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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00321
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 10-12-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00321

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Friday, October 12, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 41 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican 46 days left in 2012 Hurricane season October is Breast Cancer awareness month October is Domestic Violence awareness month Blimp rides up for grabs at society bene tBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach -They will be Dressing to Kill on Oct. 19 at the annual fundraiser for the Pompano Beach Historical Society. The event, Casino Royale, takes place at Galuppis on the Green, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach from 7 to 10 p.m. The $100 ticket/donation includes dinner, open bar, entertainment and $200 in chips to use at one of the many gaming tables, Mayor Lamar Fisher will auction two blimp rides, but there will be many other prizes at the Chinese Auction. Brush up on your poker and other table games. And with the James Bond theme in play, dress with a license to kill. This party is a major fundraiser to support the work of the historical society with a mission to preserve the heritage and history of Pompano Beach and those who have lived here. The event is open to the public. For more information visit the website www.pompanohistory.com or call 954-609-7974Commission heeds residents concerns over public bathroom By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Residents of the Oriana condominium were out in force this week to make sure commissioners heard their vehement opposition to plans for a public bathroom near their homes. A dozen of them signed up to address the commission, urging them to reconsider a decision reached in See CONCERNS on page 21 Two grants will give public better access to history, cultureBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach One day, the little red caboose that has been parked alongside the FEC tracks, will be an attraction at the Railroad Museum and story tellers at Constitution Park will be spinning their tales from a stage. Both projects will be funded from the remains of a county bond issue approved by voters in 2000. The local funding has been approved by Broward Vice Mayor Kristin Jacobs whose district includes Deer eld Beach. It is just the beginning of the process required to actually spend $78,000 to move the caboose, $150,000 for the stage in the arboretum at Constitution Park. See GRANTS on page 28By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors When Nick Berry looks at a vending cart he sees an unfair advantage. So Berry, co-owner of Shawn and Business owner cries foul over vending cartsNicks Courtyard Caf and Gelato Station, both on Wilton Drive, has asked city commissioners to do something about them. Its not a level playing eld, said Berry, See CARTS on page 19Wilton Manors Zachary Duffy-Sweeney, 2, of Oakland Park, tries lifting a pumpkin on Sunday at the Wilton Manors Kiwanis Clubs annual Pumpkin Patch. The patch, located at Five Points in front of iberia Bank, 2465 Wilton Drive, sells pumpkins, hay and corn stalks Mondays through Fridays from 12 to 9 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. All proceeds bene t the Kiwanis backpack food program for disadvantaged children, Kids Day and the other community programs the Kiwanis Club organizes throughout the year. [Photo by Michael dOliveira]

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2 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 Docents needed for Sample-McDougald HousePompano Beachs signature historical structure, the 1916 Sample-McDougald House, is looking for individuals who are interested in the past and enjoy interacting with others to become volunteer tour guides. The Sample-McDougald House is the only Pompano Beach property listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and is one of the oldest homes in the area that has been preserved in its original con guration. Following its $2.5 million restoration and site development, the house and grounds are opening to the public and for special events. Volunteers will be provided with training sessions that will cover the history of the house and the general community, as well as information on the landscape, interacting with visitors and safety procedures. The rst session will take place on Oct. 20, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the House, 450 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. A second session will be held on Oct. 27. Call 954-691-5686.Pompano Library seeks some new friendsPompano Beach Friends of the Pompano Beach Library has been around long before Friend became a verb. Members support the library in various ways as volunteers and supporters. On Oct. 20, the library hosts a new member reception from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach. The public will also get updates on the new county library proposed and underway across from city hall. Refreshments and book purchases will be available. Call 954786-2181. VolunteerBroward At the 27th Annual Beach Cleanup, sponsored by Ocean Conservancy and Broward County Natural Resources Planning and Management, more than 2,400 volunteers removed 7,100 pounds of trash from Broward County beaches. Volunteers collected trash that included a toilet seat, windsock, snake head, bicycle, bar stool, wallet, rake, tiara and a $10 bill. The largest category of collected trash was cigarettes and smoking items, amounting to 23,000 cigarette butts collected from 13 sites. Participating volunteers represented several municipalities, including Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lauderdale-By-TheSea, Fort Lauderdale, Dania Beach, Hollywood and Hallandale Beach. Volunteers included high school ecology clubs, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, private companies and Broward County employees, all interested in helping the environment. The International Coastal Cleanup, typically held on the third Saturday of September, has attracted nearly 10 million volunteers from more than 150 countries with volunteers collecting nearly 200 million pounds of trash from the shores of lakes, streams, rivers and oceans on just one day annually. For more information on the International Coastal Cleanup, visit the Ocean Conservancys website, oceanconservancy.org. Butts and snake heads gone from beach

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The Pelican 3 Friday, October 12, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors There wont be a parade but Wicked Wilton promises to be just as festive and as much fun. On Oct. 31, Wilton Drive will be closed down from 3 p.m. to 3 a.m. [from Northeast 21 Court to Five Points] to make room for Wicked Wilton, the citys annual Halloween event; organized this year by the Rainbow Business Coalition, or RBC. The party goes from 6 to 11 Over 15,000 expected for Wicked Wiltonp.m. Bars and restaurants along the street will be open after the event of cially ends. Its an adult-themed Halloween block party. It will be Stonewall on a smaller scale, said RBC Co-Chair Reece Durham, who added that the music will be turned down in the last hour to lessen the disturbance to residents. Were very, very cognizant of the neighborhood. Unlike Stonewall Summer Pride there wont be a parade or booths but many of Wilton Drives bar and restaurants will be staking out their own little party areas. All those areas will have their own fairy tale themed parties. The whole idea is well close down the street and it will be a three quarters of a mile [long] block party, said Durham. There will also be three locations for food vendors and costume contests in each area. About 15,000 party-goers are expected to descend on Wilton Drive for the event, See WICKED on page 13SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com 10-12 Jazz on the Square from 7 to 11 p.m. at Pelican Square, east end of Commercial Boulevard, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 954776-1000. 10-15 Business Networking Open House at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. The focus of the event is The KnowHow to Support Your Small Business. 954-586-1111. 10-16 Wilton Manors Candidates Night at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. All four candidates for city commission will attend to answer questions. Refreshments will be served. 954-783-8700. 10-17 Cocktails for A Cause at East End Brasserie 601 N. Forth Lauderdale Beach Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, from 7 to 10 p.m. Bene ts Broward Childrens Center. Cost is $25 pre-pay See SIGHTNGS on page 18

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4 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 Oakland Park The Dachshund Dash is always a popular attraction at the Oktoberfest celebration in Oakland Park. The two-day event, Oct. 5 and 6, featuring German dancers and music, foods and beer, a carnival and beer barrel row, attracted hundreds of visitors to Jaco Pastorius Park. The event was sponsored by the city and Oakland Park Main Street. City Commissioner Shari McCartney, at left, calls the winner in a close race. [Staff photo] Dachshund race draws crowds at Okt. Fest Former mayors trial set to begin Monday By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach After four years under the cloud of a public corruption charge, former mayor Al Capellini is expected to get his day in court next week. Jury selection is scheduled to begin Monday, Oct. 15 before Circuit Court Judge Carlos Rebollo. Capellini, 64, was charged with unlawful compensation in 2008. The charges stem from a complaint that he voted favorably on a local project despite the fact his rm, Crain Atlantis Engineering, had been hired as a consultant for the project. According to the record, Atlantis was paid $16,500 to get development of an of ce park on Natura Boulevard through governmental approval processes. Four attempts by his attorney David Bogenschutz to get the case dismissed were rejected by Rebollo. In 2010 the state attorneys of ce reworked the charges. All of these actions have contributed to the delay in the trial. In the meantime, Capellini, who was city commissioner and mayor here for 20 years, has remained out on bail.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, October 12, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point The new green or beige recycling carts are ying off the shelves at the Public Works Department. Director Art Graham said the rst 500 were distributed by four work crews Monday and Tuesday. The remainder of the 1,000 carts currently in stock are expected to be gone by Friday. Another shipment of 1,000 will come in two weeks. Distribution is on a rst call, rst served basis. Available to residents are either a 48 gallon or 65 gallon cart on wheels which is easily brought to the curb. With the countys acceptance of New recycling carts are a hitsingle-stream recycling, the amount of recycled materials is expected to grow. Last year, residents using the small bins, recycled enough household material to earn the city a $136,000 rebate from the county, which was used to purchase the new carts. To date this year we are number three in per capita recycling, Graham said. For the last 10 years, we have been number one many times. The entry of Hillsboro Beach, with its small population, into the recycling competition has been challenging to this citys percentages. Graham has ordered 3,600 of the carts. By the end of October, he expects 3,000 will be in use. While the carts are mandatory in some cities, here residents who prefer, may continue to use the small bins. However, Graham said, the goal is to have every home in the city equipped with the rolling recycling containers. To get on the cart list, ll out the application online at www.lighthousepoint.com, or call 954-946-7386.Old sewer lines found to be in good shapeLighthouse Point Sewer lines in the north end of town passed a safety check with ying colors this week. Tests performed by a contractor See SEWERS on page 9 Pompano GreenMarket returns tomorrow in new, temporary locationBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach All things fresh and organic return with the GreenMarket tomorrow from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at a new location: the southwest corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Because of scheduled construction, were moving the GreenMarket to the southwest corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard, said Dan Hobby, executive director of the Pompano Beach Historical Society and liaison to the GreenMarket, now in its tenth year. Were the longest, continuously operating green market in Broward County. Were also one of the increasingly few green markets that is locally operated. Were not operated by a corporation or management company, said Hobby. Organized by the Pompano Beach Historical Society, it was previously held on a patch of ground and asphalt located in Historic Downtown Pompano on Northeast 1 Street. But the city is building a plaza there so a temporary location was needed. We will move it back across when its done, said Pete Williams, president of the Historical Society and GreenMarket. Until then, he said, the event should bene t from a lot more space and parking.See GREEN MARKET on page 25

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6 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 41 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & Letters Dear Editor: Thanks to the efforts of our local small business owners and residents, Relay For Life of Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point and Hillsboro Beach has raised over $100,000 this year to make the 2012 fundraising campaign another great success in the Relays eleven year history. We owe a special thank you to Loren and Pheona Strassburg of Deer eld Thrift for organizing and sponsoring our nal fundraiser of the year, a treasure hunt and car wash at their business, which was held on Saturday, Aug. 18. To all those who participated, we appreciate your generous support toward our ght against cancer. Other local businesses who contributed to the success of this event with their nancial support include A Summer Place Consignments, Scuba Network, East Coast Services, Dalsimer Atlas Floral & Event Decorators, 101 Liquors, Denture Plus, X Terminator, Inc., Sunshine Gold Buyers, Cove Bagel & Deli, Boats 4 Less, Payless Jewelry, Barbaras Cleaning Service, Inc., and The Final Cut. Thank you so much for your support! Relay For Life of Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point and Hillsboro Beach October is Domestic Abuse Awareness month. We met Liz Becker this month who has worked with Women in Distress as a coach. We are pleased to publish her column regarding the impact on children when divorce or other circumstances changes their living conditions.Emotional Abuse In Split Custody Families How Do You Protect Your Kids?By Liz BeckerLIFE TRANSITION COACHWhen children have two homes,it is possible for them to experience emotional abuse by one of their parents. In split custody cases, one of the biggest challenges for the parents is coping with the loss of control of their children when they are not with them. This can trigger grief and negative behavior. That can either become emotional abuse or cause children to feel unprotected in either home. Unfortunately, there is no way to protect your children 100 percent from emotional abuse whether it be by the other parent, a bully at school or other adults in their lives. However, if you want them to feel protected there are de nitely things you can do. Parents must start with learning how to detect abuse. Warning signs of emotional abuse include a child acting fearful or anxious about disappointing people by doing something wrong. If you notice your child acting distant to the other parent or unusually extreme in his/her behaviors, this should be cause for concern. Because there are no physical scars when it comes to emotional abuse, the only way you will really know about it is if your child tells you or a third party he/she trusts. In some cases, an impartial eyewitness may bring it to your attention. Immediately after parents separate and the custody of the children is split, there are steps to take to ensure that the parent builds a strong bond with their child/children that will give them the ability to give their child the proper tools if any case of emotional abuse arises in the other home. Such steps include the following: 1. Dont focus on what you cant control; focus on the control you do have when the children are with you. Do not interrogate them, do not send messages to the other parent through them and most of all do not overreact to any information that is given to you by them. The more you stay calm and collected, the more comfortable the children will feel. 2. Control emotional outbursts and show con dence and security. If a child feels safe with you, he or she will most likely con de in you knowing that you will make the right choices. If you show signs of confusion, distress, or instability, it will be very hard for a child to open up about abuse. 3.If you dont have a respectful relationship with the other spouse and the child tells you about something that he/she has done that you dont agree with Recycling at The Pelican has come to a halt, but please recycle elsewhereWe have learned the company we used to recycle newspapers to bene t the Sample-McDougald House has gone out of business. We thank all of the readers who have brought their papers here in support of the Sample House. Recycling is one way all of us can continue to help the environment. We urge everyone to take advantage of the newspaper recycling locations in Pompano Beach. Here they are: Fire Station #3 2001 NE 10 Street Pompano Beach, Florida 33060Relay for Life team raises over $100,000 for cancer research Halloween eventsPumpkin PatchWilton Manors The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club has opened its annual Pumpkin Patch at Five Points in front of Iberia Bank, 2465 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Pumpkins will be on sale from 12 to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. All proceeds bene t the Kiwanis backpack food program for disadvantaged children, Kids Day and the other community programs the Kiwanis Club organizes throughout the year. Party in the Patch Pompano Beach The Pink Church will hold its Annual Party in the Patch on Saturday, Oct. 20 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave. There will be pumpkins, face painting, kids crafts, photo ops, local vendors and more. Proceeds bene t the schools of the Pink Church. For more information, call 954-941-2308.Halloween Horse Show and FairPompano Beach The Halloween Horse Show and Fair will be held Saturday, Oct. 20 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sands and Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., north side of the Good Year Blimp Base. The event, cosponsored by the City of Pompano Beach, includes a costumed Horsey Half Time Show, costume contest, pony rides, mini horses, hay rides, bounce houses, games, pumpkin patch, food and more. All proceeds bene t Bit-ByBits Therapeutic Riding Center and Horses for Heroes Veteran Rehabilitation Program. Visit www.BitByBitTherapy.org or call 954-786-4507 for more information.Trunk or Treat on Halloween Street Pompano Beach Trunk or Treat will be held on Friday, Oct. 26 at 6 p.m. at city hall, 100 West Atlantic Blvd. Trunk or treat street will provide a safe and fun way for families to enjoy Halloween. Children will trick or treat for candy out of decorated car trunks or truck beds. Other fun activities will include ghostly games, bounce houses, spooky crafts, movie and costume contests. Admission is free to the event. Entering a trunk in the decorating contest is $5. To enter, call 954-786-4111. Oceanside Parking Lot 109 North Ocean Boulevard Pompano Beach, Florida 33062 City Hall rear parking lot 100 West Atlantic Boulevard Pompano Beach, Florida 33060 See HALLOWEEN EVENTS on page 27 See ABUSE on page 7

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The Pelican 7 Friday, October 12, 2012 [not an emotional abuse situation], do not relay this information to the other parent because he/she most likely wont listen to you and you may lose your childs trust when more serious issues arise. There are differences in parenting between the two homes, and those will show up continuously. 4. Make sure your child feels that you are completely approachable at all times to discuss any concerns he/she has. 5. Pay close attention to changes in your childs behavior and emotional states. If you notice any changes, and have a close and trusting relationship with your child, they will most likely express to you what they are feeling, which will help you assess the situation. If they dont, you will need to re-build rapport with them and gure out how to change your communication to ultimately get the response you want. Having your child open up to you cannot be forced, so if what you have done is not working, try talking differently or asking other questions. 6. If you have exhausted all means of building rapport and trust with your child and he/she still refuses to tell you what or how they are feeling, it is wise to take them to a third party with whom they may feel more comfortable. If your child is experiencing emotional abuse by the other parent, your reaction is going to be key in your ability to protect them and ease the situation. You are probably going to experience a wide range of emotions like anger, sadness and helplessness. But you must remain strong and con dent. It is very important for a child that is experiencing emotional abuse to maintain his/her sense of con dence and strength to be able to cope with the other parents abusive behavior. A good rst step is to call the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline at 1-800-4-a-child. You will need to start on your own with damage control. Here are some suggestions: 1. Do not speak to the other parent about the situation. It could trigger them to get even more upset with the child or escalate the abuse. 2. Find out how your child is reacting to the abuse, and let them know that it is okay if they are trying to appease the other parent to prevent further abuse. This does not mean that they are weak. This means that they are very strong because they are trying to control the situation. If they are doing the opposite by ghting back and the other parents reaction is escalating, have them understand that although you know they are doing it to show their strength, and that it is admirable. It is best for them to try to stay calm as possible. 3. It is imperative that the child understands that the parents unwarranted behavior is not their fault and that they do not deserve it. 4. Give your child the tools to diminish the validity of the hurtful words they are hearing from the other parent. One such tool is to remind them of another instance in which someone was mean to them and they did not care because they knew the other person was wrong. Focus on all the things your child does right, and point them out at every opportunity. When the child is at the safe home, make sure you use that time to build con dence. Talk about past situations when they successfully coped with a challenge. Although the challenge in the past may have been simpler, it was still a challenge. By pointing this out, you are making them aware of their ability to cope, build con dence and lessen the effects of abuse. 5. Let the children know their reality can be different from the reality of an abusive parent. If the child realizes that the other parent has serious behavioral and emotional issues, they are choosing to act this way to somehow satisfy their pride, the child will have more control over the effect of the abusers words and behaviors. These tips should help you protect your child from emotional abuse to some degree, but it is important for parents to seek professional help for themselves and their children. The bene t here in the circumstance of split custody is that the protective parent does have the freedom and opportunity to make a difference when the child is at their home. AbuseContinued from page 6

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8 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFSince 1970 Stephen Silverstein, D.O. has been delivering dedicated medical services to a growing and loyal group of patients. In 2001 his son, Scott Silverstein, D.O. joined his practice, bringing his own skills to a forward looking medical approach. Both Dr. Silversteins are on the staff of Holy Cross and Imperial Point hospitals but their goal is to not only treat patients, but to help them stay out of hospitals by achieving better health through prevention. Their large suite of modern of ces, located at 729 E. Atlantic Blvd. in Pompano Beach, offers 11 examining rooms, an on-site lab for blood work, and frequently needed testing using diagnostic ultrasound, simple spirometry, EKGs and more. There is even a large Silver Sneaker tness area with Silver Sneaker trained instructors. This of ce is trilingual with English, Spanish and French speakers. Adding to the one stop feel of this practice are patient conveniences such as easily accessible covered parking and elevator service directly into the of ce. Of ce manager, Perla Korn-Silverstein, and her assistant, Melissa Stamolis, talked to The Pelican about Innovative Health & Wellness which offers professional medical services and many extras. Were all about preventing major physical problems from occurring by evaluating and handling every aspect of a patients health, Perla says. The goal of Dr. Stephen and Dr. Scott Silverstein is to prevent complications by recognizing a need before there is a complicated problem. Melissa adds, They accomplish this by spending time, one on one, getting to know a patient. They make time to listen to the patients concerns. An on-site lab saves that extra trip to an outside lab or medical facility for blood work, X-rays, ultrasounds, spirometry, EKGs and basic wound care. The Silver Sneaker program is free to the public with the proper insurance. Level one classes take place on Tuesdays and Fridays and for greater challenges, a cardio circuit class is also available on Fridays. Mike Masi, a trained Silver Sneaker tness instructor, teaches all three classes. Our medical records are all electronic, explains Father and son team up to offer many services to patients at Innovative Health & Wellness HEALTH ISSUES?On Oct. 19, look for The Pelicans rst health focus issues. We hope readers will enjoy some of these stories and offer comments. Advertisers for these pages should call 954-783-8700 for space availability. Topics next week are breathing issues, why kids need to be outdoors and a conversation about prostate cancer. Dr. Stephen Silverstein, left, and his son, Dr. Scott Silverstein, are enthusiastic believers in better health through prevention. [Photo courtesy of Innovative Health & Wellness]See TWO DOCTORS on page 25 Through OctoberCall 954-759-7500 to schedule your mammogram. Most insurance accepted, or self pay $115 cash or credit. Walk-ins welcome. Broward Health North, 201 E. Sample Road, Deer eld Beach. Womens Health Expo at North Broward is about a lot of funDeer eld Beach On Wednesday afternoon, 5 to 8 p.m., women will be the focus of a healthy feel and look. Dubbed Fun Girls Night, this free evening will focus on health, food-tasting, networking, presentations and exhibits. Some of the health topics include breast health, Botox and llers and tips to increase brain power. Mammograms, offered with insurance or $115 selfpay, will be available until 7 p.m. The event is cosponsored by the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. Its free and open to the public.Candidate debateThe Pompano Beach Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. will host a political candidates forum on Thursday, Oct. 25 at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., Pompano Beach. The forum will begin with candidate introductions, a discussion of the constitutional amendments and supreme court justices at 6 p.m. followed by a debate segment at 7. The program will last for approximately three hours, and it is hosted by the Pompano Beach Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. in partnership with the Broward County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. and the Chi Psi Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Candidates from this years State Attorney, County Commission, School Board, Judiciary, Sheriff, US Congress, US Senate, State House of Representatives and Clerk of the Court races have been invited to participate. Call 954-315-4552. 5 ft. high stilletto will be on exhibit through October for Breast Cancer Awareness month at Broward Health North.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, October 12, 2012 hired by Broward County revealed a leak at only one address, a foreclosed and abandoned home. Public Works Director Art Graham said the bank has been noti ed of the defect in the line. Another leak was found and repaired in a cleanout cap outside a house. Broward County Water and Wastewater Service has begun a four-year project to clean and examine with TV cameras all the citys sewer lines in the public right of way prior to refurbishing the pipes. At the end of the contract all the citys sewer pipes will be renewed, Graham said. The system dates back to the 70s when the city was built. The contract also calls for replacing main lines and force mains to improve water pressure. Residents were put on alert that workers would be in their neighborhoods with a smoke test which reveals fractures in the system. If smoke appears where it shouldnt, then its time to call a plumber, Graham said. Sewer fumes can present a potential danger, but are identi ed by their strong odor. Residents should expect more smoke tests in the future. Football, coed soccer signups this weekLighthouse Point Registration for fall youth sports leagues begins this week. Saturday, Oct. 13, signups for pee wee ag football will be held 9 a.m. at Frank McDonough Park, 3500 NE 27 Avenue, for kids ages 7-9. The coed youth soccer league will register players ages 10-13 Wednesday, Oct. 17, 7 p.m. at Dan Witt Park, 4521 NE 22 Ave. Registration for girls soccer begins Nov. 17, 7 p.m. at Dan Witt Park. Eligible players must be 10 15 years of age. SewersContinued from page 7By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach The jury trial involving police of cer Jim Woolsey, a 29year veteran of the local department, is scheduled to begin in federal court October 22. Woolsey is suing the town alleging Police Chief Tom Nagy discriminated against him because of his age when he was demoted from second in command to road patrol in 2010. At the same time, the chief promoted a lieutenant, Jay Szesnet, 37, to the position of major, making him the departments second ranking of cer. Woolsey is suing for back wages, compensatory damages, attorney fees and litigation expenses. At the time of his demotion, Woolsey was 52 and had been promoted by Veteran police of cer bringing federal lawsuit against Town of HilsboroNagy to the rank of captain in February 2008. According to Woolseys complaint, his promotion was one of Nagys rst actions as Hillsboros police chief. In July, 2010, also according to Woolsey, Nagy told him to hand in his retirement papers or he would make your job very dif cult. When Woolsey declined to retire, Nagy reportedly said, Im going to bring you down in an embarrassing ball of ame, In August of that year, Szesnet was named to the newly created rank of major. At the same time Woolsey was ordered to surrender his take-home car, turn over his paperwork to Szaesnet and was assigned to the midnight shift. In September, Woolsey was demoted to patrol of cer and his annual base pay reduced from $85,900 to $72,000. He is contending that his age was a substantial, See LAWSUIT on page 20

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10 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-7838700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach Robert Holmes may not look nor feel like a pioneer, but he can paint a picture of a rural farming community no one would recognize today. Born in Washington D.C., he was educated in the segregated south where he earned an A.B. degree from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga.. He arrived in Pompano in 1958 for his rst job as a math teacher at Blanche Ely High School. What made him choose to live in Pompano? He laughs and says, Well, Florida interested me because of the weather, and I had a girlfriend in Deer eld Beach. I guess that was reason enough for a young man to choose a destination. He describes Pompano as a laid back rural area with bean farms. I lived in a segregated section of the city and I still live there. It was a friendly, comfortable community with a strong church presence. I related to it then and still do. I am a member of New Creation Baptist Church and have served as chairman of the Deacons Ministry since 1993. Holmes became part of the integration of Pompano as a member of a biracial committee established by then Mayor Stewart Kester. That was the beginning, he says. We now have good representation in the city government. I feel that I, and any other African American, can live anywhere we can afford to live in Pompano Beach. I have chosen to remain in my same area because I want to help motivate our young population to achieve their potential. His philosophy, he says, is molded into me since my early years at Morehouse which stressed, You make a living by what you earn, but you make a life by what you give back to others. I have tried to live with this goal in mind. He currently serves as an alternate on the zoning board of appeals, a member of the Budget Review Committee, and is treasurer of the Unity in the Community Inc. of Pompano Beach. He was married for 24 years and has two sons, two Retired Assistant Principal Robert Holmes, of Pompano Beach, to be designated a Broward County Pioneer Oct. 20HEALTH ISSUES?On Oct. 19, look for The Pelicans rst health focus issues. We hope readers will enjoy some of these stories and offer comments. Advertisers for these pages should call 954-783-8700 for space availability. Topics next week are breathing issues, why kids need to be outdoors and a conversation about prostate cancer.Focal Point Wellness Expo SaturdayDeer eld Beach The 12th annual Health and Wellness Expo, hosted by the NE Focal Point, will be held Saturday, Oct. 20, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 227 NW 2 Street. Activities include health screenings, u shots, door prizes, entertainment, refreshments and vendors with health information for all ages. To register for a u shot, call 954-480-4449. Health screenings include balance, blood pressure, bone density, carotid artery, glucose levels and body mass index. Mammograms will be available by appointment at 561-955-4700. Information on healing touch, massage, podiatry, prostate health, pulse oximetry and skin cancer will also be available. grandsons and two great grandchildren. He says, My oldest son works in the food industry. My youngest son is the head of the Community Development Department of Lauderdale Lakes. We spend a lot of happy hours together. Holmes started as a math teacher and remained one for a good part of his long career in education. He served a twoyear stint as intern principal at Thomas Jefferson Jr. High in Miami. In 1980 he was chosen to be a curriculum planner for Broward Schools ESAA Magnet Program. He moved from this assignment to become an assistant principal at McNicol Middle School in Hollywood, a job he kept until retirement in 1992. Along the way he earned his M.S. degree from Barry University and continued post graduate education at Benedict College, Florida State, Florida Atlantic University and the University of South Florida. Throughout his life, Holmes has served and chaired many civic, school, county, alumni and church committees. His honors are legend. (See box). Asked what improvements he would like see in his city, he says, I would Cresthaven Watch meetingPompano Beach Current events will be the topic at the next Cresthaven Neighborhood Watch meeting Thursday, Oct. 18 at 7:30 p.m. at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church, 3331 NE 10 Terrace. Broward Sheriffs Of ce deputies will be on hand to answer questions about events in the neighborhood. For more information, call 954-7867536 or email carolwsw@ gmail.com.Garden Club meetsLighthouse Point The Lighthouse Point Garden Club meets on Thursday, Oct. 18 at 11 a.m. at the St. Pauls Education Center, 2700 NE 36 St., Pompano Beach. The topic is NatureScape for a Rainy Day: Increase Habitat and Improve Water Quality with Rain Gardens, Bio Swales and Riparian Buffers. For more information, call 954-975-9157.Conversation with Gloria SteinemFort Lauderdale Author, feminist and lecturer, Gloria Steinem, will host a community conversation on Oct. 21 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Artserve Auditorium, 1350 E. Sunrise Blvd., The conversation is sponsored by the Broward County Prochoice Coalition. The event is free and open to the public. RSVP by emailing beth@ browardgwencherry.com. Eager young math teacher arrives at Blanche Ely High School in 1958 Robert Holmes, center, visits with Mr. and Mrs. Jenning S. Coleman after enjoying a Glee Club concert sponsored by the Morehouse Alumni Chapter of Broward County. Holiday Boat Parade in DecemberPompano Beach The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce is looking for boats to be part of its 50th Annual Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade. Entry is free and every boat that participates will receive a hand-painted collectible glass ornament designed by local artist Pat Anderson. All decorations will be accepted. The parade will be held Sunday, Dec. 9 starting at 6 p.m. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. To enter, call 954-941-2940.See Holmes on page 11

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The Pelican 11 Friday, October 12, 2012 The Pelican! 954-783-8700 like to see our city have a short and long range plan for itself. If we had one, it would create a common goal for our commissioners instead of having them focus their interests on their own districts. He sums up his current status. Ive survived open heart surgery, a collapsed lung, and a recent automobile accident where the car was totaled but I walked away unharmed. That was like a message to me. God has more work for me to do, and I will keep on doing what I can. Thank you Robert Holmes for your efforts to improve life for those around you. Pancake breakfastOakland Park The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club hosts its annual Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, Oct. 27 from 7 to 11 a.m. at the Thomas P. Johnston American Legion Post 222, 4250 NE 5 Ave. Tickets are $5 for all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausages, coffee and orange juice. Servers will be dressed in Halloween costumes. All proceeds bene t the community projects organized by the Oakland Park Kiwanis Club. For more information, call 954-648-6170. HolmesContinued from page 10 Honors and AwardsNominee Whos Who Among Back Educators in America.1978 Nominee Outstanding E.S.E. Administrator 1991-2 School Board of Broward County 1998 Alumnus of the Year Award, Morehouse College National Alumni Association 2003 Outstanding Service Award, Morehouse College Natl Alumni Association 2005 North Broward County Links, Inc. Lifetime Achievement Award 2006 Presidential Service Award, Morehouse Natl Alumni Association Recognized as a Broward County Pioneer on Oct. 20,

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12 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Voters in this city will have a chance in March to decide if they want their local election moved from March to November during the general election in Commissioners divided on moving municipal elections from March to Novemberfuture years. Commissioners gave initial approval last week to put the charter amendment to referendum. The vote was 3-2, Mayor Anne Sallee and Commissioner Shari McCartney dissenting. Commissioners also approved on rst reading four other proposed changes to the city charter, all recommended by a Charter Review Board. All will be submitted for referendum if approved on second reading Oct. 17. Several residents spoke in favor of moving the election date. The goal is to get the people out [to the polls], said Joanne Darling, a resident and member of the Charter Review Board. The move would save a lot of money and attract more people, she said. Moving the election to November would result in substantially less cost and substantially greater turnout, said resident Sara Guevrekian. And as fewer cities hold March elections, costs will keep rising. This is not a luxury we can afford. She said moving the election to November was a win-win. Layne Walls, also a member of the Charter Review Board and a former mayor, urged commissioners to leave the city election in March. Municipal government is its own animal. It needs to be its own entity, Walls said. She noted that the Supervisor of Elections will charge the city for a November election, as well. The savings could be very little. Were Broward County taxpayers. Why do we have to pay for voting machines at all? With a move to November, Walls said the non-partisan city elections will become partisan. If voters approve the change, it wont be effective until at least 18 months after the City Commission approves the ordinance. To make the change, a municipality can either See ELECTIONS on page 17

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The Pelican 13 Friday, October 12, 2012 an event thats a partnership between RBC and the city. In addition to Wilton Manors being an of cial sponsor, RBC has hired the Wilton Manors Police Department to provide security. City commissioners speci cally requested RBC use the citys police personnel for the event. I want this to be a Wilton Manors event. Not a Wilton Manors/Broward Sheriffs Of ce [or BSO] event, said Commissioner Scott Newton at a recent meeting. Responded Durham, We want our Wilton Manors police there to represent. It makes sense. Durham said BSO has done a great job in the past and that the RBC would probably have to use them again in the future for bigger events like Stonewall when more police are needed than Wilton Manors can provide. Police Chief Paul OConnell said RBCs stewardship of the event has made a world of difference compared with some of the previous event organizers. This is a partnership, said OConnell. In two previous events, police working Wilton Drive werent paid by organizers. This year, theyre asking for and getting the money up front. I can understand why theyre a little ticked off, said Durham. Parking will be available at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive; Richardson Park, 1937 Wilton Drive; Pride Center, 2040 N. Dixie Hwy. and other locations for $10. Durham said the additional locations would be announced closer to the event. Visit www. wickedwilton.com for more information.WickedContinued from page 3Meet your next state senator for breakfastLauderdale-By-The-Sea State Senator Ellyn Bogdanoff [R] and Maria Sachs [D], both running for Dist. 34, will be at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber of Commerces monthly Power Breakfast meeting on Friday, Oct. 26 from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Blue Moon Fish Co., 4405 West Trade winds Ave. Both candidates will be part of a Q&A session. The cost is $20 and includes a gourmet breakfast. For more information, call 954776-1000.Small business workshopWilton Manors There will be a small business workshop on Thursday, Oct. 18 at 8:30 a.m. at the Hagen Park Community Center, 2020 Wilton Drive. The subject of the workshop is Maximize Your Marketing Efforts to Reach Your Targeted Customers. A light breakfast will be served. The event is free. To attend, RSVP with Randy Welker, economic development coordinator, at 954-390-2187 or send an email to rwelker@wiltonmanors.com

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14 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 October is breast cancer awareness month. Call the American Cancer Association to see how you can help as a volunteer in your community. The local chapter of EWGAs Golf Rally for a Cure revs up for its 5th annual golf event fund-raiser to help protect the women in our lives against cancer. This golf outing welcomes all levels of players, women and men, and offers great prizes. Mark Sunday, Oct. 21 for a 1:15 p.m. stroke play shotgun start at Deer Creek Golf Club, in Deer eld Beach. All golfers enjoy great golf, delicious dinner and the chance to win a boat. Hosting the event is the Executive Womens Golf Association, or EWGA, Fort fee is $95 which includes golf, range balls, tips, and dinner. Proceeds bene t The Womens Imaging Center of the Memorial Foundation to support breast and ovarian cancer research, screenings, and treatment. Visit www. ewgafortlauderdale.com to register. EWGA is a national organization, with 600 members in South Florida. New members are welcomed to learn, improve, play and enjoy the company of others who wish to share golf and networking. www. ewgafortlauderdale.com.Golf on Oct. 21, help breast/ovarian cancer researchEWGAS Golf Rally for a Cure Committee offers a Rinker Sport Boat HoleIn-One prize courtesy of The Boat Connection, West Palm Beach. Players can also win a 50/50 Raf e, golf clubs, bag, restaurant gift cards, golf lessons, at screen TV and dozens of other prizes. Pictured, L-R: Committee members Lila Abello of Deer eld Beach, Doree Garolsky of Delray Beach, Joanne Shulman, Committee Chairperson of Plantation, Karen Hord, Chapter President of Lighthouse Point, and Lori Ostrowski of Boca Raton. Not Pictured, Maxie Bryant of Boca Raton. Lauderdale Chapter. Entry

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The Pelican 15 Friday, October 12, 2012 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!

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16 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 Pompano Citi Centre will present its annual spooky Halloween Celebration on Wednesday, Oct. 31 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Enjoy a safe afternoon of fun, music, magic, games for the kids, candy bags, a parade of costumes and much more. This event is for families with kids ages 10 and under. Admission is free. We are very excited to welcome the community to the center and invite them to participate in this years Halloween Extravaganza, said Julie Katz, marketing and events manager at Pompano Citi Centre. A fun time will be had by all. For more information, call 954-943-4683 or visit www.pompanociticentre.com.Citi Centre hosts Spooky Halloween Celebration Lauderdale-By-The-Sea The Wernesgruen Brass Band from Germany will play at the opening of the Oktoberfest celebration of the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Property Owners Association. The event is set from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, at the Assumption Catholic Oktoberfest party set for Oct. 20Church Hall (behind the church) at 2001 S. Ocean Blvd. Pork roasts and brats will be provided by the association. Attendees are asked to bring a covered dish with a German air to share. Beer and wine will be served for a small charge. Local musician Aram Kassabian will provide music for dancing. There is no charge for association members. Nonmembers pay $7 per person. For more information and reservations, call Dennis Ritchie, club president, at 954-784-9495.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, October 12, 2012 extend or reduce an elected of cials term by up to eight months, according to information provided commissioners by D.J. Doody, city attorney. To implement a change in the election date at the earliest time permitted by law, the proposed ordinance shortens terms by four months. Vice Mayor John Adornato said he had no problem with a shorter term. He wanted more information on cost savings and is concerned about city races getting lost in the shuf e. He said it could cost candidates more to educate voters in November. Commissioner Jed Shank said, I feel very, very strongly about this issue, Commissioner Shari McCartney said. Our freedom, our very liberty is based on our ability to have direct input with elected of cials. Nowhere is that more profound than with municipal elections. Were talking about cost, but we havent talked about value, and theres a difference. She has asked for an audit of the election charges imposed by the county saying she doubts the costs the city is incurring are accurate. We can reduce our number of precincts, and that process might be worthwhile. In local elections, We can focus on the issues and candidates exclusively and not in the dust and fog of federal elections and 10 amendment items, she said. We can only focus on these [local] candidates and issues when they can be heard. With the onslaught of advertising and the onslaught of campaigning in the general election, Im telling you we wont get the best candidates heard, McCartney continued. The costs involved with running a campaign for a city election arent supposed to compete with a state house, she said emphatically. Theyre supposed to be 10 grand, not 20 and not 50. To win in a general election for this wee municipality thats what youre going to be spending. Those lobbyists you claim not to like, theyre going to be writing the checks. We may save money, but were losing a lot, McCartney said. Were trading liberty for a $50,000 budget item. We need to seriously think about this some more. Sallee said that with a November election the city may lose candidates. She said its in March when local candidates can walk the streets and talk to the people door-todoor. Were the ones who x your potholes and get your water reconnected, she said. In November, she said the local candidates wont be heard. You wont get the grassroots person who cares. Youll get the person who can get the lobbyist to write all those checks and thats how youll get elected.Other charter changesAnother charter amendment addresses the process of lling a vacancy in the position of vice mayor by awarding the job to the person who gets the third highest number of votes in the previous regular municipal election. If that person isnt eligible, the commission would appoint the vice mayor. Doody reminded commissioners that this issue came up when vice mayor (Anthony Niedwiecki) resigned and the charter had no way to address the situation. Candidates in Oakland Park arent elected mayor or vice mayor. Instead, those receiving the rst and second most votes become part of a rotating process to become mayor and vice mayor. Commissioners also approved an ordinance permitting the city manager to approve contracts for construction of public improvements in accordance with the code of ordinances. (The code requires purchasing through a competitive process in most areas.) Commissioners amended the proposed ordinance to remove proposed dollar amounts, which would have increased the amount of contracts the manager could approve without bids from $5,000 to $10,000. The vote was 4-1, Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue dissenting.Voting con ictCommissioners unanimously approved an amendment to require commissioners who have a voting con ict on a matter being considered by the commission to disclose that con ict prior to participating in discussion related to the matter. With this ordinance, commissioners can still take part in the discussion but must announce their con ict beforehand. Commissioners also approved an ordinance that would make the language in the charter gender neutral. And commissioners directed the city attorney to draft an ordinance for discussion to eliminate numbered commission seats and simply elect those with the highest number of votes. Adornato felt the elections would be less contentious with the change. ElectionsContinued from page 12

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18 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 3 and $25 at the door. Appetizers will be served. Visit www. bcckids.org or 954-943-7336. 10-17 Final ArtHall of the season takes place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. Local artists work will be featured. 954-586-1111. 10-18 South Florida Mustangs, the worlds rst LGBTQ square dance club, will hold a beginner class from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at Island City Park Preserve, 823 NE 28 St., Wilton Manors. Cost is $5 at the door. No dress code and no partner needed. 305899-1710. 10-18 Lighthouse Point Garden Club meets at 11 a.m. at the St. Pauls Education Center, 2700 NE 36 St., Pompano Beach. The topic is NatureScape for a Rainy Day: Increase Habitat and Improve Water Quality with Rain Gardens, Bio Swales and Riparian Buffers. 954-9759157. 10-19 Deer eld Beach Computer Club meets from 10 to 11:30 a.m. every Friday except holidays in Century Village East Le Club/Activity Center, Room B, 3501 West Drive, Deer eld Beach. Non-residents must show ID to security. $1 per person fee waived for rst time guests. Visit www.db-cc.org or call 954-725-9331. 10-20 Grannys Attic from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Over 80 vendors selling trinkets and treasures. Admission is free. 954-7864111. Hope to see you there! 10-20 Walk for Peace at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., at 8 a.m. Cost is $10 for children 18 and under and $12 for adults. The walk promotes self con dence, tness and tolerance. 754-322-8950. 10-26 & 27 Book sale at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 27 St. from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 26 and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Oct. 27. 954-6304370.Election Updates10-26 Democrat Maria Sachs and Republican Ellyn Bogdanoff debate issues for state senate District 34] election at 7:30 a.m. at Blue Moon, 4405 West Tradewinds Ave., Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Cost for breakfast is $20. Call 954-776-1000.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the See SIGHTINGS on page 20

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The Pelican 19 Friday, October 12, 2012 pointing out that brick and mortar business owners have to invest tens of thousands in rent and other expenses while people with carts can park on the sidewalk and still make money with a much smaller investment. [They] have no equity in our city, said Berry, who added that he and his business partner donate a lot to local community organizations. He estimated that he spent $100,000 last year to stay in business on Wilton Drive. Commissioners agreed with Berry. Its a legitimate concern, said Commissioner Ted Galatis. They dont have a vested interest in our city, said Commissioner Julie Carson. But that wont keep them out. You cant prohibit it, but you can regulate it, said City Attorney Kerry Ezrol. In 2003, carts were included as an approved use in what is now known as the Arts and Entertainment Special Overlay District. And in October of 2011, commissioners again gave approval to the carts when the overlay district was renamed. The district, which includes Wilton Drive and Dixie Highway, allows vending carts as well as outdoor dining, art galleries, parking garages, theatres, pet stores and other uses. In the materials provided to commissioners in October, vending carts appear at the very end of the list of allowed businesses. The devils in the details, ladies and gentlemen, said Galatis. Commissioners voted 4-0 on Tuesday to have city staff revise regulations. Mayor Gary Resnick was absent. Currently, the city allows carts in the public right of way as long as they dont block pedestrian or traf c, are a maximum of ve feet by ten feet and signage associated with them is limited to six square feet. Cart vendors must have a business tax receipt, and the city has approval over where carts are located. Im not comfortable having them in the right of way, said Carson. Last year, planning and zoning recommended the carts be allowed but only on private property and only if they are tied to a brick and mortar storefront that already has a business license with the city. So far only one person, Glenn Phillips, has asked to set-up a cart. Phillips, a chef who plans to open a hot dog cart, Dogs Gone Wild, at USA Auto on North Dixie Highway across from Publix, says hes tried to put a cart in Fort Lauderdale, Pompano Beach and other cities but has been unsuccessful. Its been a battle. Ive been bounced around every little city. I wish they would allow it more, said Phillips, who added that many cities seem to make starting a vending cart complicated on purpose. Im going to be giving someone a job. Isnt that what were trying to do in this country? Phillips said he hopes to be open in a week or two and offer something really special to capture taste buds. Street vendors dont take food away, he said. Some people want a fancy dinner and some people just want a hot dog.CartsContinued from page 1

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20 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com motivating cause of this treatment. The Florida Civil Rights Act makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate because of age or to deprive an individual of employment opportunities because of age. Two weeks have been set aside for the trial in Miami, US Dist. Judge Marcia Cooke presiding. Orders to hold mediations were ful lled with no settlement reached. Woolsey is represented by labor attorney Jennifer Daley with the Fort Lauderdale rm of Amlong & Amlong. Representing the city is Fort Lauderdale attorney Bruce Johnson who specializes in labor law. Johnson had not returned phone calls by presstime. LawsuitContinued from page 9Democrats take amendment questions to task Pompano Beach The North Broward Democratic Club will host Dr. Alice Levy, League of Women Voters, on Wednesday, Oct. 24 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Levy, a member of the League will discuss the state ballot questions that will be decided by voters on Nov. 6. The meeting is open to the public and free. Call 954-7838232.SightingsContinued from page 18month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.Saturdays Pony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.See SIGHTINGS on page 27

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The Pelican 21 Friday, October 12, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 July to place a public bathroom in an alleyway between Anglins Fishing Pier and the Oriana. My house butts up against the beach accessway, said Maj Soueidan. This affects me and all my neighbors. This is not a rose garden. Its a public bathroom. I dont think a homeowner should have to bear that. He suggested commissioners step back and see what else is available so it becomes a win-win for everyone. Soueidan said his home will lose a signi cant amount of value if the restroom is built nearby. How much would you pay for a townhome thats 15 feet from a public restroom? asked Dan David, a part owner of Soueidans property. To put this bathroom in a residential area is virtually beyond belief, said Oriana resident Ned Seibert. I dont think this is fair. He said there are commercial areas where the bathroom could be located. Seiberts wife Dorothy said she thought the town needed to provide a formal notice if something like this were to be done. Shes lived in areas where neighbors had to be noti ed of a deck addition. Weve been out of the loop. Were Johnny come lately because we didnt know about the plans, she said. Dorothy Seibert said the residents still havent seen any exact information on where the bathroom would be located. But we know where the property line is, and [the alleyway] is extremely narrow. It would be very near the residences. Unless theres a compelling, urgent reason why would you penalize the residents? she asked. Will Powers said there are already problems with vagrancy, intoxicated people and illicit behavior in the area. We dont want any more issues than we already have. Public restrooms are a breeding ground for illicit behavior. They should be built in public, lighted areas that can be controlled. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser, who voted for the alleyway site in July, put the issue on Tuesdays commission agenda in response to the many calls he received from Oriana residents. He said a couple of things kept ringing true to him. One was he didnt feel the plans were communicated well enough to residents. In all the other projects weve done there has been lots of public input. Im usually the one who wants things to go faster. But this maybe went too fast without enough information, Sasser said. Sasser acknowledged there is never going to be a good place to put bathrooms. He said a lot more discussion needs to happen. And with so many projects in the works, this one is not a high priority for him. Sasser asked that it be postponed to a date uncertain, or to be discussed in 2014. Commissioner Mark Brown said he is a longtime proponent of public bathrooms somewhere downtown, but he didnt favor the site next to Oriana. He supported putting the facility in El Prado Park or in a parking lot near the Country Ham & Eggs restaurant. Now that theyve heard the feedback from the Oriana residents, he suggested putting off a decision until construction work is completed on Commercial Boulevard and then looking at sites. Commissioner Chris Vincent, who also favored the El Prado site earlier, applauded the Oriana residents for turning out. He said not enough had been done to engage them. And though he called for public bathrooms downtown when he campaigned for ofce, Vincent said he would like to see the matter stricken now and looked at way down the road. I feel its our duty to provide public bathrooms but not next to Oriana, he said. Commissioner Stuart Dodd said the commission has yet to see any plans for the public bathroom. Its a pending site, he said, and they have no idea how many feet it is from the homes. He urged residents to call the Broward Sheriffs Of ce if theyre seeing problems in the area, such as public urination. Dodd said there is no ideal place for the public restrooms. Everyone wants bathrooms but not in their backyard. Were damned if we do and damned if we dont. But when the overwhelming voice from the public is we dont want it here that does in uence the way we operate. He agreed the matter should be postponed. We havent seen this kind of excitement or this kind of anger in a long time, said Mayor Roseann Minnet. She assured the Oriana residents they had been heard and agreed the decision on bathroom location should be reconsidered. Minnet suggested the issue be brought up again when the commission works on improvements on El Mar Drive, perhaps the end of next year. Commissioners unanimously approved a motion calling for no further work on the public bathroom project. I bet youve never seen government work like that, Minnet said to the residents. As he left the meeting, Soueidan said he was happy with their decision and pleasantly surprised. They heard our voices, and they seem to care. ConcernsContinued from page 1

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22 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Lead Diesel Truck MechanicsWe have an immediate opening for Lead Diesel Mechanics in Pompano Beach. We provide excellent pay and benefits. We require a minimum two years experience, your own tools, good driving and work history. CDL drivers license would be helpful but is not required. Apply in person at Salem National Lease/ Freightliner office c/o Atlantic Truck Center, 2840 Center Point Circle, Pompano Beach, FL 33064 or apply online www.salemleasing.com.Jobs HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 10-19 CAREGIVER / COMPANION Seeking Work. Available Days. Northwest Broward Area. Available For Dr. Appts. Shopping & Light Housekeeping. References Available / Own Car. $12 / Hr. Call 954-801-7305 Or 954-7206815. 10-12 HHA Very Caring. 15 Yrs Exp. W/Dementia, Alzheimers, Etc. Drive, Take To appts., Grocery Shopping, Live In Or Hourly. Please Call 954-203-0698. 10-12 ELDERLY CARE/ MEDICAL Medically Licensed Health Professional. Over 20 Years Exp. Comfortable With All Medical Equipment. Very Flexible. Reliable & Compassionate. Lisa 754-245-3839. 10-12 LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954-8957850. 10-12 AIDE / CAREGIVER Seeks Position To Care For Your Sick Or Elderly. State Certi ed, Honest, Reliable & Caring. 954-554-5640 Or 786-4447043. 10-12 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954232-2832. Very Reasonable! 10-12 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 10-19 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees Landscape Yard Fill Pressure Wash Roofs Home Repairs Welding Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 10-26 RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL CLEANING IN Pompano Lighthouse Point Deer eld. Dependable Thorough Experienced. References. Call Ana 954-6924691. 10-26 EXPERIENCED DRIVER AVAILABLE! TO & FROM STORES DOCTORS APPOINTMENTS AIRPORT, ETC. CALL MARYANN 954-895-3202. 11-2 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 10-26 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1012 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CAntiquesTwo antique cabinets Mahagony, 3 shelves, 6 ft. high. $200. Champagne colored 3 shelves, 3 lower doors. Chrome engraving $150. Call 954696-3076. 10-12 COLLECTIBLESWANTED CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques Artwork US Stamps. Coins Silver Or Gold Vintage Jewelry Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 11-2 SHARE TOWNHOUSETAMARAC Share Newly Renovated 3 / 2 Townhome. Professional Or Retired Female. $600 Per Month Plus Utilities. Call 954-618-3003 Or 401-215-7271. 10-19 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 DUPLEXESPOMPANO BEACH E OF Federal Hwy. 2/1 Enclosed Porch W/Washer & Dryer. Central Air. New Tile Floors. No Pets $1,100 Mo. 954-8229395. 10-19 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO PVT ROOM & BATH $500 MONTH. Includes Utilities, Cable, Internet. Walking distance To Shopping. Call 954-793-1363. 10-12 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like Youre On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. 10-12 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE Corner 2 / 2 1st Floor Updated! NEW Kitchen. Golf Course View! Best Building. New Roof. BIRD REALTY 954-491-8767. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH THE CLARIDGE Large Updated 2 / 2 Corner Penthouse Ocean Intracoastal & City Views! Washer / Dryer In Unit. Impact Glass. $498,500. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. Please Call 954-803-4174. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324.CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH ON WATER 1 / 1.5 Furnished. Beautiful Sunsets / Waterviews Of Canals / St. George Waterways From Floor To Ceiling Windows. $925 Mo. 1 Year Lease. 954-785-7571 Or 954-649-4373. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2 / 1 Pool! Sunroom Ground Floor, Beautifully Furnished. On Golf Course. $750 Mo. 1 Year +. Good Credit. 917-5440771. 10-5

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The Pelican 23 Friday, October 12, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds work for you! 954-7838700! POMPANO 1 / 1.5 UPDATED 1st Floor. Screened Patio. Community Pool. Small Waterfront Complex. $1,200 Month. Dockage Available For Rent. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. Please Call 954-803-4174. 10-12 LIGHTHOUSE PT 2 / 2 ---1st Floor 55+. Pool, Unfurnished. Laundry Facilities. $895 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-5624919. 10-12 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT ITS BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like Youre On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. 10-19 LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 10-19 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 10-19 POMPANO 1 / 1 APT. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 10-19 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 2/1 $750 NW NE 1/1 $675 2/1 $950 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 10-19 POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W / D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. POMPANO BEDROOM LIVING ROOM BATH NO Kitchen. Partially Furnished. All Utilities Paid. Private Yard & Separate Entrance. $175 Week Deposit $175. 954-8228327. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH LARGE EFFICIENCY Partially Furn. $650 Per Month. $350 Deposit 2 Weeks Notice. Includes A/C, Cable, Pvt Entrance, Parking. 954-6380167. 10-12 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 10-19 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Season. 500 To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 11-2 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 11-2 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 10-19

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24 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Pelican Classi eds work for you 954-783-8700! SPECIAL TO THE PELICANSt. Nicholas Episcopal Church will offer a free Last Things Forum at 6 p.m., on Wednesday, Oct. 17 to which the public is welcome. Advanced planning while healthy can make for better decision-making. Advanced planning can be a great gift for grieving loved ones, said the Rev. Mark Andrew Jones, BSG. Fr. Jones will facilitate a panel discussion with Estates Lawyer Bill Sullivan, David King from Hospice of Broward, Galvin Mitchell, a Social Worker with North Broward Medical Center, Grief Support Coordinator Debra McLaughlin, and Ken Stolar, who is associated with Kraeer, Babione and Forest Lawn Funeral Homes, Cremation Centers & Cemeteries. Also participating will be Carolyn Mann, Regional Leader of Primerica Financial Services, who will address the subject of long-term care insurance. Mann reports that 70 percent of those who reach age 65 will need assistance with a daily living activity at some point in their lives. Perhaps the greatest benefit of long-term care insurance is that it can allow your loved one to care about you, instead of caring for you, said Mann. Everyone is invited to come and learn the advantages of planning and making arrangements before it becomes a necessity, said Fr. Jones. I would like to see young people and couples come, too; because, as a pastor, Ive seen the Saint Nicholas Church to offer free Last Things forumdifference it makes when tragedy strikes unexpectedly, added Fr. Jones. By offering this free seminar to our parishioners and neighbors, Saint Nicholas Episcopal Church is living out its mission of sharing, by the grace of the Spirit, the all-embracing love of God in Christ with everyone, celebrating diversity in fellowship, service and worship. Located at 1111 E. Sample Road in Pompano Beach, a Spanish Eucharist is offered at 7:30 p.m. on Saturdays, while English Eucharists are offered at 8 and 10:30 a.m. on Sundays, and Portuguese Eucharists are offered at 1 and 7 p.m. on Sundays. Come, See, and Share Our Peace. Vinde, vide e compartilhe nossa paz. Venga, vea y comparta nuestra paz.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, October 12, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@yahoo. com Melissa. This is a legal requirement which all doctors must comply with by 2014. Were ahead of the game. Its a big job to switch years of paper records, but were glad weve gone this route ahead of schedule. The advantages are many. She laughs as she says, The computer does not have the handwriting issues that many doctors are accused of having. Going electronic allows us to transfer and receive information instantly, a major improvement in diagnostic work. With this fast access, a patients health history is up to date and instantly available to the physician in the of ce, in the hospital or wherever that information might be needed. This is very important to a patient who might be involved in an unexpected accident, or become ill while traveling. Under normal conditions having an entire health history available immediately speeds up communication between the of ce, the doctor and the patient. Our practice offers another public service, says Perla. Anyone, patient or not, who stops in to visit us can bene t from a free blood pressure and glucose test. For speci c medical attention, appointments are necessary. However, if one of our regular patients is sick, that patient will be seen immediately without an appointment and need never head for the emergency room because medical help was not available. Between our two doctors and our on site physician assistants, sick patients are never forced to wait or go elsewhere for help. One patient, Mark Sullivan, writes, This medical center is top notch, very professional and dedicated. Rusty Garrett agrees. This is the nicest bunch of people to ever run a doctors of ce. Dr. Steve and his son, Dr. Scott, are the two best doctors on the planet. Deborah Tracht says, Dr. Stephen has been taking care of me, my husband, our mothers and other family members for many years and were all very satis ed with his and his sons excellent medical handling of all of us over this long period. Innovative Health & Wellness of ces are open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. for patient visits and lab work. Call 954-943-5044. Two doctorsContinued from page 8It will have a lot more space and a lot more visibility. Were expecting good things to result from that, said Hobby. Along with fresh fruits, vegetables, juices, baked goods, seafood, gourmet teas and coffees, art, books, orchids and other health-related products and services, Maria Ellis is ready to bring out her natural, handmade soaps again. I have a big customer base in Pompano Beach, said Ellis, who owns Gold Coast Soapworks and makes soap bars out of olive oil, coconut oil, cocoa butter and shay butter. Its really whats not in the soaps, she said, referring to the chemicals in soaps bought in stores. When the GreenMarket isnt in season, Ellis said she has to deliver her product to her customers. When the GreenMarket is up and running, they come to her. Its just easier to be in one location and have everyone come to me. And to go with the fresh or organic goods and live music and entertainment, there will be art shows, historical walking tours of Downtown, antique automobile shows, environmental exhibits and products and other special themes. We plan on having a lot more special activities, said Hobby. The GreenMarket will be held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. until April 27. The event is free to the public. Vendors pay $25 per Saturday per 10 ft. by 10 ft. space. Vendors can also pay for all 29 dates at a cost of $500, a discount of $225. Vendors who pay for four Saturdays get one Saturday free. Visit www.pompanohistory.com/ phc/market for more information. To become a vendor, email Debbi Moore, GreenMarket manager, at greenmarketpompano@gmail.com or call 352-369-7355. Green MarketContinued from page 5 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@yahoo. com

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26 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Send your fishing news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Divers, anglers team upBy Brian GagasGOLD COAST SCUBAOne of Lauderdale by the Seas most well known attractions is Anglins Fishing Pier, located in the heart of the city, at the end of Commercial Blvd. The pier extends almost 900 feet over the ocean and sits atop a beautiful coral reef. The pier is a hot spot for fishermen and tourists who can be found patronizing the attraction everyday. Divers also take advantage of this area because of the reef system so close to shore. Divers have noticed that because of all the fishing and foot traffic, trash has built up on top of the reef. Since divers have to stay 300 feet away from the pier, nothing can be done about it. Divers have witnessed turtles, sharks and other sea creatures See DIVERS on page 27By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSWahoo and sword sh seminar at the International Game sh AssociationThere is going to be lots of talent in the building this coming Monday, Oct. 18 at the International Game Fish Association, 300 Gulfstream Way, in Dania Beach. It will be a whos who of the best local fishermen in all of Florida. You dont want to miss this one. The topic is going to be a mix of swordfish and wahoo techniques. The guys we have chosen stand head and shoulders above most and excel in both fisheries. The headliners include Capt. Stan Hunt, Capt. Chip Sheehan, Capt. Bouncer Smith, Capt. Ray Rosher, Capt. Dean Panos, and Capt. Brandon Mullar. We will have many other top fishermen in the room as well that will give their input on teaching and technique. Skip Smith and I will be asking this panel of fishermen lots of tough and secret revealing questions that may help you in your quest for one of these two gamefish. We will have bait rigging tables as well as wahoo lure rigging tables for some hands on instruction. We have limited seating, so reserve your tickets now. Cost is $20. There will also be a raffle and a cash bar. For more information and tickets, call 954-420-5001.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, October 12, 2012 Pompano Beach Womens nine-hole leagueResults by Class: Odd Holes OnlyClass A 1st Place [tie] Susana Rust 27; Meryl Friedman 27 2nd Place: Maureen Hussian 30 Class B 1st Place [tie]: Joanne Price 32; Rita Melville 32 2nd Place: Diane Constantino 38Soreboard Pompano Beach Womens Golf Assn.Results Oct. 9 The Palms TROUBLE1st Place Sandra Gore, 2 2nd Place Vonnie OKeefe 3 [tiebreaker] 3rd Place Janet Stuart.3 POMPANO BEACH MENS GOLF ASSN. WED. Oct. 10 Two best balls of threesome1st placeJoe Patchen, Fernando Garcia, Jim DeCicco 118 2nd place Joe Gard, Ed Northrop, Paul Dauzickas 123 Closest to Pin, Palms #11, Bob Bridgman tangled up in mono-filament. Fishermen are also losing expensive tackle because they are getting their lines caught on trash and more rigs already caught below. Thanks to the efforts of Gold Coast Scuba, a local dive shop, and volunteer fishermen, there is now an ongoing effort to clean up the reef. Once every few months, fishing is closed on one side of the pier so divers can pick up trash on the other side. Divers place debris in buckets that are lowered from the pier by fisherman and PADI volunteers. PADI is home to Project Aware, a non-profit organization that supports the protection of our oceans and important issues like Sharks in Peril and Marine Debris. Once filled, the buckets are raised back up and trash is disposed of properly. The debris found under the pier is mainly fishing tackle like mono-filament, sinkers, hooks and fishing rods. But even cell phones, bottles and jewelry have been found. During a previous clean up divers successfully freed a tangled nurse shark and found a diamond engagement ring! If you would like to get involved with this important movement you can contact Gold Coast Scuba to sign up for the next pier clean up. Divers and top-side volunteers are always appreciated.DiversContinued from page 26 Halloween eventsContinued from page 6BSO Community DayWilton Manors The Broward Sheriffs Of ce will hold its Sheriffs Community Day at The Pride Center, 2040 N. Dixie Hwy., on Saturday, Oct. 27 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Events include free child ngerprinting, K-9 and police gear demonstrations. For more information, call 954831-8900.Falloween and Trunk or TreatOakland Park Halloween will be held Saturday, Oct. 27 from 5 to 9 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. There will be a kids costume contest, magic show, crafts, music, bounce house, trick or treating and an interactive stage show. There will also be a trunk decorating contest. For more information, visit www.oaklandpark .org or call 954-630-4500. Monster ConcertPompano Beach The Pink Church will hold its annual Halloween Monster Concert on Wednesday, Oct. 31 at 7 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave. Audience members are encouraged to wear Halloween costumes as church members play haunting harmonies on the Great Pipe Organ. For more information, call 954-941-2308.

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28 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 In 2008, Pompanos historic Sample McDougald House was awarded $250,000 from this same fund source, the People or Parks Grant Program. According to Marcia Monsarret, Jacobs aide, those funds are still being disbursed. Both of Deer elds projects, however, are less complicated. The caboose, vintage 1950s, was donated to the Historical Society by Wm. Thies & Sons, and brought to the railroad siding at Hillsboro Boulevard that serves Deer eld Builders Supply. Over the years, attempts to move it to the Seaboard Airline Station and the Railroad Museum there failed due to lack of money. Now the parks grant will go for engineering costs, permits, site construction and restoration of the caboose so that it can be opened to the public as an educational tool. Unfortunately, three governmental entities are involved: the city, the county and Tri-Rail. Ed Dietrich, president of Deer eld Builders and avid historian, has become the keeper of the caboose. Some months ago, he announced it would be repainted in its original colors orange and blackby volunteers from the Kiwanis Club and Historical Society. Dietrich said this week the paint came but the perfect moment willing volunteers on a sunny day has not. Nevertheless, with his grant funds in hand, Dietrich is excited. Its all aboard as we say, he quipped this week. Just where the caboose will be placed is still up for discussion. The front of the Seaboard Railroad Station, on Hillsboro Blvd., just east of Military Trail, would give it great visibility, but has traf c issues, Dietrich said. Placing it further to the south would make it adjacent to the Railroad Museum on a more spacious piece of land. The Friends of the Arboretum are hoping $150,000 can be allotted from the remaining bond funds to build a band shell in the meadow there. Friends president, Jerry Behan, said the idea is in the formative stages and there are considerations because of nearby homes in Deer Creek and possible deed restrictions on Constitution Park. If it can be built, a band shell would provide the stage for small musical events, private parties and the storytelling festival, Behan said. We want only the nice stuff there, he said. Not high impact events. Local volunteer PJ Egan put together the package of photos and projected band shell costs submitted to Jacobs of ce. I was just the squeaky wheel, Egan said this week. But I called and got the ball rolling. There is no sense in leaving $150,000 on the table. The band shell would have a lot of uses for the public. And the grants purpose is to use green space to enhance the community. With the expectation that the band shell will be built and that the arboretum will get more visitors, a parking lot is being constructed on the east side of Constitution Park which could triple the number of parking spots. Fifty boulders, taken from beneath the shing pier to allow for its renovation, have been moved to the arboretum to become part of the landscape. Areas around the parking lot will be developed as hammocks, wetlands, and pine forests. The parking surface will be a stabilized turf. The park/arboretum offers another amenity not often used, the C-2 Canal which ows north and south on the very east end alongside the new parking lot. Wed like to bring bass shermen in there. Behan said.GrantContinued from page 1

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Friday, October 12, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 41 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The Pelican 46 days left in 2012 Hurricane season October is Breast Cancer awareness month October is Domestic Violence awareness month Blimp rides up for grabs at society bene tBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach -They will be “Dressing to Kill” on Oct. 19 at the annual fundraiser for the Pompano Beach Historical Society. The event, Casino Royale, takes place at Galuppi’s on the Green, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach from 7 to 10 p.m. The $100 ticket/donation includes dinner, open bar, entertainment and $200 in chips to use at one of the many gaming tables, Mayor Lamar Fisher will auction two blimp rides, but there will be many other prizes at the Chinese Auction. Brush up on your poker and other table games. And with the James Bond theme in play, dress with a license to kill. This party is a major fundraiser to support the work of the historical society with a mission to preserve the heritage and history of Pompano Beach and those who have lived here. The event is open to the public. For more information visit the website www.pompanohistory.com or call 954-609-7974Commission heeds residents’ concerns over public bathroom By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – Residents of the Oriana condominium were out in force this week to make sure commissioners heard their vehement opposition to plans for a public bathroom near their homes. A dozen of them signed up to address the commission, urging them to reconsider a decision reached in See CONCERNS on page 21 Two grants will give public better access to history, cultureBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – One day, the little red caboose that has been parked alongside the FEC tracks, will be an attraction at the Railroad Museum and story tellers at Constitution Park will be spinning their tales from a stage. Both projects will be funded from the remains of a county bond issue approved by voters in 2000. The local funding has been approved by Broward Vice Mayor Kristin Jacobs whose district includes Deer eld Beach. It is just the beginning of the process required to actually spend $78,000 to move the caboose, $150,000 for the stage in the arboretum at Constitution Park. See GRANTS on page 28By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – When Nick Berry looks at a vending cart he sees an unfair advantage. So Berry, co-owner of Shawn and Business owner cries foul over vending cartsNick’s Courtyard Caf and Gelato Station, both on Wilton Drive, has asked city commissioners to do something about them. “It’s not a level playing eld,” said Berry, See CARTS on page 19Wilton Manors – Zachary Duffy-Sweeney, 2, of Oakland Park, tries lifting a pumpkin on Sunday at the Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club’s annual Pumpkin Patch. The patch, located at Five Points in front of iberia Bank, 2465 Wilton Drive, sells pumpkins, hay and corn stalks Mondays through Fridays from 12 to 9 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. All proceeds bene t the Kiwanis backpack food program for disadvantaged children, Kids Day and the other community programs the Kiwanis Club organizes throughout the year. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]

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2 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 Docents needed for Sample-McDougald HousePompano Beach’s signature historical structure, the 1916 Sample-McDougald House, is looking for individuals who are interested in the past and enjoy interacting with others to become volunteer tour guides. The Sample-McDougald House is the only Pompano Beach property listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and is one of the oldest homes in the area that has been preserved in its original con guration. Following its $2.5 million restoration and site development, the house and grounds are opening to the public and for special events. Volunteers will be provided with training sessions that will cover the history of the house and the general community, as well as information on the landscape, interacting with visitors and safety procedures. The rst session will take place on Oct. 20, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the House, 450 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. A second session will be held on Oct. 27. Call 954-691-5686.Pompano Library seeks some new friendsPompano Beach Friends of the Pompano Beach Library has been around long before “Friend” became a verb. Members support the library in various ways as volunteers and supporters. On Oct. 20, the library hosts a new member reception from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach. The public will also get updates on the new county library proposed and underway across from city hall. Refreshments and book purchases will be available. Call 954786-2181. VolunteerBroward At the 27th Annual Beach Cleanup, sponsored by Ocean Conservancy and Broward County Natural Resources Planning and Management, more than 2,400 volunteers removed 7,100 pounds of trash from Broward County beaches. Volunteers collected trash that included a toilet seat, windsock, snake head, bicycle, bar stool, wallet, rake, tiara and a $10 bill. The largest category of collected trash was cigarettes and smoking items, amounting to 23,000 cigarette butts collected from 13 sites. Participating volunteers represented several municipalities, including Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lauderdale-By-TheSea, Fort Lauderdale, Dania Beach, Hollywood and Hallandale Beach. Volunteers included high school ecology clubs, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, private companies and Broward County employees, all interested in helping the environment. The International Coastal Cleanup, typically held on the third Saturday of September, has attracted nearly 10 million volunteers from more than 150 countries with volunteers collecting nearly 200 million pounds of trash from the shores of lakes, streams, rivers and oceans on just one day annually. For more information on the International Coastal Cleanup, visit the Ocean Conservancy’s website, oceanconservancy.org. Butts and snake heads gone from beach

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The Pelican 3 Friday, October 12, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – There won’t be a parade but Wicked Wilton promises to be just as festive and as much fun. On Oct. 31, Wilton Drive will be closed down from 3 p.m. to 3 a.m. [from Northeast 21 Court to Five Points] to make room for Wicked Wilton, the city’s annual Halloween event; organized this year by the Rainbow Business Coalition, or RBC. The party goes from 6 to 11 Over 15,000 expected for Wicked Wiltonp.m. Bars and restaurants along the street will be open after the event of cially ends. “It’s an adult-themed Halloween block party. It will be Stonewall on a smaller scale,” said RBC Co-Chair Reece Durham, who added that the music will be turned down in the last hour to lessen the disturbance to residents. “We’re very, very cognizant of the neighborhood.” Unlike Stonewall Summer Pride there won’t be a parade or booths but many of Wilton Drive’s bar and restaurants will be staking out their own little party areas. “All those areas will have their own fairy tale themed parties. The whole idea is we’ll close down the street and it will be a three quarters of a mile [long] block party,” said Durham. There will also be three locations for food vendors and costume contests in each area. About 15,000 party-goers are expected to descend on Wilton Drive for the event, See WICKED on page 13SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com 10-12 – Jazz on the Square from 7 to 11 p.m. at Pelican Square, east end of Commercial Boulevard, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 954776-1000. 10-15 – Business Networking Open House at the Business Resource Center 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. The focus of the event is “The KnowHow to Support Your Small Business.” 954-586-1111. 10-16 – Wilton Manors Candidates Night at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. All four candidates for city commission will attend to answer questions. Refreshments will be served. 954-783-8700. 10-17 – Cocktails for A Cause at East End Brasserie 601 N. Forth Lauderdale Beach Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, from 7 to 10 p.m. Bene ts Broward Children’s Center. Cost is $25 pre-pay See SIGHTNGS on page 18

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4 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 Oakland Park The Dachshund Dash is always a popular attraction at the Oktoberfest celebration in Oakland Park. The two-day event, Oct. 5 and 6, featuring German dancers and music, foods and beer, a carnival and beer barrel row, attracted hundreds of visitors to Jaco Pastorius Park. The event was sponsored by the city and Oakland Park Main Street. City Commissioner Shari McCartney, at left, calls the winner in a close race. [Staff photo] Dachshund race draws crowds at Okt. Fest Former mayor’s trial set to begin Monday By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – After four years under the cloud of a public corruption charge, former mayor Al Capellini is expected to get his day in court next week. Jury selection is scheduled to begin Monday, Oct. 15 before Circuit Court Judge Carlos Rebollo. Capellini, 64, was charged with unlawful compensation in 2008. The charges stem from a complaint that he voted favorably on a local project despite the fact his rm, Crain Atlantis Engineering, had been hired as a consultant for the project. According to the record, Atlantis was paid $16,500 to get development of an of ce park on Natura Boulevard through governmental approval processes. Four attempts by his attorney David Bogenschutz to get the case dismissed were rejected by Rebollo. In 2010 the state attorney’s of ce reworked the charges. All of these actions have contributed to the delay in the trial. In the meantime, Capellini, who was city commissioner and mayor here for 20 years, has remained out on bail.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, October 12, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – The new green or beige recycling carts are ying off the shelves at the Public Works Department. Director Art Graham said the rst 500 were distributed by four work crews Monday and Tuesday. The remainder of the 1,000 carts currently in stock are expected to be gone by Friday. Another shipment of 1,000 will come in two weeks. Distribution is on a rst call, rst served basis. Available to residents are either a 48 gallon or 65 gallon cart on wheels which is easily brought to the curb. With the county’s acceptance of New recycling carts are a hitsingle-stream recycling, the amount of recycled materials is expected to grow. Last year, residents using the small bins, recycled enough household material to earn the city a $136,000 rebate from the county, which was used to purchase the new carts. “To date this year we are number three in per capita recycling,” Graham said. “For the last 10 years, we have been number one many times.” The entry of Hillsboro Beach, with its small population, into the recycling competition has been challenging to this city’s percentages. Graham has ordered 3,600 of the carts. By the end of October, he expects 3,000 will be in use. While the carts are mandatory in some cities, here residents who prefer, may continue to use the small bins. However, Graham said, the goal is to have every home in the city equipped with the rolling recycling containers. To get on the cart list, ll out the application online at www.lighthousepoint.com, or call 954-946-7386.Old sewer lines found to be in good shapeLighthouse Point – Sewer lines in the north end of town passed a safety check with ying colors this week. Tests performed by a contractor See SEWERS on page 9 Pompano GreenMarket returns tomorrow in new, temporary locationBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – All things fresh and organic return with the GreenMarket tomorrow from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at a new location: the southwest corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. “Because of scheduled construction, we’re moving the GreenMarket to the southwest corner of Cypress Road and Atlantic Boulevard,” said Dan Hobby, executive director of the Pompano Beach Historical Society and liaison to the GreenMarket, now in its tenth year. “We’re the longest, continuously operating green market in Broward County. We’re also one of the increasingly few green markets that is locally operated. We’re not operated by a corporation or management company,” said Hobby. Organized by the Pompano Beach Historical Society, it was previously held on a patch of ground and asphalt located in Historic Downtown Pompano on Northeast 1 Street. But the city is building a plaza there so a temporary location was needed. “We will move it back across when it’s done,” said Pete Williams, president of the Historical Society and GreenMarket. Until then, he said, the event should bene t from a lot more space and parking.See GREEN MARKET on page 25

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6 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 41 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Opinion & Letters Dear Editor: Thanks to the efforts of our local small business owners and residents, Relay For Life of Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point and Hillsboro Beach has raised over $100,000 this year to make the 2012 fundraising campaign another great success in the Relay’s eleven year history. We owe a special thank you to Loren and Pheona Strassburg of Deer eld Thrift for organizing and sponsoring our nal fundraiser of the year, a treasure hunt and car wash at their business, which was held on Saturday, Aug. 18. To all those who participated, we appreciate your generous support toward our ght against cancer. Other local businesses who contributed to the success of this event with their nancial support include A Summer Place Consignments, Scuba Network, East Coast Services, Dalsimer Atlas Floral & Event Decorators, 101 Liquors, Denture Plus, X Terminator, Inc., Sunshine Gold Buyers, Cove Bagel & Deli, Boats 4 Less, Payless Jewelry, Barbara’s Cleaning Service, Inc., and The Final Cut. Thank you so much for your support! Relay For Life of Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point and Hillsboro Beach October is Domestic Abuse Awareness month. We met Liz Becker this month who has worked with Women in Distress as a coach. We are pleased to publish her column regarding the impact on children when divorce or other circumstances changes their living conditions.Emotional Abuse In S plit Custody Families How Do You Protect Your Kids?By Liz BeckerLIFE TRANSITION COACHWhen children have two homes,it is possible for them to experience emotional abuse by one of their parents. In split custody cases, one of the biggest challenges for the parents is coping with the loss of control of their children when they are not with them. This can trigger grief and negative behavior. That can either become emotional abuse or cause children to feel unprotected in either home. Unfortunately, there is no way to protect your children 100 percent from emotional abuse whether it be by the other parent, a bully at school or other adults in their lives. However, if you want them to feel protected there are de nitely things you can do. Parents must start with learning how to detect abuse. Warning signs of emotional abuse include a child acting fearful or anxious about disappointing people by doing something wrong. If you notice your child acting distant to the other parent or unusually extreme in his/her behaviors, this should be cause for concern. Because there are no physical scars when it comes to emotional abuse, the only way you will really know about it is if your child tells you or a third party he/she trusts. In some cases, an impartial eyewitness may bring it to your attention. Immediately after parents separate and the custody of the children is split, there are steps to take to ensure that the parent builds a strong bond with their child/children that will give them the ability to give their child the proper tools if any case of emotional abuse arises in the other home. Such steps include the following: 1. Don’t focus on what you can’t control; focus on the control you do have when the children are with you. Do not interrogate them, do not send messages to the other parent through them and most of all do not overreact to any information that is given to you by them. The more you stay calm and collected, the more comfortable the children will feel. 2. Control emotional outbursts and show con dence and security. If a child feels safe with you, he or she will most likely con de in you knowing that you will make the right choices. If you show signs of confusion, distress, or instability, it will be very hard for a child to open up about abuse. 3.If you don’t have a respectful relationship with the other spouse and the child tells you about something that he/she has done that you don’t agree with Recycling at The Pelican has come to a halt, but please recycle elsewhereWe have learned the company we used to recycle newspapers to bene t the Sample-McDougald House has gone out of business. We thank all of the readers who have brought their papers here in support of the Sample House. Recycling is one way all of us can continue to help the environment. We urge everyone to take advantage of the newspaper recycling locations in Pompano Beach. Here they are: Fire Station #3 2001 NE 10 Street Pompano Beach, Florida 33060Relay for Life team raises over $100,000 for cancer research Halloween eventsPumpkin PatchWilton Manors – The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club has opened its annual Pumpkin Patch at Five Points in front of Iberia Bank, 2465 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Pumpkins will be on sale from 12 to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. All proceeds bene t the Kiwanis backpack food program for disadvantaged children, Kids Day and the other community programs the Kiwanis Club organizes throughout the year. Party in the Patch Pompano Beach – The Pink Church will hold its Annual Party in the Patch on Saturday, Oct. 20 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave. There will be pumpkins, face painting, kids crafts, photo ops, local vendors and more. Proceeds bene t the schools of the Pink Church. For more information, call 954-941-2308.Halloween Horse Show and FairPompano Beach – The Halloween Horse Show and Fair will be held Saturday, Oct. 20 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sands and Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., north side of the Good Year Blimp Base. The event, cosponsored by the City of Pompano Beach, includes a costumed “Horsey Half Time Show,” costume contest, pony rides, mini horses, hay rides, bounce houses, games, pumpkin patch, food and more. All proceeds bene t Bit-ByBit’s Therapeutic Riding Center and Horses for Heroes Veteran Rehabilitation Program. Visit www.BitByBitTherapy.org or call 954-786-4507 for more information.Trunk or Treat on Halloween Street Pompano Beach – “Trunk or Treat” will be held on Friday, Oct. 26 at 6 p.m. at city hall, 100 West Atlantic Blvd. Trunk or treat street will provide a safe and fun way for families to enjoy Halloween. Children will “trick or treat” for candy out of decorated car trunks or truck beds. Other fun activities will include ghostly games, bounce houses, spooky crafts, movie and costume contests. Admission is free to the event. Entering a trunk in the decorating contest is $5. To enter, call 954-786-4111. Oceanside Parking Lot 109 North Ocean Boulevard Pompano Beach, Florida 33062 City Hall rear parking lot 100 West Atlantic Boulevard Pompano Beach, Florida 33060 See HALLOWEEN EVENTS on page 27 See ABUSE on page 7

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The Pelican 7 Friday, October 12, 2012 [not an emotional abuse situation], do not relay this information to the other parent because he/she most likely won’t listen to you and you may lose your child’s trust when more serious issues arise. There are differences in parenting between the two homes, and those will show up continuously. 4. Make sure your child feels that you are completely approachable at all times to discuss any concerns he/she has. 5. Pay close attention to changes in your child’s behavior and emotional states. If you notice any changes, and have a close and trusting relationship with your child, they will most likely express to you what they are feeling, which will help you assess the situation. If they don’t, you will need to re-build rapport with them and gure out how to change your communication to ultimately get the response you want. Having your child open up to you cannot be forced, so if what you have done is not working, try talking differently or asking other questions. 6. If you have exhausted all means of building rapport and trust with your child and he/she still refuses to tell you what or how they are feeling, it is wise to take them to a third party with whom they may feel more comfortable. If your child is experiencing emotional abuse by the other parent, your reaction is going to be key in your ability to protect them and ease the situation. You are probably going to experience a wide range of emotions like anger, sadness and helplessness. But you must remain strong and con dent. It is very important for a child that is experiencing emotional abuse to maintain his/her sense of con dence and strength to be able to cope with the other parent’s abusive behavior. A good rst step is to call the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline at 1-800-4-a-child. You will need to start on your own with damage control. Here are some suggestions: 1. Do not speak to the other parent about the situation. It could trigger them to get even more upset with the child or escalate the abuse. 2. Find out how your child is reacting to the abuse, and let them know that it is okay if they are trying to appease the other parent to prevent further abuse. This does not mean that they are weak. This means that they are very strong because they are trying to control the situation. If they are doing the opposite by ghting back and the other parent’s reaction is escalating, have them understand that although you know they are doing it to show their strength, and that it is admirable. It is best for them to try to stay calm as possible. 3. It is imperative that the child understands that the parent’s unwarranted behavior is not their fault and that they do not deserve it. 4. Give your child the tools to diminish the validity of the hurtful words they are hearing from the other parent. One such tool is to remind them of another instance in which someone was mean to them and they did not care because they knew the other person was wrong. Focus on all the things your child does right, and point them out at every opportunity. When the child is at the “safe” home, make sure you use that time to build con dence. Talk about past situations when they successfully coped with a challenge. Although the challenge in the past may have been simpler, it was still a challenge. By pointing this out, you are making them aware of their ability to cope, build con dence and lessen the effects of abuse. 5. Let the children know their reality can be different from the reality of an abusive parent. If the child realizes that the other parent has serious behavioral and emotional issues, they are choosing to act this way to somehow satisfy their pride, the child will have more control over the effect of the abuser’s words and behaviors. These tips should help you protect your child from emotional abuse to some degree, but it is important for parents to seek professional help for themselves and their children. The bene t here in the circumstance of split custody is that the protective parent does have the freedom and opportunity to make a difference when the child is at their home. AbuseContinued from page 6

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8 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFSince 1970 Stephen Silverstein, D.O. has been delivering dedicated medical services to a growing and loyal group of patients. In 2001 his son, Scott Silverstein, D.O. joined his practice, bringing his own skills to a forward looking medical approach. Both Dr. Silversteins are on the staff of Holy Cross and Imperial Point hospitals but their goal is to not only treat patients, but to help them stay out of hospitals by achieving better health through prevention. Their large suite of modern of ces, located at 729 E. Atlantic Blvd. in Pompano Beach, offers 11 examining rooms, an on-site lab for blood work, and frequently needed testing using diagnostic ultrasound, simple spirometry, EKGs and more. There is even a large Silver Sneaker tness area with Silver Sneaker trained instructors. This of ce is trilingual with English, Spanish and French speakers. Adding to the one stop feel of this practice are patient conveniences such as easily accessible covered parking and elevator service directly into the of ce. Of ce manager, Perla Korn-Silverstein, and her assistant, Melissa Stamolis, talked to The Pelican about Innovative Health & Wellness which offers professional medical services and many extras. “We’re all about preventing major physical problems from occurring by evaluating and handling every aspect of a patient’s health,” Perla says. “The goal of Dr. Stephen and Dr. Scott Silverstein is to prevent complications by recognizing a need before there is a complicated problem.” Melissa adds, “They accomplish this by spending time, one on one, getting to know a patient. They make time to listen to the patient’s concerns.” An on-site lab saves that extra trip to an outside lab or medical facility for blood work, X-rays, ultrasounds, spirometry, EKGs and basic wound care. The Silver Sneaker program is free to the public with the proper insurance. Level one classes take place on Tuesdays and Fridays and for greater challenges, a cardio circuit class is also available on Fridays. Mike Masi, a trained Silver Sneaker tness instructor, teaches all three classes. “Our medical records are all electronic,” explains Father and son team up to offer many services to patients at Innovative Health & Wellness HEALTH ISSUES?On Oct. 19, look for The Pelican’s rst health focus issues. We hope readers will enjoy some of these stories and offer comments. Advertisers for these pages should call 954-783-8700 for space availability. Topics next week are breathing issues, why kids need to be outdoors and a conversation about prostate cancer. Dr. Stephen Silverstein, left, and his son, Dr. Scott Silverstein, are enthusiastic believers in better health through prevention. [Photo courtesy of Innovative Health & Wellness]See TWO DOCTORS on page 25 Through OctoberCall 954-759-7500 to schedule your mammogram. Most insurance accepted, or self pay $115 cash or credit. Walk-ins welcome. Broward Health North, 201 E. Sample Road, Deer eld Beach. Women’s Health Expo at North Broward is about a lot of funDeer eld Beach – On Wednesday afternoon, 5 to 8 p.m., women will be the focus of a healthy feel and look. Dubbed “Fun Girl’s Night,” this free evening will focus on health, food-tasting, networking, presentations and exhibits. Some of the health topics include breast health, Botox and llers and tips to increase brain power. Mammograms, offered with insurance or $115 selfpay, will be available until 7 p.m. The event is cosponsored by the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. It’s free and open to the public.Candidate debateThe Pompano Beach Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. will host a political candidates’ forum on Thursday, Oct. 25 at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., Pompano Beach. The forum will begin with candidate introductions, a discussion of the constitutional amendments and supreme court justices at 6 p.m. followed by a debate segment at 7. The program will last for approximately three hours, and it is hosted by the Pompano Beach Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. in partnership with the Broward County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. and the Chi Psi Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Candidates from this year’s State Attorney, County Commission, School Board, Judiciary, Sheriff, US Congress, US Senate, State House of Representatives and Clerk of the Court races have been invited to participate. Call 954-315-4552. 5 ft. high stilletto will be on exhibit through October for Breast Cancer Awareness month at Broward Health North.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, October 12, 2012 hired by Broward County revealed a leak at only one address, a foreclosed and abandoned home. Public Works Director Art Graham said the bank has been noti ed of the defect in the line. Another leak was found and repaired in a cleanout cap outside a house. Broward County Water and Wastewater Service has begun a four-year project to clean and examine with TV cameras all the city’s sewer lines in the public right of way prior to refurbishing the pipes. At the end of the contract all the city’s sewer pipes will be renewed, Graham said. The system dates back to the 70s when the city was built. The contract also calls for replacing main lines and force mains to improve water pressure. Residents were put on alert that workers would be in their neighborhoods with a smoke test which reveals fractures in the system. If smoke appears where it shouldn’t, then it’s time to call a plumber, Graham said. Sewer fumes can present a potential danger, but are identi ed by their strong odor. Residents should expect more smoke tests in the future. Football, coed soccer signups this weekLighthouse Point – Registration for fall youth sports leagues begins this week. Saturday, Oct. 13, signups for pee wee ag football will be held 9 a.m. at Frank McDonough Park, 3500 NE 27 Avenue, for kids ages 7-9. The coed youth soccer league will register players ages 10-13 Wednesday, Oct. 17, 7 p.m. at Dan Witt Park, 4521 NE 22 Ave. Registration for girls soccer begins Nov. 17, 7 p.m. at Dan Witt Park. Eligible players must be 10 – 15 years of age. SewersContinued from page 7By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach The jury trial involving police of cer Jim Woolsey, a 29year veteran of the local department, is scheduled to begin in federal court October 22. Woolsey is suing the town alleging Police Chief Tom Nagy discriminated against him because of his age when he was demoted from second in command to road patrol in 2010. At the same time, the chief promoted a lieutenant, Jay Szesnet, 37, to the position of major, making him the department’s second ranking of cer. Woolsey is suing for back wages, compensatory damages, attorney fees and litigation expenses. At the time of his demotion, Woolsey was 52 and had been promoted by Veteran police of cer bringing federal lawsuit against Town of HilsboroNagy to the rank of captain in February 2008. According to Woolsey’s complaint, his promotion was one of Nagy’s rst actions as Hillsboro’s police chief. In July, 2010, also according to Woolsey, Nagy told him to hand in his retirement papers or he would “make your job very dif cult.” When Woolsey declined to retire, Nagy reportedly said, “I’m going to bring you down in an embarrassing ball of ame,” In August of that year, Szesnet was named to the newly created rank of major. At the same time Woolsey was ordered to surrender his take-home car, turn over his paperwork to Szaesnet and was assigned to the midnight shift. In September, Woolsey was demoted to patrol of cer and his annual base pay reduced from $85,900 to $72,000. He is contending that his age was “a substantial, See LAWSUIT on page 20

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10 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-7838700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach Robert Holmes may not look nor feel like a pioneer, but he can paint a picture of a rural farming community no one would recognize today. Born in Washington D.C., he was educated in the segregated south where he earned an A.B. degree from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga.. He arrived in Pompano in 1958 for his rst job as a math teacher at Blanche Ely High School. What made him choose to live in Pompano? He laughs and says, “Well, Florida interested me because of the weather, and I had a girlfriend in Deer eld Beach. I guess that was reason enough for a young man to choose a destination.” He describes Pompano as a “laid back rural area with bean farms. I lived in a segregated section of the city and I still live there. It was a friendly, comfortable community with a strong church presence. I related to it then and still do. I am a member of New Creation Baptist Church and have served as chairman of the Deacons’ Ministry since 1993.” Holmes became part of the integration of Pompano as a member of a biracial committee established by then Mayor Stewart Kester. “That was the beginning,” he says. “We now have good representation in the city government. I feel that I, and any other African American, can live anywhere we can afford to live in Pompano Beach. I have chosen to remain in my same area because I want to help motivate our young population to achieve their potential.” His philosophy, he says, “is molded into me since my early years at Morehouse which stressed, ‘You make a living by what you earn, but you make a life by what you give back to others.’ I have tried to live with this goal in mind.” He currently serves as an alternate on the zoning board of appeals, a member of the Budget Review Committee, and is treasurer of the Unity in the Community Inc. of Pompano Beach. He was married for 24 years and has two sons, two Retired Assistant Principal Robert Holmes, of Pompano Beach, to be designated a Broward County Pioneer Oct. 20HEALTH ISSUES?On Oct. 19, look for The Pelican’s rst health focus issues. We hope readers will enjoy some of these stories and offer comments. Advertisers for these pages should call 954-783-8700 for space availability. Topics next week are breathing issues, why kids need to be outdoors and a conversation about prostate cancer.Focal Point Wellness Expo SaturdayDeer eld Beach – The 12th annual Health and Wellness Expo, hosted by the NE Focal Point, will be held Saturday, Oct. 20, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 227 NW 2 Street. Activities include health screenings, u shots, door prizes, entertainment, refreshments and vendors with health information for all ages. To register for a u shot, call 954-480-4449. Health screenings include balance, blood pressure, bone density, carotid artery, glucose levels and body mass index. Mammograms will be available by appointment at 561-955-4700. Information on healing touch, massage, podiatry, prostate health, pulse oximetry and skin cancer will also be available. grandsons and two great grandchildren. He says, “My oldest son works in the food industry. My youngest son is the head of the Community Development Department of Lauderdale Lakes. We spend a lot of happy hours together. Holmes started as a math teacher and remained one for a good part of his long career in education. He served a twoyear stint as intern principal at Thomas Jefferson Jr. High in Miami. In 1980 he was chosen to be a curriculum planner for Broward Schools ESAA Magnet Program. He moved from this assignment to become an assistant principal at McNicol Middle School in Hollywood, a job he kept until retirement in 1992. Along the way he earned his M.S. degree from Barry University and continued post graduate education at Benedict College, Florida State, Florida Atlantic University and the University of South Florida. Throughout his life, Holmes has served and chaired many civic, school, county, alumni and church committees. His honors are legend. (See box). Asked what improvements he would like see in his city, he says, “I would Cresthaven Watch meetingPompano Beach – Current events will be the topic at the next Cresthaven Neighborhood Watch meeting Thursday, Oct. 18 at 7:30 p.m. at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church, 3331 NE 10 Terrace. Broward Sheriff’s Of ce deputies will be on hand to answer questions about events in the neighborhood. For more information, call 954-7867536 or email carolwsw@ gmail.com.Garden Club meetsLighthouse Point – The Lighthouse Point Garden Club meets on Thursday, Oct. 18 at 11 a.m. at the St. Paul’s Education Center, 2700 NE 36 St., Pompano Beach. The topic is “NatureScape for a Rainy Day: Increase Habitat and Improve Water Quality with Rain Gardens, Bio Swales and Riparian Buffers.” For more information, call 954-975-9157.Conversation with Gloria SteinemFort Lauderdale – Author, feminist and lecturer, Gloria Steinem, will host a community conversation on Oct. 21 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Artserve Auditorium, 1350 E. Sunrise Blvd., The conversation is sponsored by the Broward County Prochoice Coalition. The event is free and open to the public. RSVP by emailing beth@ browardgwencherry.com. Eager young math teacher arrives at Blanche Ely High School in 1958 Robert Holmes, center, visits with Mr. and Mrs. Jenning S. Coleman after enjoying a Glee Club concert sponsored by the Morehouse Alumni Chapter of Broward County. Holiday Boat Parade in DecemberPompano Beach – The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce is looking for boats to be part of its 50th Annual Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade. Entry is free and every boat that participates will receive a hand-painted collectible glass ornament designed by local artist Pat Anderson. All decorations will be accepted. The parade will be held Sunday, Dec. 9 starting at 6 p.m. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. To enter, call 954-941-2940.See Holmes on page 11

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The Pelican 11 Friday, October 12, 2012 The Pelican! 954-783-8700 like to see our city have a short and long range plan for itself. If we had one, it would create a common goal for our commissioners instead of having them focus their interests on their own districts.” He sums up his current status. “I’ve survived open heart surgery, a collapsed lung, and a recent automobile accident where the car was totaled but I walked away unharmed. That was like a message to me. God has more work for me to do, and I will keep on doing what I can.” Thank you Robert Holmes for your efforts to improve life for those around you. Pancake breakfastOakland Park – The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club hosts its annual Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, Oct. 27 from 7 to 11 a.m. at the Thomas P. Johnston American Legion Post 222, 4250 NE 5 Ave. Tickets are $5 for all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausages, coffee and orange juice. Servers will be dressed in Halloween costumes. All proceeds bene t the community projects organized by the Oakland Park Kiwanis Club. For more information, call 954-648-6170. HolmesContinued from page 10 Honors and AwardsNominee “Who’s Who Among Back Educators in America.1978 Nominee “Outstanding E.S.E. Administrator 1991-2 School Board of Broward County 1998 Alumnus of the Year Award Morehouse College National Alumni Association 2003 Outstanding Service Award Morehouse College Nat’l Alumni Association 2005 North Broward County Links, Inc. Lifetime Achievement Award 2006 Presidential Service Award, Morehouse Nat’l Alumni Association Recognized as a Broward County Pioneer on Oct. 20,

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12 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – Voters in this city will have a chance in March to decide if they want their local election moved from March to November during the general election in Commissioners divided on moving municipal elections from March to Novemberfuture years. Commissioners gave initial approval last week to put the charter amendment to referendum. The vote was 3-2, Mayor Anne Sallee and Commissioner Shari McCartney dissenting. Commissioners also approved on rst reading four other proposed changes to the city charter, all recommended by a Charter Review Board. All will be submitted for referendum if approved on second reading Oct. 17. Several residents spoke in favor of moving the election date. “The goal is to get the people out [to the polls],” said Joanne Darling, a resident and member of the Charter Review Board. The move would save a lot of money and attract more people, she said. Moving the election to November would result in substantially less cost and substantially greater turnout, said resident Sara Guevrekian. “And as fewer cities hold March elections, costs will keep rising. This is not a luxury we can afford.” She said moving the election to November was a “win-win.” Layne Walls, also a member of the Charter Review Board and a former mayor, urged commissioners to leave the city election in March. “Municipal government is its own animal. It needs to be its own entity,” Walls said. She noted that the Supervisor of Elections will charge the city for a November election, as well. “The savings could be very little. We’re Broward County taxpayers. Why do we have to pay for voting machines at all?” With a move to November, Walls said the non-partisan city elections will become partisan. If voters approve the change, it won’t be effective until at least 18 months after the City Commission approves the ordinance. To make the change, a municipality can either See ELECTIONS on page 17

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The Pelican 13 Friday, October 12, 2012 an event that’s a partnership between RBC and the city. In addition to Wilton Manors being an of cial sponsor, RBC has hired the Wilton Manors Police Department to provide security. City commissioners speci cally requested RBC use the city’s police personnel for the event. “I want this to be a Wilton Manors event. Not a Wilton Manors/Broward Sheriff’s Of ce [or BSO] event,” said Commissioner Scott Newton at a recent meeting. Responded Durham, “We want our Wilton Manors police there to represent. It makes sense.” Durham said BSO has done a great job in the past and that the RBC would probably have to use them again in the future for bigger events like Stonewall when more police are needed than Wilton Manors can provide. Police Chief Paul O’Connell said RBC’s stewardship of the event has “made a world of difference” compared with some of the previous event organizers. “This is a partnership,” said O’Connell. In two previous events, police working Wilton Drive weren’t paid by organizers. This year, they’re asking for and getting the money up front. “I can understand why they’re a little ticked off,” said Durham. Parking will be available at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive; Richardson Park, 1937 Wilton Drive; Pride Center, 2040 N. Dixie Hwy. and other locations for $10. Durham said the additional locations would be announced closer to the event. Visit www. wickedwilton.com for more information.WickedContinued from page 3Meet your next state senator for breakfastLauderdale-By-The-Sea – State Senator Ellyn Bogdanoff [R] and Maria Sachs [D], both running for Dist. 34, will be at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber of Commerce’s monthly Power Breakfast meeting on Friday, Oct. 26 from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Blue Moon Fish Co., 4405 West Trade winds Ave. Both candidates will be part of a Q&A session. The cost is $20 and includes a gourmet breakfast. For more information, call 954776-1000.Small business workshopWilton Manors – There will be a small business workshop on Thursday, Oct. 18 at 8:30 a.m. at the Hagen Park Community Center, 2020 Wilton Drive. The subject of the workshop is “Maximize Your Marketing Efforts to Reach Your Targeted Customers.” A light breakfast will be served. The event is free. To attend, RSVP with Randy Welker, economic development coordinator, at 954-390-2187 or send an email to rwelker@wiltonmanors.com

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14 The PelicanFriday, October 12, 2012 October is breast cancer awareness month. Call the American Cancer Association to see how you can help as a volunteer in your community. The local chapter of EWGA’s Golf Rally for a Cure revs up for its 5th annual golf event fund-raiser to help protect the women in our lives against cancer. This golf outing welcomes all levels of players, women and men, and offers great prizes. Mark Sunday, Oct. 21 for a 1:15 p.m. stroke play shotgun start at Deer Creek Golf Club, in Deer eld Beach. All golfers enjoy great golf, delicious dinner and the chance to win a boat. Hosting the event is the Executive Women’s Golf Association, or EWGA, Fort fee is $95 which includes golf, range balls, tips, and dinner. Proceeds bene t The Women’s Imaging Center of the Memorial Foundation to support breast and ovarian cancer research, screenings, and treatment. Visit www. ewgafortlauderdale.com to register. EWGA is a national organization, with 600 members in South Florida. New members are welcomed to learn, improve, play and enjoy the company of others who wish to share golf and networking. www. ewgafortlauderdale.com.Golf on Oct. 21, help breast/ovarian cancer researchEWGA’S Golf Rally for a Cure Committee offers a Rinker Sport Boat HoleIn-One prize courtesy of The Boat Connection, West Palm Beach. Players can also win a 50/50 Raf e, golf clubs, bag, restaurant gift cards, golf lessons, at screen TV and dozens of other prizes. Pictured, L-R: Committee members Lila Abello of Deer eld Beach, Doree Garolsky of Delray Beach, Joanne Shulman, Committee Chairperson of Plantation, Karen Hord, Chapter President of Lighthouse Point, and Lori Ostrowski of Boca Raton. Not Pictured, Maxie Bryant of Boca Raton. Lauderdale Chapter. Entry

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The Pelican 15 Friday, October 12, 2012 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!

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16 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 Pompano Citi Centre will present its annual spooky Halloween Celebration on Wednesday, Oct. 31 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Enjoy a safe afternoon of fun, music, magic, games for the kids, candy bags, a parade of costumes and much more. This event is for families with kids ages 10 and under. Admission is free. “We are very excited to welcome the community to the center and invite them to participate in this year’s Halloween Extravaganza,” said Julie Katz, marketing and events manager at Pompano Citi Centre. “A fun time will be had by all.” For more information, call 954-943-4683 or visit www.pompanociticentre.com.Citi Centre hosts Spooky Halloween Celebration Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – The Wernesgruen Brass Band from Germany will play at the opening of the Oktoberfest celebration of the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Property Owners Association. The event is set from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, at the Assumption Catholic Oktoberfest party set for Oct. 20Church Hall (behind the church) at 2001 S. Ocean Blvd. Pork roasts and brats will be provided by the association. Attendees are asked to bring a covered dish with a German air to share. Beer and wine will be served for a small charge. Local musician Aram Kassabian will provide music for dancing. There is no charge for association members. Nonmembers pay $7 per person. For more information and reservations, call Dennis Ritchie, club president, at 954-784-9495.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, October 12, 2012 extend or reduce an elected of cial’s term by up to eight months, according to information provided commissioners by D.J. Doody, city attorney. To implement a change in the election date at the earliest time permitted by law, the proposed ordinance shortens terms by four months. Vice Mayor John Adornato said he had no problem with a shorter term. He wanted more information on cost savings and is concerned about city races getting lost in the shuf e. He said it could cost candidates more to educate voters in November. Commissioner Jed Shank said, “I feel very, very strongly about this issue,” Commissioner Shari McCartney said. “Our freedom, our very liberty is based on our ability to have direct input with elected of cials. Nowhere is that more profound than with municipal elections. We’re talking about cost, but we haven’t talked about value, and there’s a difference.” She has asked for an audit of the election charges imposed by the county saying she doubts the costs the city is incurring are accurate. “We can reduce our number of precincts, and that process might be worthwhile.” In local elections, “We can focus on the issues and candidates exclusively and not in the dust and fog of federal elections and 10 amendment items,” she said. “We can only focus on these [local] candidates and issues when they can be heard. “With the onslaught of advertising and the onslaught of campaigning in the general election, I’m telling you we won’t get the best candidates heard,” McCartney continued. “The costs involved with running a campaign for a city election aren’t supposed to compete with a state house,” she said emphatically. “They’re supposed to be 10 grand, not 20 and not 50. To win in a general election for this wee municipality that’s what you’re going to be spending. Those lobbyists you claim not to like, they’re going to be writing the checks. “We may save money, but we’re losing a lot,” McCartney said. “We’re trading liberty for a $50,000 budget item. We need to seriously think about this some more.” Sallee said that with a November election the city may lose candidates. She said it’s in March when local candidates can walk the streets and talk to the people door-todoor. “We’re the ones who x your potholes and get your water reconnected,” she said. In November, she said the local candidates won’t be heard. “You won’t get the grassroots person who cares. You’ll get the person who can get the lobbyist to write all those checks and that’s how you’ll get elected.”Other charter changesAnother charter amendment addresses the process of lling a vacancy in the position of vice mayor by awarding the job to the person who gets the third highest number of votes in the previous regular municipal election. If that person isn’t eligible, the commission would appoint the vice mayor. Doody reminded commissioners that this issue came up when vice mayor (Anthony Niedwiecki) resigned and the charter had no way to address the situation. Candidates in Oakland Park aren’t elected mayor or vice mayor. Instead, those receiving the rst and second most votes become part of a rotating process to become mayor and vice mayor. Commissioners also approved an ordinance permitting the city manager to approve contracts for construction of public improvements in accordance with the code of ordinances. (The code requires purchasing through a competitive process in most areas.) Commissioners amended the proposed ordinance to remove proposed dollar amounts, which would have increased the amount of contracts the manager could approve without bids from $5,000 to $10,000. The vote was 4-1, Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue dissenting.Voting con ictCommissioners unanimously approved an amendment to require commissioners who have a voting con ict on a matter being considered by the commission to disclose that con ict prior to participating in discussion related to the matter. With this ordinance, commissioners can still take part in the discussion but must announce their con ict beforehand. Commissioners also approved an ordinance that would make the language in the charter gender neutral. And commissioners directed the city attorney to draft an ordinance for discussion to eliminate numbered commission seats and simply elect those with the highest number of votes. Adornato felt the elections would be less contentious with the change. ElectionsContinued from page 12

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18 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 3 and $25 at the door. Appetizers will be served. Visit www. bcckids.org or 954-943-7336. 10-17 – Final ArtHall of the season takes place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. Local artist’s work will be featured. 954-586-1111. 10-18 – South Florida Mustangs the world’s rst LGBTQ square dance club, will hold a beginner class from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at Island City Park Preserve, 823 NE 28 St., Wilton Manors. Cost is $5 at the door. No dress code and no partner needed. 305899-1710. 10-18 – Lighthouse Point Garden Club meets at 11 a.m. at the St. Paul’s Education Center, 2700 NE 36 St., Pompano Beach. The topic is “NatureScape for a Rainy Day: Increase Habitat and Improve Water Quality with Rain Gardens, Bio Swales and Riparian Buffers.” 954-9759157. 10-19 – Deer eld Beach Computer Club meets from 10 to 11:30 a.m. every Friday except holidays in Century Village East Le Club/Activity Center, Room B, 3501 West Drive, Deer eld Beach. Non-residents must show ID to security. $1 per person fee waived for rst time guests. Visit www.db-cc.org or call 954-725-9331. 10-20 – Granny’s Attic from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Over 80 vendors selling trinkets and treasures. Admission is free. 954-7864111. Hope to see you there! 10-20 – Walk for Peace at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., at 8 a.m. Cost is $10 for children 18 and under and $12 for adults. The walk promotes self con dence, tness and tolerance. 754-322-8950. 10-26 & 27 – Book sale at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 27 St. from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 26 and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Oct. 27. 954-6304370.Election Updates10-26 – Democrat Maria Sachs and Republican Ellyn Bogdanoff debate issues for state senate District 34] election at 7:30 a.m. at Blue Moon, 4405 West Tradewinds Ave., Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Cost for breakfast is $20. Call 954-776-1000.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the See SIGHTINGS on page 20

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The Pelican 19 Friday, October 12, 2012 pointing out that brick and mortar business owners have to invest tens of thousands in rent and other expenses while people with carts can park on the sidewalk and still make money with a much smaller investment. “[They] have no equity in our city,” said Berry, who added that he and his business partner donate a lot to local community organizations. He estimated that he spent $100,000 last year to stay in business on Wilton Drive. Commissioners agreed with Berry. “It’s a legitimate concern,” said Commissioner Ted Galatis. “They don’t have a vested interest in our city,” said Commissioner Julie Carson. But that won’t keep them out. “You can’t prohibit it, but you can regulate it,” said City Attorney Kerry Ezrol. In 2003, carts were included as an approved use in what is now known as the Arts and Entertainment Special Overlay District. And in October of 2011, commissioners again gave approval to the carts when the overlay district was renamed. The district, which includes Wilton Drive and Dixie Highway, allows vending carts as well as outdoor dining, art galleries, parking garages, theatres, pet stores and other uses. In the materials provided to commissioners in October, vending carts appear at the very end of the list of allowed businesses. “The devil’s in the details, ladies and gentlemen,” said Galatis. Commissioners voted 4-0 on Tuesday to have city staff revise regulations. Mayor Gary Resnick was absent. Currently, the city allows carts in the public right of way as long as they don’t block pedestrian or traf c, are a maximum of ve feet by ten feet and signage associated with them is limited to six square feet. Cart vendors must have a business tax receipt, and the city has approval over where carts are located. “I’m not comfortable having them in the right of way,” said Carson. Last year, planning and zoning recommended the carts be allowed but only on private property and only if they are tied to a brick and mortar storefront that already has a business license with the city. So far only one person, Glenn Phillips, has asked to set-up a cart. Phillips, a chef who plans to open a hot dog cart, Dogs Gone Wild at USA Auto on North Dixie Highway across from Publix, says he’s tried to put a cart in Fort Lauderdale, Pompano Beach and other cities but has been unsuccessful. “It’s been a battle. I’ve been bounced around every little city. I wish they would allow it more,” said Phillips, who added that many cities seem to make starting a vending cart complicated on purpose. “I’m going to be giving someone a job. Isn’t that what we’re trying to do in this country?” Phillips said he hopes to be open in a week or two and offer something really special to “capture taste buds.” “Street vendors don’t take food away,” he said. “Some people want a fancy dinner and some people just want a hot dog.”CartsContinued from page 1

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20 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com motivating cause“ of this treatment. The Florida Civil Rights Act makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate because of age or to deprive an individual of employment opportunities because of age. Two weeks have been set aside for the trial in Miami, US Dist. Judge Marcia Cooke presiding. Orders to hold mediations were ful lled with no settlement reached. Woolsey is represented by labor attorney Jennifer Daley with the Fort Lauderdale rm of Amlong & Amlong. Representing the city is Fort Lauderdale attorney Bruce Johnson who specializes in labor law. Johnson had not returned phone calls by presstime. LawsuitContinued from page 9Democrats take amendment questions to task Pompano Beach The North Broward Democratic Club will host Dr. Alice Levy, League of Women Voters, on Wednesday, Oct. 24 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Levy, a member of the League will discuss the state ballot questions that will be decided by voters on Nov. 6. The meeting is open to the public and free. Call 954-7838232.SightingsContinued from page 18month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.Saturdays Pony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.See SIGHTINGS on page 27

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The Pelican 21 Friday, October 12, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 July to place a public bathroom in an alleyway between Anglin’s Fishing Pier and the Oriana. “My house butts up against the beach accessway,” said Maj Soueidan. “This affects me and all my neighbors. This is not a rose garden. It’s a public bathroom. I don’t think a homeowner should have to bear that.” He suggested commissioners step back and see what else is available so it becomes a win-win for everyone. Soueidan said his home will lose a signi cant amount of value if the restroom is built nearby. “How much would you pay for a townhome that’s 15 feet from a public restroom?” asked Dan David, a part owner of Soueidan’s property. “To put this bathroom in a residential area is virtually beyond belief,” said Oriana resident Ned Seibert. “I don’t think this is fair.” He said there are commercial areas where the bathroom could be located. Seibert’s wife Dorothy said she thought the town needed to provide a formal notice if something like this were to be done. She’s lived in areas where neighbors had to be noti ed of a deck addition. “We’ve been out of the loop. We’re Johnny come lately because we didn’t know about the plans,” she said. Dorothy Seibert said the residents still haven’t seen any exact information on where the bathroom would be located. “But we know where the property line is, and [the alleyway] is extremely narrow. It would be very near the residences. “Unless there’s a compelling, urgent reason why would you penalize the residents?” she asked. Will Powers said there are already problems with vagrancy, intoxicated people and illicit behavior in the area. “We don’t want any more issues than we already have. Public restrooms are a breeding ground for illicit behavior. They should be built in public, lighted areas that can be controlled.” Vice Mayor Scot Sasser, who voted for the alleyway site in July, put the issue on Tuesday’s commission agenda in response to the many calls he received from Oriana residents. He said a couple of things kept ringing true to him. One was he didn’t feel the plans were communicated well enough to residents. “In all the other projects we’ve done there has been lots of public input. I’m usually the one who wants things to go faster. But this maybe went too fast without enough information,” Sasser said. Sasser acknowledged there is never going to be a good place to put bathrooms. He said a lot more discussion needs to happen. And with so many projects in the works, this one is not a high priority for him. Sasser asked that it be postponed to a date uncertain, or to be discussed in 2014. Commissioner Mark Brown said he is a longtime proponent of public bathrooms somewhere downtown, but he didn’t favor the site next to Oriana. He supported putting the facility in El Prado Park or in a parking lot near the Country Ham & Eggs restaurant. Now that they’ve heard the feedback from the Oriana residents, he suggested putting off a decision until construction work is completed on Commercial Boulevard and then looking at sites. Commissioner Chris Vincent, who also favored the El Prado site earlier, applauded the Oriana residents for turning out. He said not enough had been done to engage them. And though he called for public bathrooms downtown when he campaigned for of ce, Vincent said he would like to see the matter stricken now and looked at “way down the road.” “I feel it’s our duty to provide public bathrooms but not next to Oriana,” he said. Commissioner Stuart Dodd said the commission has yet to see any plans for the public bathroom. “It’s a pending site,” he said, and they have no idea how many feet it is from the homes. He urged residents to call the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce if they’re seeing problems in the area, such as public urination. Dodd said there is no ideal place for the public restrooms. “Everyone wants bathrooms but not in their backyard. We’re damned if we do and damned if we don’t. “But when the overwhelming voice from the public is ‘we don’t want it here’ that does in uence the way we operate.” He agreed the matter should be postponed. “We haven’t seen this kind of excitement or this kind of anger in a long time,” said Mayor Roseann Minnet. She assured the Oriana residents they had been heard and agreed the decision on bathroom location should be reconsidered. Minnet suggested the issue be brought up again when the commission works on improvements on El Mar Drive, perhaps the end of next year. Commissioners unanimously approved a motion calling for no further work on the public bathroom project. “I bet you’ve never seen government work like that,” Minnet said to the residents. As he left the meeting, Soueidan said he was happy with their decision and pleasantly surprised. “They heard our voices, and they seem to care.” ConcernsContinued from page 1

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22 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Lead Diesel Truck MechanicsWe have an immediate opening for Lead Diesel Mechanics in Pompano Beach. We provide excellent pay and benefits. We require a minimum two years experience, your own tools, good driving and work history. CDL drivers license would be helpful but is not required. Apply in person at Salem National Lease/ Freightliner office c/o Atlantic Truck Center, 2840 Center Point Circle, Pompano Beach, FL 33064 or apply online www.salemleasing.com.Jobs HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954-7290192. 10-26SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA – I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid – Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 10-19 CAREGIVER / COMPANION – Seeking Work. Available Days. Northwest Broward Area. Available For Dr. Appts. Shopping & Light Housekeeping. References Available / Own Car. $12 / Hr. Call 954-801-7305 Or 954-7206815. 10-12 HHA – Very Caring. 15 Yrs Exp. W/Dementia, Alzheimer’s, Etc. Drive, Take To appts., Grocery Shopping, Live In Or Hourly. Please Call 954-203-0698. 10-12 ELDERLY CARE/ MEDICAL – Medically Licensed Health Professional. Over 20 Years Exp. Comfortable With All Medical Equipment. Very Flexible. Reliable & Compassionate. Lisa 754-245-3839. 10-12 LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954-8957850. 10-12 AIDE / CAREGIVER Seeks Position To Care For Your Sick Or Elderly. State Certi ed, Honest, Reliable & Caring. 954-554-5640 Or 786-4447043. 10-12 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954232-2832. Very Reasonable! 10-12 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 10-19 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees – Landscape – Yard Fill – Pressure Wash – Roofs – Home Repairs – Welding – Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 10-26 RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL CLEANING IN Pompano – Lighthouse Point – Deer eld. Dependable – Thorough – Experienced. References. Call Ana 954-6924691. 10-26 EXPERIENCED DRIVER AVAILABLE! “TO & FROM STORES” “DOCTORS” “APPOINTMENTS” “AIRPORT’’, ETC. CALL MARYANN 954-895-3202. 11-2 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 10-26 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1012 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CAntiquesTwo antique cabinets – Mahagony, 3 shelves, 6 ft. high. $200. Champagne colored – 3 shelves, 3 lower doors. Chrome engraving $150. Call 954696-3076. 10-12 COLLECTIBLESWANTED – CASH FOR COLLECTIBLES. Private Collector Buying Antiques – Artwork – US Stamps. Coins – Silver Or Gold – Vintage Jewelry – Sterling All Items. We Come To You! 561-9894286. 11-2 SHARE TOWNHOUSETAMARAC – Share Newly Renovated 3 / 2 Townhome. Professional Or Retired Female. $600 Per Month Plus Utilities. Call 954-618-3003 Or 401-215-7271. 10-19 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 DUPLEXESPOMPANO BEACH E OF Federal Hwy. 2/1 – Enclosed Porch W/Washer & Dryer. Central Air. New Tile Floors. No Pets $1,100 Mo. 954-8229395. 10-19 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO PVT ROOM & BATH $500 MONTH. Includes Utilities, Cable, Internet. Walking distance To Shopping. Call 954-793-1363. 10-12 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like You’re On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. 10-12 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE Corner 2 / 2 1st Floor Updated! NEW Kitchen. Golf Course View! Best Building. New Roof. BIRD REALTY 954-491-8767. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH “THE CLARIDGE” Large Updated 2 / 2 Corner Penthouse – Ocean – Intracoastal & City Views! Washer / Dryer In Unit. Impact Glass. $498,500. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. Please Call 954-803-4174. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324.CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH – ON WATER 1 / 1.5 Furnished. Beautiful Sunsets / Waterviews Of Canals / St. George Waterways From Floor To Ceiling Windows. $925 Mo. – 1 Year Lease. 954-785-7571 Or 954-649-4373. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2 / 1 Pool! Sunroom – Ground Floor, Beautifully Furnished. On Golf Course. $750 Mo. 1 Year +. Good Credit. 917-5440771. 10-5

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The Pelican 23 Friday, October 12, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds work for you! 954-7838700! POMPANO 1 / 1.5 UPDATED 1st Floor. Screened Patio. Community Pool. Small Waterfront Complex. $1,200 Month. Dockage Available For Rent. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. Please Call 954-803-4174. 10-12 LIGHTHOUSE PT 2 / 2 ---1st Floor – 55+. Pool, Unfurnished. Laundry Facilities. $895 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano – Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-5624919. 10-12 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT IT’S BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like You’re On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner – Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. 10-19 LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf – By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 10-19 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 10-19 POMPANO 1 / 1 APT. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 10-19 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – 2/1 $750 NW – NE 1/1 $675 2/1 $950 – 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $75 App MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 10-19 POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W / D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. POMPANO – BEDROOM – LIVING ROOM – BATH NO Kitchen. Partially Furnished. All Utilities Paid. Private Yard & Separate Entrance. $175 Week – Deposit $175. 954-8228327. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH LARGE EFFICIENCY – Partially Furn. $650 Per Month. $350 Deposit – 2 Weeks Notice. Includes A/C, Cable, Pvt Entrance, Parking. 954-6380167. 10-12 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 10-19 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Season. 500’ To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 11-2 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 11-2 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 10-19

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24 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Pelican Classi eds work for you 954-783-8700! SPECIAL TO THE PELICANSt. Nicholas Episcopal Church will offer a free “Last Things” Forum at 6 p.m., on Wednesday, Oct. 17 to which the public is welcome. “Advanced planning while healthy can make for better decision-making. Advanced planning can be a great gift for grieving loved ones,” said the Rev. Mark Andrew Jones, BSG. Fr. Jones will facilitate a panel discussion with Estates Lawyer Bill Sullivan, David King from Hospice of Broward, Galvin Mitchell, a Social Worker with North Broward Medical Center, Grief Support Coordinator Debra McLaughlin, and Ken Stolar, who is associated with Kraeer, Babione and Forest Lawn Funeral Homes, Cremation Centers & Cemeteries. Also participating will be Carolyn Mann, Regional Leader of Primerica Financial Services, who will address the subject of long-term care insurance. Mann reports that 70 percent of those who reach age 65 will need assistance with a daily living activity at some point in their lives. “Perhaps the greatest benefit of long-term care insurance is that it can allow your loved one to care about you, instead of caring for you,” said Mann. “Everyone is invited to come and learn the advantages of planning and making arrangements before it becomes a necessity,” said Fr. Jones. “I would like to see young people and couples come, too; because, as a pastor, I’ve seen the Saint Nicholas Church to offer free “Last Things” forumdifference it makes when tragedy strikes unexpectedly,” added Fr. Jones. By offering this free seminar to our parishioners and neighbors, Saint Nicholas Episcopal Church is living out its mission of sharing, by the grace of the Spirit, the all-embracing love of God in Christ with everyone, celebrating diversity in fellowship, service and worship. Located at 1111 E. Sample Road in Pompano Beach, a Spanish Eucharist is offered at 7:30 p.m. on Saturdays, while English Eucharists are offered at 8 and 10:30 a.m. on Sundays, and Portuguese Eucharists are offered at 1 and 7 p.m. on Sundays. Come, See, and Share Our Peace. Vinde, vide e compartilhe nossa paz. Venga, vea y comparta nuestra paz.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, October 12, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@yahoo. com Melissa. “This is a legal requirement which all doctors must comply with by 2014. We’re ahead of the game. It’s a big job to switch years of paper records, but we’re glad we’ve gone this route ahead of schedule. The advantages are many.” She laughs as she says, “The computer does not have the handwriting issues that many doctors are accused of having. Going electronic allows us to transfer and receive information instantly, a major improvement in diagnostic work. With this fast access, a patient’s health history is up to date and instantly available to the physician in the of ce, in the hospital or wherever that information might be needed. This is very important to a patient who might be involved in an unexpected accident, or become ill while traveling. Under normal conditions having an entire health history available immediately speeds up communication between the of ce, the doctor and the patient.” “Our practice offers another public service,” says Perla. “Anyone, patient or not, who stops in to visit us can bene t from a free blood pressure and glucose test. For speci c medical attention, appointments are necessary. However, if one of our regular patients is sick, that patient will be seen immediately without an appointment and need never head for the emergency room because medical help was not available. Between our two doctors and our on site physician assistants, sick patients are never forced to wait or go elsewhere for help.” One patient, Mark Sullivan, writes, “This medical center is top notch, very professional and dedicated.” Rusty Garrett agrees. “This is the nicest bunch of people to ever run a doctor’s of ce. Dr. Steve and his son, Dr. Scott, are the two best doctors on the planet.” Deborah Tracht says, “Dr. Stephen has been taking care of me, my husband, our mothers and other family members for many years and we’re all very satis ed with his and his son’s excellent medical handling of all of us over this long period.” Innovative Health & Wellness of ces are open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. for patient visits and lab work. Call 954-943-5044. Two doctorsContinued from page 8“It will have a lot more space and a lot more visibility. We’re expecting good things to result from that,” said Hobby. Along with fresh fruits, vegetables, juices, baked goods, seafood, gourmet teas and coffees, art, books, orchids and other health-related products and services, Maria Ellis is ready to bring out her natural, handmade soaps again. “I have a big customer base in Pompano Beach,” said Ellis, who owns Gold Coast Soapworks and makes soap bars out of olive oil, coconut oil, cocoa butter and shay butter. “It’s really what’s not in the soaps,” she said, referring to the chemicals in soaps bought in stores. When the GreenMarket isn’t in season, Ellis said she has to deliver her product to her customers. When the GreenMarket is up and running, they come to her. “It’s just easier to be in one location and have everyone come to me.” And to go with the fresh or organic goods and live music and entertainment, there will be art shows, historical walking tours of Downtown, antique automobile shows, environmental exhibits and products and other special themes. “We plan on having a lot more special activities,” said Hobby. The GreenMarket will be held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. until April 27. The event is free to the public. Vendors pay $25 per Saturday per 10 ft. by 10 ft. space. Vendors can also pay for all 29 dates at a cost of $500, a discount of $225. Vendors who pay for four Saturdays get one Saturday free. Visit www.pompanohistory.com/ phc/market for more information. To become a vendor, email Debbi Moore, GreenMarket manager, at greenmarketpompano@gmail.com or call 352-369-7355. Green MarketContinued from page 5 Tell The Pelican about your news! Email mdpelican@yahoo. com

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26 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Send your fishing news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com Divers, anglers team upBy Brian GagasGOLD COAST SCUBAOne of Lauderdale by the Sea’s most well known attractions is Anglin’s Fishing Pier, located in the heart of the city, at the end of Commercial Blvd. The pier extends almost 900 feet over the ocean and sits atop a beautiful coral reef. The pier is a hot spot for fishermen and tourists who can be found patronizing the attraction everyday. Divers also take advantage of this area because of the reef system so close to shore. Divers have noticed that because of all the fishing and foot traffic, trash has built up on top of the reef. Since divers have to stay 300 feet away from the pier, nothing can be done about it. Divers have witnessed turtles, sharks and other sea creatures See DIVERS on page 27By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSWahoo and sword sh seminar at the International Game sh AssociationThere is going to be lots of talent in the building this coming Monday, Oct. 18 at the International Game Fish Association, 300 Gulfstream Way, in Dania Beach. It will be a who’s who of the best local fishermen in all of Florida. You don’t want to miss this one. The topic is going to be a mix of swordfish and wahoo techniques. The guys we have chosen stand head and shoulders above most and excel in both fisheries. The headliners include Capt. Stan Hunt, Capt. Chip Sheehan, Capt. Bouncer Smith, Capt. Ray Rosher, Capt. Dean Panos, and Capt. Brandon Mullar. We will have many other top fishermen in the room as well that will give their input on teaching and technique. Skip Smith and I will be asking this panel of fishermen lots of tough and secret revealing questions that may help you in your quest for one of these two gamefish. We will have bait rigging tables as well as wahoo lure rigging tables for some hands on instruction. We have limited seating, so reserve your tickets now. Cost is $20. There will also be a raffle and a cash bar. For more information and tickets, call 954-420-5001.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, October 12, 2012 Pompano Beach Women’s nine-hole leagueResults by Class: Odd Holes OnlyClass A 1st Place [tie] Susana Rust 27; Meryl Friedman 27 2nd Place: Maureen Hussian 30 Class B 1st Place [tie]: Joanne Price 32; Rita Melville 32 2nd Place: Diane Constantino 38Soreboard Pompano Beach Women’s Golf Assn.Results – Oct. 9 – The Palms “TROUBLE”1st Place Sandra Gore, 2 2nd Place Vonnie O’Keefe 3 [tiebreaker] 3rd Place Janet Stuart.3 POMPANO BEACH MEN’S GOLF ASSN. WED. Oct. 10 Two best balls of threesome1st placeJoe Patchen, Fernando Garcia, Jim DeCicco 118 2nd place Joe Gard, Ed Northrop, Paul Dauzickas 123 Closest to Pin, Palms #11, Bob Bridgman tangled up in mono-filament. Fishermen are also losing expensive tackle because they are getting their lines caught on trash and more rigs already caught below. Thanks to the efforts of Gold Coast Scuba, a local dive shop, and volunteer fishermen, there is now an ongoing effort to clean up the reef. Once every few months, fishing is closed on one side of the pier so divers can pick up trash on the other side. Divers place debris in buckets that are lowered from the pier by fisherman and PADI volunteers. PADI is home to Project Aware, a non-profit organization that supports the protection of our oceans and important issues like Sharks in Peril and Marine Debris. Once filled, the buckets are raised back up and trash is disposed of properly. The debris found under the pier is mainly fishing tackle like mono-filament, sinkers, hooks and fishing rods. But even cell phones, bottles and jewelry have been found. During a previous clean up divers successfully freed a tangled nurse shark and found a diamond engagement ring! If you would like to get involved with this important movement you can contact Gold Coast Scuba to sign up for the next pier clean up. Divers and top-side volunteers are always appreciated.DiversContinued from page 26 Halloween eventsContinued from page 6BSO Community DayWilton Manors – The Broward Sheriff’s Of ce will hold its Sheriff’s Community Day at The Pride Center, 2040 N. Dixie Hwy., on Saturday, Oct. 27 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Events include free child ngerprinting, K-9 and police gear demonstrations. For more information, call 954831-8900.Falloween and Trunk or TreatOakland Park – Halloween will be held Saturday, Oct. 27 from 5 to 9 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. There will be a kids costume contest, magic show, crafts, music, bounce house, trick or treating and an interactive stage show. There will also be a trunk decorating contest. For more information, visit www.oaklandpark .org or call 954-630-4500. Monster ConcertPompano Beach – The Pink Church will hold its annual Halloween Monster Concert on Wednesday, Oct. 31 at 7 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave. Audience members are encouraged to wear Halloween costumes as church members play “haunting harmonies” on the Great Pipe Organ. For more information, call 954-941-2308.

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28 The Pelican Friday, October 12, 2012 In 2008, Pompano’s historic Sample McDougald House was awarded $250,000 from this same fund source, the People or Parks Grant Program. According to Marcia Monsarret, Jacob’s aide, those funds are still being disbursed. Both of Deer eld’s projects, however, are less complicated. The caboose, vintage 1950s, was donated to the Historical Society by Wm. Thies & Sons, and brought to the railroad siding at Hillsboro Boulevard that serves Deer eld Builders Supply. Over the years, attempts to move it to the Seaboard Airline Station and the Railroad Museum there failed due to lack of money. Now the parks grant will go for engineering costs, permits, site construction and restoration of the caboose so that it can be opened to the public as an educational tool. Unfortunately, three governmental entities are involved: the city, the county and Tri-Rail. Ed Dietrich, president of Deer eld Builders and avid historian, has become the keeper of the caboose. Some months ago, he announced it would be repainted in its original colors – orange and blackby volunteers from the Kiwanis Club and Historical Society. Dietrich said this week the paint came but the perfect moment – willing volunteers on a sunny day – has not. Nevertheless, with his grant funds in hand, Dietrich is excited. “It’s ‘all aboard’ as we say,” he quipped this week. Just where the caboose will be placed is still up for discussion. The front of the Seaboard Railroad Station, on Hillsboro Blvd., just east of Military Trail, would give it great visibility, but has traf c issues, Dietrich said. Placing it further to the south would make it adjacent to the Railroad Museum on a more spacious piece of land. The Friends of the Arboretum are hoping $150,000 can be allotted from the remaining bond funds to build a band shell in the meadow there. Friends president, Jerry Behan, said the idea is in the formative stages and there are considerations because of nearby homes in Deer Creek and possible deed restrictions on Constitution Park. If it can be built, a band shell would provide the stage for small musical events, private parties and the storytelling festival, Behan said. “We want only the nice stuff there,” he said. “Not high impact events.” Local volunteer PJ Egan put together the package of photos and projected band shell costs submitted to Jacobs’ of ce. “I was just the squeaky wheel,” Egan said this week. “But I called and got the ball rolling. There is no sense in leaving $150,000 on the table. The band shell would have a lot of uses for the public. And the grant’s purpose is to use green space to enhance the community.” With the expectation that the band shell will be built and that the arboretum will get more visitors, a parking lot is being constructed on the east side of Constitution Park which could triple the number of parking spots. Fifty boulders, taken from beneath the shing pier to allow for its renovation, have been moved to the arboretum to become part of the landscape. Areas around the parking lot will be developed as hammocks, wetlands, and pine forests. The parking surface will be a stabilized turf. The park/arboretum offers another amenity not often used, the C-2 Canal which ows north and south on the very east end alongside the new parking lot. “We’d like to bring bass shermen in there.” Behan said.GrantContinued from page 1

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