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The Pelican 17 Friday, October 19, 2012Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com atmosphere and enjoy its bene ts “Salt is a natural antibiotic,” explains Jessica,” and deeply breathing it clears the sinus, creates mucus to clear the bronchi and rids the body of various toxins. lt has natural antibiotic and anti-in ammatory properties that act positively in the sinuses and respiratory system.” Salt therapy near the shores of the Dead Sea has been used for thousands of years. But its medicinal qualities to light in Europe when a Polish health of cial, Felix Bochkovsky, observed that miners working in the salt mines rarely came down with respiratory illnesses. So he created salt caves to which people ocked to breath in the purifying air. Today, Halotherapy is used in health facilities all over Europe often in conjunction with the inhaling of the fragrance of pine trees. The Holmers have brought this therapy into our area with a luxurious salon where the visitor relaxes, can listen to music, read or dream away the 45minute session in serene contemplation. The therapy room is dimly lit by salt lamps glowing against the pristine salt walls. According to the book of testimonials in the waiting area, clients feel totally relaxed and leave their sessions feeling cleansed and energized. But Salt Suites offers more than the quiet therapy of its treatment room. Halo Yoga classes allow clients to practice yoga in a unique studio where the Halogenerator lters in the salt air. Hatha yoga, Tao yoga, Tai Chi, Yin and breath work classes are all offered on week days with the exception of Wednesday. Saturday classes are also available. Usually the rst class is offered with a discount. Prices for Halotherapy range from $45 for a single session [the rst session is complimentary] to monthly fees that range from $250 for one month to a sixmonth membership at $150 a month. Memberships include yoga sessions. Children’s sessions range from $35 per session to a 15-session package at $300. Memberships for the young set sell from $175 for one month to $115 monthly with a six-month commitment. Siblings are offered a 50 percent discount. All levels allow one session daily. Sessions are by appointment only. Looks like sand, but it’s all sea salt on the oor, walls and ceiling. Children enjoy the room and play with the salt as if they were at the beach.Salt SuiteContinued from pag owner have to keep that designation? The ordinance provides for an appeal before the Historic Preservation Board or the commission. The designation also may be rescinded if the resource no longer retains its historical signi cance due to permitted alterations or extensive damage caused by re or storm. The ordinance also provides for a procedure to request approval to relocate or demolish a historic resource and includes a process to provide tax incentives to preserve a historic property. Applications for these incentives can only be approved by the city commission. Shank said he is troubled by the tax incentives and concerned about administrative costs to review them. “Preserving history is what creates the character of a community,” said Susan Gillis, an Oakland Park resident and consultant to historical agencies. She heartily endorsed the ordinance, noting it gives property owners an incentive to stay in the community and gives the city a chance to embrace a new planning tool. Historic lawContinued from page

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18 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Visit www.oaklandparkfl.org or call 954-630-4500. 10-31 – Monster Concert at The Pink Church at 7 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. Audience members are encouraged to wear Halloween costumes as church members play “haunting harmonies” on the Great Pipe Organ. 954-9412308. 11-3 – Self defense class at Jarvis Hall, located next to city hall, 4501 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, at 11 a.m. Cost is $75 per person. Three-hour long course. 954548-2578. 11-6 – Deerfield Beach Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. 11-10 – Wilton Manors Yard Sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. Free to the public. Cost to vendors is $20 for residents and $25 for nonresidents for an area the size of a parking space. Multiple spaces can be rented. 954390-2130. 11-10 – Wilton Manors Friends of the Library Book Tent from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. A wide selection of books and audio and video materials will be available. 954-566-9019. FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-7863274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the first and third SightingsContinued from page 13 See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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The Pelican 19 Friday, October 19, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news or special events! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954783-8700 to Traveling Vietnam MemorialFort Lauderdale – The traveling three-quarter scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., is on display Today, Oct. 19 through Oct. 21 at Forest Lawn South Funeral Home, 2401 Davie Road in Fort Lauderdale. The memorial is dedicated to the veterans of the Vietnam War and honors all U.S. servicemen and women. The tribute begins at 9 a.m. with a continuous reading of all the names inscribed on the memorial and closes each day at dusk. A variety of musical performances will provide entertainment throughout each day. A Broward County Veterans Services’ of cer will be in attendance to assist veterans with any questions they may have regarding veterans bene ts on Friday, 9 a.m. to noon, and on Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, visit www. broward.org/ElderVets or call Broward County Elderly and Veterans Services at 954-3576622. Early voting sitesBroward – The Supervisor of Elections Office has selected sites across the county to serve as early voting locations from Oct. 27 through Nov. 3 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd.; Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive; Art Serve, 1350 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale and the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Blvd., Pompano Beach and the Northwest Regional Library, 3151 University Drive, Coral Springs, were among the sites chosen. To see a full list of early voting sites, visit www. browardsoe.org or call 954357-7050.

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20 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com a speaker and most recently a volunteer for the Pompano Beach Relay for Life. She chairs the caregiver and survivor walks at Community Park in Pompano Beach, on May 17 and 18, 2013. Survivors of cancer, draped with purple sashes, take the rst lap. That lap is followed by caregivers, who receive their white sashes from survivors. Laps, activity and open conversations continue throughout the night. “It’s an 18-hour overnight journey,” says Jesse Brooks, community representative of the ACS. Pompano Beach Commissioner Charlotte Burrie, who has lost family members to cancer, says she was happy to take on the chair position. “I want everyone in the city to help me. I need civic clubs and churches and other groups to form teams to raise funds for research.” Teams raise money through garage sales, bake sales or any means to cover the $100 for each team member. Brooks says the group has monthly parties to mark team goals. Dianna Jaffe, another survivor, will chair the luminaria drive at the event this May. Jaffe explains that luminaries, candles placed in paper bags, will line the relay walk. The candles are meant to honor those who have survived cancer and those who have been lost to cancer. “At my condominium,” Jaffe says, “We have a close group that cooks out once a week. Out of the 12 of us, four were diagnosed with cancer. That’s one-third of our little group.” Jaffe has another friend, a man, who was diagnosed with breast cancer over 20 years ago. His wife found the lump. “He’s ne today,” says Jaffe, “But men need to know they can get breast cancer.” Jaffe says she feels like her old self again. She was busy getting a pedicure when The Pelican caught up with her. These women, Johnson, Hurwit, Burrie, Brooks and Jaffe, through help from their husbands, friends and family members, represent the millions of men and women who stand up against this disease. Now they want everyone to stand with them. Every Relay for Life is different. Some people come with tents to spend the night, always having a member of their team walking around a track to symbolize that cancer never sleeps. Some people bring entertainment. Some come to walk one lap, visit and go home. The dynamic of each Relay for Life team is changed with every new team member. Families, singles, church groups, civic clubs and more are invited to join a team. “The luminary walk is so emotional. It’s not something a person could ever forget. Everyone of those candles has a story to tell,” said Johnson. There are many ways to help Relay for Life meet its goal of $52,000. Last year the teams came close with a little more than $40,000. Sponsors always help teams meet their goals, and Burrie is looking for some. To nd out how to purchase a luminaria [$5 or whatever a person can afford] or to form a team, call Jessie Brooks at The American Cancer Society, 954-200-7536. Relay for LifeContinued from page 18

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The Pelican 21 Friday, October 19, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Enforcement Trust Fund and matched by the Foundation. Each year, two students will be selected for the fouryear scholarships until there are eight kids in the university. Certain criteria will apply – grades, community servicein selecting the students. In acknowledging the partnership FAU President Mary Jane Saunders said, “This will change lives. “No one else has reached out [in this way]. I am proud of your leadership. This is what public education is all about.”Green market under private management: Opens Nov. 4 Deer eld Beach -The city has stepped out of the green market business and has contracted with Emily Lilly to operate the event. Lilly has operated a farmers’ market in Boca Raton for 18 years and is a member of the Palm Beach County Green Market Coalition. Per her agreement with the city, Lilly will hold a green market in the Cove Shopping Center every Sunday beginning Nov. 4, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will handle vendors, entertainment and promotion. Emphasis will be on organic and farm grown produce, homemade crafts, gourmet foods, fresh dairy, meat, poultry and seafood, baked goods, plants, owers, specialty beverages, baked goods and organic home and garden items. The market will run through Apr. 28.A good example of privatizationDeer eld Beach – The city saved $90,000 last year working with a private company to maintain its vehicles. In supporting the renewal of the contract between Genuine Parks Company and NAPA Miami, Chad Grecseke, assistant environmental services director, told the commission Tuesday that NAPA had also purchased some of the city’s unused parts. He complimented the work of Alan Severese, who manages the city’s eet. Said Vice Mayor Bill Ganz, “This is smart, out of the box thinking… this is how private – public partnerships can work.”FAUContinued from page 2 Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096. The Deerfield Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deerfield Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak. com or 954-781-0073 for rates. SightingsContinued from page 18

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22 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds work for you! 954-783-8700! HELP WANTED AFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26COURT ORDERA COMPLAINT has been presented to this County by the Plaintiff JEANE CRISTINE JORGE seeking SUPPORT, CUSTODY AND VISITATION. You are required to serve upon plaintiff – attorney for plaintiff JEANE CRISTINE JORGE, PRO SE whose address is 10 LISCOMB STREET # 3 – 4 WORCESTER, MA. 01604 your answer on or before SEPTEMBER 4, 2012. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to le a copy of your answer in the of ce of the Register of this court at Worcester Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Suite 2001 Worcester, Ma 01608. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA – I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid – Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 10-19 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 10-19 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees – Landscape – Yard Fill – Pressure Wash – Roofs – Home Repairs – Welding – Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 10-26 RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL CLEANING IN Pompano – Lighthouse Point – Deer eld. Dependable – Thorough – Experienced. References. Call Ana 954-6924691. 10-26 EXPERIENCED DRIVER AVAILABLE! “TO & FROM STORES” “DOCTORS” “APPOINTMENTS” “AIRPORT’’, ETC. CALL MARYANN 954-895-3202. GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – Love To Clean Windows! Refrigerators, Ovens. No Problem. FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266/ 11 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 10-26 MISS PATTY’S ERRAND SERVICE!! Will Pick Up & Deliver Your Groceries To Your Condo Or Home. Please Call 954-691-7816. 10-19 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915.BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 11-2 WAREHOUSE SALEANNUAL WAREHOUSE SAMPLE SALE!! Wholesale manufacture of ladies clothing selling samples, overruns and closeouts. Specialty design apparel; Bling Bling bejeweled look. Selling single pieces and entire boxes of samples. Great pricing, 75% to 85% off original cost. Cash and credit cards accepted. Resellers welcome. Friday October 26th, 10am-4pm. 1301 W Copans Rd. Ste E7, Pompano Beach, FL 33064. 1-800-438-5677 ext. 26. MEDICALHOSPITAL BED – Heavy Duty Bariatric Wide Full Size For Up To 500lbs With Side Rails & Remote Control. $1,000 OBO. PICK-UP ONLY. 561-731-3174 Leave Message! Boynton Beach. 10-19 SHARE TOWNHOUSETAMARAC – Share Newly Renovated 3 / 2 Townhome. Professional Or Retired Female. $600 Per Month Plus Utilities. Call 954-618-3003 Or 401-215-7271. 10-19 SEASONAL RENTALPOMPANO BEACH 2 / 2 Condo – Island Club – Federal Hwy. 9th Floor Corner Apt. Beautiful Views. Nicely Furnished. All Amenities. $2,000 Month. 954785-0177. 10-26

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The Pelican 23 Friday, October 19, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. DUPLEXESPOMPANO BEACH E OF Federal Hwy. 2/1 – Enclosed Porch W/Washer & Dryer. Central Air. New Tile Floors. No Pets $1,100 Mo. 954-8229395. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH “THE CLARIDGE” Large Updated 2 / 2 Corner Penthouse – Ocean – Intracoastal & City Views! Washer / Dryer In Unit. Impact Glass. $498,500. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. Please Call 954-803-4174. 10-19 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 11-9CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2 / 1 Pool! Sunroom – Ground Floor, Beautifully Furnished. On Golf Course. $750 Mo. 1 Year +. Good Credit. 917-5440771. 10-26 POMPANO 1 / 1.5 UPDATED 1st Floor. Screened Patio. Community Pool. Small Waterfront Complex. $1,200 Month. Dockage Available For Rent. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. Please Call 954-803-4174. 10-19 LIGHTHOUSE PT 2 / 1.5 ---1st Floor – 55+. Pool, Unfurnished. Laundry Facilities. $895 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano – Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-5624919. 10-26 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT IT’S BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like You’re On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner – Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. 10-19 LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf – By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 10-19 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 10-19 POMPANO 1 / 1 APT. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 10-19 POMPANO BEACH STUDIO – 2 Blocks From Beach!! Quiet!! Utilities Included. A / C. Outdoor Patio. $675 Month. Call For Information 954-5923595. 10-26 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – 2/1 $750 NW – NE 1/1 $675 2/1 $950 – 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App MovU-In. 954-781-6299. POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W / D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 10-19 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/Unfurnished. $650 $850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954--610-2327. 10-26 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-868-5560 Wayne. 10-19 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Season. 500’ To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 11-2 BOX BOLD POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 11-2 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 10-19

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24 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@yahoo. com working hard to improve their business and make Pompano a better place.” This year’s honorees are: Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher, receiving the Stewart Kester Award; Isle Casino General Manager Rob Wyre, receiving the Business Man Award; Broward College North Campus President Barbara Bryan, Ph.D., receiving the Business Woman Award and Merritt’s Boat and Engine Works owners Roy and Allen Merritt, receiving the Founders Award. The Stewart Kester Award is named after a longtime community leader who died in 2008. The Founders Award is given each year to a recipient who has been in the community a long time and has “always been a part of the community, always giving to the community,” said Leila Moavero, chair of the awards ceremony. Allen Merritt founded Merritt’s Boat and Engine Works in 1948 and he’s been on the same 10-acre piece of Pompano land ever since. His family business has grown in size and strength. “They’ve always been huge in the community,” said Moavero. Roy Merritt, Allen’s son, said his family doesn’t donate to everything but where and when they can. “Whatever it takes. There are different things around you just donate to.” This year’s Lights of the Community Awards, part of the Shining Stars event, will be given to the Brazilian Business Group, State Rep. Gwyn Clarke-Reed, entertainer Bill Jaycox, Lighthouse Point Police Chief Ross Licata, Sample-McDougald House volunteer Margaret White and Starworks Motorsport Race Team Driver Peter Baron. Of all this year’s award recipients, Baron’s service to Pompano may be the most unique. “He’s at these international races and he still promotes Pompano. He promotes Pompano at every race he goes to,” said Moavero. Tickets for the Shining Stars event are $45 for individuals. Table sponsorships are available for $425. To RSVP, call 954-941-2940. Past honorees include: Calvin Glidewell, director of Imperial Point Hospital, for reaching out to the community in Pompano; Mary Phillips, president of the new Small Business & Economic Development Corp., for starting her small business organization; Major William H. Knowles, Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, for his involvement in raising money for earthquake victims in Haiti and Lisa Hamburg, for spearheading the creation of the city’s dog park and Phyllis J. Neuberger for her weekly stories in The Pelican spotlighting local volunteers. Shining StarsContinued from page 1

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26 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Send your fishing news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSI have been wanting to change it up a bit on the art side. I paint lots of sword sh bills as well as lots of medium sized paintings for private collectors and boat owners. But I have been itching to do some large pieces. I really just haven’t had the time to invest into these larger projects. In the past I have, on numerous occasions, bought canvases with the intent on doing these large pieces. Unfortunately, they begin to collect dust as I start other projects. I guess I am afraid RJ Boyle captures giant sword sh on canvas entitled “Spooky Calm” See PAINTING on page 27RJ Boyle knows how to capture sh, both on and off the water.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, October 19, 2012 directs two community redevelopment agencies in Pompano Beach and is the planning consultant for Oakland Park, Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, Dania Beach and Delray Beach. RMA was selected over Calvin Giordano and Associates, Michelle Melbourne, and Walter Keller. Keller has been the town planner since 1989 and in making his presentation said he never charged a retainer and would be happy to make whatever changes the commission thought necessary. He recently moved his company from Coral Springs to Sewell’s Point in Stuart, but said it would not affect his work with the town. Keller had the support of Commissioner Jim Lambert who said, “If we have had no complaints, there is no reason to change. Is someone unhappy with Walter’s work?” Mayor Dan Dodge cited poor response times from Keller and said, “Change can be good. This is an opportunity to save on the rates passed on to residents. There will be some major impacts here in the near future and an opportunity to give fresh eyes to situations . there are going to challenges.” In making his presentation, Brown said, “Cities hire us to make change, to make their cities more livable, more beautiful. We are not interested in just processing. “ One of the cornerstones of Brown’s 25-year career in planning is the redevelopment of Atlantic Boulevard in Delray Beach RMA will charge the city $100 an hour for its services. Much of the planning costs are passed through to the applicants in charges for plan review and permitting. HillsboroContinued from page 15meaningful volunteer work. Registration and schedule info is at hoofers.floridatrail. org or call 954-609-4727 or 954-658-8386. Happy Hoofers and those interested are invited to the Florida Trail Association 30th Annual South Regional Conference Nov. 2 through Nov. 4 at at the Tanah Keeta Boy Scout Camp at 8501 SE Boy Scout Road., Tequesta. Camp sites, dorm rooms and cabins are available as well as sites for RV trailers. Activities include: guided nature hikes with certified Florida Master Naturalists, canoeing/kayaking on the Loxahatchee river, presentations on invasive plant management, native wildlife, edible bugs, and edible native plants; hands on learning to carve a hiking stick and proper trail maintenance. Contra dancing, stargazing, campfire, “wuz-Nu” raffle and silent auction are part of the event. Everyone is welcome. The Florida Trail Association develops, maintains, protects and promotes a network of hiking trails throughout the state, including the unique Florida National Scenic Trail. Together with partners the group provides opportunities for the public to hike, engage in outdoor recreation, participate in environmental education and contribute to Trail group conference set in Tequesta Nov. 2 to start the canvas just to walk away halfway through the painting. Painting is like being on an emotional roller coaster. You go through phases of the painting where you are starting and you straggle with wondering if you want to continue. You hope nobody walks in and sees where you are at that point in the painting. Other times, it starts to take shape and your excitement begins to rise as you see success in the near future. Believe it or not, painting is really emotional and really plays on your mind. This painting is six feet high and is painted in acrylics. The painting is called “Spooky Calm” and it is painted to look a little aged. It harkens back to those days long ago when giant sh roamed the oceans without intervention. It also feels dreamlike for me. It has that surreal feeling wondering if a sh like that is out there waiting for me. None the less, I love artwork and doing paintings. If you get a chance, stop by the shop and see some interesting large paintings. PaintingContinued from page 26

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28 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-783company, we have many foreign investors showing active interest in our market.” Garrett reminds readers, that their team offers a free home value and market analysis. “Most sellers are unsure of the true values of their properties. Our analysis is not a guessing game, because there is so much information readily available. “We do a complete review of county tax records plus a comprehensive study of comparable properties that are listed and have sold in the surrounding areas of the buyers/sellers’ property. We come up with a realistic selling price.” Here’s what a few clients have to say about the Garrett James team: Ian Norris says, “Garrettt was able to bridge the gap between us and the seller and bring the entire transaction to a favorable resolution. We now own a parcel of land in Fort Lauderdale where we will be building our new corporate headquarters.” The Pelican spoke with Kenan Packman in New York who is a property management client of Garrett’s. Packman said, “We love our Florida second home and try to visit often. However, we are so far away we are happy to have a professional like Garrett handling a lot of things in our absence. “He makes sure our pool and yard maintenance is done correctly, handles the security systems, checks the property after friends have used it for visits, and supervises occasional upgrades. It’s reassuring to know your second home is being well cared for.” For further information Contact Garrett Wayne at 786-303-2222 or James Paul Williams at 954-612-3295.ColdwellContinued from page 8

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Friday, October 19, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 42 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican 39 days left in 2012 Hurricane season October is Breast Cancer awareness month October is Domestic Violence awareness month Chamber to honor Shining Stars WednesdayBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach On Wednesday, Oct. 24, the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce will recognize its 2012 Shining Stars. The Shining Star Awards Luncheon will be held from 12 to 2 p.m. at Hillsboro Club, 901 Hillsboro Mile, Hillsboro Beach. These awards are given to call attention to people for what they do, for what theyve done, said Ric Green, president/CEO of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. In selecting this years recipients, the Chamber has singled out a race car driver, the mayor and members of the Brazilian business community. Theres so much in the community that residents dont know about, said Green. People dont know these things. Its our job to go out and tell them. Its all about telling the stories of everyday heroes . working hard to improve their See SHINING STARS on page 24Another motion delays mayors trialDeer eld BeachThe trial of former mayor Al Capellini was delayed this week to give the state attorney time to respond to a motion led by the defense. Capellinis attorney, David Bogenshutz led a motion that the case be dismissed on the grounds of selective prosecution. In granting the state attorneys request for more time, Judge Carlos Rebollo reset the trial to Monday, Dec.10. Capellini was charged in 2010 with public corruption after he voted to approve a project while his rm was doing its consulting work. Previous motions to dismiss this case have been denied by Rebollo.Deer elds International Fishing Pier is a popular setting for photographers. Now, city videographers would like submissions of such photos for a video to be featured at the piers new welcome station scheduled to be open Dec. 7. Pictures showing family and friends enjoying memorable moments at the pier and beach are also welcome. Photos can be old or new, but must have been taken at this beach. Submit to web.pio@Deer eld-Beach.com. For further details, call 954-480-4317. [Photo courtesy of Jeff Graves] By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Dedication of the new entrance to the shing pier has been set for Friday, Dec. 7 and appropriate ceremonies are planned. But the pier will open without its restaurant. Determining who will operate the 70-seat eatery has been slowed by a challenge to the bidding process. One of the protests has been led by Pete Boinis, a former restaurant owner with a colorful history here. Eco-Eatery, Inc. and Red Baron Entertainment have led protests challenging the selection committees decision that found they were nonresponsive bidders, i.e. did not submit all the required information. The city commission will meet in special session Oct. 29 to rule on the protest. Principal in Eco-Eatery is Pete Boinis, the Boca Raton restaurant Pete Boinis challenging city as two le protests in pier restaurant biddingowner whose attempt to build a restaurant on the pier parking lot in 2004 created huge controversy and gave momentum to the Original Save Our Beach organization. When his restaurant failed to win commission approval, Boinis posted an area of beach property he owned adjacent to the pier as Private and did not allow public use. Eventually, the city purchased the tract in order to make the current pier renovations. Red Baron Entertainment is a Lighthouse Point entity whose principal is Mike Coner. The other bidder deemed non-responsive was Johanna Gallagher, Gallagher and Associates of Deer eld Beach. Gallagher did not le a protest. The remaining bidder was Todd Weiss, DH2 of Boca Raton, who was not recommended by the selection See PIER PROTEST on page 3

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2 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach BSO Police Chief Pete Sudler and the FAU Foundation are embarking on a pilot project that will eventually grant eight local students fouryear scholarships to Florida Atlantic University. Sudler outlined his program for city commissioners Tuesday saying it grew out of his approaching members of the FAU football team to ride with his deputies as examples to young people. The Owls on Patrol stop at parks and mentor the kids, occasionally, as a bonus, getting in on some real law enforcement action.First-ever partnership with FAU sends 8 kids to college That program was so successful that Sudler decided to give 30 disadvantaged kids a real college experience football games. Using funds raised from con scated contraband, he purchased 30 season tickets on the 40-yard line to the Owls games and got amazing reactions from the kids. Not content, Sudler began searching for a way to expand this college and cops partnership and contacted Jennifer OFlanneryAnderson who directs the FAU Foundation. The result of that matchup is a $100,000 scholarship fund seeded by $50,000 from the Law See FAU on page 21Casino Royale . for your eyes only with your ticket!3rd Annual Casino Night to bene t the Pompano Beach Historical Society.Win two Goodyear Blimp rides! Tickets $100 Call 954-609-7974. Meet you at Galuppis Oct. 19 10-20 Grannys Attic from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Over 80 vendors selling trinkets and treasures. Admission is free. 954-7864111. Hope to see you there! 10-20 Walk for Peace at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., at 8 a.m. Cost is $10 for children 18 and under and $12 for adults. The walk promotes self confidence, fitness and tolerance. 754-322-8950. 10-20 Party in the Patch at the Pink Church from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. Pumpkins, face painting, kids crafts, photo ops, local vendors and more. 954-941-2308. 10-20 Halloween Horse Show and Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sands and Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Costumed Horsey Half Time Show, costume contest, pony rides, mini horses, hay rides, bounce houses, games, pumpkin patch, food and more. 954-786-4507. 10-22 Senior Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach. Expo will include 85 vendors showcasing products and services catered to seniors. Free admission and parking. Visit www.retirement-times.com or call 754-246-2874. 10-23 Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 10-23 Pompano Beach City Commission meeting See SIGHTINGS on page 3

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The Pelican 3 Friday, October 19, 2012 committee. Three companies of the seven that responded to the request for proposal have been recommended by the committee: Brewzii International, Boca Raton; Class Act Restaurant Group, LLC from Hallandale, and Two Together, LLC out of Delray Beach. Depending on the commissions decision on the 29th, the committees recommendation will likely come before them in December. The protest is not the only reason the restaurant will not be operational when the pier opens. The rst proposal issued in June for a restaurant tenant was rejected by the commission, rewritten and readvertised. Based on the new schedule, choosing the restaurateur, negotiating a lease and out tting the dining space, could not have happened by December, according to Purchasing Manager David Santucci. Pier protestContinued from page 1 Scene about town . Broward County Property Appraisers Bob Wolfe, State Representative George Moraitis and Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Commissioner Chris Vincent with daughter Paige at Arubas during a recent fundraising event. at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 10-23 Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 10-23 Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 10-24 Oakland Park Commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall, 3650 NE 12 SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 7

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4 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 Lighthouse Point Supporting local business has always been a focus of the LHP Chamber of Commerce. Now the effort is being stepped up with the introduction of Shop the Point discount cards that will be mailed to every household. The card makes shoppers eligible for discounts on merchandise, meals and services. According to Chamber President Mike McLain the discounts are being offered to answer an oftasked question: What is the Chamber doing for me? Special perks for locals and business owners in LHPMcLain acknowledges that some professionals like himself who work with a nancial brokerage rm, may not be able to come up with offers. But he is encouraging all of his 115 members to participate if they can. The effort is being organized now. McLain plans to have Shop the Point cards in the mail to every residence and LHP business owners by Thanksgiving. One of the requirements for Chamber membership here is to either live or have a business in the city. Despite that restriction, the 10-yearold organization, still edging by most Chamber standards, now has 115 members and outsiders are constantly asking to join. But, as McClain said It would easy to get more members. But the rules are clear. JBs marks a decade by holding a partyDeer eld BeachJBs on the Beach, the rst upscale restaurant to be built beachside here, is celebrating 10 years next weekend with three days of food and drink offers and continual entertainment including The Voice contestant Laura Vivas. Also in the house, magician John Savarese, longtime radio 105.9 See JBs on page 5

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The Pelican 5 Friday, October 19, 2012 broadcaster Paul Castronova, musicians Uproot Hootanny and The Resolvers. A $30 pass buys two for one drinks, a food discount and raf e opportunities for the entire weekend. The festivities begin Friday with a rollout of wines from the Castronova Vineyards and a roast pig barbecue. It continues through Sunday. General Manager Scott Moen, who has been at JBs helm since the beginning said, Its been a good run. I feel lucky we are still here and we look forward to another 10 years. The weekend pass is available on line at allaccesspass@jbsonthe beach. Proceeds bene t the Lynn Cancer Institute in Boca Raton. JBsContinued from page 4In Deer eld Beach, the list is longBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Gordon Vatch has been an advocate of this citys Relay for Life so long his name is synonymous with the event. He was there for the premier of Relay in 2003, chaired the event for three years and remains one of its major movers. I would never, never leave Relay. Its part of my life, Vatch said. Michelle Long was concerned about the rising number of burglaries in the Cove, including two that happened at her home, so she organized a neighborhood watch that is now connected by email with 150 of her neighbors. I thought we needed better communication. There was a void here, BSO establishes Community Heroes awardsLong said. Now crime watch signs and an increased police presence let the bad guys know these residents are on alert, Long said. Vatch and Long are two of the citizens honored last week by the Broward Sheriffs Of ce as community heroes. More than ve dozen people were on the list of honorees, many of them deeply involved with improving the lives of children either through giving time or nancial support. Some of those recognized had saving a life to their credit such as the team of re ghters who brought wrestling coach Bob Burns back to life after he went into cardiac arrest at the Deer eld Beach High School gym. They were Battalion Chief Scott Holloway, Lt. David McCluskey, Lt. Bruce Young, Driver Engineer Lance Ambruster, re ghter/paramedics Jennifer Ameerally and Brian Baker. BSO Dep. Kevin Coleman was also in on the save. Some 20 church leaders who have worked with BSO to establish a liaison with the deputies in their area and their members were also given hero status at this inaugural meeting that was held at Embassy Suites. Others receiving the handsome crystal plaque were the Citizens on Patrol organization, Avis Swenson for organizing the Coral Manor Neighborhood Watch, businessman Frank Congemi for his signi cant nancial See HEROES on page 16

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6 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 42 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & LettersAmendment Four sounds nice But at what cost?Floridas Amendment Four, which gives tax breaks to incoming homeowners, caps corporate and non-homestead property assessment growth, and removes recapture, was added to the November ballot and comes with it government promises to improve the housing market and add jobs. Dont believe the hype.Existing homeowners will see a property tax increase By providing a tax rebate to out-of-state and rst time home buyers, local residents will be asked to make up for up to ve percent of the city, county, and hospital district budgets. In Lighthouse Point, property owners may see a tax increase of $30 to $50 dollars, on average, and the citys levy represents twenty percent of ones property tax bill. When considering county and hospital levies, residents may see a property tax increase of $150 per year. State legislators are violating home rule for cities and counties Cities and counties, already dealing with shrinking property tax revenue, will be forced to wrestle with smaller budgets or pass tax increases along to residents. In addition to raising property taxes, cities and counties could raise the costs of licenses, permits, and other local fees.Amendment Four extends property tax unfairness caused by Save Our HomesSave Our Homes created wide gaps between what homeowners pay in property taxes based on nothing more than the date you purchased a home. People who bought homes more than fteen years ago already pay half or less in property taxes than those who bought a similarly valued home within the last ve years. This amendment will create another situation where families living in virtually the same house on the same street could pay signi cantly different property tax bills while using no more city or county services than their neighbors. If Amendment Four passes, cities and counties will be forced to decide between increasing taxes or reducing services, without having input into the legislative process, and will extend the existing unfairness built into the property tax system created by Save Our Homes. Ignore the promises of jobs and real estate market growth, and look at the costs of this expensive and unnecessary amendment. We strongly urge everyone to consider the impact of this amendment on your city and county before voting. Becky Lysengen, Lighthouse Point City Commissioner and Paul Proia Lighthouse Point Community Appearance Board Member Recently the Pompano Beach Exchange Club hosted its monthly student recognition luncheon at the LHP Yacht Club. Students from six local area high schools were recognized as being the most improved students of the month. The following is a list of schools and students who were honored. The Pompano Beach Exchange Club has been serving the local community for over 55 years with an emphasis on Child Abuse Prevention. The students are Blanche Ely High School, Amanda Jeanmary and Adeyinka Obisanya; Highlands Christian Academy, Kyle Audet and Heather Gray; Zion Lutheran Christian School, Michael Herzig and Caitlin Huiting; Deer eld Beach High School, Luis Cardenas and Angel De Sousa; Coconut Creek High School, Samantha Truong and Albert Dima; Pompano Beach High School, Alexandria L Stuart and Patrick R Sullivan. For more information about the Pompano Beach Exchange Club or to attend a meeting, visit www.exchangeclubofpompanobeach.com Most Improved [Back row] Kyle Audet, Luis Cardenas, Michael Herzig, Albert Dima, Alexandra Stuart, Patrick Sullivan, Angel DeSousa, Jim Balistreri [Front row] Heather Gray, Caitlin Huiting, Amanda Jeanmary, Samantha Truong, Adeyinka Obisanya Local students honored for being Most Improved by Exchange ClubThe Pelican urges voters to vote NO on this amendment.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, October 19, 2012 Cast Your Advertising Net to 7 Northeast Broward Cities! The Pelican 954783-8700 Oakland Park Commissioners have approved an amendment to the city code to require doing business with the city to provide equal bene ts for their employees domestic partners and the dependents of domestic partners.New rules for contractors in Oakland ParkThe city extends equal bene ts to employees spouses, their dependents and employees domestic partners and their dependents. Commissioners also amended the ordinance to change the amount of contracts affected from $200,000 to $100,000 to companies with 25 full-time employees instead of ve. We are thrilled that you have brought this forward, said Stratton Pollitzer, deputy director of Equality Florida.SightingsContinued from page 3Ave. 10-25 Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Chamber of Commerce networking event at Blue Martini in The Galleria Mall, 2432 East Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, from 5 to 8 p.m. One free drink and hors doeuvres. Cost is $20 in advance and $25 at the door. RSVP by calling 954-5635454. 10-26 Halloween Spooktacular from 6 to 9 p.m. at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., Wilton Manors. Costume contest, games, concession stand, giant cake walk, hay ride and pictures with the Great Pumpkin. 10-26 Trunk or Treat on Halloween Street at 6 p.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 West Atlantic Blvd. Admission is free to the event. Entering a trunk in the See SIGHTINGS on page 13Internet safety workshopFort Lauderdale NetSmartz, an internet safety workshop by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, will be held at 8:30 a.m. on Monday, Oct. 29 at Christ Church, 4845 NE 25 St. Parents, guardians, educators, law enforcement of cers and children ages 5 to 17 are welcome to attend. The workshop is part of Christ Church Schools Breakfast with Bonham series, topical discussions hosted by Principal Tane Bonham. This seminar will promote two-way conversation between children and adults about online and of ine risks; empower children to help them avoid exploitation and to report victimization to a trusted adult; and teach children how to recognize potential internet risks. To reserve a spot, send an email

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8 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFSeasoned Realtors, Garrett Wayne and James Williams, each has had a 25-year career in real estate sales and property management in the Washington, D.C. area and in South Florida. Our combined experience plus our association with an internationally famous company like Coldwell Banker means we can give our clients maximum exposure nationally and internationally, claims James Paul Williams, licensed Realtor and broker associate. The other half of this team is Garrett Wayne who is a licensed Realtor and also licensed in condominium management with a national designation. Operating out of the main Coldwell Banker of ce at 909 E. Las Olas Blvd., the team can offer a client rst rate service. Garrett says, One of us is always available to answer a clients needs. He adds, This is an ideal time to sell property because interest rates are so attractive, its hard to resist becoming a property owner. And inventory is low which means sellers have a wide open opportunity to sell. Prices are beginning to go up, making the market attractive. The season is about to begin. The sun lovers are coming and many will want a property in South Florida. We have buyers looking right now. Sellers should take advantage of this opportunity while it lasts. On the other side of the coin, James adds, we encourage people wanting to buy to act now because prices are moving up. Its foolish to wait too long. We advise all of our clients to get prequali ed so that they can act fast and not lose their dream home when they see it. We are happy to guide them through the process.Coldwell Banker team, Garrett and James Realtors have buyers, sellers, property management services coveredGarrett says, We have clients who are ready to buy, but not able to occupy yet. For them and all of our clients we offer a complete residential property management service for condominiums, coops, rentals, duplexes and single and multi unit properties. This service is ideal for investors, part time residents or anyone seeking professional management. At Coldwell Banker we realize that you dont need the additional hassles of trying to rent your own property, manage appliance repairs, check prospective tenants credit history or handle three a.m. emergencies. We offer all of these services for a reasonable price. Asked how business is these days, James says, After a long period of an unstable economy, the phones are ringing again. All indications are for a positive recovery in the housing market. Because Coldwell is an international See COLDWELL on page 28Democrats meet in PompanoPompano Beach The North Broward Democratic Club holds its next meeting at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 24. For more information, call 954-783-8232.Local pioneers to be honored at Pioneer Day eventOakland Park The Broward County Historical Commission celebrates four decades of honoring Broward County pioneers at its 40th Annual Pioneer Day Event on Saturday, Oct. 20 at 2 p.m. at Oakland Park Elementary School, 936 NE 33 St. Among the 29 men and women selected as pioneers are: Oakland Park residents Ira B. Rubinstein, Merceda Edwards Dykes, Robert A. McCarty, Jr and Andrew E. Buchta; Pompano Beach residents James L. Jones and Robert W. Holmes; Deer eld Beach resident Martha L. Butler and Wilton Manors resident Virginia Pearce. The public is welcome at this free event. Call 954-357-5553.Broward Sierra Club MeetingThe Broward Sierra Club meets Nov. 1 at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek at 7:30 p.m. Novembers program will feature guest speaker Kenneth Banks, Broward County Natural Resource Specialist IV, who will discuss coral reefs. The free event is open to the public. Call Barbara Curtis 954-946-7359 or emaillegalbarb2@yahoo.comJames Williams and Garrett Wayne pause to show one of their listings. This Realtor team operates out of Coldwell Bankers main of ce on Las Olas Boulevard. [Photo courtesy of Williams and Wayne]

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The Pelican 9 Friday, October 19, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City commissioners gave initial approval Wednesday to an historic preservation ordinance. The vote was 4-0. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue had left the room. The ordinance was proposed to assist with grant applications and to encourage historic preservation and maintenance of historic properties. The city hopes to become eligible for non-matching state grants and will establish an Historic Preservation Board to recommendations on whether a property meets requirements for historic designation. City commissioners will name the board members. To the extent possible, the board must be composed of professionals, who Law will encourage historic preservationhave signi cant working experience/certi cation in architecture, history, architectural history, archaeology, etc. Laypersons with a special interest, experience or knowledge in these elds are eligible only if there arent enough professionals available to serve. Commissioner Jed Shank asked for assurance that any propertys designation as historic is voluntary on the part of the property owner. Chris Gratz, senior planner, assured him that it is. To create a historic district, the ordinance requires the majority of property owners in the area agree to request designation. According to the ordinance, all decisions of the Historic Preservation Board can be appealed and reversed by the city commission. Commissioner Shari McCartney said she has concerns about encumbering property rights. What if the owner of a house designated as historic sells the house? she asked. Would the new See HISTORIC LAW on page 17Fair in Coconut CreekCoconut Creek The Womens Club of Coconut Creek and the City of Coconut Creek will hold its annual fair on Saturday, Nov. 3 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Coconut Creek Government Center, 4800 W. Copans Road. Free admission. Vendors will be selling new and handcrafted items and a homemade quilt will be raf e. Raf e tickets are $1 each or six for $5. There will also be baked goods, refreshments and coffee for sale as well as a food truck. The money raised will go toward scholarships for residents of Coconut Creek. For more information, visit www.coconutcreek.net, email Carolyn @ caprn@att.net or call 954-545-6670. Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700!

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10 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-7838700. Briefs Americas Moms to host garage salePompano Beach Great deals will be for the taking on Nov. 3 at 701 SE 6 Ave., Pompano Beach. The sale will bene t Americas Moms for Soldiers, a non-pro t group that sends packages overseas to soldiers overseas who normally do not receive mail for a number of reasons, including cost. The sale runs from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Editors note: Last week The Pelican pro led Robert Holmes, the other Pompano Beach gentleman designated a Pioneer by Broward County Group. Holmes and James Jones are both educators and friends. They have been neighbors for over 50 years pioneering Pompano Beach together, but because each has a signi cant history, The Pelican decided to give each man space for his own story. James Jones arrived in Pompano in 1956, mathematics degree in hand from Bethune-Cookman College, ready to teach math at Blanche Ely High School He recalls getting off the train at Dixie Highway and what was then Hammondville Road, a dirt road upon which he walked to his cousins house where he would stay. James Jones, retired principal of Blanche Ely High School to become a Broward County Pioneer tomorrow I had been a teacher intern at Blanche Ely the year before and was pleased to have a job in this farming community. My students all helped on farms after school and on weekends. Ours was a totally segregated community. Everyone seemed to be involved in churches, and I joined them. I have been involved with Antioch Missionary Baptist Church for many years, serving as a deacon, trustee board chairman and nancial director. When I turned 80, I made up my mind to be supportive, but no longer take leadership roles. Young people must begin to take over. Weve trained many capable men and women. They are doing good jobs in the church community and city. He continues, The changes in this city are phenomenal. Weve grown from a farming town to a metropolitan city. I have stayed in my rst neighborhood by choice because I have spent most of my rewarding and ful lling adult life here and I have stayed to give back. The people I have had the opportunity to work with, mainly students, have grown and many are now ne contributing neighbors and residents giving their time and talents as we did. I have enjoyed being a role model to these young people and in turn I believe I have impacted their lives in a positive way. I know they have had a positive in uence in my life. He says things have improved for the African Americans in Pompano Beach. We are very much a part of our citys government A young James Jones [Left] began his career in education as a math teacher at Ely High School in 1956. He retired in 1992 as principal of the school. He has been honored as Ely Teacher of the Year and Man of the Year in 2009 by the Pompano City Commission. [Photos courtesy of James L. Jones] Pictured here with the late E. Pat Larkins, former mayor of Pompano Beach, Jones knew Larkins when he was president of the Ely Student Council. He saw promise in Larkins, supported his political campaigns and saw Larkins rise to become a powerful leader in the city. See JONES on page 9National College Fair Fort Lauderdale The Greater Fort Lauderdale National College Fair takes place Thursday, Nov 1 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 5 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fort Lauderdale/ Broward County Convention Center, 1950 Eisenhower Blvd. The college fair allows students and parents to meet one-on-one with over 250 representatives from colleges and universities across the country. In addition to browsing the college and university booths, students will have the opportunity to attend information workshops designed to make the college transition a little easier. These workshops will be geared towards parents as well. Students can register for a barcode at Browardschools. com/collegefair or call 754321-2119.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, October 19, 2012 The Pelican! 954-783-8700 and we are represented as a district. The CRA is nally acting and its a beginning. Weve seen some improvements in our community, but not as fast as wed like. The plans sound good. Im eager to see them become a reality. We must be patient, but thats not easy because weve been patient for a long time. Currently, Im a walker. I walk three miles three times a week with Commissioner Poitier who is a former student and one of many I am very proud of. Jones began his professional career as an educator with the Broward County School Board under the leadership of the esteemed Mrs. Blanche Ely. He says, During my time at Ely, my growth was immense. I chaired the mathematics department, served as student council advisor, faculty chairperson, of cer of the assistant administrative council and became Teacher of the Year. My 12 years at Blanche Ely shaped my educational philosophy in subsequent leadership positions. While there I earned a Master of Education degree in Guidance and Counseling from Florida Atlantic University. Jones went on to become guidance director at Everglades Middle School, Dean of Boys at Plantation High School, assistant principal at Pompano Beach High School and in 1980 he became principal at Ely High School where he remained until retirement in 1992. He became the longest tenure principal at Blanche Ely, exceeded only by the schools founder, Mrs. Blanche General Ely. In those 12 years, Jones supervised the infusion of students from Pompano Beach High School which was closed, helped develop and implement Elys magnet program, increased academic and athletic scholarships and was honored to have the school auditorium named after him. After retiring, he established the James L. Jones Scholarship Fund and subsequently awarded 24 scholarships to deserving students. While serving on Pompanos Education Advisory Board, he helped to advance the citys Blanche Ely Scholarship program for academically disadvantaged students from a two year to a four year program. In 2009, he was honored to be recognized as Man Of The Year by the Pompano City Commission. Jones has been married to Thelma Black Jones for 50 years. Their daughter, Angella Jones Vann is a department planning administrator with the city of West Palm Beach. He says Life has been a rewarding and ful lling journey for me. And now he can add Broward County Pioneer to his long list of impressive titles. Congratulations and thank you for impacting so many lives with your shared knowledge and energy. Jones service record is legend 13 years Pompano Beach Charter Review Board 8 years Education Advisory Board Chair 15 year member of Pompano Community Development Advisory Bd. 6 years Pompano Police and Fire ghters Pension Board Chair of Broward County Charter Review Commission 1994-95 6 years Professional Standards Bd., Broward County Sheriffs Dept. Member Kiwanis Club, founder Tigers Roar Club Eta Nu Chapter, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. JonesContinued form page 8

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12 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors When King Wilkinson travels with his kegs its time for Taste of the Island. Every year we bring in at least half a keg more. Were bringing four kegs of Bud Light this year, said Wilkinson, owner of Reds Bar. For Wilkinson and his bar staff, the trip is short and so is the life of the beer he brings. We dont even shut the tap off. They drink em faster than we can put them out there. Wilkinson and dozens of other area bar and restaurant proprietors will be serving up Seven years later, Taste of the Island is still a premier eventsome of their best beverages and menu items at the 7th Annual Taste of the Island on Monday, Nov. 5 at Richardson Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, from 6 to 9 p.m. Its an outdoor evening of food and libations in Wilton Manors, said Krishan Manners, Taste of the Island board member. The event features and introduces bars and restaurants to the surrounding area. So far, about 34 businesses including Whole Foods, Menchies Frozen Yogurt, Humpys Pizza, Rosies Bar and Grill, The Alibi, The Melting Pot and Nuts About Yogurt have all jumped on board; some for their rst year of the Taste, some as veterans of the culinary occasion. Were still taking restaurants at this point, said Manners. Returning for its third year is Shawn and Nicks Courtyard Caf. And along with their fried green tomatoes, Courtyards owners are frying up Oreos and bringing out the pineapple basil gelato from their other Wilton Drive business, Gelato Station. The Oreos, tomatoes and gelato were all a big hit at last years Taste and Nick Berry, co-owner of Courtyard Caf, expects the same popularity this year. The fried Oreos are a Berry family recipe and the fried green tomatoes are something he brought back from Georgia a few years ago. Were not the Jenny Craig of The Drive. Were about comfort food. Just good oldfashioned comfort food, he said. And for Berry, comfort food and Taste of the Island are much the same. Its just an awesome thing to do that unites both gay and straight and brings everyone together for a family event. Its just a real warm feeling when you have this event. Along with giving local bars and restaurants a chance to addict some new customers to their menus, Taste of the Island also bene ts local organizations. The Kiwanis Club, Historical Society, Leisure Services Department and the Wilton Manors Development Alliance, or WMDA, all receive a portion of the money raised. The Friends of the Library receives money generated from the silent auction. Last year, we each received $3,500, said Manners, who also serves as president and CEO of WMDA. Its substantial for us, said Manners about the money. We look forward to that check on an annual basis. See TASTE on page 13

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The Pelican 13 Friday, October 19, 2012 Last year was the most weve ever received and we hope to grow it this year. Tickets are $30 in advance and $35 at the door. Tickets can be purchased at www. tasteoftheisland.org or at the following locations: Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive; Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive; Barton & Miller Cleaners, 2600 N. Dixie Hwy., WMDA, 2164 Wilton Drive and the Wilton Manors Library, 500 NE 26 St. Silent auction prizes include: four all day Water Taxi passes, $50 gift certi cate to Big City Tavern, $25 gift card to Cheesecake Factory, two admission passes to Museum of Discovery & Science, four passes to Jungle Island, a family pass to Monkey Jungle and two passes to the Improv Comedy Club in West Palm Beach. TasteContinued from page 12 decorating contest is $5. 954-786-4111. 10-26 & 27 Book sale at the Oakland Park Library, SightingsContinued from page 71298 NE 27 St. from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 26 and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Oct. 27. 954-6304370. 10-26 Democrat Maria Sachs and Republican Ellyn Bogdanoff debate issues for state senate District 34] election at 7:30 a.m. at Blue Moon, 4405 West Tradewinds Ave., Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Cost for breakfast is $20. Call 954-776-1000. 10-27 & 28 Arts and Crafts Show at Pelican Square, east end of Commercial Boulevard, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. Event is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. 954776-1000. 10-27 & 28 Arts and Crafts Show at Pelican Square, east end of Commercial Boulevard, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. Event is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. 954776-1000. 10-27 Broward Sheriffs Office will hold its Sheriffs Community Day at The Pride Center, 2040 N. Dixie Hwy., Wilton Manors, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free child fingerprinting, K-9 and police gear demonstrations. 954-8318900. 10-27 Falloween and Trunk or Treat from 5 to 9 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. Kids costume contest, magic show, crafts, music, bounce house, trick or treating, interactive stage show and trunk decorating contest. See SIGHTINGS on page 18

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14 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFRemember when people whispered, Its the Big C? The Big C was always cancer, a word that implied a hopeless prospect. That was then. In 1985, Relay for Life was founded in Washington State. The public decided to shake out the shame and shine a light on hope. Research was on the rise. In 2003, Pompano Beach hosted its rst Relay for Life and became part of the largest fundraiser for the American Cancer Society, or ACS. The Relay event consists of a night of walking, feasting, sharing and talking about cancer. Relay has since raised more than $374 million since its inception. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and the main reason for all that pink stuff going on around town. And all those pink tee shirts, police cars, newspapers and posters arent alone. Even the Queen of England gave her nod to bathe Buckingham Palace in pink lights to launch this years awareness month. Lighthouse Point Commissioner Sandy Johnson, a breast cancer survivor, lost her mother to breast cancer 40 years ago. Johnson was one of the early people to support Relay for Life. Relay for Life has made enormous strides in cancer research. Im a survivor. My mother wasnt. Research made the difference for me. She adds that ACS volunteers, most of them survivors, came to her side when she had her surgery several years ago. A woman came to me in the hospital to see if I needed any help. She held my hand and asked me if I needed to cry. She was the sweetest woman. A week later when I was home, another volunteer rang my doorbell and wanted to show me some Breast Cancer Month focuses attention on a dreaded disease exercises that I needed to do. Its a phenomenal network. Diane Hurwit learned in her 60s that she had breast cancer. She lost her breasts in 2007, thought it was all over and in 2010 the cancer returned to her chest cavity. Today, Hurwit is a survivor, a HEAL HEAL T TH To breathe easy, take in the air at Salt SuitesBy Carol RomanoPELICAN WRITERFrom the salt mines of 19th century Poland and the depths of the Dead Sea comes a fascinating turn on an ancient method of healing known as Halotherapy. Now it is available in South Florida. According to the owners of Salt Suite, Jessica and Elliot Holmer, salt, when processed by a Halogenerator to the nth degree and circulated into a soothing, dimly lit retreat, gives relief to those with respiratory or dermatological conditions. The Holmers, who imported 24,000 tons of Dead Sea salt, opened their unique spa almost a year ago and have already developed a loyal and enthusiastic clientele. StatePoint News Not all American children get regular doses of fresh air. A 2012 report published in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that only about half of U.S. preschoolers are taken outside to walk or play daily. And older kids arent faring much better, say experts. Too much time inside contributes to obesity, attention problems, hyperactivity and lack of appreciation for the earths resources. By taking kids outside regularly to explore nature, you can help them get physical activity and connect to the world. From building bird feeders to camping, discover together what makes the outdoors great. Project Learning Tree, a non-pro t environmental education program, has great tips for family activities on its website to get you started. Visit www.plt.org/outdoors for ideas.Too much time indoors is bad for kids healthSalt Suite3100 South Federal Hwy. #3 Delray Beach 561-316-7258 The couple rst heard of this therapy from a friend in California who had enjoyed its bene ts. Wanting to take a new turn in their life path, and eager to do something that brought goodness to others, the Holmers researched salt therapy and soon decided they wanted to work in the eld. Jessica is a native Floridian while Elliot hails from Vermont. The Sunshine State won out over Vermont and the Holmers moved back here and found a perfect spot for The Salt Suites in the bright yellow complex at 3100 S. Federal Highway, Delray Beach. Entering the spa doorway the rst thing one sees, through a giant picture window, is the childrens room where the deep salt on the oor, the sealife mural on one wall and the brightlycolored beach toys give the illusion of a giant sandbox. But its salt, not sand on the oors, and the walls are made of salt. Salt air is being ltered into the room so little ones can play to their hearts content while getting therapy for allergies or skin conditions such as eczema. Watched over by their accompanying adult, the children spend 45 -minute sessions in the healing environment. While there is a charge for the child, there is no charge for the adult care taker, so mom can bask in the beach-like See SALT SUITE on page 17 Diane Hurwit chairs the survivor and caretaker laps. She is seeking names of people in the community who should be honored.See RELAY FOR LIFE on page Clients bring white socks to make it through the small desert of salt and reach their comfortable chairs. Once seated, relaxation takes over.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, October 19, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach The romance and mystery of barefoot mailman James Hamilton, who lost his life at the Hillsboro Inlet, inspired local history-makers to have his statue overlooking the Inlet recast at a cost of about $30,000. The original sculptor, Frank Varga, did the work and funds were raised to pay him by former mayor Carmen McGarry and members of the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society, or HLPS. This week, Mayor Dan Dodge said $7,000 is still needed to pay for the restoration and he suggested donations would be welcome. In other news concerning the lighthouse, the HLPS has taken over its maintenance from the Coast Guard. HLPS President Art Makenian said The life of James Ed Hamilton was remembered this month in a proclamation presented by Hillsboro Beach Mayor Dan Dodge (l) to Art Makenian, president of the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society. Hamilton, one of the barefoot mailmen who trudged the beaches of South Florida delivering the mail, was presumed drowned at the Hillsboro Inlet in 1887. The mayor proclaimed Oct. 11, James Hamilton Day. Two statues, one at Hillsboro Town Hall and the other at the Inlet, also commemorate Hamilton.Donations needed to pay for Barefoot Mailman repairshe anticipates the annual budget will be $25,000, money that comes from membership dues and donations to the Society. Every penny donated will go to maintenance, he said. And it is only a matter of time before the Coast Guard is out of there. The service currently uses cottages on the site for R&R. Makenian said he will propose to Broward County that the lighthouse be designated as a national monument. In the meantime, volunteers are now doing some refurbishment of the structure. Tours for the public will continue. The next one is Saturday, Oct. 13 and Hamilton will be remembered at a brief ceremony.RMA lands contract for planning services in Hillsboro BeachHillsboro Beach Commissioners have chosen Redevelopment Management Associates over three other bidders this week for the towns planning services. The rm, headed by Chris Brown and Kim Briesemeister, See HILLSBORO on page 27

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16 The PelicanFriday, October 19, 2012 support, John DiPrato, Drivers Alert Program; Judy Stanich, DB Cultural committee; Alex Leon, Steve Collazo and Butch Santy for their work with the Police Athletic League; BSO Sgt. Craig Brown, Sgt. Valerie Devlin, Det. Neil Munson and Det. Frank Canales for contributions to Special Olympics; Jan Moran from the Jim Moran Foundation and Kim Bentley from the JM Family Enterprises, City Commissioner Ben Preston for his work with kids in Dist. 2; Roxanne Liddiard and Joy Surrusco from the Dart Foundation, Lucio and Joan Giambattista of SAHL Group, Barry and Renee Honig and their charitable foundation, Derek Schwartz of The Schwartz Group, Dr. Jennifer OFlannery Anderson with the FAU Foundation, the Deer eld Kiwanis club and Deer eld Rotary Club for their donations to youth programs and BSO deputies Chad Dunham, Harold Morrison and Lamar Williams.HeroesContinued from page 5 Lighthouse Point Curves of Lighthouse Point, a womens tness club, is celebrating its second anniversary by waiving the joining fee for anyone joining during the month of October. Check out the club and start your success story getting in shape for the holidays. In September, members completed pledges showing the strength theyve gained at Curves and that they have no limits including the First Annual Curves of Lighthouse Point Triathlon. Curves is a facility specially designed for women featuring a complete 30 minute workout and weight management program that is fun, fast and safe. Curves works every major muscle group with a complete 30minute workout that combines strength training and sustained cardiovascular activity through safe and effective hydraulic resistance. Curves also works to help women lose weight, gain muscle strength and aerobic capacity, and raise metabolism with its groundbreaking, scienti cally proven method that ends the need for perpetual dieting. Curves of Lighthouse Point has participated in local health fairs and charity walks and Making Strides against Breast Cancer. Curves mission is to strengthen women. Come check out the club this month, take advantage of the waived joining fee and start your healthier life. For more information please contact us at 954-783-2900.Curves of Lighthouse Point waives joining fee for new members in celebration of its second year

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The Pelican 17 Friday, October 19, 2012Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com atmosphere and enjoy its bene ts Salt is a natural antibiotic, explains Jessica, and deeply breathing it clears the sinus, creates mucus to clear the bronchi and rids the body of various toxins. lt has natural antibiotic and anti-inammatory properties that act positively in the sinuses and respiratory system. Salt therapy near the shores of the Dead Sea has been used for thousands of years. But its medicinal qualities to light in Europe when a Polish health of cial, Felix Bochkovsky, observed that miners working in the salt mines rarely came down with respiratory illnesses. So he created salt caves to which people ocked to breath in the purifying air. Today, Halotherapy is used in health facilities all over Europe often in conjunction with the inhaling of the fragrance of pine trees. The Holmers have brought this therapy into our area with a luxurious salon where the visitor relaxes, can listen to music, read or dream away the 45minute session in serene contemplation. The therapy room is dimly lit by salt lamps glowing against the pristine salt walls. According to the book of testimonials in the waiting area, clients feel totally relaxed and leave their sessions feeling cleansed and energized. But Salt Suites offers more than the quiet therapy of its treatment room. Halo Yoga classes allow clients to practice yoga in a unique studio where the Halogenerator lters in the salt air. Hatha yoga, Tao yoga, Tai Chi, Yin and breath work classes are all offered on week days with the exception of Wednesday. Saturday classes are also available. Usually the rst class is offered with a discount. Prices for Halotherapy range from $45 for a single session [the rst session is complimentary] to monthly fees that range from $250 for one month to a sixmonth membership at $150 a month. Memberships include yoga sessions. Childrens sessions range from $35 per session to a 15-session package at $300. Memberships for the young set sell from $175 for one month to $115 monthly with a six-month commitment. Siblings are offered a 50 percent discount. All levels allow one session daily. Sessions are by appointment only. Looks like sand, but its all sea salt on the oor, walls and ceiling. Children enjoy the room and play with the salt as if they were at the beach.Salt SuiteContinued from pag owner have to keep that designation? The ordinance provides for an appeal before the Historic Preservation Board or the commission. The designation also may be rescinded if the resource no longer retains its historical signi cance due to permitted alterations or extensive damage caused by re or storm. The ordinance also provides for a procedure to request approval to relocate or demolish a historic resource and includes a process to provide tax incentives to preserve a historic property. Applications for these incentives can only be approved by the city commission. Shank said he is troubled by the tax incentives and concerned about administrative costs to review them. Preserving history is what creates the character of a community, said Susan Gillis, an Oakland Park resident and consultant to historical agencies. She heartily endorsed the ordinance, noting it gives property owners an incentive to stay in the community and gives the city a chance to embrace a new planning tool. Historic lawContinued from page

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18 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Visit www.oaklandparkfl.org or call 954-630-4500. 10-31 Monster Concert at The Pink Church at 7 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. Audience members are encouraged to wear Halloween costumes as church members play haunting harmonies on the Great Pipe Organ. 954-9412308. 11-3 Self defense class at Jarvis Hall, located next to city hall, 4501 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, at 11 a.m. Cost is $75 per person. Three-hour long course. 954548-2578. 11-6 Deerfield Beach Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. 11-10 Wilton Manors Yard Sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. Free to the public. Cost to vendors is $20 for residents and $25 for nonresidents for an area the size of a parking space. Multiple spaces can be rented. 954390-2130. 11-10 Wilton Manors Friends of the Library Book Tent from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. A wide selection of books and audio and video materials will be available. 954-566-9019. FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-7863274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the first and third SightingsContinued from page 13 See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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The Pelican 19 Friday, October 19, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news or special events! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954783-8700 to Traveling Vietnam MemorialFort Lauderdale The traveling three-quarter scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., is on display Today, Oct. 19 through Oct. 21 at Forest Lawn South Funeral Home, 2401 Davie Road in Fort Lauderdale. The memorial is dedicated to the veterans of the Vietnam War and honors all U.S. servicemen and women. The tribute begins at 9 a.m. with a continuous reading of all the names inscribed on the memorial and closes each day at dusk. A variety of musical performances will provide entertainment throughout each day. A Broward County Veterans Services of cer will be in attendance to assist veterans with any questions they may have regarding veterans bene ts on Friday, 9 a.m. to noon, and on Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, visit www. broward.org/ElderVets or call Broward County Elderly and Veterans Services at 954-3576622. Early voting sitesBroward The Supervisor of Elections Office has selected sites across the county to serve as early voting locations from Oct. 27 through Nov. 3 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd.; Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive; Art Serve, 1350 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale and the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Martin Luther King Blvd., Pompano Beach and the Northwest Regional Library, 3151 University Drive, Coral Springs, were among the sites chosen. To see a full list of early voting sites, visit www. browardsoe.org or call 954357-7050.

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20 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com a speaker and most recently a volunteer for the Pompano Beach Relay for Life. She chairs the caregiver and survivor walks at Community Park in Pompano Beach, on May 17 and 18, 2013. Survivors of cancer, draped with purple sashes, take the rst lap. That lap is followed by caregivers, who receive their white sashes from survivors. Laps, activity and open conversations continue throughout the night. Its an 18-hour overnight journey, says Jesse Brooks, community representative of the ACS. Pompano Beach Commissioner Charlotte Burrie, who has lost family members to cancer, says she was happy to take on the chair position. I want everyone in the city to help me. I need civic clubs and churches and other groups to form teams to raise funds for research. Teams raise money through garage sales, bake sales or any means to cover the $100 for each team member. Brooks says the group has monthly parties to mark team goals. Dianna Jaffe, another survivor, will chair the luminaria drive at the event this May. Jaffe explains that luminaries, candles placed in paper bags, will line the relay walk. The candles are meant to honor those who have survived cancer and those who have been lost to cancer. At my condominium, Jaffe says, We have a close group that cooks out once a week. Out of the 12 of us, four were diagnosed with cancer. Thats one-third of our little group. Jaffe has another friend, a man, who was diagnosed with breast cancer over 20 years ago. His wife found the lump. Hes ne today, says Jaffe, But men need to know they can get breast cancer. Jaffe says she feels like her old self again. She was busy getting a pedicure when The Pelican caught up with her. These women, Johnson, Hurwit, Burrie, Brooks and Jaffe, through help from their husbands, friends and family members, represent the millions of men and women who stand up against this disease. Now they want everyone to stand with them. Every Relay for Life is different. Some people come with tents to spend the night, always having a member of their team walking around a track to symbolize that cancer never sleeps. Some people bring entertainment. Some come to walk one lap, visit and go home. The dynamic of each Relay for Life team is changed with every new team member. Families, singles, church groups, civic clubs and more are invited to join a team. The luminary walk is so emotional. Its not something a person could ever forget. Everyone of those candles has a story to tell, said Johnson. There are many ways to help Relay for Life meet its goal of $52,000. Last year the teams came close with a little more than $40,000. Sponsors always help teams meet their goals, and Burrie is looking for some. To nd out how to purchase a luminaria [$5 or whatever a person can afford] or to form a team, call Jessie Brooks at The American Cancer Society, 954-200-7536. Relay for LifeContinued from page 18

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The Pelican 21 Friday, October 19, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Enforcement Trust Fund and matched by the Foundation. Each year, two students will be selected for the fouryear scholarships until there are eight kids in the university. Certain criteria will apply grades, community servicein selecting the students. In acknowledging the partnership FAU President Mary Jane Saunders said, This will change lives. No one else has reached out [in this way]. I am proud of your leadership. This is what public education is all about.Green market under private management: Opens Nov. 4 Deer eld Beach -The city has stepped out of the green market business and has contracted with Emily Lilly to operate the event. Lilly has operated a farmers market in Boca Raton for 18 years and is a member of the Palm Beach County Green Market Coalition. Per her agreement with the city, Lilly will hold a green market in the Cove Shopping Center every Sunday beginning Nov. 4, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will handle vendors, entertainment and promotion. Emphasis will be on organic and farm grown produce, homemade crafts, gourmet foods, fresh dairy, meat, poultry and seafood, baked goods, plants, owers, specialty beverages, baked goods and organic home and garden items. The market will run through Apr. 28.A good example of privatizationDeer eld Beach The city saved $90,000 last year working with a private company to maintain its vehicles. In supporting the renewal of the contract between Genuine Parks Company and NAPA Miami, Chad Grecseke, assistant environmental services director, told the commission Tuesday that NAPA had also purchased some of the citys unused parts. He complimented the work of Alan Severese, who manages the citys eet. Said Vice Mayor Bill Ganz, This is smart, out of the box thinking this is how private public partnerships can work.FAUContinued from page 2 Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096. The Deerfield Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deerfield Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak. com or 954-781-0073 for rates. SightingsContinued from page 18

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22 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds work for you! 954-783-8700! HELP WANTED AFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26COURT ORDERA COMPLAINT has been presented to this County by the Plaintiff JEANE CRISTINE JORGE seeking SUPPORT, CUSTODY AND VISITATION. You are required to serve upon plaintiff attorney for plaintiff JEANE CRISTINE JORGE, PRO SE whose address is 10 LISCOMB STREET # 3 4 WORCESTER, MA. 01604 your answer on or before SEPTEMBER 4, 2012. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to le a copy of your answer in the of ce of the Register of this court at Worcester Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Suite 2001 Worcester, Ma 01608. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 10-19 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 10-19 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees Landscape Yard Fill Pressure Wash Roofs Home Repairs Welding Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 10-26 RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL CLEANING IN Pompano Lighthouse Point Deer eld. Dependable Thorough Experienced. References. Call Ana 954-6924691. 10-26 EXPERIENCED DRIVER AVAILABLE! TO & FROM STORES DOCTORS APPOINTMENTS AIRPORT, ETC. CALL MARYANN 954-895-3202. GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable Love To Clean Windows! Refrigerators, Ovens. No Problem. FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266/ 11 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 10-26 MISS PATTYS ERRAND SERVICE!! Will Pick Up & Deliver Your Groceries To Your Condo Or Home. Please Call 954-691-7816. 10-19 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915.BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. C COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 11-2 WAREHOUSE SALEANNUAL WAREHOUSE SAMPLE SALE!! Wholesale manufacture of ladies clothing selling samples, overruns and closeouts. Specialty design apparel; Bling Bling bejeweled look. Selling single pieces and entire boxes of samples. Great pricing, 75% to 85% off original cost. Cash and credit cards accepted. Resellers welcome. Friday October 26th, 10am-4pm. 1301 W Copans Rd. Ste E7, Pompano Beach, FL 33064. 1-800-438-5677 ext. 26. MEDICALHOSPITAL BED Heavy Duty Bariatric Wide Full Size For Up To 500lbs With Side Rails & Remote Control. $1,000 OBO. PICK-UP ONLY. 561-731-3174 Leave Message! Boynton Beach. 10-19 SHARE TOWNHOUSETAMARAC Share Newly Renovated 3 / 2 Townhome. Professional Or Retired Female. $600 Per Month Plus Utilities. Call 954-618-3003 Or 401-215-7271. 10-19 SEASONAL RENTALPOMPANO BEACH 2 / 2 Condo Island Club Federal Hwy. 9th Floor Corner Apt. Beautiful Views. Nicely Furnished. All Amenities. $2,000 Month. 954785-0177. 10-26

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The Pelican 23 Friday, October 19, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. DUPLEXESPOMPANO BEACH E OF Federal Hwy. 2/1 Enclosed Porch W/Washer & Dryer. Central Air. New Tile Floors. No Pets $1,100 Mo. 954-8229395. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH THE CLARIDGE Large Updated 2 / 2 Corner Penthouse Ocean Intracoastal & City Views! Washer / Dryer In Unit. Impact Glass. $498,500. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. Please Call 954-803-4174. 10-19 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 11-9CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2 / 1 Pool! Sunroom Ground Floor, Beautifully Furnished. On Golf Course. $750 Mo. 1 Year +. Good Credit. 917-5440771. 10-26 POMPANO 1 / 1.5 UPDATED 1st Floor. Screened Patio. Community Pool. Small Waterfront Complex. $1,200 Month. Dockage Available For Rent. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. Please Call 954-803-4174. 10-19 LIGHTHOUSE PT 2 / 1.5 ---1st Floor 55+. Pool, Unfurnished. Laundry Facilities. $895 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-5624919. 10-26 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT ITS BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like Youre On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. 10-19 LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 10-19 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 10-19 POMPANO 1 / 1 APT. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 10-19 POMPANO BEACH STUDIO 2 Blocks From Beach!! Quiet!! Utilities Included. A / C. Outdoor Patio. $675 Month. Call For Information 954-5923595. 10-26 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 2/1 $750 NW NE 1/1 $675 2/1 $950 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App MovU-In. 954-781-6299. POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W / D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 10-19 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/Unfurnished. $650 $850 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954--610-2327. 10-26 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-868-5560 Wayne. 10-19 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Season. 500 To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 11-2 BOX BOLD POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 11-2 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 10-19

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24 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@yahoo. com working hard to improve their business and make Pompano a better place. This years honorees are: Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher, receiving the Stewart Kester Award; Isle Casino General Manager Rob Wyre, receiving the Business Man Award; Broward College North Campus President Barbara Bryan, Ph.D., receiving the Business Woman Award and Merritts Boat and Engine Works owners Roy and Allen Merritt, receiving the Founders Award. The Stewart Kester Award is named after a longtime community leader who died in 2008. The Founders Award is given each year to a recipient who has been in the community a long time and has always been a part of the community, always giving to the community, said Leila Moavero, chair of the awards ceremony. Allen Merritt founded Merritts Boat and Engine Works in 1948 and hes been on the same 10-acre piece of Pompano land ever since. His family business has grown in size and strength. Theyve always been huge in the community, said Moavero. Roy Merritt, Allens son, said his family doesnt donate to everything but where and when they can. Whatever it takes. There are different things around you just donate to. This years Lights of the Community Awards, part of the Shining Stars event, will be given to the Brazilian Business Group, State Rep. Gwyn Clarke-Reed, entertainer Bill Jaycox, Lighthouse Point Police Chief Ross Licata, Sample-McDougald House volunteer Margaret White and Starworks Motorsport Race Team Driver Peter Baron. Of all this years award recipients, Barons service to Pompano may be the most unique. Hes at these international races and he still promotes Pompano. He promotes Pompano at every race he goes to, said Moavero. Tickets for the Shining Stars event are $45 for individuals. Table sponsorships are available for $425. To RSVP, call 954-941-2940. Past honorees include: Calvin Glidewell, director of Imperial Point Hospital, for reaching out to the community in Pompano; Mary Phillips, president of the new Small Business & Economic Development Corp., for starting her small business organization; Major William H. Knowles, Broward Sheriffs Of ce, for his involvement in raising money for earthquake victims in Haiti and Lisa Hamburg, for spearheading the creation of the citys dog park and Phyllis J. Neuberger for her weekly stories in The Pelican spotlighting local volunteers. Shining StarsContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 25 Friday, October 19, 2012

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26 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Send your fishing news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSI have been wanting to change it up a bit on the art side. I paint lots of sword sh bills as well as lots of medium sized paintings for private collectors and boat owners. But I have been itching to do some large pieces. I really just havent had the time to invest into these larger projects. In the past I have, on numerous occasions, bought canvases with the intent on doing these large pieces. Unfortunately, they begin to collect dust as I start other projects. I guess I am afraid RJ Boyle captures giant sword sh on canvas entitled Spooky Calm See PAINTING on page 27RJ Boyle knows how to capture sh, both on and off the water.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, October 19, 2012 directs two community redevelopment agencies in Pompano Beach and is the planning consultant for Oakland Park, Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, Dania Beach and Delray Beach. RMA was selected over Calvin Giordano and Associates, Michelle Melbourne, and Walter Keller. Keller has been the town planner since 1989 and in making his presentation said he never charged a retainer and would be happy to make whatever changes the commission thought necessary. He recently moved his company from Coral Springs to Sewells Point in Stuart, but said it would not affect his work with the town. Keller had the support of Commissioner Jim Lambert who said, If we have had no complaints, there is no reason to change. Is someone unhappy with Walters work? Mayor Dan Dodge cited poor response times from Keller and said, Change can be good. This is an opportunity to save on the rates passed on to residents. There will be some major impacts here in the near future and an opportunity to give fresh eyes to situations . there are going to challenges. In making his presentation, Brown said, Cities hire us to make change, to make their cities more livable, more beautiful. We are not interested in just processing. One of the cornerstones of Browns 25-year career in planning is the redevelopment of Atlantic Boulevard in Delray Beach RMA will charge the city $100 an hour for its services. Much of the planning costs are passed through to the applicants in charges for plan review and permitting. HillsboroContinued from page 15meaningful volunteer work. Registration and schedule info is at hoofers.floridatrail. org or call 954-609-4727 or 954-658-8386. Happy Hoofers and those interested are invited to the Florida Trail Association 30th Annual South Regional Conference Nov. 2 through Nov. 4 at at the Tanah Keeta Boy Scout Camp at 8501 SE Boy Scout Road., Tequesta. Camp sites, dorm rooms and cabins are available as well as sites for RV trailers. Activities include: guided nature hikes with certified Florida Master Naturalists, canoeing/kayaking on the Loxahatchee river, presentations on invasive plant management, native wildlife, edible bugs, and edible native plants; hands on learning to carve a hiking stick and proper trail maintenance. Contra dancing, stargazing, campfire, wuz-Nu raffle and silent auction are part of the event. Everyone is welcome. The Florida Trail Association develops, maintains, protects and promotes a network of hiking trails throughout the state, including the unique Florida National Scenic Trail. Together with partners the group provides opportunities for the public to hike, engage in outdoor recreation, participate in environmental education and contribute to Trail group conference set in Tequesta Nov. 2 to start the canvas just to walk away halfway through the painting. Painting is like being on an emotional roller coaster. You go through phases of the painting where you are starting and you straggle with wondering if you want to continue. You hope nobody walks in and sees where you are at that point in the painting. Other times, it starts to take shape and your excitement begins to rise as you see success in the near future. Believe it or not, painting is really emotional and really plays on your mind. This painting is six feet high and is painted in acrylics. The painting is called Spooky Calm and it is painted to look a little aged. It harkens back to those days long ago when giant sh roamed the oceans without intervention. It also feels dreamlike for me. It has that surreal feeling wondering if a sh like that is out there waiting for me. None the less, I love artwork and doing paintings. If you get a chance, stop by the shop and see some interesting large paintings. PaintingContinued from page 26

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28 The Pelican Friday, October 19, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954-783company, we have many foreign investors showing active interest in our market. Garrett reminds readers, that their team offers a free home value and market analysis. Most sellers are unsure of the true values of their properties. Our analysis is not a guessing game, because there is so much information readily available. We do a complete review of county tax records plus a comprehensive study of comparable properties that are listed and have sold in the surrounding areas of the buyers/sellers property. We come up with a realistic selling price. Heres what a few clients have to say about the Garrett James team: Ian Norris says, Garrettt was able to bridge the gap between us and the seller and bring the entire transaction to a favorable resolution. We now own a parcel of land in Fort Lauderdale where we will be building our new corporate headquarters. The Pelican spoke with Kenan Packman in New York who is a property management client of Garretts. Packman said, We love our Florida second home and try to visit often. However, we are so far away we are happy to have a professional like Garrett handling a lot of things in our absence. He makes sure our pool and yard maintenance is done correctly, handles the security systems, checks the property after friends have used it for visits, and supervises occasional upgrades. Its reassuring to know your second home is being well cared for. For further information Contact Garrett Wayne at 786-303-2222 or James Paul Williams at 954-612-3295.ColdwellContinued from page 8

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